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Publication numberUS3077059 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 12, 1963
Filing dateOct 31, 1958
Priority dateOct 31, 1958
Publication numberUS 3077059 A, US 3077059A, US-A-3077059, US3077059 A, US3077059A
InventorsRobert K Stout
Original AssigneeRobert K Stout
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Brick veneer construction material
US 3077059 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. K. sToUT BRICK VENEER CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL Feb. 12, 1963 2 sheets--sheevn 1 Filed 001,. 3l, 1958 1 lnwwmfm Olii. il!! Feb. 12, 1963 R. K. sToUT BRICK VENEER CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed OCc. 5l, 1958 Robert Ktout b MMM/M y ttorlleg.

United States Patent O 3,377,525@ BRHK 't/ENEER CNS'ERUSTEN MATEETAL Robert itl. Stout, Rte. l, Norwalk, iowa Filed @et 3i, 1958, Ser. No.. 770,935 Qlalins. (Cl. 5th-3M) My invention relates to structural clay products and more particularly to a veneer material for creating a brick-like finish on a wall surface or the like.

The building of a brick or masonry wall is one of the more expensive aspects in construction costs. This is true beca-use of the relative slowness in constructing such a wall from small brick elements, the high degree o skill required by the craftsman who builds the wall, and the diiiculty in handling and moving the brick and mortar on a construction job.

Therefore, the principal object of my invention is to provide brick veneer construction material which can be rapidly installed.

A further object of my invention is to provide brick veneer construction material that is light in weight and which can be easily transported.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a brick veneer construction material which will create a realistic appearance of a brick or masonry wall.

A still further object of myv invention is to provide a brick veneer construction material whose mortar joints can be created in one continuous operation rather than a plurality of successive operations.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a brick veneer construction material that will be protected from smearing by the mortar during the installation operation.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a brick veneer co-nstruction material that is economical of manufacture, durable in use and reiined in appearance.

These and other objects will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

My invention consists in the construction, arrangement, and combination, of the various parts of the device, whereby the objects contemplated are attained as hereinafter more fully set forth, speciiically pointed out in my claims, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FG. l is a perspective view of one specie of my device with portions of the brick slabs cut away to more fully show its construction;

FlG. 2 is an end elevational view of another specie of my device which has been rolled up for carrying or transportation purposes;

FIG. 3 is an elevational view of my device as it is being installed;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of my device taken on line 4-4 of FIG. 3;

PEG. 5 is a perspective View of a particular specie of my device; and

FIG. 6 is an enlarged, fragmentary perspective view o my device wherein continuous wires are used.

The numeral it! designates a sheet of ilexible corrugated cardboard which has its conventional webbing l2 preferably disposed in a horizontal position. Sheet l@ should be impervious to moisture and this can be accomplished in any of the conventional coating or impregnating methods to which cardboard is usually subjected for such purposes. Sheet itl in FIG. l is rigid.

Wire mesh lll is secured to one side oi sheet 10 by a suitable adhesive lo. This same adhesive ltd can be used to secure a plurality of spaced apart brick slabs 18 to the mesh le and the sheet it). As shown in FIGS. l, 2 and 3, the elongated, thinly constructed slabs ELS are preferably disposed in a horizontal fashion with a uniform opening or void 2t) surrounding each parallel slab. Thus,

lCe

a stack bond can be created by the slabs i3 as shown in FIG 3. Each slab i8 has a plurality of vertical cores 19 through which wires 2l can extend to interlace the slabs to mesh 14. A protective sheet 22 of paper or the like is secured to the outer face of slabs 13 by a suitable adhesive (not shown) which has no speciiic requirements other than the ability to permit the sheets 22 to be selectively removed from the slabs.

Referring particularly to FlG. 6, portions of adjacent slabs 18 are shown in combination with the sheet l@ of cardboard to which the wire mesh la has been affixed by the adhesive 16 (FIG. 4). The slabs ttl are so arranged horizontally that the openings or voids 2d therebetween are uniform as described hereinbefore. Each slab 18 has a plurality of two or more or the horizontally spaced, vertically disposed cores i9, and the extensions through each core ll9 and its vertically adjacent core l@ of the continuous wire 2l is clearly depicted. In between each vertically spaced pair of slabs lt, each wire 2. as it passes through the void 2d is threaded underneath a portion or strand of the wire mesh le so as to connect the slabs to the wire mesh lli at location above and below slabs i8. Thus a plurality of continuous wires 2l are passed through a plurality of parallel cores 39 in one slab 1S, and with each wire 2l passed through vertically adjacent and aligned cores l@ in slabs i8 above and below the one slab l, with each wire 21 interlaced with the wire mesh i4 inbetween each vertically adjacent slabs 18.

The numerals 24, 26 and 2S designate 2 x 4 wood studdings which are customarily used in wall construction. FIG. 4 shows nails 3&3 penetrating the cardboard sheet lll and wire mesh la at points in between brick slabs 1S to hold my device to the studding members. The numeral 32 designates grout which has been used to fill voids 2d.

FIG. 5 shows a particular specie of my device which also utilizes the cardboard sheet lo and wire mesh lll. But instead of adhering a plurality of individual brick slabs to the wire mesh and cardboard sheet, a larger tile 34 is used. Tile 34 has the same substantial thickness as slabs i8. The outer tace of tile 3d is scored to create a plurality of parallel voids 36. The areas between voids 36 are comparable to the shape and area of slabs 1S. Thus, the tile 3d presents an outer surface very similar to that created by brick slabs i8. As shown in FIG. 5, the individual tiles 34 are spaced apart a distance equal to the breadth of voids 3o. Reinforcing webs 3S and it? can extend outwardly along the inner face of tile 3d for strengthening purposes. Web 38 extends in a vertical direction and webs it? extend in a horizontal direction.

ecause of the great strength these webs give my unit, I prefer that one or both of them be utilized. The tiles 3d are secured to wire mesh 1d and cardboard sheet lil by the adhesive lo. The portion of tile 3d between voids is also covered by sheets 22.

I prefer that my device be fabricated in 40 x 8'0" sheets which would permit three 151/2 brick slabs to extend across sheet l@ in each course of brick. lVy device is satisfactory for use on both internal and external walls.

My device is usually transported in rolls as shown in FIG. 2, and all elements of the product are intact except for the grout material 3?.. The rolls can easily be formed because of the exiblc nature of cardboard ld and wire mesh la.

After studding members 24, 26 and 2S have been erected in conventional manner, my device is unrolled to form a substantial iiexible sheet. lts weight is greatly reduced because the brick slabs l (or tile 34) are relatively light in weight. The spaces between the studding members are substantially equal to the horizontal lengths of either the slabs l or tile 34. Nails 3b are used to secure the cardboard sheet and wire 14 to the studding in the manner described above.

After my device has been nailed to the studding members, grout 32 can be inserted into the voids 26 between slabs 13 or into the voids 36 of tile 34. lf the tiles are being used, the voids between the spaced tiles are similarly iilled. The insertion of the grout 32 into the various voids creates the necessary mortar joints and conceals the heads of nails 3d. After the grout 32 has been placed in the voids and has dried, the protective sheets 22 are manually pulled from the outer surfaces of slabs 16 or tile 3d, thus leaving the outer surfaces thereof completely free from grout. Ordinarily, acid and heavy scrubbing are required to clean a brick wall after it has been constructed by conventional methods.

I have found that my invention Works very well even when used in combination with the rigid board 11i' shown in FIG. 1. It should be noted that a random bond could be used in the mounting of brick slabs 13 instead of the stack bond shown in the drawings.

Thus, from the foregoing, it is seen that my invention will accomplish at least all of its statedy objectives.

Some changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of my brick veneer construction material Without departing from the real spirit and purpose of my invention, and it is my intention to cover by my claims, any modified forms of structure orV use of mechanical equivalents which may be reasonably included within their scope.

i claim:

l. ln a veneer construction material, a sheet member, a Wire mesh material secured to said sheet member, a plurality of brick slabs secured to said Wire mesh and said sheet member, said brick slabs being disposed on said Wire mesh and said sheet member in parallel courses, said slab members having parallel core openings extending therethrough in one direction, a f1rst continuous wire extending through the core opening in one of said brick slabs, and thence extending through a single core opening in a brick slab in each of said courses, a plurality of con- 'tinuous 'Wires extending through other core openings in other brick slabs in the same manner as said first continuous wire; each of said continuous Wires being interlaced with said wire mesh material at points intermediate said brick slabs.

2. in a veneer construction material, a flexible sheet member having oppositely disposed outer surface areas, a iiexble Wire mesh material secured to one outer surface area of said sheet member and engaging only said one outer surface of said sheet member, said wire mesh being secured to said sheet member by an adhesive substance, a plurality of brick slabs secured to said Wire mesh and said sheet member, said brick slabs being disposed on said wire mesh and said sheet member paraliel courses, said slab members having parallel core openings extending therethrough in one direction, a rst contlnuous flexible metal wire threadably loosely extending through the core opening in one of said brick slabs, and thence similarly extending through a single core opening in a brick slab in each of said courses, a plurality of continuous wires extending through other core openings in other brick slabs in the same manner as said iirst continuous Wire; each of said continuous wires being interiaced with said wire mesh material at points intermediate said brick slabs.

3. In a veneer construction material, a flexible sheet member having oppositeiy disposed outer surface areas, .a flexible Wire mesh material secured to one outer surface area of said sheet member and engaging only said one outer surface of said sheet member, said wire mesh being secured to said sheet member by an adhesive substance, a plurality of brick slabs secured to said Wire mesh and said sheet member, said brick slabs being dis` posed on said wire mesh and said sheet member in parallel courses, said slab members having parallel core openings extending therethrough in one direction, a first continuous tlexible metal wire threadably loosely extending through the core opening in one of said brick slabs, and thence similarly extending through a single core opening in a brick slab in each of said courses, a plurality of continuous wires extending through other core openings in other brick slabs in the same manner as said rst continuous wire; each of said continuous wires being interlaced with said Wire mesh material at points intermediate said brick slabs; said slab members having voids therebetween capable of receiving a grout material.

4. In a veneer construction material, a tlexible sheet member having oppositely disposed outer surface areas, a flexible Wire mesh material secured to one outer surface area of said sheet member and engaging only said one outer surface of said sheet member, said wire mesh being secured to said shee member by an adhesive substance, a plurality of brick slabs secured to said Wire mesh and said sheet member said brick slabs being disposed on said wire mesh and said sheet member in parallel courses, said slab members having parallel core openings extending therethrough in one direction, a rst continuous flexible metal wire threadably loosely extending through the core opening in one of said brick slabs, and thence similarly extending through a single core opening in a brick slab in each of said courses, a plurality of continuous wires extending through other core openingsv in other brick slabs in the same manner as said first continuous Wire; each of said continuous wires being interlaced with said wire mesh material at points intermediate said brick slabs; and protecting sheet members detachably secured to the outer face of said slab members.

5. ln a veneer construction material, a sheet member having oppositely disposed outer surface areas, a wire mesh material secured to one outer surface area of said sheet member and engaging only said one outer surface area of said sheet member, said wire mesh being secured to said sheet member by an adhesive substance, a plurality ot brick slabs secured to said wire mesh and said sheet member, said brick slabs being disposed on said wire mesh and sheet member in parallel courses, said slab members having parallel core openings extending therethrough in one direction, a first continuous ilexible metal wire threadably loosely extending through the core opening in one of said brick slabs, and thence similarly extending through. a single core opening in a brick slab in each of said courses, a prurality of continuous wires extending through other core openings in other brick slabs in the same manner as said first continuous Wire; each of said continuous wires being interlaced with said Wire mesh material at points intermediate said brick slabs.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 21,285 Desagnat Dec. 5, 1939 720,941 Mack Feb. 17, 1963 751,094 Murphy Feb. 2, 1904 1,071,091 Rogers Aug. 26, 1913 1,173,678 Munro Feb. 29, 1916 1,641,623 Carter Sept. 6, 1927 1,857,856 Medina May l0, 1932 1,950,363 Marks Mar. 6, 1934 1,994,644 -Harshberger Mar. 19, 1935 2,020,455 Butler Nov. 12, 1935 2,022,363 Vertuno Nov. 26, 1935 2,263,192 Schatzkin Nov. 18, 1941 2,308,650 Desagnat Ian. 19, 1943 FOREIGN PATENTS 119,650 Australia May 2", 1940 78,916' Netherlands Aug. 15, 1955

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/388, 52/127.1, 52/127.3, 52/DIG.160, 428/906, 52/712
International ClassificationE04F13/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0862, Y10S52/16, Y10S428/906
European ClassificationE04F13/08C