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Publication numberUS3078498 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 26, 1963
Filing dateMay 23, 1960
Priority dateMay 23, 1960
Publication numberUS 3078498 A, US 3078498A, US-A-3078498, US3078498 A, US3078498A
InventorsErving B Morgan
Original AssigneeAmerican Seating Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Furniture glide and method of making same
US 3078498 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 26, 1963 E. B. MORGAN 3,078,498

FURNITURE GLIDE AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed May 23, 1960 I I .15 .11, 1-2 4' 3 6 INVENTOR Ef'ZJi nj .3. Morgan wmvzss BY 3M4; Wan/u S. B/ww1v 4/0. ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,078,498 FURNITURE GLIDE AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Erving B. Morgan, Grand Rapids, Mich., assignor to American Seating Company, Grand Rapids, Mich., a

corporation of New Jersey Filed May 23, 1960, Ser. No. 30,969 3 Claims. (Cl. 1642) The present invention relates to furniture glides and more particularly to glides adapted for attachment to chairs, tables and the like having legs of tubular metal.

The primary objects of the invention are to provide an improved glide for furniture legs which are disposed at different angles; to provide such a glide which includes a resilient cushioning member and which will slide on a floor quietly when the article of furniture on which the glide is installed, is moved; to provide novel means for installing the glide on furniture legs of tubular metal; to provide an improved method for making such a glide; and in general to provide a furniture glide which is efficient in use, reasonably economical in manufacture, and attractive in appearance.

An illustrative embodiment of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevatio-nal view of the new glide attached to a tubular metal furniture leg shown fragmentarily and in central vertical section;

FIGURE 2 is a central vertical sectional view of the assembled glide and furniture leg, the leg being here shown in angular disposition;

FIGURE 3 is a horizontal sectional view taken on line 3-3 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken on line 44 of FIGURE 1;

FiGURE 5 is an exploded view showing various parts of the glide in perspective; and

FIGURE 6 is a vertical sectional view of parts of the glide and a two-part gated mold used in making the glide.

Referring now in detail to this drawing, the glide there shown has an outer, floor-contacting, circular shell 10 having an upwardly and inwardly turned rim 11 defining a circular central opening 12. This shell 10 is preferably made of steel which is first formed and then case-hardened to give it a long-wearing characteristic.

A central member 13, preferably a zinc die-casting, has a square foot 14 disposed within the shell 10, a cylindrical stem 15 extending upwardly from the middle of the square foot 14 and through the circular opening 12 in the shell 10, and a ball 16 on the upper end of the stem 15. A resilient plastic filling material 17 occupies the entire space within the shell 10 except that occupied by the foot 14 and stem 15 of the central member 13.

A retainer 18 comprises a pair of complementary retainer-halves 19 of rigid molded plastic composition, said retainer-halves having complementary cavities providing a socket 20 in which is turnably mounted the ball 16, and having adjoining complementary cavities forming a void 21 through which passes the stem 15 of the central member 13. It will readily be seen that the void 21 permits limited angular movement of the retainer 18 relative to the central member 13, so that the glide is self-adjusting with respect to a sloping furniture leg as seen in FIGURE 2. The retainer-halves 19 are inserted into the open lower end of the tubular leg 22 and are gripped into assembly by said leg.

The method by which parts of the glide are assembled is illustrated in FIGURE 6. A two-part mold is provided, comprising a lower mold part 22 and an upper mold part 23 having a gate 24 therein. These mold parts have complementary recesses therein corresponding to "ice the assembled shell 10, central member 13 and plastic filling material 17. To start the operation, the casehardened shell 10 is placed in the lower mold part 22. The central member is next placed in the lower mold part 22 with the square foot 14 thereof disposed within the shell 10. This is made possible by the fact that the sides of the square foot 14 of the central member are of lesser dimension than the diameter of the circular opening 12 in the shell 10 so that the foot can first be inserted into the shell at an angle, and then set true, being spaced from all of the walls of the shell. The mold is then closed and fluid plastic material is introduced through the gate 24 so as to occupy the entire space Within the shell except that occupied by the foot and the stern of the central member. After the plastic material has set, the mold is opened and the completed assembly is removed therefrom.

When the glide is assembled to the tubular furniture leg, the two retainer halves 19 are first assembled around the ball 16 of the central member 13. The retainer is then inserted into the open lower end of the leg, and the upwardly extending ribs 25 on the retainer guide it into the leg and wedge within the leg so that the leg itself grips the retainer-halves in assembly. The retainerhalves have outwardly extending semicircular flanges 26 at their lower ends on which rest the circular lower end of the furniture leg.

It will be seen that, whereas the sides of the square foot 14 of the central member 13 are of lesser dimension than the circular opening 12 in the shell 10 so that the foot can be inserted into the shell, the diagonals of the square foot 14 are of greater dimension than the diameter of said circular opening so that in the completed glide, the corners of the square foot 14 underlie the inwardly turned rim 11 of the shell. These parts are thus secured in assembly so that there is no possibility of the shell being pulled off the glide.

The invention thus provides a novel furniture glide and method of making the same, and while but one specific embodiment of the invention has been herein shown and described, it will be understood that the invention is not to be limited to or by details of construction of that particular embodiment, and that the spirit of the invention comprehends all such modifications as fall within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A glide for a furniture leg, comprising: a pre-formed shell having an upwardly and inwardly turned rim defining a circular opening; a central member having a square foot and a stem extending upwardly from the foot, said square foot having sides of lesser dimension than the diameter of the circular opening in said shell so that the foot can be inserted into the shell at an angle, and said square foot having diagonals of greater dimension than the diameter of said opening so that when inserted in the shell and axially aligned therewith the corners of the square foot underlie the inwardly turned rim of the shell surrounding said circular opening; a resilient plastic filling material occupying the entire space within said shell except that occupied by the foot and the stem of said central member; and means on the upper end of said stem adapting the glide for attachment to the lower end of said furniture leg.

2. A glide for a furniture leg, comprising: a pre-formed circular metal shell having an upwardly and inwardly turned rim defining a circular central opening; a metal central member having a square foot, a stem extending upwardly from the foot, and a ball at the top of the stem, said square foot having sides of lesser dimension than the diameter of the circular opening in said shell so that the foot can be inserted in the shell at an angle, and said square foot having diagonals of greater dimension than the diameter of said opening so that when inserted in the shell and axially aligned therewith the corners of the square foot underlie the inwardly turned rim of the shell surrounding said central opening; a resilient plastic filling material occupying the entire Space within said shell except that occupied by the foot and the stem of said central member; and a retainer having a socket for the ball and means adapting said retainer for attachment to the lower end of said furniture leg.

3. A glide for a tubular metal furniture leg, comprising: a circular metal shell having an upwardly and inwardly turned rim defining a circular central opening; a metal central member having a square foot disposed within said shell spacedly from all the Walls of the shell, said square foot having sides of lesser dimension than the diameter of the circular opening in said shell so that the foot can be inserted into the shell at an angle, and said square foot having diagonals of greater dimension than the diameter of said opening so that when inserted in the shell and axially aligned therewith the corners of the square foot underlie the inwardly turned rim of the shell surrounding said circular opening, said metal central member having also a cylindrical stem extending upwardly from the middle of said square foot and through the opening in said shell, and having a ball on the upper end ,4 of said stem; a resilient plastic filling material occupying the entire space within said shell except that occupied by the foot and the stern of said central member; and a retainer comprising complementary retainer-halves providing a socket in which is turnably disposed said ball and providing a void through which passes said stern, said void being of greater diameter than said stem to permit limited angular movement of the retainer relative to the central member, and said retainer-halves being inserted into the open lower end of said tubular leg and gripped in assembly by said leg.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 918,083 Palmer Apr. 13, 1909 1,494,766 Benjamin May 20, 1924 1,734,727 Herold Nov. 5, 1929 2,490,956 Freund Dec. 13, 1949 2,704,663 Blake Mar. 22, 1955 2,767,944 Moore Oct. 23, 1956 2,873,482 Bridge et a1 Feb. 17, 1959 2,885,719 Nordmark et al May 12, 1959 2,908,941 Sabo et al Oct. 20, 1959 2,973,546 Roche Mar. 7, 1961

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US918083 *Jan 28, 1909Apr 13, 1909Foster Merriam And CompanyDetachable caster for metal bedsteads.
US1494766 *Dec 31, 1919May 20, 1924Internat Oxygen CompanyInsulating support
US1734721 *Dec 9, 1927Nov 5, 1929Frisch AugustLubricant and fuel pump
US2490956 *Aug 11, 1944Dec 13, 1949Freund Robert RExtensible brace for articulated beds
US2704663 *Jul 24, 1948Mar 22, 1955 Leveling device
US2767944 *Oct 28, 1953Oct 23, 1956Gen ElectricSupporting structure for clothes washing machines and the like
US2873482 *Apr 2, 1958Feb 17, 1959Bridge Richard BMethod of making a plastic encased article
US2885719 *Aug 19, 1957May 12, 1959American Seating CoFurniture glide
US2908941 *Jul 3, 1957Oct 20, 1959Gen Motors CorpMethod for molding a ball-like article
US2973546 *Jul 24, 1958Mar 7, 1961Harvard Mfg CompanyPlastic caster socket
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3191213 *Sep 12, 1963Jun 29, 1965Plastocon CorpSwivel type furniture-supporting glide
US3301610 *Jun 24, 1964Jan 31, 1967Gen Motors CorpGuide roller assembly
US3334409 *Sep 1, 1964Aug 8, 1967Honeywell IncMethod of flexure mounting print hammers
US5170972 *Jun 18, 1991Dec 15, 1992Pablo Casals GuellBase for furniture legs and improvements in the manufacture of bases
US6405982 *Dec 18, 1998Jun 18, 2002Magic Sliders, LpSelf-attaching sliding support for articles of furniture
US6626405 *Jun 5, 2002Sep 30, 2003James KeastReplaceable floor protectors
US7234199Oct 16, 2003Jun 26, 2007Bushey Richard DSelf adjusting furniture guide
US7237302Jan 11, 2005Jul 3, 2007Bushey Richard DWrap around furniture guide
US7406746Aug 29, 2005Aug 5, 2008Bushey Richard DSlider for heavy loads
US8726463Nov 10, 2011May 20, 2014Richard D. BusheyWrap around furniture glide
WO2006005114A1 *Jul 8, 2005Jan 19, 2006Lasota RadoslawJoining apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification16/42.00R, 16/42.00T, 264/262
International ClassificationA47B91/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47C7/002, A47B91/066
European ClassificationA47C7/00B, A47B91/06S