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Publication numberUS3078614 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 26, 1963
Filing dateNov 12, 1958
Priority dateNov 12, 1958
Publication numberUS 3078614 A, US 3078614A, US-A-3078614, US3078614 A, US3078614A
InventorsFors Dolores M, Fors James A
Original AssigneeFors Dolores M, Fors James A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
String toy
US 3078614 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 26, 1963 J. A. FORS ETAL STRING TOY 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 12, 1958 F m a 5. aum g 1 W T mm mm W w, m m @M N m 1 p M G fi m A m a a m. M, W8 mm m d m w w R u .w m Q w @\W m w m M mm mm m% mm mm mm mm 9 J w I mm. i v g mmm QQE m m w 0 mm 4 m a @m 8 mm $3 gwfi v wk R a E\ v 9mm EN SWW S S S Q Q QflWT nw & E R G k m N m w M mm m R Q MP A\@ Q N HM. EMU b; m Em w Emu EMU 5M:

Feb. 26, 1963 J. A. FORS ETAL STRING TOY 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed NOV. 12, 1958 INVENTORS James Afors 8 DO/OfES Mfors BY E g & flu Na 4..\ g 5 8 g g \N wt QN wt Feb. 26, 1963 J. FORS ETAL STRING TOY 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Nov. 12, 1958 JNVENTORS James A. Fan; 8 Dolores M. For:

Patented Feb. 26, 1963 3,078,614 STRING TOY James A. Bots and Dolores M. Fors, both of 4958 W. Park Ave., Chicago 39, Ill. Filed Nov. 12, 1958, Ser. No. 773,258 23 Claims. (Ci. 46-1) This invention relates to a string toy or demonstration device. More particularly, it relates to a device which is manipulated by hand.

It is an object of this invention to provide a device in which a plurality of separate objects slidably mounted on a length of elongated material may be caused to descend on the length of material under the influence of gravity separately or together as determined by a person manipulatin g the device.

A further object is to provide a toy or story telling device comprising a plurality of objects slidably mounted on a length of elongated material, at least some of which objects simulate things and persons in a story, rhyme or the like, and at least one of which objects may be caused to descend on the length of material under the influence of gravity as determined by a person manipulating the device.

Still another object is to provide a toy or story telling aid in which a plurality of separate objects on a length of elongated material may be caused to descend on the length of material under the influence of gravity together from one end thereof toward the other and separately and sequentially from said other end toward said one end as determined by a person manipulating the device.

Still another object is to provide a toy or story telling aid in which a plurality of separate objects slidably mounted on a string or cord may be caused to descend on the string or cord under the influence of gravity, separately or together, as determined by a person manipulating the device.

A still further object is to provide such a device in which a plurality of the objects have cooperating interfitting parts and form a container for the string or cord and other objects thereon.

Other objects will appear hereinafter.

In order that the invention may be better understood, reference is made to the accompanying drawings which form a part of this specification and in which FIGURE 1 is a view in elevation of a string toy embodying features of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a view in central vertical cross section through one of the elements of the string toy shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 through another element of the string toy shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 through still another element of the string toy shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 5 is a series of views illustrating the operation of one form of device embodying the features of the present invention;

FIGURE 6 is a similar series of views illustrating the operation of another form of device embodying the features of the present invention;

FIGURES 7, 8, 9 and 10 each consist of a series of views, each illustrating the operation of a dilIerent form of device embodying features of the present invention and useful in demonstrating the events described in a particular nursery rhyme;

FIGURE 11 illustrates a modification of the device shown in FIGURE 9;

FIGURES 12 and 13 similarly illustrate a modification of the devices shown, respectively, in FIGURES 8 and 7;

FIGURES 14,15 and 16 are views similar to FIGURE 11 showing still other devices embodying features of the present-invention;

FIGURE 17 is a view in perspective of another form of device embodying features of the present invention and useful in demonstrating events in a nursery rhyme;

FIGURE 18 is a view in cross section on the line 1818 in FIGURE 17;

FIGURE 19 is a view in cross section on the line 1919 in FIGURE 17;

FIGURE 20 is a fragmentary view in cross section of a modification of the device shown in FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 21 is a view in cross section on the line 21-21 in FIGURE 20;

FIGURE 22 is a view in perspective of another kind of structure embodying features of this invention;

FIGURE 23 is a view in elevation of the same device;

FIGURE 24 is a view in perspective of a device similar to that shown in FIGURE 22 but having a different arrangement of parts;

FIGURE 25 is a view in elevation of the same device;

FIGURE 26 is a view in elevation of still another device involving features of the present invention;

FIGURE 27 is a view in cross section on the line 27--27 in FIGURE 26; and

FIGURE 28 is a plan view of the same device.

Referring first to FIGURE 1, it may be seen that the device there shown includes parts designated 10, 12 and 14 which, respectively, simulate the first, second and third stages of a 3-stage rocket. Each of these rocket simulating portions has a generally vertically extending opening therein as may be seen in FIGURES 2, 3 and 4, the opening in rocket section It) being indicated by numeral 16, that in rocket section 12 by numeral 18 and that in rocket section 14 by numeral 29. While each of these openings 16, 18 and 20 has its outer ends located on or substantially on the vertical axis of the rocket section, it will be noted from FIGURES 2, 3 and 4 that the various openings intermediate their ends diverge from the axis or from a straight line connecting their outer ends to varying degrees for a purpose to be explained more fully.

Referring again to FIGURE 1, it will be seen that a string or cord 22 of flexible material is provided and this cord is threaded through the respective openings 16, 18 and 20 so that the rocket sections 10, 12 and 14 are slidably mounted upon the cord 22. To retain the rocket sections on the cord and also to provide a convenient means for manipulating the device, a pair of handles 24 and 26 are provided. These handles may take any desired form, short rod sections which might be wood dowels, for example, being illustrated. The opposite free ends of the cord 22 are secured, respectively, to the handles 24 and 26 by passing the respective ends of the cord through the openings 28 and 3t) and then tying the end' around the handle portion 24 or 26 as the case may be. Alternatively, the handles 24 and 26 may be shaped to simulate, respectively, the earth and sky if desired or given any other desired form. For greater realism the first rocket stage 10 may, if desired, be provided with fins such as 32 and the third rocket stage 14 may be provided with antennae 34 simulating those provided on satellites to be placed in orbit.

In accordance with one method of construction each of the rocket stages 10, 12 and 14 is formed of two parts which are ultimately glued or otherwise secured together as indicated by the glue lines 36, 38 and 44 The purpose in this method of construction is to facilitate the formation of the openings 16, 18 and 26 with the desired configuration. To this end, before the two parts of each section are glued together as described, the section of the respective openings 16, 18 and 20 extending in that part is formed in the part, preferably by drilling a hole therethrough which extends at a slight angle to the axis of the part as shown in FIGURES 2, 3 and 4. The angularity of the opening with respect to the axis is the same in each of the two parts of a stage so that when the parts are glued together as described and shown, the opening in the one part is in communication with the opening in the other part.

It will be observed by Comparing FIGURES 2, 3 and 4 that the two portions of the opening 16 extend at a relatively slight angle to the axis of the first stage 10, that the two parts of the opening 18 extend at a slightly greater angle to the axis of the second stage 12, and that the two parts of the opening 2%) extend at a still greater angle with respect to the axis of the third stage 14. It will be clear that the string or cord 22 extending in the openings 16, 1S and 2% when it is pulled tight will press against the walls of these openings by reason of the fact that the openings diverge from a straight line connecting their outer ends.

It has furthermore been found that the frictional engagement or resistance to movement or falling of the parts 10, 12 and 14 on the string 22 varies for any given tension on the string 22 as the angularity of the respective openings 16, 18 and 2t varies with respect to a line connecting their respective outer ends, or to put it in another way, the falling or resistance to movement varies with the degree to which the openings 16, 18 and 20 diverge from a straight line connecting their ends. Thus, for a given tension on the thread 22 the part 10 with the opening 16 therein having the least divergence will show the least resistance to movement or falling. The part 12 will show slightly greater resistance to movement or falling and the part 14', in which the opening it} has the greatest divergence, will show the greatest resistance to movement or falling.

The frictional resistance to movement or falling of each of the parts 10, 12 and 14 also varies with variations in tension on the string 22 increasing as the tension is in creased and vice versa. Consequently, the device shown in FIGURE 1 may be manipulated by holding one of the handles 24 and 26 in each hand. With the handle 26 being held uppermost and substantially no tension on the cord 22, all of the parts 10, 12 and 14 will come together adjacent the handle 24 and in abutting relation. If tension is then applied to the cord and the vertical positions of the handles 24 and 26 are reversed so that the handle 24 is substantially vertically over the handle 26, as tension is thereafter gradually relaxed on the cord 22, it will be observed that the part 16 which, as described above, has the minimum resistance to falling will eventually fall away from the parts 12 and 14 which remain stationary on the cord and if the cord is maintained substantially at the same tension, at which the part 10 starts to fall, this part will drop all the way down to the handle 26 before either of the parts 12 and 14 have moved. If tension is then further decreased, ultimately the part 12 will start its movement downward and by holding substantially that tension on the cord 22, the part 12 will be caused to drop down to an abutting relation with the part 10 while part 14 remains stationary. Thereafter, by further releasing the tension on the cord, the part 14 may be caused to drop in its turn. If the positions of the handles 26 and 24 are now reversed so that the handle 26 is uppermost, meanwhile retaining tension on the cord and if, thereafter, the tension is gradually released, it will be observed that all three of the parts 10, 12 and 14 descend on the cord simultaneously.

It is pointed out above that the rocket stages 10, 12 and 14 are made in two parts for convenience in forming the openings 16, 18 and 29 therein. Accordingly, other methods of forming these parts are within the scope of the invention. For example, such parts may be molded in one piece with a removable core portion to form the desired opening such as 16, 18 and 20, or they could be formed in two pieces divided along the plane defined by the axis of the desired opening, or any other desired method may be used.

It is also pointed out that while each of the openings 16, 18 and 2G is made up of two straight portions forming an obtuse angle with respect to each other, it is within the scope of the invention to form the desired opening in a rocket stage such as 10, 12'or 14 or any other desired piece in any other configuration so long as the opening diverges substantially from a straight line connecting its open ends. Thus, the opening such as 16, 18 or 26 could take the form of a curve or portion of an arc of a circle, or it could have an S shape or any other shape which may be desired.

By diverging substantially from a straight line connecting the ends of the opening is meant that it diverges sufficiently so that the cord or string extending therethrough will press against the walls of the opening at at least three points when it is placed under tension. Thus, the required divergence may vary with the cross-sectional dimension of the opening as well as with the size of the opening or string employed. For example, a very thin string or thread in a comparatively large opening will require more divergence than a thicker string or a relatively small opening in order to give the same resistance in moving or falling. Obviously, also, for the device to operate as above described, it is necessary that the opening such as 16, 18 or 20 be sutiiciently large in cross-sectional area as compared with the particular cord or thread used to permit the part of object such as the rocket stages 10, 12 and 14 to fall freely on the string under the action of gravity when the tension on the string is released. It is not essential, however, that the cross-sectional area of the openings such as 16, 18 and 29 be uniform throughout their length.

As might be expected, the weight of a rocket stage such as 10, 1.2 and 14 is also a factor in determining the resistance to falling of the particular part when held on a string under tension as described above. Thus, two parts having openings therein such as the opening 16, for example, each of which diverges from a straight line connecting its ends to the same extent will vary in falling resistance if their weights are materially different. The one of these objects which is the heavier will fall on a string or cord under the influence of gravity at a tension on the string or cord which is still sufficient to support the other object. By reason of this, as will be further illustrated hereinafter, in addition to varying the falling resistance of objects by varying their weight, it is within the scope of the invention to provide devices in which one or more of the objects such as 10, 12 and 14 on the string, such as 22, have no falling resistance, that is, have an opening therethrough which does not diverge from a straight line connecting its open ends. The result of the inclusion of such an object in an assembly is that the weight of the object is added to that of an object immediately below it to cause the latter to fall while the string is still under a tension which would otherwise prevent the lower object from falling.

In the further description of this invention, reference will be made frequently to falling resistance or relative falling resistance of objects. Usually it is the falling resistance of one object relative to another which is meant and it is further to be understood that such differences in relative falling resistance may be due either to diflferences in weight of the objects or differences in divergence of the openings through them, or both. It is further pointed out that manipulation of a device, such as is shown in FIGURE 1, in the manner previously described is facilitated if the differences in the falling resistances of the various objects mounted on a string or cord, such as string 22, are substantial. It is surprising, however, that such devices can be manipulated by hand as described so as to vary and maintain just the right tension on a cord such as 22 to cause objects such as 10, 12 and 14 to drop on the cord as described above, one at a time. The required difference in falling resistance cannot be set forth in absolute terms, the only requirement being that it be sufiicient to permit manipulation by hand. Simply by way of illustration, it is pointed out that the relative divergence of the openings 16, 13 and 20 illustrated. in FIGURES 2,

3 and 4 is adequate to give the desired diiierences in falling resistance.

FIGURE 5 illustrates graphically the various steps in the manipulation of a device embodying the features of the present invention. It includes a cord or thread 42, the ends of which are secured to handles 44 and 46 corre sponding to the handles 24 and 26. Mounted on the string 42 are a pair of balls 4-3 and Stl. The balls 48 and 50 are so constructed according to the principles described above that the ball 50, as indicated by the numeral 2 appearing thereon, has a falling resistance which is substantially or significantly greater than the falling resistance of the ball 48 which bears the number 1.

It is to be understood that the application of the values 1 and 2 to balls 48 and 50 is not intended to indicate that ball 50 has twice or even approximately twice the falling resistance of ball 48. To the contrary, it merely means that the one has a greater falling resistance than the other and that the difference in falling resistance is significant or substantial, i.e., it is sufiicient so that an appropriate tension on cord 42 which may be maintained by hand the one object with lesser falling resistance will slide down on the cord under the influence of gravity while the other object is held or remained stationary in an elevated position. It is both difiicult and unnecessary to determine or express the falling resistances in absolute values. In the light of this disclosure it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art how to construct objects having any desired or required falling resistances or difierences in falling resistance.

The various views in FIGURE 5, which are designated successively by the letters of the alphabet, show the dif ferent positions that the balls 48 and 50 may occupy as the device is manipulated. Thus, view 5A shows the starting position with the handle 44 uppermost and the two balls 48 and 50 abutting on the string close tothe handle 44. The string 42 in this position is being held under substantial tension so that the balls 48 and 50 remain stationary near the upper end of the string. View 53 shows that the result of relaxing the tension on the string 42 is that the balls 48 and 5th move downwardly together on the string as indicated by the arrow in the view. The next view C shows that the balls 48 and 56 will continue to move downwardly together under the relaxed tension on the string 42 until they reach a position adjacent the handle 46.

If the device is now inverted to the position shown in view 5D so that the handle 46 is uppermost, maintaining tension on the string 42 during the inversion and then releasing it slightly when the position shown in view D is reached, the ball 48 because of its lower falling resistance may be caused to fall by itself on the cord 42 while the ball 50 remains stationary near the upper end of the cord, the ball 48 dropping as indicated by the arrow in view D until it reaches the position shown in view E. Thereafter, if the tension on the cord 42 is further or completely relaxed, the ball 5% will then drop on the string 42 as indicated in view F until it engages the ball 48 adjacent the handle 44 as illustrated in view G. It will be observed that the balls 48 and 50 in view G have re turned to the position they occupied in view A adjacent the handle 44. It should also be noted that when the balls 48 and 50 are in the position shown in views B, D and F or in any other positions intermediate the ends of the cord while it is extending substantially vertically, the tension on cord 42 may be easily increased sufiiciently to stop the downward movement of the balls and that the ball or balls may thereafter be caused to again resume their downward movement by appropriate relaxation of the tension on cord 42.

The manipulation of a somewhat more complicated device is illustrated in FIGURE 6. This device which is generally similar to that shown in FIGURE 1 like those previously described includes a length of string or cord 52, having handles 54 and 56, respectively, attached to its opposite ends. Mounted on this string or cord are three objects 58, 6t and 62 which are shown as being in the form of balls. As indicated by the numerals appearing upon these balls, the ball 58 has a falling resistance of unity, the ball 60 has a falling resistance which is significantly greater than that of ball 58 and the ball 62 has a falling resistance which is significantly greater than that of ball 69.

Starting with the device in the position indicated in view A with the string 52 under substantial tension, all of the balls 58, 6t) and 62 remain stationary at the upper end of the string 52 adjacent to the handle 54. If the tension is now relaxed, these balls 58, 60 and 62 will fall together or simultaneously as indicated in views B and C until they come to rest at the lower end of the cord adjacent to the handle 56. This occurs because sufficient relaxation of tension to permit the lowermost ball 62 to fall also permits each of the other two balls to drop because of their lesser falling resistance.

When the device is now inverted to the position shown in View D with the handle 56 uppermost so long as the string 52 is held under adequate tension, all the balls will remain stationary at the top of the string near the handle 56. As the tension on the string 52 is gradually released, however, a tension will be reached at which the ball 58 will begin to drop on the string 52 as indicated in view D, eventually coming to rest at the lower end of the string adjacent the handle 54 as indicated in view B, both of the balls 60 and 62 meanwhile remaining stationary at the top of string 52 adjacent the handle 56 as indicated in these same views. The tension on string 52 is then further relaxed whereupon the ball 6% starts to drop downwardly on the string while ball 62 still remains at the top near the handle 56 as shown in view F. After the ball 6% has come to rest against the ball 58 at the bottom of the string 52 adjacent to the handle 54 as indicated in view G, if the tension on the string 52 is then further relaxed, the ball 62 will finally start to fall as indicated in view H, continuing downwardly under the relaxed tension until it comes to rest against the ball 6% as shown in view I, restoring the balls to the position they occupied in view A adjacent the handle 54.

In addition to the embodiments which have been described, the device of the present invention is subject to many other variations and uses. It lends itself especially well, however, to use in the graphic representation of events and persons which charatcerize childrens stories and particularly nursery rhymes. Various embodiments of the invention which are adapted to simulate the events occurring in nursery rhymes are illustrated in FIGURES 7 to 16, inclusive, of the drawings.

Referring first to FIGURE 7, there is shown in this figure a device which is based on the nursery rhyme Little Miss Mutfet and the various views in this figure show how the device is manipulated in accordance with the events that occur in this particular nursery rhyme. The device shown comprises a length of thread 64 to the respective ends of which are secured hand gripping portions 66 and 68 which may take any desired form and in this figure are shown simply as open ended square boxes into and through which the string 64 extends as indicated by the dotted lines. About midway of the length of the thread 64 there is secured thereon in a fixed position a body '76 which is intended to represent or simulate a tutfet. The fixed character of the body '79 is indicated by the letter F enclosed in a circle with an arrow pointing toward the body 7t). Similar indications are provided with respect to the hand gripping portions 66 and 68 as may be seen. Slidably mounted on the thread 64 between the tulfet '70 and the hand gripping portion 66 is a body '72 formed to resemble a little girl and as will be apparent it is intended to represent Little Miss Mutiet. The opening in the body "Iii through which the thread 64 passes is shaped generally like the opening 18 in the second rocket stage 12 shown in FIGURE l so as to give this body a substantial resistance to falling as indicated by the numeral 2 enclosed in the circle with an arrow pointing to the body 72 in view B of FEGURE 7. Slidably mounted on the other portion of the thread 6 between the tuffet 70 and the hand gripping portion 68 is another small body 74 shaped to resemble or simulate a spider. As indicated by the numeral 1 in the circle placed alongside this body, the opening through the spider 74 in which the thread 64 extends is similar to the opening 16 in the first rocket stage 19 shown in FIGURE 4 so that the spider 74 has a falling resistance which is significantly less than the falling resistance of the body 72 representing Little Miss Mullet.

View A of FIGURE 7 illustrates how the device will appear when the operator is ready to begin manipulating it in accordance with the nursery rhyme. Little Miss Mutfet 72 and the spider 74 are not seen in this figure because they are located, respectively, in the boxes 66 and 68, Little Miss Mullet being retained there by the application of tension to the thread 64. The first occurrence set out in this nursery rhyme is Little Miss Muttet sat on a tutfet. This is simulated in the device shown in FIGURE 7 by releasing the tension on the thread 64 whereupon the figure 72 representing Little Miss Muffet will slide down the thread 64 as shown in view B until it is seated upon the tufiet ill as shown in view C. It of course will be obvious that during this and subsequnet manipulations of the device, the manipulator may recite the well known nursery rhyme. Now while maintaining the thread 64 under tension the manipulator will invert the device so that the box 63 is uppermost as indicated in view D and then release the tension on the string 64 just sufiiciently to permit the spider 74 to slide down out of the box 63 as indicated in view D and eventually come to rest against the tufiet 70, as indicated in view B, in accordance with the next part of the nursery rhyme which recites that a spider came along and sat down beside Miss Mullet. Thereupon the manipultaor or operator will further release the tension on the thread 64, causing Miss Mullet 72 to drop away from tutfet 70 and down into the box 66 out of view, as indicated in views F and G, to conform to the last portion of the rhyme which recites that the spider irightened Miss Muitet away. View H in FIGURE 7 illustrates how the device may be restored to its starting position by reinverting it so that the box 66 is again uppermost and relaxing the tension on the thread 64 just sufiiciently to cause the spider to slide down the thread 64 away from the tuifet 70 and to enter the box 68 so that the device will appear as indicated in view I, which is the same as view A.

It will of course be obvious why relaxing the tension on the string as in view B causes Miss Mufiet to slide downwardly on the string while the other parts remain stationary since the tufiet 7G is fixed and the spider 74 is already at the lowermost part of the thread 64. Upon the inversion of the device to the position indicated in view D, it is possible to cause the spider 74 to slide down the string while Miss Mufifet remains stationary because the Miss Mufiet figure 72 has a substantially greater falling resistance than the spider figure 74 as previously described. However, when the spider 74 reaches the tuffet 70, as illustrated in view B, it can fall no further, and further relaxation of the tension on the thread 64 then permits Miss Muffet to fall. Finally, when the device is reinverted as indicated in view H, becaue of the greater resistance of the Miss Mullet figure 72 to falling, this figure may be retained within the box 66 while the spider 74 drops into the box 68 by only partially relaxing the tension on the thread 64-.

FIGURE 13 shows a modification of the same device shown in FIGURE 7 in which the boxes 66 and 63 are replaced, respectively, with a box portion 76 which is formed and decorated on the exterior to resemble a house and a cooperatin box portion 73 which is decorated on the exterior to simulate a spider web. In addition to these features the box portions 76 and 78 may also be shaped and formed to fit together and provide a container for the thread 64 as well as the tufiet 70, Miss Mutlet 72 and the spider 74. To this end, the bottom of the box portion '76 is provided with a generally centrally located circular opening 80 through which the thread 64 extends and the upper end of the box portion 78 is formed with a similar centrally located circular opening surrounded by an upstanding collar 82 which may be fitted into the opening 80 and is of such dimension as to snugly engage the walls of this opening 8d so that the box portions 76 and 7 8 in this manner are held together to form a container.

FIGURE 8 shows a device which is based on the rhyme about Humpty Dumpty. In this modification the boxes 84 and 86 to which the ends of the thread 38 are secured may be decorated to simulate a brick wall as shown. Slidably mounted on the string 88 are three separate objects 9! 92 and 94. The object 90, which is decorated to resemble I-lurnpty Dumptys head, is formed as indicated by the small numeral in a circle to have a falling resistance of one on an arbitrary scale. The object 92, which resembles a flattened ball, has parts or portions marked or formed thereon to simulate arms and is intended to represent Humpty Dumptys body. This object 92, as indicated, is formed as to have no re sistance to falling, that is, the opening in this body through which the thread 83 passes does not diverge from a straight line connecting its ends. The third object 94 on the string 33 which is mounted on the thread 88 between the body 92 and the box 86 has marked thereon on one side as shown representations of men and on the other side, which is not shown, representations of horses. The opening through the object 94 is formed similarly to that in the object so that it also has a falling resistance of one.

It will be apparent that in this modification, since the object 92 has no falling resistance and the falling resistance of the objects 96 and 94 is the same, the specification that the objects 963 and 94 have a falling resistance of one does not have quite the same significance as in the embodiments previously described and simply serves to indicate that the objects 90 and 94 have some falling resistance as compared with the object 92 which has none. It will also be clear that as compared with the objects shown in figures previously described, such as FIGURES l, 6 and 7, the falling resistances of the objects 90 and 94 could as well be two as one so long as they are both the same. t may also be pointed out that a device which will work in a manner similar to that shown in FIGURE 8 may have a body member corresponding to the member 92 with a falling resistance of one and members corre sponding to fit and 94, each with a falling resistance of two. Such an embodiment, however, is not quite as easy to manipulate as the one illustrated in the drawing.

As in the figures previously described, view A in FIG- URE 8 shows the device in position for the start of the manipulation, the box 86 being lowermost with the member 94 therein and the members 99 and 92 just outside the box, as shown. In this position no tension need be applied to the string 88 since all of the members 90, 92 and 5 4 are resting in their lowermost positions. It will be recalled that the story of Humpty Dumpty begins with the statement Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall, and this is indicated in view A. The story continues with a statement Humpty Dumpty had a great fall. To illustrate this, as indicated in view B, the device is inverted from the position shown in view A so that the box 86 is now uppermost. During the inversion the string 88 is maintained under tension and the inversion is complete, by relaxing the tension slightly, the head 99 and the body 92 of Humpty Dumpty may be caused to fall together on the thread 88 as shown in view B while the member 94 remains within the box 86, the head and body continu- 9. ing down until they enter the box 84 as shown in view C, thus representing Humpty Dumptys fall. After the head and body reach this position by further or completely releasing the tension on the thread 88, the member 94 representing the horses and men may be caused to descend on the string as indicated in view D, eventually coming to rest, as indicated in view E, on the body 92. This represents the next portion of the rhyme And all the kings horses and all the kings men.

As indicated in view F, the device is now reinverted so that the box 84 is uppermost, the tension being maintained on the thread '88 during this time. When the inversion is complete a partial release of the tension will cause the member 94 together with Hurnpty Dumptys body 92 to descend on the thread 88 while the head 96 remains in the box 84 as indicated by views F and G. This manipulation corresponds to the conclusion of the rhyme Couldnt put Humpty Dumpty together again.

The rhyme being completed, the tension on the thread 88 is now completely relaxed whereupon the head 96 descends on the thread 8-8 as shown in view H until it rests on the body 92, as shown in view I, restoring the d vice to the condition illustrated in view A, in which it is ready to be manipulated again.

The partial relaxation of tension mentioned in connection with view B permits the head 91} and the body 92 of Humpty Dumpty to descend on the thread 88 while the object 94 remains in the box 86 even though the head 90 and the object 94 both have the same falling resistance. The reason this occurs is because the falling resistance of the head 90 is partially overcome by the weight of the freely falling body 92 which has no falling resistance, or to put it in another way, the combination of the body 92. and the head 99 has lesser falling resistance than the object 94 alone. In like manner, the body 92 and the object 94 descend on the thread 83 while the head 9% remains in the box '84 as shown in view F for the reason that, again, the weight of the body 92 in past overcomes the falling resistance of the object 94.

FIGURE 12 shows a modification of the device shown in FIGURE 8 which is similar to the modification shown in FIGURE 13 or" the device shown in FIGURE 7. Thus, in the device of FIGURE 12 the box 86 is replaced by a modified box portion 96 and the box 84 is replaced by a modified box portion 98. The box portion 96 similarly to the box portion '76 is formed with a centrally located circular opening 190 in its bottom wall through which the thread 83 extends and the top wall of the box portion 98 is formed with a similar central opening surrounded by an upstanding collar 10?. of such size as to fit snugly Within the opening 1% whereby the portions 96 and 98 may be fitted together to provide a container for the other parts of the device.

The device shown in FIGURE 9 is based on the rhyme which begins Ding, dong bell, Pussys in the well. The two hand gripping portions 194 and 1% are formed respectively to simulate the bell and the well and one end of the length of cord or string 1% is secured to one of these portions and the other end to the other of the two hand gripping portions or members. Both the bell 104 and well 106 are somewhat cup-shaped and positioned with their open ends opposed and the cord or thread 103 extending therethru.

Cord 108 has three objects slidably mounted thereon. One of these simulating Tommy Green and designated 11% is positioned closest to the bell 1%. Object 112 simulating Johnny Stout is positioned nearest to the well 106 and the object 114 simulating the cat is located between the two boys. As indicated by the le ends in FIGURE 9 both of the boy figures 119 and 112 have the same falling resistance which is indicated as unity.

The cat figure 114, however, has a si nificantly .meater falling resistance than either of the boy figures as indicated by the legend 2 in view A of FIGURE 9.

As in the other embodiments view A in FIGURE 9 is the first position in the manipulation of the device according to the nursery rhyme. In this view the boy figure simulating Tommy Green is in the bell 104 and the cat 114 is located just outside the bell as shown. The other figure 112 simulating Johnny Stout is in the well 1116 and the cord 108 is held under tension to retain the objects 110 and 114 at the upper end of the cord as indicated. I

As the demonstration begins tension on cord 1118 is relaxed to permit the cat 114 and Tommy Green 11% to slide down the cord as shown in views B and C until the cat 114 is within the Well 106 and Tommy Green 110 is just outside, meanwhile, if desired, manipulating bell 194 to indicate that it is ringing. This corresponds to the beginning portion of the rhyme Ding, dong bell, Pussys in the well. Next comes the passage Who put her in? and at this, the device is inverted to the position shown in view D with well 106 uppermost, tension being maintained on cord 108 during the inversion. Then for the line Little Tommy Green tension on cord 108 is relaxed just sufficiently to permit the Tommy Green figure 110 to slide down the cord as in view D until "it comes to rest in the bell 104 as indicated in view B.

For the line Who pulled her out tension on cord 1% is further relaxed causing the cat 114 and the Johnny Stout figure 112 to move down the cord together as in view F until the cats head engages the object 119 in hell 104 as shown in view G. Again applying tension the device is reinverted to the position shown in view H with bell 104 uppermost in preparation for the line Little Johnny Stout. Whereupon tension on cord 1% is released just sufficiently to permit the Johnny Stout figure 112 to slide down the cord as in view H and enter the well 1% as indicated in view I completing the manipulation and restoring the device to its starting position.

By way of explanation, the cat 114 and figure 1110 fall together in views B and C because of the complete or substantially complete relaxation of tension on cord 1198. However, in view D the partial relaxation of tension permits figure 110 to fall while retaining the cat 114 in the well with figure 112 because the larger falling resistance of cat 114 prevents it from falling and also supports figure 112. Again substantially complete relaxation of tension as in view F causes figure 112 and cat 114 to fall together but in view H the cat 114, because of its greater falling resistance, remains stationary supporting figure 110 in the bell 104 while figure 112 falls under the partially relaxed tension.

FIGURE 11 shows a modification of the device of FIGURE 9 which is similar to those shown in FIGURES =12 and 13 previously described. In this embodiment the bell 1114 is replaced by a bell 116 provided with a bottom wall having a centrally located circular opening 118 therein thru which cord 108 extends. Well 1116 is similarly replaced with a Well 121) provided with a top wall having a centrally located opening therein surrounded by a collar 122 which fits snugly in the opening 118 so that the well 121} and bell 116 cooperate to provide an'enclosure for the remainder of the device.

It will be readily apparent that the device of FIGURE 10 is based on the rhyme Hey Diddle Diddle. A figure 12d of a cat playing a fiddle provides one hand grip. It is secured to one end of the cord 126, the other end of which is secured to another hand grip 128 which is shaped to simulate a little dog with its mouth open to suggest laughing. Also secured to the cat 124 is a part 139 which represents or simulates the moon. It is to be noted that this moon part 130 is preferably so secured to the cat 124 that when the cat is held in a normal position the free end of the moon part 130 is far enough away from the cord 126 to permit the cow 132 to slide by it as will be described. This figure 132 simulating a cow is one of the two parts which are slidably mounted on 11' cord 126, the other being a figure 134 simulating a dish with a spoon attached to it.

The cow 132 is formed to have a falling resistance of unity and the dish-spoon figure 134 is formed to have a significantly greater resistance to falling as indicated by the legend 2 in view A of FIGURE 10. Although the cat 12.4 and the dog 128 do not slide on cord 126, the simulation of the rhyme may be enhanced by constructing the eat so that it can be manipulated by hand to move the bow laterally on the fiddle as though it were being played and similarly the dog may be so made that when squeezed or otherwise actuated by hand, its mouth opens and closes to suggest barking or laughing or it emits a noise suggestive of laughing or barking.

The manipulation of the device begins with the position shown in view A with the cat 124 uppermost to call attention to it in accordance with the first part of the rhyme Hey Diddle Diddle, the cat and the fiddle. If the cat has moving parts as described above, they could also be moved at this time. Then maintaining tension on the cord 126 the device is inverted to the position shown in view B with the dog 128 uppermost and to conform to the next part of the rhyme which reads The cow jumped over the moon, the tension on cord 126 is partially relaxed to permit cow 132 to slide down the cord 126. Because cow 132 has substantially less falling resistance than the dish-spoon figure 134, the cow can thus be caused to drop down to the position shown in view C where it is over the moon while the dish-spoon figure is held stationary up by the dog 128.

The rhyme continues And the little dog laughed to see such sport" for which it is appropriate to wiggle the dog 128 or to actuate any movable parts it may have. Finally for the concluding words of the rhyme And the dish ran away with the spoonthe tension on cord 126 is further relaxed to permit the dish-spoon figure 134 to slide down the cord as indicated in view D until it rests on top of the cow 132. Although it is not shown in a separate view it will be readily apparent that from the position shown in view D it the device is reinverted without tension on cord 126, the cow 132 and the dish-spoon figure 134 will slide down the cord until they come to rest adjacent the dog 128 restoring the device to its starting condition as shown in view A.

In the light of the above disclosure, many other modifications of the invention will be apparent so that detailed description of them is not required. Two such are shown in the single views of FIGURES 14 and 15. Thus FIGURE 14 is based on the rhyme Mary Had a Little Lamb. One hand grip 136 secured to cord 133 takes the form of a house with a floor or bottom wall having a central circular opening 140 therein. The other hand grip 142 may have the hemispherical form shown or any desired shape and preferably is decorated with an outdoor scene such as fields or woods. By providing an upstanding circular collar 144 about the open face of grip 142, which fits snugly into the opening 140 in house 136, a container for the other parts or" the device is provided.

In this device there are two objects slidably mounted on the cord 133, one being a figure 146 simulating Mary and the other a figure 14-8 representing her lamb. The lamb 143 is constructed to have a significantly greater falling resistance than that of the Mary figure 146 so that in one direction on cord 138 both figures fall together when tension is relaxed and in the other direction a partial relaxation of tension will cause the Mary figure 146 to descend alone after which further relaxation permits the lamb 143 to descend. It is believed that the relation of these movements to the rhyme will be readily understood.

The rhyme about lack and lill provides the basis for the device of FIGURE 15. One hand grip 150 which simulates a house is secured to one end of cord 152 and .the other hand grip 154 secured to the other endof the cord may take the form of an open ended box as shown or any other desired form. Preferably, as in other embodiments described, it is provided with an upstanding collar 156 about its open end of rectangular shape and such size as to fit snugly against the side walls of the house when inserted in its open bottom portion. It is preferably decorated with a representation of a hill with a well at the top.

The device of FIGURE 15 also has two figures slidably mounted on the cord 152. One of these figures, 158, is a representation of Jack which is mounted nearest to the house 150 and has a minimum falling resistance. The other figure, 160, representing Jill has a significantly greater falling resistance. From this it will be clear that these figures 158 and 160 will fall together from the house 150 toward the other hand grip 154 so that they go up the hill together as in the rhyme. When the device is inverted, however, so that grip 154 is uppermost it may be manipulated to cause the Jack figure 158 to fall first and the fill figure 166 to come tumbling after.

One of the simplest forms of the invention which is shown in FIGURE 16 is based on the rhyme Hickory Dickory Dock. In this device one hand grip 162 which simulates an old fashioned clock has one end of the cord 164 secured to it. A weight or representation of a weight 166 not only serves as the other grip but with the cord 164 adds to the simulation of the clock. A single figure 168 representing the mouse is slidably mounted on the cord 164. Preferably this figure will have a unit falling resistance-that is, a relatively low falling resistance which is sufficient nonetheless to permit control of the falling of the mouse by applying and relaxing tension on cord 164 although this may be varied as desired since it is the only figure on the cord. In any event, in accordance with the rhyme the mouse may readily be caused to run up the clock when clock 162 is lowermost and to run down again when the device is inverted so weight 166 is lowermost as shown. The device may be further enhanced by providing means in clock 162 which may be manipulated to produce a sound suggestive of the clock struck one.

FIGURES 17, 18 and 19 illustrate a modification of the invention in which the elongated member is formed of rigid or non-flexible material. More particularly, the elongated member 170 shown in these figures may be, for example, a piece of a small or fine dowel rod. Slidably mounted on member 176 are a pair of objects 172 and 174, simulating, respectively, a spider and Little Miss Mutfet. As shown in FIGURE 19, the spider figure 172 has a circular opening 176 extending there through and a small metal sleeve 178 which tightly engages the walls of opening 176 and is positioned centrally therein. Thus, the wall of the central opening in sleeve 178 engages the surface of member 170 and slidably supports the spider 172 thereon. The parts of the spider figure 172 other than the sleeve 178 may be formed of any desired material for reasons which will become apparent.

The figure 174 also has a circular opening extending therethrough, which is indicated by the numeral 180. Firmly positioned centrally in this opening is a hollow rod-like portion 182 which is preferably formed of rubher. In this way, the wall of the central opening in the member 182 provides a surface to slidably engage the member 17% to support the figure 174 thereon. It will be obvious that the part 182 being formed of rubber will have a greater coefiicient of friction in respect to the wood rod 176 than that of the sleeve part 178 in respect to that rod. The remaining parts of the figure 17". may be formed of any desired material, since, as will be explained, the operation of this device depends upon the coefficient of friction of the members 178 and 182 in sliding relation to rod 176.

A pair of end stops 184 and 186 are secured, respectively, to the opposite ends of the member 170. These end stops, which are too large to pass through the openings in the washer 178 and rod portion 182, serve to prevent the figures 172 and 174 from sliding off of the rod 176. Fixed centrally lengthwise of the rod or elongated member 1741 is a body 188 which serves as a simulation of a tuffet and is sufficiently large to prevent the members 172 and 174 from sliding thereover.

The manipulation of this device is similar in a number of respects to the manipulation of the device shown in FIGURE 7, and like that device, it is designed to demonstrate the events in the nursery rhyme Little Miss Muffet. The manipulation may be started with the rod 170 extending horizontally and the figures 172 and 174 located, respectively, adjacent the end stops 184 and 186. If the rod 170 is then tilted to move the end carrying the step 186 to a position higher than that of the end carrying stop 184, a degree of tilt will finally be reached which Will cause the figure 174 toslide downwardly. on the rod 170 until it engages the tuffet 188. If the tilt of the rod 170 is then reversed to place the end carrying stop 184 uppermost by gradually increasing the degree'towhich the rod 1'70 is tilted in this direction, a position. can be reached at which the figure 172 will slide down to the tuffet 188 without the figure 174 having moved at all. This is due to the difference in the coeflicients of friction of the materials of which these two parts are made in respect to wood. Thereafter increasing the tilting of the rod 170 in the same direction will ultimately cause the member 174 to slide downwardly on the rod 170 until it engages the stop 186. In this manner it will be seen that the movements or manipulations of the device shown in FIGURE 7 are thus substantially duplicated.

FIGURES 20 through 28 show in fragmentary views various constructions of objects, the movements of which ously described.

Referring first to FIGURES 20 and 21, there is shown in these figures a hollow object 1% which is indicated as having a spherical shape but could have any other desired external configuration as will be apparent, A pair of openings 192 and 194 are provided in the wall of the object 1%, preferably at diametrically opposed points. Within the hollow interior of the member 1% a rod-like portion 19-6 is secured in a position laterally offset from a line connecting the openings 192 and 1534 as shown in the drawings.

It is readily apparent in FIGURE 20 that the elongated flexible member 198 extending through the opening 192 around the rod 196 and out through opening 194 is com 'pelled to follow a diverging path with-in the object 198 with the consequence that when the elongated flexible member 193 is held under tension movement of the object 1% downwardly thereon under the influence of gravity is prevented.

In the devices previously described, the diverging paths provided in the various objects mounted for sliding movements on an elongated flexible member have been provided in the interior of these objects. The remaining FIGURES of the drawing show embodiments of the invention in which the path is formed on the outside of the object. Thus, FIGURES 22 and 23 show an object 20o which is generally block shaped. Suitably mounted on one face of this object is a series of screw eyes 282, 204 and 206. While these screw eyes are in alignment as viewed in FIGURE 23, it will be apparent from FIG- iunder the influence of gravity on an elongated flexible URE 22 that the screw eyes 202 and 206 project outwardly from the surface of the block 2410 the same distance but that the middle screw eye 2% projects out substantially farther than do the other two. By reason of this structure the elongated flexible member 2% extending through the three screw eyes, as shown, is compelled to follow a divergent path.

The device of FIGURES 24 and 25 also includes an object 219 which is block type in form, as shown. Firmly fixed to the block and projecting outwardly from the surface thereof to equal distance are three screw eyes 212, 214- and 216. As indicated in FIGURE 25, however, the upper and lower screw eyes 212 and 216 are in vertical alignment but the middle screw eye 214 is laterally offset. Accordingly, the flexible member 218 extending through the screw eyes must follow a divergent path.

In the object 220 of FIGURES 26, 27 and 28 a pair of screw eyes 222 and 224 are secured to and extend out from one surface of the block type object 22%) and, as may be seen, these screw eyes are located in vertical alignment. Intermediate the two screw eyes, the object 220 is formed with a bulging surface 226 which projects outwardly beyond the straight line connecting the centers of the two screw eyes, thus forcing the elongated flexible member 228 to follow a divergent path as it extends through the screw eyes 222 and 224 and around the bulge 226. p

A wide variety of embodiments of the present invention are disclosed in the accompanying drawings and the foregoing description. From this disclosure it will, how ever, be apparent that the invention may take many other forms than those specifically set forth above.

The uses and advantages are likewise believed to be self-evident. As explained, the invention may be embodied in a simple toy unrelated to any other object or thing, or it may be employed as a demonstration or story telling device, being particularly adaptable, as shown, to the demonstration and telling of nursery rhymes and other simple stories. A child familiar with the nursery rhyme may readily manipulate the device in accordance therewith, or a teacher or other person teaching nursery rhymes or simple stories to children may employ devices embodying the features of the present invention as visual aids. The devices of the present invention have the particular advantages that they are not only comparatively inexpensive to make, but, in addition, are quite easy to manipulate.

It is apparent that many widely different embodiments of this invention may be made without departing from the spirit or scope thereof, and therefore it is not intended to be limited except as indicated in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. An article of manufacture comprising a length of elongated flexible material having dimensions approximating those of a cord or string, a plurality of members having elongated openings therethrough in which said length of flexible material extends, the openings in said members being of such size that when said length of flexible material is supported in a vertically extending position under substantially no tension, said members slide freely downwardly thereon under the influence of gravity and the opening through at least one of said members diverging intermediate its ends from a straight line connecting said ends to such an extent that when a given longitudinal tension is applied by hand to said length of flexible material, said flexible material presses against the Walls of said opening with sufficient force to prevent said member from sliding downwardly on said flexible material under the influence of gravity and another of said members remains free to so slide under the influence of gravity.

2. An article as described in claim 1 in which the openings in at least two of said members diverge intermediate their ends from a straight line connecting the said ends of the members to such an extent that when longitudinal tension is applied by hand to said length of flexible material, said flexible material presses against the walls of, said openings with suflicient force to prevent said members from sliding downwardly on said flexible material under the influence of gravity.

3. An article as described in claim 2 in which the minimum tension on said flexible material which is sufflcient to prevent said downward movement of one of said slidable members is insuflicient to prevent said downward movement of the other of said slidable members.

4. An article as described in claim 3 in which the opening through the said one slidable member diverges from a straight line to a greater extent than does the opening through the said other slidable member.

5. An article of manufacture comprising a length of elongated flexible material having dimensions approximating those of a cord or string, a pair of hand gripping portions secured to said flexible material adjacent the ends thereof, one at one end and the other at the opposite end, a plurality of members having elongated openings thercthrough in which said length of flexible material extends, the openings in said members being of such size that when said length of flexible material is supported in a vertically extending position under substantially no tension, said members slide freely downwardly thereon under the influence of gravity and the opening through at least one of said members diverging intermediate its ends from a straight line connecting said ends to such an extent that when a given longitudinal tension is applied by hand to said length of flexible material, said flexible material presses against the walls of said opening with sutflcient force to prevent said member from sliding downwardly on said flexible material under the influence of gravity and another of said members remains free to so slide under the influence of gravity.

6. An article as described in claim 5 in which the said hand gripping portions have interfitting parts and cooperate to provide a container for the other portions of the said article.

7. An article of manufacture comprising a length of elongated flexible material having dimensions approxi-g mating those of a cord or string, a plurality of members having elongated openings therethrough in which said length of flexible material extends, the openings in said members being of such size that when said length of flexible material is supported in a vertically extending position under substantially no tension, said members slide freely downwardly thereon under the influence of gravity and the opening through at least one of said members diverging intermediate its ends from a straight line connecting said ends to such an extent that when a given longitudinal tension is applied by hand to said length of flexible material, said flexible material presses against the walls of said opening with sufli ient force to prevent said member from sliding downwardly on said flexible material under the influence of gravity and another of said members remains free to so slide under the influence of gravity, and each of said slidable members simulatin g a feature of events in which the two features are related in action.

8. An article as described in claim 7 in which a pair of hand gripping portions are secured to said flexible material adjacent the ends thereof, one at one end and the other at the opposite end.

9. An article as described in claim 8 in which the said hand gripping portions simulate other features of the some events from which the features of said slidable members are derived.

10. An article of manufacture comprising a length of elongated flexible material having dimensions approximating those of a cord or string, a plurality of members, each of which is provided with means forming a path in which said elongated material extends and is confined at at least two spaced apart points, the path with which each such member is provided being of such size that when said length of flexible material is supported in a vertically extending position under substantially no tension, said members slide freely downwardly thereon under the influence of gravity and the said path of at least one of said members diverging intermediate said two points from a straight line connecting said points to such an extent that when a given longitudinal tension is applied by hand to said length of flexible material, said flexible material presses against said member with suthcient force to prevent said member from sliding downwardly on said flexible material under the influence of gravity and another of said members remains free to so slide under the influence of gravity.

11. An article as described in claim 10 in which the paths of at least two of said members diverge intermediate said two points from a straight line connecting the said points of the paths to such an extent that when longitudinal tension is applied by hand to said length of flexible material, said flexible material presses against the said members with suflicient force to prevent said members from sliding downwardly on said flexible material under the influence of gravity.

12. An article as described in claim 11 in which the minimum tension on said flexible material which is sufficient to prevent said downward movement of one of said slidable members is insuiflcient to prevent said downward movement of the other of said slidable members.

13. An article as described in claim 12 in which the path of the said one slidable member diverges from a straight line to a greater extent than does the path of the said other slidable member.

14. An article of manufacture comprising a length of elongated flexible material having dimensions approximating those of a cord or string, a pair of hand gripping portions secured to said flexible material adjacent the ends thereof, one at one end and the other at the opposite end, a plurality of members, each of which is provided with means forming a path in which said elongated member extends and is confined at at least two spaced apart points, the path with which each such memher is provided being of such size that when said length of flexible material is supported in a vertically extending position under substantially no tension, said members slide freely downwardly thereon under the influence of gravity and the said path of at least one of said members diverging intermediate said two points from a straight line connecting said points to such an extent that when a given longitudinal tension is applied by hand to said length of flexible material, said flexible material presses against said member with sufficient force to prevent said member from sliding downwardly on said flexible material under the influence of gravity and another of said members remains free to so slide under the influence of gravity.

15. An article as described in claim 14 in which the said hand gripping portions have interfitting parts and cooperate to provide a container for the other portions of the said article.

16. An article of manufacture comprising a length of elongated flexible material having dimensions approximating those of a cord or string, a plurality of members, each of which is provided with means forming a path in which said elongated material extends and is confined at at least two spaced apart points, the path with which each such member is provided being of such size that when said length of flexible material is supported in a vertically extending position under substantially no tension, said members slide freely downwardly thereon under the influence of gravity and the said path of at least one of said members diverging intermediate said two points from a straight line connecting said points to such an extent that when a given longitudinal tension is applied by hand to said length of flexible material,

said flexible material presses against said member with sufiicient force to prevent said member from sliding downwardly on said flexible material under the influence of gravity and another of said members remains free to so slide under the influence of gravity, and each of said slidable members simulating a feature of events in which the two features are related in action.

17. An article as described in claim 16 in which a pair of hand gripping portions are secured to said flexible material adjacent the ends thereof, one at one end and the other at the opposite end, and in which the said hand gripping portions simulate other features of the same events from which the features of said slidable members are derived.

18. An article of manufacture comprising a length of elongated material, one dimension of which is many times larger than any other dimension, a plurality of members slidably mounted on said length of material and slidable thereon under the influence of gravity, the inner surface of at least one of said members having a substantially greater coeflicient of friction in respect to the outer surface of said length of material than does the inner surface of another of said members, and means manipulatable by an operator gripping at least one end of said length of material for selectively controlling the sliding of said members on said length of material under the influence of gravity when the inner surfaces of said slidable members are being maintained in engagement with the outer surface of said length of material under the influence of gravity.

19. An article as described in claim 18 in which the elongated material is flexible.

20. An article as described in claim 18 in which the elongated material is rigid.

21. An article as described in claim 20 in which there is a member mounted on said length of material cen- 18 trally thereof in a fixed position and between the said slidable members which prevents said slidable members from moving past it.

22. An article as described in claim 21 in which the said fixed member and the said slidable members each simulate a feature of events in which the three features are related in action.

23. An article of manufacture comprising a length of elongated material, one dimension of which is many times larger than any other dimension, a plurality of members slidably mounted on said length of material and slidable thereon under the influence of gravity, at least one of said members having a substantially greater resistance to sliding on said length of material under the influence of gravity than does another of said members, means manipulatable by an operator gripping at least one end of said length of material and means on each of said two last named slidable members cooperating therewith for selectively causing the said members at the will of the operator to remain stationary in an elevated position on said length of material or to slide downwardly one at a time on said length of material under the influence of gravity.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 109,204 Hartz Nov. 15, 1870 1,258,464 Riley Mar. 5, 1918 FOREIGN PATENTS 206,009 Germany Jan. 22, 1909 333,619 Germany Mar. 2, 1921 121,666 Sweden May 11, 1948 OTHER REFERENCES Magic (Hopkins), published by Munn & Co. (N.Y.), 1906 (pages 137 and 138 relied on).

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US109204 *Nov 15, 1870 Improvement in toy-balls
US1258464 *Jul 10, 1917Mar 5, 1918Harry Landis RileyToy.
*DE206009C Title not available
DE333619C *Mar 2, 1921Alois WolfmuellerGeraeuscherzeugendes Spielzeug
SE121666A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3098652 *Dec 14, 1962Jul 23, 1963James LeeCat and bird game
US3535819 *Jun 1, 1966Oct 27, 1970Experimentoy CorpDescending music box and the like
US4655723 *Mar 18, 1985Apr 7, 1987Mattel, Inc.Child's activity ring toy
US4784391 *Nov 6, 1986Nov 15, 1988Herron Sylvia TRope game device
US5836801 *Mar 12, 1997Nov 17, 1998Lin; Kuo JungClimbing toy device
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/489, 446/314, 472/130
International ClassificationA63H33/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H33/00
European ClassificationA63H33/00