Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3078699 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 26, 1963
Filing dateNov 30, 1959
Priority dateNov 30, 1959
Publication numberUS 3078699 A, US 3078699A, US-A-3078699, US3078699 A, US3078699A
InventorsHuntley Baxter D
Original AssigneeHuntley Knitting Mills Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making knit garment
US 3078699 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 26, 1963 B. D. HUNTLEY 3,078,699

METHOD OF MAKING KNIT GARMENT Filed NOV- 30, 1959 v I' I INVENTOR: E1 g=5 BAXTER. D. HUNTLE'Y ATTORNEYS Unite .1 States Patent 3,078,699 METHOD OF MAKING KNIT GARMENT Baxter D. Huntley, Charlotte, N.C., assignor to Huntley Knitting Mills, line, Charlotte, N.C., a corporation of North Carolina Filed Nov. 30, 1959, Ser. No. 856,089 2 Claims. (Cl. 66-176) This invention relates generally to improvements in knit garments such as shirts, sweaters or the like and more particularly to garments of this type which are formed of individually knit fashioned panels that are connected together.

It is well known to knit the individual panels of shirts and sweaters on full-fashion knitting machinery of the type ordinarily employed to knit hosiery and the like. In the formation of this type of garment, the individual panels, such as the front, rear and sleeve panels are individually knit and fashioned in a fiat condition with selvage edges and the garment is formed by sewing or looping together the edges of the various panels. Most garments of this type, particularly knit shirts, are fashioned to closely fit the body and, therefore do not provide free movement of the arms and shoulders in all directions. Also, since most purchasers desire this type of garment to fit snugly, the manufacturer must provide the garments in a wide range of sizes and in order to change sizes, the front and rear panels of each different size garment must be knit a different width, thus requiring that the set-up of the knitting machine be changed each time it is desired to knit a different size garment. Although most knit shirts are light weight and relatively thin, they are usually knit of synthetic yarn which tends to hold in body heat and does not readily absorb perspiration so that this type of shirt is normally hotter than the same weight shirt knit of cotton yarn.

With the foregoing in mind, it is the primary object of the present invention to provide a full-fashioned knit garment having separately knit body and sleeve panels and a stretchable insert panel at each side of the shirt which connects the body panels and extends into the sleeve to thereby permit free unrestricted movement of the wearers arms in all directions.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a full-fashioned knit garment of the type described wherein the insert panel is knit in such a manner as to provide ventilation to the body of the wearer, particularly beneath the arms.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a full-fashioned knit garment of the type described and a novel method of forming the same wherein the width of the insert panel may be varied to thereby vary the overall size of the garment without having to change the width of the front and rear panels.

Some of the objects of the invention having been stated, other objects will appear as the description proceeds when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which FIGURE 1 is a front elevation of the completed garment and showing the location of the insert panels;

FIGURE 2 is a rear elevation of the garment shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of the garment in the position it would assume when worn and looking upwardly underneath the right sleeve;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged view of the insert panel removed from the shirt to illustrate its configuration; and

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged schematic illustration of one type of stitch structure which may be employed to produce ventilation openings in the insert panel.

Referring to the drawings, there is shown one type of knit shirt with which the insert panel of the present invention may be utilized, however, it is to be understood that the insert panel could be utilized with other types of shirts, sweaters or the like.

The knitted shirt illustrated in the drawings includes respective front and rear knit panels 10 and 12 which are knit on a full-fashion knitting machine and the upper portions thereof are fashioned during knitting along fashion lines 14, 15 and 16, 17 respectively. The shirt also includes sleeve panels 20 and 21 which are also knit on a full-fashion knitting machine and fashioned during knitting along respective fashion lines 22, 23 and 24, 25 respectively. The upper portions of the front and rear panels 10 and 12 are connected to the inner ends of the sleeves 20 and 21 along respective seam lines 30 and 31.

Any suitable type of collar 35 may be attached to the upper portions of the front and rear panels 10 and 12. In conventional knit shirts, the free selvage edges of the sleeve panels 20 and 21 are sewn or looped together in one continuous seam which extends along the lower portion of the sleeves and down each side to connect the front and rear panels 10 and 12 together at their free selvage edges.

In the improved garment of the present invention, insert panels 40 and 41 are provided at the sides of the shirt. The insert panels 40 and 41 are each elongated with straight parallel edges throughout the major portion of their length and, at their upper ends, the edges converge to form a tapered portion 45.

The insert panels 49 and 41 are preferably knit from the bottom to the top, in FIGURE 4, with a turned welt portion being knit first in the well-known manner on a full-fashion knitting machine. The main portion of the insert panels is then knit on a predetermined number of needles to provide the desired width of fabric from one selvage edge to the other. After a sufiicient number of courses are knit to provide the desired length of panel, the conventional narrowing mechanism of the machine is actuated to gradually decrease the width of the fabric and thereby cause the selvage edges to converge and form the tapered portion 45. It is preferred that the tapered portion 45 be formed by narrow ng the fabric during knitting so that opposite edges thereof will not ravel, however, the insert panels may be formed with straight parallel edges and the tapered portion 45 obtained by cutting the fabric, if desired.

It is preferred that at least the main body of the insert panels 40 and 41 be knit with a special stitch of the type which will provide a greater degree of stretchability and ventilation than the plain stitches of the body panels. To this end, a lace stitch, which is formed by transferring spaced-apart loops coursewise in first one direction and other groups of loops coursewise in an opposite direction, may be utilized. It will be noted that the lace stitch forms a plurality of spaced openings 50 (FIGURE 5) in the fabric. It is well known that this type of lace stitch fabric provides greater stretchability in both a walewise and coursewise direction than does plain or jersey knit fabrics.

The insert panels 40 and 41 are attached at opposite sides of the knit shirt by sewing or looping one edge of the insert panel 46 to one edge of the front panel 10 and one edge of the tapered portion 45 to one edge of the sleeve panel 20. The opposite edge of the insert panel 40 is then sewed to one edge of the rear panel 12 and one edge of the tapered portion 45 is sewed to the opposite edge of the sleeve panel 20. Opposite edges of the sleeve panel are sewed together, beyond the end of the tapered portion 45 of the insert panel 40, by a continuation of either of the sewing operations utilized to attach the panel 40 to the front and back panels. The insert panel 41 is then sewed to the front panel 10, rear panel 12 and sleeve panel 21 in the same manner as the insert panel 41.

When the knit shirt is completed, the insert panels 40 and 41 provide 'stretchability and permit freedom of movement of the arms and at the same time provide ventilation to the body of the wearer. Also, if it is desired to change the size shirt being made, the width of the insert panels 40 and 41 may be decreased or increased to correspondingly vary the overall diameter of the body of the shirt. The size of the shoulders and sleeves can also be changed by varying the degree of taper at the. tapered upper end of the inserts 40 and 41. Thus, the improved full-fashioned knit garment having an insert panel positioned beneath and extending into the arms of the garment provides several advantages over a conventional shirt of this type wherein the panels or inserts are not provided.

In the drawings and specification there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention and, although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation, the scope of the invention being defined in the claims.

I claim:

1. A method of forming full-fashioned shirts of various sizes comprising the steps of knitting a plurality of identical front panels while fashioning to form selvage edges thereon, knitting a plurality of identical rear panels while fashioning to form selvage edges thereon, knitting a plurality of identical sleeve panels while fashioning to form selvage edges thereon, forming a plurality of knitted elongated insert panels of at least two different widths and having substantially straight side edges which taper inwardly to substantially a point at one end, securing the selvage edges of certain of the front, rear and sleeve panels to corresponding edges of the elongated inserts of one width to form a first group of shirts of one size, and securing the selvage edges of others of the front, rear and sleeve panels to corresponding edges of the elongated inserts of a diiferent width to form a second group of shirts of a size dilferent from the first group of shirts.

2. A method of forming full-fashioned shirts of various sizes comprising the steps of knitting a plurality of identical front panels while fashioning to form selvage edges thereon, knitting a plurality of identical rear panels while fashioning to form selvage edges thereon, knitting a plurality of identical sleeve panels while fashioning to form selvage edges thereon, knitting a plurality of fashioned elongated insert panels of at least two different widths and having substantially straight side selvage edges which taper inwardly to substantially a point at one end, securing the selvage edges of certain of the front, rear and sleeve panels to corresponding selvage edges of the elongated inserts of one width to form a first group of shirts of one size, and securing the selvage edges of others of the front, rear and sleeve panels to corresponding selvage edges of the elongated inserts of a different width to form a second group of shirts of a size different from the first group of shirts.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 378,465 Scriven Feb. 28, 1888 1,136,097 Cahn Apr. 20, 1915 1,571,016 Lesser Jan. 26, 1926 1,973,419 Trageser Sept. 11, 1934 2,239,593 Crawford Apr. 22, 1941 2,268,818 Goodman Jan. 6, 1942 2,434,809 Northrup Jan. 20, 1948 2,456,190 Heilbranner Dec. 14, 1948 2,575,700 Artzt Nov. 20, 1951 2,613,360 Friedland et al. Oct. 14, 1953 2,792,572 Rosenbaum et al. May 21, 1957 2,799,023 Goodman July 16, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 446,575 Canada Feb. 10, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US378465 *Dec 30, 1885Feb 28, 1888 Jeremiah a
US1136097 *Apr 20, 1915 Hosiery.
US1571016 *Oct 28, 1925Jan 26, 1926Albert D LesserSports trousers
US1973419 *Dec 29, 1933Sep 11, 1934Stadium Underwear Company IncGarment
US2239593 *May 9, 1938Apr 22, 1941Raalte Company Inc VanHosiery
US2268818 *Mar 21, 1939Jan 6, 1942Nat Silk Hosiery Mills IncStocking with means for improving the elasticity, and process of producing the same
US2434809 *May 9, 1946Jan 20, 1948Bradford Northrup HaroldGarment
US2456190 *Feb 24, 1947Dec 14, 1948Heilbronner Harry SSelf-adjusting garment
US2575700 *Jul 22, 1950Nov 20, 1951William W ArtztWearing apparel and method of making the same
US2613360 *Aug 13, 1951Oct 14, 1952Champion Knitwear Company IncAthletic garment or the like
US2792572 *Nov 15, 1954May 21, 1957Richard HarveyKnit garment
US2799023 *Nov 29, 1954Jul 16, 1957Triumph Hosiery Mills IncLeotard type garment
CA446575A *Feb 10, 1948Jack DanielsGarment
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3391534 *Apr 27, 1967Jul 9, 1968Rolls RoyceFuel system for gas turbine engines
US3979928 *Feb 26, 1975Sep 14, 1976Atwater Roy VHosiery-type knitting machines adapted for the production of large loose stitches from heavy-denier yarn
US4057981 *Dec 2, 1976Nov 15, 1977Crescent Hosiery MillsVentilated cushion foot sock and method
US4473908 *Jun 8, 1982Oct 2, 1984Gabriele KnechtGarment
US4698849 *Jan 23, 1987Oct 13, 1987Figgie International Inc.Football jersey
US4802282 *Jul 16, 1987Feb 7, 1989Shikibo Ltd.Master pattern for upper garments
US4937883 *Mar 10, 1989Jul 3, 1990Shirai Todd TAthletic shirt
US4939844 *Sep 27, 1988Jul 10, 1990Shikibo Ltd.Master pattern for upper garments
US5105478 *Nov 1, 1990Apr 21, 1992Pyc Chester FVentilated shirt
US6148445 *Jul 26, 1999Nov 21, 2000Spruill; Gary RayfordAwning sleeve shirt
US6202216 *Feb 3, 1999Mar 20, 2001The Yokohama Rubber Co., Ltd.Garment
US6353934 *Dec 16, 1999Mar 12, 2002Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd.Outerwear
US7340780 *Apr 14, 2005Mar 11, 2008Levy Edward MSports garment
US7437774Jan 24, 2005Oct 21, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of apparel incorporating a zoned modifiable textile structure
US8187984May 29, 2012Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Temperature responsive smart textile
US8192824Aug 8, 2007Jun 5, 2012Mmi-Ipco, LlcTemperature responsive smart textile
US8333221 *Dec 18, 2012The North Face Apparel Corp.Variegated ripstop
US8389100Mar 5, 2013Mmi-Ipco, LlcTemperature responsive smart textile
US8555414 *May 6, 2004Oct 15, 2013Nike, Inc.Article of apparel utilizing zoned venting and/or other body cooling features or methods
US8578517Mar 17, 2010Nov 12, 2013Irma P. AlanizAthletic garment
US8856964 *May 6, 2008Oct 14, 2014Nike, Inc.Articles of apparel including zones having increased thermally insulative and thermally resistive properties
US9119707Aug 31, 2009Sep 1, 2015Intelliskin Usa, LlcSensory motor stimulation garment and method
US9125442Apr 7, 2010Sep 8, 2015Intelliskin Usa, LlcSensory motor stimulation garment and method
US9332792Feb 17, 2005May 10, 2016Nike, Inc.Articles of apparel utilizing targeted venting or heat retention zones that may be defined based on thermal profiles
US20030061650 *Sep 27, 2002Apr 3, 2003Bert EmanuelGarment for controlling body temperature during physical activities
US20050204449 *Jan 24, 2005Sep 22, 2005Nike, Inc.Article of apparel incorporating a zoned modifiable textile structure
US20050246813 *May 6, 2004Nov 10, 2005Nike, Inc.Article of apparel utilizing zoned venting and/or other body cooling features or methods
US20060085889 *May 25, 2005Apr 27, 2006Shimano Inc.Bicycle riding apparel
US20060179539 *Feb 17, 2005Aug 17, 2006Nike Uk Ltd.Articles of apparel utilizing targeted venting or heat retention zones that may be defined based on thermal profiles
US20060230491 *Apr 14, 2005Oct 19, 2006Levy Edward MSports garment
US20070000015 *Jun 29, 2005Jan 4, 2007Alaniz Irma PAthletic garment
US20070028351 *Jul 19, 2005Feb 8, 2007Coolik Michael AGarment with improved sleeve movement
US20070271965 *May 24, 2006Nov 29, 2007Nathaniel KolmesCut, slash and/or abrasion resistant protective fabric and lightweight protective garment made therefrom
US20080057261 *Aug 8, 2007Mar 6, 2008Mmi-Ipco, LlcTemperature Responsive Smart Textile
US20080057809 *Aug 29, 2007Mar 6, 2008Mmi-Ipco, LlcTemperature and moisture responsive smart textile
US20080075850 *Apr 26, 2007Mar 27, 2008Moshe RockTemperature responsive smart textile
US20080289078 *May 6, 2008Nov 27, 2008Nike, Inc.Articles of Apparel Including Zones Having Increased Thermally Insulative and Thermally Resistive Properties
US20080301849 *Mar 10, 2008Dec 11, 2008Levy Edward MSports garment
US20100218300 *Mar 17, 2010Sep 2, 2010Alaniz Irma PAthletic garment
US20100242151 *Sep 30, 2010Nike, Inc.Article Of Apparel With Variable Air Permeability
US20110052861 *Oct 15, 2010Mar 3, 2011Mmi-Ipco, LlcTemperature Responsive Smart Textile
US20110070412 *Mar 24, 2011Ly John TVariegated Ripstop
US20120011635 *Sep 27, 2007Jan 19, 2012Yoshie TsujiWear
US20130312154 *Dec 27, 2010Nov 28, 2013Yutaka KogaUpper body wear
US20140007314 *Sep 11, 2013Jan 9, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of apparel utilizing zoned venting and/or other body cooling features or methods
US20140201883 *Jan 17, 2014Jul 24, 2014Nike, Inc.Optimal Range Of Motion Garment Utilizing Sleeve Openings And Gussets
US20140310846 *Apr 14, 2014Oct 23, 2014Nike, Inc.Article Of Apparel Incorporating A Zoned Modifiable Textile Structure
US20160198778 *Aug 27, 2014Jul 14, 2016Drifire, LlcGarment having extensible sleeves
USD746552 *Mar 14, 2013Jan 5, 2016Intelliskin Usa, LlcSports shirt
USD762344 *May 8, 2015Aug 2, 2016Nike, Inc.Shirt
EP2526789A1 *May 21, 2012Nov 28, 2012InovaCook's jacket
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/176, 2/115
International ClassificationA41D27/00, A41D1/00, A41D27/28, A41D1/04
Cooperative ClassificationA41D27/28, A41D1/04
European ClassificationA41D27/28, A41D1/04