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Publication numberUS3077314 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 12, 1963
Filing dateJun 17, 1960
Priority dateJun 17, 1960
Publication numberUS 3077314 A, US 3077314A, US-A-3077314, US3077314 A, US3077314A
InventorsCharles B Caperton
Original AssigneeCharles B Caperton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rod reel
US 3077314 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 12, 1963 c. B. CAPERTON ROD REEL 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 17, 1960 FTC-7: 1

M 0 5 an wn m, M m "DJ r Feb. 12, 1963 c. B. CAPERTON 3,077,314

ROD REEL Filed June 17. 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

BY @J: @J

A TIDE/V5345.

United States Patent Ofifice 3,977,314 Fatented Feb, 12, 1963 3,677,314 ROD REEL Charles B. Caperton, 1832 Pine St, Philadelphia 3, Pa. Filed .lune 17, 196%, a. No. 36,770 9 Claims. (El. 2425 i) This invention relates to rodding equipment of the type used in the cleaning and maintenance of sewer pipes, water pipes and other underground conduit structures.

As is known, sewer pipes, water pipes and the like are cleared of obstructions, such as tree roots, sand, dirt, etc., by feeding coupled steel rods into the pipe. For long distance work, i.e. for distances on the order of 100 feet and more, it is customary to use a string of individual solid rods of A1 to spring steel stock, each about 39 inches long, coupled together with suitable couplings to form a continuous length of rods up to say 1000 feet in length. At the foremost extremity of the coupled rods, a suitable tool is connected for performing the particular cutting or clearing operation. Such tool may, for example, be an auger bit, a root saw, a centrifugal cutter, a pick-up, or any other of the large variety of tools especially adapted for the purpose. In order for the tool, particularly a cutting tool, to be effective it is necessary ordinarily for the coupled rods to be rotated axially, and power drives have been developed and are available adapted to rotate the rods at speeds of the order of 90 120 r.p.m.

For storing such lengths of coupled steel rods when not in use, or for transporting such rods to another work location, reels have been developed capable of holding 9G0-1000 feet of coupled rods. Such reels are designed to confine the rods in coils or loops of large diameter in order to avoid bending the individual rods into a permanent set. A typical rod reel will have a diameter of from 4 to 8 feet.

Because of the inherent properties of the spring steel rods to spring out to a straight line, it is not necessary for the rod reel to include an inner supporting surface. The tendency of the rods to straighten out keeps the rods in position on the reel pressed against its outer peripheral surface. I had previously observed, however, a tendency for the string of rods during placement on the reel to take up loose and overlapping positions. This causes the rod couplings to catch on the loose overlapping rods and is highly undesirable.

In my co-pending patent application, Serial No. 24,621, filed April 25, 1960, entitled Rod Reel Device, now United States Patent No. 3,039,715, granted June 19, 1962, I describe and claim means for attachment to a rod reel for assuring that the rods during placement onto the reel take up a tight coiled position without looseness and entanglement. The means provided by my aforesaid invention, as described and claimed in the aforesaid patent, comprise unidirectional drag means connected to the guide tube (the guide tube being the tube on the rod reel which serves to guide the rods into coil-up position) for providing resistance to relative rotation between the guide tube and the reel in one direction while permitting free relative rotation in the other. The one direction in which resistance is provided is that direction in which the guide tube tends to move relative to the reel when the rods are pushed therethrough onto the reel. Thus, the invention of my aforesaid patent is concerned with the provision of means adapted to provide improved operation of the rod reel during lengthwise movement of the rods, and specifically during lengthwise movement of the rods in the direction in which the rods move when they are being pulled out of the sewer pipe or other conduit and placed on to the reel.

The invention of my present application, in contrast to my aforesaid invention, is directed to means for improving the operation of the rod reel when the coupled rods are being rotated about their axis for the purpose of rotating the cutting or other tool secure-d to the outermost end, and particularly as the rods are being rotated axially for the purpose of unscrewing the tool from the obstruction.

My present invention will be clear from a consideration of the following description of preferred embodiments taken together with the drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation, partly broken away, of a typical rod reel embodying the improvement of my present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged detailed view of the center portion of FIG. 1 along the line and looking in the direction of the arrows Il-il showing tne condition of the pawl and ratchet when the guide tube is rotating in a clockwise direction;

PEG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 showing the condition of the pawl and ratchet when the guide tube is rotating in a counter clockwise direction;

FIG. 4 is a cross section along the line IVlV of FIG. 2 looking in "the direction of the arrows; and

FIG. 5 is a side elevation, partly buoken away, of an alternate embodiment of my present invention.

In describing the preferred embodiments of the invention illustrated in the drawing, specific terminology is resorted to for the sake of clarity. However, his not my intention to be limited to the specific terms so selected, and it is to be understood that each specific term includes all technical equivalents which operate in a similar manner to accomplish a similar purpose.

Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown a rod reel 10 comprising a bell-shaped wire cage 11 mounted on a two-wheel vehicular frame 14 for rotation about the horizontal axis of the reel. Reel it is supported at its large diameter end by a shaft 15 mounted for rotation in a bearing support 19. Shaft 13 extends axially into the reel cage 11 and has fixed thereto a cylindrical sleeve in having at its outer end a flange 17 to which the radial spokes of the cage are secured. At its inner end, sleeve 16 supports other radial spokes which extend to an inner ring and together with the outer cage form a trough for receiving the rods. In order to avoid confusion in the drawing, the inner spokes, inner ring and the ribs connected thereto have been omitted.

At the innermost end of shaft 18 is mounted a unidirectional'resistance or drag mechanism as described and claimed in my aforesaid Patent No. 3,039,715, the details of which are also shown in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4"of the present application. As seen in FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 4, the unidirectional resistance mechanism includes a member 23 mounted for free rotation on shaft 18, as by roller bearings 22. Member 23 has oppositely extending arms 24 and 25. Arm 2s terminates in a clamp portion 29 which holds an elongated guide tube 31 through which the coupled rods 28 are passed. (The couplings are omitted from the drawing.) Guide tube 31 extends in a double-curve from the center axis of the reel at the front end to a point near to the large diameter end of the reel. The tube 31 curves gradually outwardly and then inwardly so that the rods passing therethrough are gradually curved without being bent severely enough to result in a permanent set.

Also rotatably mounted on shaft 18, adjacent to memher 23, is a brake drum .4 having an I-shaped crosssection as seen in FIG. 4. The brake drum 44 is equipped with an external shoe 45 having thereon a suitable brake lining 46. A tension adjustment 43 is provided for the brake shoe 45, as seen more clearly in FIGS. 2 and 3.

A U-clamp 58 connects the brake shoe 45 to the guide arm 24.

Since the external brake shoe 45 is coupled by Uclamp 58 to the guide arm 24, it will be seen that the brake shoe 45 moves rotationally whenever guide tube 31 moves rotationally, in a like direction and for a like distance. fixed to shaft 18 adjacent to the brake drum 44 is a ratchet 54. A pawl 56 is mounted on the radial portion of the brake drum 44 and is spring pressed against the ratchet 54 by the spring 59. The tooth of pawl 56 is shaped to permit clockwise rotation of the drum 44 relative to the ratchet 54, as viewed in FIG. 2, but to prevent counter-clockwise rotation of the drum relative to the ratchet, as viewed in FIG. 3.

. The unidirectional resistance or drag mechanism illustrated in FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 4 is but one form of oneway drag device which may be used to provide resistance to rotation of guide tube relative to the reel in one direction while permitting free rotation in the other. The unidirectional resistance device, its purpose, and its manner of operation are fully described in my aforesaid patent. It will be suflicient here to state that the purpose of the device, as described in my aforesaid patent, is to provide improved operation of the reel when the coupled rods are being moved lengthwise, particularly when they arebeing placed on to the reel, irrespective of whether or not the rods are also being driven rotationally at the same time. The invention of my present application provides a further improvement to the reel, and assumes that a unidirectional resistance mechanism, such for example as shown in FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 4, is already on the reel. The further improvement provided by my present invention is needed when the rods are being driven axially rotational to turn the cutting or other tool, irrespective of whether or not the rods are also being pulled lengthwise at the same time.

In FIG. 1, cage 11 of reel 13 is shown adapted to be driven rotationally by means .of a belt drive 30, pulley 32, reduction gearing 34, drive belt 36 and driving motor not shown. For convenience of description, driving the cage 11 rotationally will be referred to hereafter merely as driving the reel 1t? rotationally. The driving means just mentioned are employed for rotating the coupled rods 28 axially to rotate the screw cutting or other tool secured tothe forward end of the rods in a direction to turn the tool into the obstruction. Assume that to drive the screw tool into the obstruction, the tool must be driven rotationally in a clockwise direction as viewed from the driving end of the rods. In such case, to effect such axial rotation of the screw tool, the reel would be rotated in a clockwise direction looking from right to left in FIG. 1. This would, of course, be counter-clockwise looking in the direction of the arrows 11-11, and it should be kept in mind that this is the direction of view represented in FIGS. 2 and 3 of the drawing.

Consider what happens when, with the reel 14} being driven counter-clockwise as viewed in the direction of the arrows 11-11 of FIG. 1, the cutting or other screw tool should become stuck in the obstruction, preventing axial rotation of the coupled rods. In such event, as the reel continued to rotate, a reaction force would be established which would tend to coil the rods into coils of larger diameter, thus tending to push the rods 28 toward the outer diameter of the reel and tending to coil the rods 28 more tightly than ever along the peripheral wall of the reel. This would not be undesirable.

Consider now what would happen if the reel 10 were to be driven rotationally in the opposite or clockwise direction by means of pulley 32 and belt 30 for the purpose of removing the stuck screw tool from the obstruction. If the screw tool remains stuck, preventing axial rotation of the rods, then as the reel continued to be driven clockwise (as viewed in FIG. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows 11-11) a reaction force would be set up which would tend to unwind the coils into coils of smaller diameter, thus tending to pull the coiled rods 28 from their coiled position on the outer or peripheral wall of the reel toward the center axis where there is no support for the rods. Thus, the coiled rods would be loosened, causing entanglement between the couplings and the rods. This is a highly undersirable condition.

To avoid the highly undesirable condition mentioned above, it is proposed, in accordance with my present invention, to unscrew the screw tool from the obstruction by driving the guide tube (not the reel) rotationally in the clockwise direction (as viewed in FIG. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows II-II). One way of accomplishing this is illustrated in FIG. 1. As there shown, guide tube 31 extends forwardly through the small-diameter end of cage 11 and through a support bearing 65. At or near the front end of the guide tube 31 a pulley 66 is secured adapted to be driven in a clockwise direction (looking to the right in FIG. 1) by the belt 67.

Belt 67 is driven by a pulley 68 which in turn is driven by belt 36 through reduction and bevel gearing and a suitable clutch mechanism controlled by handle lever 7t Lever 70 controls whet-her belt 36 drives pulley 32 or pulley 68. When driven, pulley 32 drives the reel 10 in a counterclockwise direction While pulley 68, when driven, drives the guide tube 31 in a clockwie direction (in each case as viewed looking in the direction of the arrows IIII in FIG. 1).

In a conventional reel, the guide tube does not extend through the small-diameter end of the reel. Rather, it terminates at about the point where the guide tube first meets the axis of the reel, which in the structure in FIG. 1 of the drawing is at about the point where the connection 71 to the counter balancing arm 25 joins the guide tube 31. Connection 71 may be secured to the guide tube 31 by welding or by other suitable means and may be conveniently secured to counter balance arm 25 as by a clamp 72.

It will be seen that I have provided means for selectively driving either the reel 10 or the guide tube 31 I0- tationally, the reel in one direction, the guide tube in the other, at different times, as desired. In the particular embodiment selected for illustration and description, the reel is driven counter-lockwise to turn the tool into the obstruction, the guide tube being driven clockwise to turn the screw tool out of the obstruction. In these operations, the unilateral resistance shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 and previously described, plays an important role in preventing the undesirable condition of loosening and entanglement of the coiled rods during unscrewing of the tool from the obstruction.

Referring again to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, and assuming the direction of coil shown in FIG. 1, there are two conditions under which the reaction force would tend to pull the string of coiled rods away from the outer or peripheral wall of the reel toward the center axis, tending to form a coil of smaller diameter and greater number of turns. Such a reaction force is established when the reel 10 is moved clockwise relative to the guide tube, or the guide tube 3-1 is moved counter-clockwise relative to the reel. The two conditions under which such reaction force would be present are (a) if the reel 10 were driven clockwise to turn the screw tool out of the obstruction and the tool was stuck; and (b) if the guide tube 31 were driven counter-clockwise to turn the screw tool into the obstruction. In condition (b) above, the reaction force would be present whenever the screw tool became lodged or stuck. It would also be present at startup, even if the screw tool was not lodged or stuck, and would continue until the rotational inertia of the motion-. less, relatively heavy, rod-laden reel was overcome and the reel began rotating. Under both conditions (a) and (b), the unilateral resistance device of FIGS. 2 and 3 locks the reel and guide tube together for rotation. In (a), driving the reel 10 drives shaft 18 and ratchet 54 clockwise (FIG. 2), and the brake drum 44, brake shoe 45, and guide tube 31 are locked thereto by the pawl 56. In (b), the guide tube 31, brake shoe 45, brake drum 44 and pawl 56 are driven counter-clockwise and the reel is locked thereto by the ratchet 54 (FIG. 3). Hence, under both conditions (a) or (b) the reel 1% and guide tube 31 are locked together for rotation, thus preventing the establishment of the undesirable reaction force discussed above which otherwise would tend to pull the string of coiled rods away from the outer or peripheral wall of the reel and would tend to form a coil of smaller diameter nearer to the center axis where there is no coil support, with the result that the unsupported coils would tend to become tangled with each other.

An alternative arrangement is shown in FIG. 5. In FIG. 5, only the guide tube 31A is driven; the reel 16A is not driven. A unidirectional resistance device similar to that shown in FEGS. 2 and 3 is employed. The guide tube 31A is adapted to be driven in either direction, as by a reversible driving motor (not shown), driving belt 36A, pulley 32A, belt 30A, and pulley 66A. Pulley 65A is fixed to guide tube 31A, and guide tube 31A is mounted for rotation in support bearing 65A.

Consider now What happens when the guide tube 31A is driven rotationally counter-clockwise to turn the screw tool into the obstruction. (As in the previous discussion, the direction of rotation is described as viewed looking in the direction of the arrows LIII in FIG. 1, i.e. looking from left to right in FIG. 5.) Note that when the guide tube 31A is driven counter-clockwise, the reel 10A rotates at the same speed and in the same direction as the guide tube 31A. This rotation of the reel 10A is due to the fact that when the guide tube 31A is being driven rotationally counter-clockwise, the brake shoe 45, brake drum M- and pawl 56 are also being driven in the same direction. This is because the brake shoe is connected by Uclamp 58A to the arm 24A, and thus to the guide tube 31A. in this direction of rotation of pawl 56, the pawl tooth locks into ratchet 54 (FIG. 3), thereby turning shaft 18 and thus rotating reel NA. This prevents the undesirable pulling of coiled rods 28 away from the outer periphery of the reel and toward the center axis which would otherwise occur at start-up due to the rotational inertia of the motionless rod-laden reel.

When the guide tube 31A is driven in the opposite direction (clockwise looking from left to right in FIG. 5) to turn the screw .tool out of the obstruction, reel 16A is not rotated by any positive or locked coupling, but the reaction force is such as to push the rods 28 toward the outer diameter or peripheral wall of the reel. This desirable reaction force is strong enough to overcome the rotational inertia of the reel, and thus the reel 16A and the guide tube 31A rotate together as though rigidly coupled. When the driving force on the guide tube 31A is removed, any tendency for the reel MA to continue rotating, due to momentum, in the clockwise direction is prevented by the fact that the ratchet 54 and pawl 56 lock together (FIG. 2).

While the preferred embodiments of this invention have been described in some detail, it will be obvious to one skilled in the art that various modifications may be made without departing from the invention as hereinafter claimed.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. Apparatus for receiving and storing coupled steel rods of the type used in the clearing of obstructions from sewer pipes, water pipes, and the like, said rods being used to drive axially a screw tool fixed to the forward end thereof, said apparatus comprising: a reel for receiving and storing said rods mounted for rotation about a center axis; a guide tube for guiding said rods onto and from said reel, said guide tube extending from a point on the forwardly-extended center axis of said reel to a point near the outer physical periphery of said reel; means for mount ing said guide tube for complete rotation about the center axis of said reel independently of said reel, the complete rotation 'of said guide tube generating an axially tapering surface having an apex which lies on the forwardlyextended center axis of the reel; unidirectional means for permitting rotation of said guide tube in one direction relative to said reel but substantially preventing rotation in the other direction relative to said reel, said one direction being that direction in which said rods are rotated axially when said screw tool is being turned into said obstruction; means for driving said reel rotationally in said one direction to drive said screw tool into said obstruction; and means operative independently of said reeldriving means for driving said guide tube rotationally in the opposite direction to remove said screw tool from said obstruction.

2. Apparatus for receiving and storing coupled steel rods of the type used in the clearing of obstruction from sewer pipes, water pipes, and the like, said rods being used to drive axially a screw tool fixed to the forward end thereof, said apparatus comprising: a reel having a cage for receiving and storing said rods; a shaft on which said reel is mounted for rotation; a guide tube for guiding said rods onto and from said reel, said guide tube extending from a point on the forwardly extended center axis of said reel to a point near the outer physical periphery of said cage; means for mounting said guide tube for complete rotation on said shaft independently of said reel, the complete rotation of said guide tube generating an axially tapering surface having an apex which lies on the forwardly-extended outer axis of the reel; unidirectional means, including first means fixed to said shaft and second means adapted to connect or to not connect said first means to said guide-tube mounting means depending upon the relative direction of rotation of said shaft and guidetube mounting means, for permitting free rotation of said guide tube in one direction relative to said reel but preventing rotation in the opposite direction relative to said reel, said one direction being that direction in which said rods are rotated axially when said tool is being screwed into said obstruction; means for driving said reel rotationally in said one direction to drive said tool into said obstruction; and means operative independently of said reel-driving means for driving said guide tube rotationally in the opposite direction to remove said tool from said obstruction.

3. Apparatus as claimed in claim 2 characterized in that said first means comprises a ratchet fixed to said shaft and in that said second means comprises a pawl mounted for rotation on said shaft and adapted for locking engagement with said ratchet in one direction of rotation only relative to said ratchet, said pawl being connected to said guide tube for rotation therewith about said shaft.

4. Apparatus for receiving and storing coupled steel rods of the type used in the clearing of obstructions from sewer pipes, water pipes, and the like, said rods being used to drive axially a screw tool fixed to the forward end thereof, said apparatus comprising: a reel having a cage for receiving and storing said rods; a shaft on which said reel is mounted for rotation; a guide tube for guiding said rods onto and from said reel, said guide tube extending from a point on the forwardly-extended center axis of said reel to a point near the outer physical periphery of said cage; means for mounting said guide tube for complete rotation on said shaft independently of said reel, the complete rotation of said guide tube generating an axially tapering surface having an apex which lies on the forwardly-extended center axis of the reel; unidirectional means for permitting free rotation of said guide tube in one direction relative to said reel but substantially preventing rotation in the other direction relative to said reel, said one direction being that direction in which said rods are rotated axially when said screw tool is being turned into said obstruction; means for driving said reel rotationally in said one direction to drive said screw tool into said obstruction; and means operative independently of said reel-driving means for driving said guide tube rotationally 1n the opposite direction to remove said screw tool from said obstruction.

' 5. Apparatus as claimed in claim 4 characterized in that said unidirectional means comprises a ratchet fixed to said shaft and a spring-pressed pawl connected to said guide tube and mounted for rotation on said shaft together with said guide tube, said pawl being mounted for locking engagement with said ratchet in said opposite direction of rotation only.

' 6. Apparatus for receiving and storing coupled steel rods of the type used in the clearing of obstructions from sewer pipes, water pipes, and the like, said rods being used to drive axially a screw tool fixed to the forward end thereof, said apparatus comprising: a reel having a cage for receiving and storing said rods; a shaft on which said reel is mounted for rotation; a guide tube for guiding said rods onto and from said reel, said guide tube extending from a point on the forwardly-extended center axis of said reel to a point near the outer physical periphcry of said cage; means for mounting said guide tube for complete rotation on said shaft independently of said reel, said guide tube when completely rotated functioning as the generatrix of an axially tapering surface having an apex which lies on the forwardly-extended center axis of thereel; unidirectional means for permitting free rotation of said guide tube in one direction relative to said reel but preventing rotation in the other direction relative to said reel, said one direction being that direction in which said rods are rotated axially when said screw tool is being turned into said obstruction; and means for driving said guide tube rotationally in one direction to turn said screw tool into said obstruction and for driving said guide tube rotationally in the opposite direction to remove said screw tool from said obstruction.

7. Apparatus as claimed in claim 6 characterized in that said unidirectional means comprises a ratchet fixed to said shaft and a spring-pressed pawl connected to said guide tube and mounted for rotation on said shaft together with said guide tube, said pawl being mounted 8 for locking engagement with said ratchet in said opposite direction of rotation only.

8. Apparatus for receiving and storing coupled steel rods of the type used in the clearing of obstructions from sewer pipes, Water pipes, and the like, said rods being used to drive axially a screw tool fixed to the forward end thereof, said apparatus comprising: a reel having a cage for receiving and storing said rods; a shaft on which said reel is mounted for rotation; a guide tube for guiding said rods onto and from said reel, said guide tube extending from a point on the forwardly-extended center axis of said reel to a point near the outer physical periphery of said cage; means for mounting said guide tube for complete rotation on said shaft independently of said reel,

the complete rotation of said guide tube generating an axially tapering surface having an apex on the forwardlyextended center axis of said reel; unidirectional means for permitting free rotation of said guide tube in one direction relative to said reel but preventing rotation in the opposite direction relative to said reel, said one direction being that direction in which said rods are rotated axially when said tool is being screwed into said obstruction; and means operative independently of said reel for driving said guide tube rotationally to remove said tool from said obstruction.

9. Apparatus as claimed in claim 8 characterized in that said unidirectional means comprises a ratchet fixed to said shaft and a spring-pressed pawl connected to said guide tube and mounted for rotation on said shaft to gather with said guide tube, said pawl being mounted for locking engagement with said ratchet in said opposite direction of rotation only.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 22,113 Blane June 16, 1942 1,992,430 Johnson Feb. 26, 1935 2,267,493 Clotz Dec. 23, 1941

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1992430 *May 12, 1933Feb 26, 1935Edgar H JohnsonPanning machine
US2267493 *Aug 5, 1940Dec 23, 1941Edward ClotzSewer cleaning machine
USRE21113 *Feb 27, 1936Jun 13, 1939 sproull
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3154157 *Dec 29, 1961Oct 27, 1964Anderson Dewey LSide wall sampling device
US3958293 *Aug 26, 1974May 25, 1976Augerscope, Inc.Pipe cleaning machine
US4364139 *May 7, 1981Dec 21, 1982Emerson Electric Co.Drum type sewer cleaner
US4646985 *Jan 7, 1986Mar 3, 1987FramatomeApparatus for winding and unwinding a cable of which one end makes electric contact with a fixed installation
US5956923 *Nov 17, 1997Sep 28, 1999Leucadia, Inc.Method and apparatus for installing, retrieving and reusing protective coverings for plants, vines and trees
US6626195 *Mar 16, 2001Sep 30, 2003Aqua Dynamics, Inc.High pressure tube cleaning apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/386, 15/104.33, 242/407, 242/403, 242/397.1
International ClassificationB65H75/34, E03F9/00, B65H75/36
Cooperative ClassificationB65H75/364, E03F9/005, B08B9/045
European ClassificationB65H75/36B2, E03F9/00B2, B08B9/045