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Publication numberUS3078789 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 26, 1963
Filing dateMar 2, 1960
Priority dateMar 2, 1960
Publication numberUS 3078789 A, US 3078789A, US-A-3078789, US3078789 A, US3078789A
InventorsBernard F Mcgee
Original AssigneeBernard F Mcgee
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Depositories
US 3078789 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 2s, 1963 B. F. MCGEE' 3,078,789

DEPOSITORIES Filed March 2, 1960 3 SheelLs-Shee?l 1 /2- INVENTOR.

BERNARD F. MCGEE Feb. 26, 1963 B. F. MoGE-:E 3,078,789

DEPosI'roRIEs Filed March 2, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 v INVENToR. BERNARD F. MC (35E.

Feb. 26, B. F. MCGEE DEPOSITORIES Filed March 2, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 RECTIFIER TRIGGER swrrcH l y 233 L* m DEPOS\T NUMBER\NG CLUTCH COIL INVENTOR. BERNARD F. MC GEF.

United States Patent iihce 3,078,789 rasantes ree. 26, 1963 3,078,789 DEPOITORIES Bernard F. McGee, 1404i Clay St., Davenport, Iowa Filed Mar. 2, 1960, Ser. No. 12,469 6 Claims. (Cl. 10i-66) This invention relates to a depository and particularly to a protective system for night depositories for banks.

Various types of arrangements have been utilized by banks for the acceptance of customer deposits during hours when the banks are not open for business. In one commonly used arrangement the customer merely drops an envelope or like package containing a deposit through a slotted opening in a door or a wall of the building in which the bank is situated. As can be expected, such an arrangement is highly susceptible to pilfering. Furthermore, inasmuch as no receipt is issued, such an arrangement is also likely to lead to contradictory claims by a customer and a bank as to whether or not a deposit was actually made.

It has been proposed to utilize both protective devices for deposit vaults and mechanisms for issuing deposit receipts, but such devices and mechanisms have generally entailed relatively complex arrangements which require operation in a particular manner at the time or deposit. Some of the mechanisms require the use of a particular kind of envelope which includes an attached receipt form that is severed from the envelope at the time of deposit. In others, operation of the mechanism is predicated upon the weighing of a specific quantity `of coins or the like.

`It is a primary object of this invention to construct a depository which effectively overcomes such problems as encountered ywith depositories heretofore known. Other objects of the present invention, related to the foregoing object, are to construct a depository which eiectively prevents withdrawal of an envelope or like deposit article once the article has been inserted into the depository. Another object is to aiford a depository which automatically issues a numbered receipt cor-responding to a number given the package bearing the deposit.

A protection system for a depository constructed in accordance with the present invention incorporates both a transport mechanism for automatically transferring a deposit article from an inlet opening -to a storage area and receipt delivery apparatus for ejecting a receipt from the depository through an outlet opening in response to movement of a deposit from the inlet opening to the storage area. The transport mechanism includes spacedapart conveyor members effective to engage a package therebetween; these conveyor members may comprise a conveyor belt and a series of rollers disposed in spaced relation to the outer surface of the conveyor belt. An electric motor and drive mechanism are provided for driving `both the conveyor belt and the rollers. A trigger member or other sensing device is mounted adjacent the inlet opening, and is utilized to close a switch upon insertion of a deposit through the inlet slot to energize the motor and thereby initiate operation of the transport mechanism. Thus, the transport mechanism is driven only at such times as a deposit is placed within the depository. To incorporate the foregoing structural features in a novel depository is another object of the present invention.

lt is a speciiic object of the present invention to include a `roller formed with a serrated or similar outer periphery in the transport mechanism in a manner such that the serrated periphery engages each deposit article to prevent withdrawal of the deposit once it has been inserted through the inlet opening of the depository. In this manner, the serrated surface eifectively serves to drive the package through the transport mechanism and additionally serves to shred or tear the package containing the deposit should an attempt be made to tamper with the depository, as by withdrawing the package. The serrated roller may also =be incorporated in an alarm or other safety device.

A chute or like structure is disposed adjacent the outlet end of the transport mechanism for directing a package to the storage area of the depository. A sensing apparatus which preferably includes a photo-electric sensing device, is utilized for sensing the passage of a package through the chute. The sensing apparatus is operatively associated with an electrical control system for driving the receiptdssuing apparatus. The sensing apparatus is disposed a suiiicient distance from the outlet end of the transport mechanism to insure that a package containing a deposit is passed completely therethrough prior to energization of the control system and thus prior to actuation o-f the receipt-issuing apparatus. Thus, a receipt is delivered to the customer only after a package bearing a deposit is safely disposed within the depository; and to incorporate the foregoing in a novel depository is yet another object of the present invention.

Still further objects of the present invention are: to construct a protection system for a depository which embodies relatively simple structural elements; to associate the various structural elements of the depository in a compact arrangement so that the depository can be conveniently mounted Within a building wall; and to arrange the component parts or" the depository in a manner such that various parts are shielded from outside tampering tothereby minimize problems of malfunctioning of the depository.

Other and further objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description and claims and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings which, by way of illustration, show a preferred embodiment of the present invention and the principles thereof and what is now considered to be the best mode contemplated for applying these principles. Other embodiments of the invention embodying the same or equivalent principles may Ibe used and structural changes may be made as desired by those skilled in the art without departing from the present invention and the purview of the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation view, partly in section, of a depository constructed in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a front elevation view, partly in section, of

the depository illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional elevation view illustrating details of the resilient mounting for the roller shafts ofthe depository illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the depository illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a schematic representation of an electrical control circuit for the depository illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a schematic detail view of a front elevation of a numbering mechanism utilized in the depository illustrated in FIG. l; and

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary detail view of a side elevation of the numbering mechanism illustrated in FIG. 6.

in FIGS. l-4 a depository constructed in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention is indicated generally by the reference numeral 11. The depository Il is contained within an outer casing 12 which is, in turn, mounted within a suitable opening formed in a building wall 13. As best viewed in FIG. 1, the casing 12 is formed with a slotted opening 14 for the reception of envelopes or like deposit articles containing coins, currency, checks, business papers, and the like.

amava@ This inlet opening is, ofcourse, disposed in the exterior or` street side of the depository and. building wall, and.

a second opening 15 mounting a chute 16 and a guide clip 17 therein is also formed in the exterior surface of thecasing 12 andaiords an outlet opening for the delivery of. receipts.

The. depository 11 comprises two principal mechanisms-:a transport mechanism, indicatedy generally bythe reference numeral 21, for transferring an envelope or like deposit articlev from the inlet opening 14 toa storage area, andareceipt-issuing mechanism, indicated generally by the reference numeral 22, for issuing a receipt through the outlet opening 15V in response to the movementofan envelope or like package from the inlet opening tothe storage area of the depository. Both ofthe transport mechanisms 21and 22 are adapted to be driven. by anelectric motor` M through chain or belt drivesiny One importanty a manner described in detail hereinafter. featureof; the presentinvention is a controll system, incorporated'in the depository 11,- for driving thereceiptissuing mechanism 22byinterconnecting the receipt-issuin'g,mechanism,with the transport mechanism-21 only.v after a` deposit has, passedapredeterminedpoint in its` travelffrom the inlet opening 14 tothe storage area;

this control'. system isalsodescribed in-detail-hereinafter.

Thetransport mechanism 21 includes a conveyor belt 23u-.which is mounted `on rollers 24 and 26. The rollers 24.` and 26 are in turn mounted for rotation with respec- -tiveshafts 27 Aand `28, and the shafts y27 and 28v'are journailed. for rotationwithin support blocks 29 aixed toopposite sidewalls of the casing 12. The motor M isl operatively.associatedwith-a gear box GB to rotate a main-drive sprocket31 whenever the control-circuit forthe motor. M is energized. The main drive sprocket 31 is in turn connected to drive therconveyorbelt 23 byia'f drive chain 32 and a sprocket 33Y that is keyed or otherwise lixed" for rotation with the shaft 28-of thereonveyor beltmechanism.Y The conveyor belt itself is preferably providedv withv a high-,friction inner surface to aord a positiverdriving relation between the belt 23 and therollers 24 and 26. Y

The transport `mechanism 21 also includes a feed roller 34mounted on a shaft 36 adjacentithe inlet opening 14. The shaft 36 is journalled for rotation within support blocks 37 -axed to opposite side wallsl of the casing `12. As best-viewed-in FIG. l, it'is seen that the roller 34 is normally held in engagement with the conveyor belt 23. Inasmuch as envelopes or packages of" varying thickness must be accepted fordepostby the depository 1-1, means are incorporatedin the support for the roller shaft 36 to provide for limited movement of the rollers 34fwith respect to the conveyor belt 33 thereby permittingthe insertion of envelopes and packages ofvarying thickness into the depository. Preferably, such meanscomprises a spring-biased bearing arrangement 33 for each of the support blocks 37. However, rotherapparatus may be. utilized'to accomplish the same result.

In accordance with the present invention a.sensing device isY incorporated in the depositoryy 11 adjacent the inlet opening 14 for sensing the insertion of anA envelope or package within the inlet opening 14 and energizing the control circuit for the motor M to initiate operation` of the transport mechanism 2 1. This sensingdevice comprises a trigger element 395` which is pivotally mountedv ontheV shaft v27 for rotation through an arc indicated by thefull anddashed outlines of the trigger member 39. Thesensing means also includes a switch 41 mounted on a lxerd. framemember 42. As shown in FIG. l, inser-r tionofanhenvelope or like package through the inlet opening 14.is effective to cause the trigger member 39 to,

engage the switch 41. As is explained in detail hereinafterwith rspecic., reference to FIG. 5, actuation of the switgh 41,is`reffective to initiate a complete sequence of An ejection roller 43 is mounted adjacent the end ofl the conveyor belt 23 mounted on the roller 26. The roller 43 is rotatable with a shaftk 44, and the shaft 44 is resiliently mounted at opposite ends by spring-biased bearing structures` 46' contained within support blocks 47 aixedto the oppositeside walls ofthe casing 12 (see FIGS. 3 and 4). Thus,y the roller 43l is movable to a limited extent toward or away from the conveyor belt 23 yin the same manner as the roller 34'. The roller 43 servestwo functionsit maintains the envelope or other deposit article in engagement with the conveyor belt 23 and also serves to eject the envelope intoa chute 48 leading to a storage area. may. beformedwith rubber surfaces for providing rm frictionalcontact with the envelope or. other article passed througl1;t.he transport. mechanism 21. A- sprocket 51 iS aixedtothe shaft 44,' and adrive chainSZ interconnects the sproeketrSl` and shaft 44 for rotation With-the shaft 28;

Means; are incorporated 1in the transport mechanism 21 for preventing withdrawal of an envelope or like package from the depository 11 once the envelope has been insertedlhrough the inletopening14 and `into the transport mechanism 2,1. Such means comprise a roller 53 formed withV aserratedor similar outer periphery. The roller 53' is-mounted on a; shaft SLi-which is, in turn,- resiliently.

supportedgatlopposite endswithin ,a pair of support blocks 56 aixed to the opposite side walls of the casing v-12=.in.

thesamezmanner as the shafts 36and 44. Thus, the serratedy peripheryof theA roller 53 is maintainedlin pressure; contactiwith the envelope ,or package being transferredthrough the transport mechanism Z1 and .effectively aids inmoving such an envelope or package through the transport mechanism. Furthermore, the serratedperipheryvinsuresthat theenvelope or package cannot be withdrawn from,thedepository11- once ithas been inserted` therein.

Thus,` the yroller 53'serves asa protective device which-` guards `against',pilferingffromor tampering with the dep ository 11. 'Iheroller 53 is chain-driven from the main drivesprocket 31.- Thus, as illustrated` in FIG. l, a

sprocket 56 isA atlxed'to the shaft 54and `a chain Ydrive 57'.

extends'from the sprocket-56 to a sprocket 58 mounted on a;,shaft,59'. Agearl 611is also mounted on-the shaft 59 end mesheswith `a gear 62 mounted on the same shaft- 28 asthe sprocket 733;. Thun/,rotation of the maindrive sprocket 31is-,effectivegtorotate the ,shaft 2S tor drive the gear 61 and sprocket 58v andthereby rotate. the shaft 54 bearing` the roller S35. Additionally, avclrive chain 62 eX- tendsabout a sprocket 6 3'keyed tothe shaft 36 for rotating the yshaft 36 witlithe shaft 54. It should be understoodthat a gear-beltor timing belt drive arrangement may be used, instead o f the chain drivesdescribed hereinabove, it`l desired; or otherdrivesystems may be adopted without departing from the invention.

Each; envelope or` package inserted through the inlet opening 14 iis given an'identifying number. For the purpose ofimprinting such an identifying number on the deposit article as it.istransferred through the transport mechanism 21, a nur nbering wheel 66y is mounted on a shaft 67 intermediate the rollers 53 and 43. As in the case ofthe-.mounting forthe shafts 36 and 44, theshaft 671s permitted a limited degree of movement toward and away from the-,conveyor belt 23 by means of spring-biased,v bearing mounts contained in the support blocks 68 axed to theside walls ofthe casing 121at ,they Aopposite ends of the shaft-67. A gear;,69is ,aliixedto the shaft 67 and a drive chain 71 is proyided forrdriving thenumbering Wheel 66 `witlrthe. shaft 44.

The numbering Wheel 66 mountsA a numbering machine 760i conventional-constructiongthereon; the numbering machine-76yis shownin detail in FIGS. 6 and 7. As`

shown lin these figures, the ywheel Y 66. isA provided, with a Each ofthe rollers .34.and 43- peripheral wedge-shaped land 153 extending around the major portion thereof. One side of the base 159 of the numbering machine 7o is provided with a complementary mounting shoulder 161 which engages one side of the wedge-shaped land 158. The other side of the land 158 is engaged by a clamping member 162 which is mounted upon an Allen head screw 1113, the screw 163 being threaded into a shoulder 164 projecting from the base 159 of the numbering machine. rl'hus, the land 15S is clamped between the members 161 and 162, and the two clamping members serve to hold the numbering machine firmly upon the wheel 66. On the other hand, it is a simple matter to adjust the angular position of the numbering machine 157 upon the wheel 6o. This may be accomplished simply by loosening the set screw 163, thereby permitting the entire unit to be slidably moved around the periphery of the mounting ring 155 to any desired position. When properly located, of course, the numbering machine is secured to the mounting ring simply by tightening the set screw 163.

The numbering machine 7o is of conventional construction and includes a series of number printing type wheels 1155 and a suitable indexing mechanism. The indexing mechanism for changing the numerals present at the print position 166 of the type wheels (FIG. 7) includes an indexing lever 167 having a cam follower llh mounted at one end thereof. To change the number at the print position 166 by one digit, the lever 167 is moved pivotally from its normal or unactuated position, as shown in solid lines in FiG. 7, to an alternate or indexing position 163A. Numbering machines of this general type are well known in the art; a suitable numbering machine, for example, is manufactured by the Wetter Numbering Machine Co. of New York and sold by them under the designation of Model 500.

rihe indexing lever 167 is tripped, by engagement with the deposit article, each time the numbering wheel 66 is rotated through one complete cycle or revolution, to index the numbers presented by the type wheels 165. An ink roller 1112 of conventional construction is suitably mounted in the depository adjacent the numbering wheel 66 for inking the type characters presented by the numbering machine 76. Of course, it may be necessary to provide a more complex ink train, where many deposits are received in a short period of time; in most instances, however, a single fountain roller should be adequate.

While the deposits transferred through the transport mechanism 21 will generally be of a standard configuration, it is desirable that the numbering wheel oo be adapted for operation with envelopes or packages of other than a standard or uniform configuration in a manner such that only one identifying number is given to any one deposit article transferred through the transport mechanism 21. For this purpose an electrically actuated clutch 1113 is included in the drive for the numbering wheel 66. The clutch may be of conventional construction and permits the portion of the shaft `o7 mounting the gear o9 to rotate freely with respect to the portion of the shaft o7 mounting the numbering wheel 6o until such time as the clutch coil is electrically energized to engage the clutch and cause the numbering wheel 66 to rotate with the gear o9. The control circuit for the clutch is described in detail with reference to FIG. 5, but it may be noted that the mode of operation of the clutch 1113 andthe numbering wheel do is such that the numbering machine 7o is returned to the home position illustrated in FIG. 1 after the numbering wheel o6 has been rotated through only one revolution for any particular envelope or package transferred through the transport mechanism 21. To provide such a mode of operation of the clutch 1113 and numbering wheel 66, sensing means, which include a pivotally mounted trigger element 11i-4. and switch 1G16 similar to the trigger member 39 and switch i1 described hereinabove, are disposed in the path of transfer of the envelope or like package. '.he location of the trigger element 11B/t is chosen such that movement of the envelope or package along the conveyor belt 23 rotates the trigger member 1114 into engagement with the switch 1116 to de-energize the clutch 1113 as the numbering machine 76 reaches the home position illustrated in FIG. l.

r111e receipt-issuing mechanism 22 includes a pair of rollers 111 and 112 mounted on respective shafts 113 and 11d. A conveyor belt 116 is mounted on the rollers 111 and 112. A hopper 17, containing a supply of receipts therein, is supported on a pedestal 113 so as to be dispose-d closely adjacent to one end of the conveyor belt 11o. The receipt issuing -mechanism 22 may also include a second conveyor belt 119 (see FIG. 2) mounted on rollers on the same shafts 27 and 28 which drive the conveyor belt 23. Thus, as best viewed in FIG. 2, the receipt transport mechanism 22 preferably includes upper and lower conveyor belts 119 and 116 which are adapted to grip a receipt slip therebetween. It may be noted that, as illustrated in FlG. 3, the shaft 114 is permitted a limited degree of Vertical movement by means of a spring-biased bearing arrangement 121 contained within support blocks 122.

rThe receipt mechanism 22 also includes a numberingr wheel 123 mounting a numbering machine 124 thereon. ri`he numbering wheel 123 is mounted on a shaft 126 so that the wheel 123 is interposed between the conveyor belt 116 and chute 16 in the outlet opening 15. The numbering wheel 123 and numbering machine 124 are essentially similar in construction and operation to the numbering wheel 66 and numbering machine 76 described hereinabove with relation to -the transport mechanism 21. A cam 127 similar to the cam 1111 projects upwardly from a lower surface of the casing 12, as viewed in FiG. l, for tripping the indexing lever of the numbering machine 12d to index the numbers presented thereon on each cycle of operation ofthe wheel 123. An inking roller 123 is also mounted adjacent the wheel 123` for inking the type characters presented by the numbering machine 124. inasmuch as standard size receipts are to be issued by the receipt transport mechanism 22 the numbering wheel 123 may be positioned with respect to the hopper 117 so that the numbering wheel 123 makes only one revolution each time the receipt transport mechanism 22 is driven. However, if desired, an electrically actuated clutch may be incorporated in the drive for the numbering wheel 123 to insure that the numbering wheel 123 makes but a single revolution in any one cycle of operation of the receipt mechanism 22. Sprockets 131 and 132 are keyed for rotation with the respective shafts 136 and 113 and are interconnected by a drive chain or belt 133 so that rotation of the shaft 113 and drive of the conveyor belt 116 occurs simultaneously with rotation of the numbering wheel 123.

The main drive shaft 113 of the receipt transport mechanism 22 is, in turn, adapted to be driven directly from the transport mechanism 21, but only after an envelope or package has reached a predetermined point in its travel between the inlet opening 14 and the storage area, as mentioned hereinabove. The means accomplishing such direct drive include the gear 61 affixed Ito the shaft 59 and a gear 137 affixed to the shaft 113. An idler gear 138 is journalled for rotation within a pair of spaced lugs 139 disposed at one end of a retractable arm 141. Movement of the arm 141 is under the control of a solenoid 142 so that energization of the solenoid 142 is effective to retract the arm 141 in the direction indicated by the arrow in FIG. l to a position wherein the idler gear 13S meshes with both of the gears 61 and 137 to thereby a'lord a drive between the transport mechanism 21 and 22.

Energization of the solenoid 142 is under the control of sensing means which include a photo-electric device 143 mounted in the chute 48. Thus, the chute 48 is formed with a slit 144 and the photocell 143 is mounted on the under side of the chute 4S in alignment with the agotarse a'. aperture 144, as illustrated in FIG. 1. A lamp 219 is` effective to direct a light beam through they aperture 144 to the pho-tocell 143 to maintain the photocell 143 in an energized condition. In this condition of operation, the solenoid 142 is maintained de-energized. sothat the gear 133 is positioned` as illustrated in FIG. 1 and the receipt transport mechanism 22 is not driven.

The receipt transport mechanism 22 also includes` a kicker wheel 1511er engaging the uppermost sheet of the stack of receipts contained within the hopper 117' and, delivering `such a sheet to the conveyor belt 116. The kicker wheel 151 is preferably adaptedv to be continuously rotated as by a drive belt or chain 152 interconnecting the kicker wheelY for rotation with the shaft 28. In such a case, the support shaft for the kicker wheel'152 is adapted4 to be swung in an arc toward and away from the hopper 1-17 under the controlof. a kicker solenoidY in the same manner as the gear 138 is moved into and out of engagement with the gears 61' and 137 described hereinabove. Alternatively, the kicker wheel 151 may be continuously engaged with the stack of receipts in the hopper 117 and periodically energized for rotation by an electrically actuated clutch similar to the clutch 193 described hereinabove. In either event, the

kicker wheel'151 is actuated to feed only a single receiptv to the conveyor `belt 116 for any one envelope or like package inserted within the inlet, opening 114. The control' circuit which electively accomplishes such a mode of operation of thekicker wheel 151 is describedhereinafter with reference to TBIG. 5.

As illustrated in FIG. 1, one or more shoes 1511 may be adjustably positionable along the inner periphery of the conveyor belt 23 to support the conveyor belt and to provi-de printing anvils for. the numbering machines 76 and 124.

The present inventionV also contemplates the use of a one-.way clutch, such as a conventional sprag clutch, a ratchetV brake, or similar apparatus for preventing rotationofthevarious rollers and. wheels in a direction opposite that indicated by the arrows in FIG. 1 to thereby.

provide an additional safeguard against the withdrawal ofan envelope orlike package from the inlet opening 14. Such a one-way clutch or similar apparatuscan be conveniently incorporated in the gear box GB. Also, an alarm system may be incorporated in the depository 11 for giving. an audible or visible signal' in the event that such reverse rotation of the rollers is attempted, as by anattempted Ywithdrawalof an envelope or package from the inlet slot 1d.

To summarize briefly the mechanical aspects of the depositorystructure illustrated in FIGS. 1-4 ofthe drawings, operation ofthe depository is initiated by insertion of an envelope or other deposit article through the inlet opening 14. Such action causes the trigger member 39V to engage the switch t1 and energize the motor M to drive the ztransport mechanism 21 in-the manner indicated by thjegarrows in FIG. 1. The envelope is gripped between the feedroller 34 and the conveyor belt 23 and moved into engagement with the serrated roller 53. Continued drive of the transport mechanism 21 moves the envelope or package beneath the numbering wheel 66 and an identifying number is printed thereon. Subsequently, the envelope trips the trigger 104 to close the switch 106 and de-energize the clutch 103. However, the drive for the transport mechanism 21 is uninterrupted and the deposit is ejected from the transport mechanism 21 bythe action of the `ejection roller 431. As the envelope moves down thechute 48, itinterrupts the light beam between the lamp 219. and the switch 143 to initiate a sequence of operations which include actuation of the kicker roller 151 and energization of the solenoid142 to drive the receipt transportrmechanism 22. A receipt is delivered from thetop of the stack withinrthehopper 117 to the conveyor belt 116. and subsequently to the numbering roller 123.. The numbering roller 123` is effective to imprint Aan identifying number on the receipt corresponding to the number printed on the deposit envelope by the numbering roller 66 Thereafter, the numbered receipt is delivered to the chute 16 and out the outlet opening 15. At the completion of such delivery of a numbered receipt through the outlet opening 15, time delay relays or other suitable electrical control means are effective to de-energize the motor M and the. other component parts of the electrical control circuit.

The electrical control circuit illustrated in FIG. 5 comprises a pair of main electrical lines 201 and 202 which may, for example, be connected to a conventional 60- cycley 1Z0-volt supply source. The control. circuit further. includes a secondary bus or conductor 2.03, which comprises a part of the main energizing circuit and is utilized to energize all but one of the control relays and other operating devices of the control circuit, as described in detail hereinafter.. The major control components are three conventional control relays identied as CRL CK2, CRS, a pair of time delay relays designated as TDRl and TDRZ, and a photocell-actuated relay identilied as the relayvPCR. All of these relays are of known type, and each may be replaced by any conventional relay orsimilar device capable of carrying out the required operatingv to 'the main line 2112, the other terminal of the coilbeing connectedthrough the main trigger switch 41 to the power line 2111. The main trigger switc'h is the switch 41 at the entrance part of the protective device which is closed upon the insertion of a deposit envelope into the night depository. The contacts 2115 of the relay C121 afford an energizing circuit for the secondary power line 203, being connected in series with a circuit betweenthe main power line 2111 and the secondary line 203i.

The time delay relay TDR1 includes an operating coil 2117 and a pair of normally open contacts 208. The relay is provided with. a conventional time delay4 circuit, including a variable resistor 2119 for adjusting the time delay characteristics of the relay. The contacts 268 of the timeV is connected in parallel with the switch 41. This holding;

[circuit is utilized to keep the control relayCR1 energized after the main switch 41 has opened, as described in more detail hereinafter.

The time delay relay TDRZ is essentially similar to relay TDRL and comprises an operating coil 211 anda pair of normally open contacts 212. This relayis also preferably provided with means for adjusting the time delay operating characteristic of the relay, the means in this instance being shown as a variable resistor 213. The second control relay CK2, on the other hand, comprises a conventional operating relay which is provided with an operating coil 214, a pair of normally open contacts 215, and a pair of normally closed contacts 216. The no1'- mally open contacts 215 of the control relay CK2 are connected in series with the solenoid 142 which controls the receipt-issuing mechanism 22. Thus, the contacts 215 are connected in ser-ies with the solenoid 142 between the auxiliary power line 203 and the main power line 202. The normally open contacts 215 of the relay- CR2 are also connected in an energizing circuit for a solenoid 239, the normally open `contacts 212 ofthe time delay relay TDR2 also being connected in series in this circuit. The solenoid 231) is the solenoid which controls operation of the kicker wheel 151 to eject a single receipt from the receipt magazine or hopper 117 at the beginning of a receipt-issuing cycle. The normally closed contacts 216 of the control relay CB2, on the other hand, are connected in an energizing circuit for the operating coils 207 and 211 of thetwo time delay relays, this circuit beginning at the secondary power line 203 and extending through the normally closed contacts 216 and through each of the operating coils 207 and 211 tothe main power line 202.

The photocell-operated relay PCR is provided with an operating coil 217 and a pair of normally closed contacts 213. The operating coil 217 of this relay is connected in series with a photocell 143, the photocell and relay coil being energized from a power supply or rectifier 220 that is connected across the power lines 262 and 203. The normally closed contacts 218 of the relay PCR, on the other hand, are connected in an energizing circuit for the control relay CR2, this circuit including, in sequence, the secondary power line 203, the normally closed contacts 218, the relay operating coil 214, and the main power line 202.

The final control relay for the control system of FIG. 5, the relay CRS, comprises an operating coil 221, a pair of normally open contacts 222, and a pair of normally closed contacts 223. The operating coil 221 is connected across the power lines 202 and 203 in an energizing circuit which includes, in series, the second trigger switch 105. The switch 106 is disposed adjacent the main conveyor in position to be triggered by a deposit envelope after the envelope has moved a predetermined distance into the night depository. The normally open contacts 222 of the relay CR3 are connected in parallel with the switch 106 toafford a holding circuit for the relay. T he normally closed contacts 223, on the other hand, are connected in series with a deposit numbering clutch coil 232 in an energizing circuit that extends between the power lines 202 and 203. This clutch coil controls the clutch 103 which drives the numbering device '76 that applies a serial number to the deposit envelope.

Operation of the control system illustrated in FIG. is, of course, initiated by closing of the main switch 11, this switch being closed when a deposit envelope is first inserted into the night depository. The closing of the trigger switch i1 energizes the operating coil 204 of the main control relay CR1, thereby closing the relay contacts 205. The closing of the contacts 205 connects the main bus 201 to the secondary power line 203, affording a means for energizing the other control devices of the control system. Furthermore, closing of these contacts 2% is effective to energize the main drive motor M of the night depository protective device 11.

With power applied to the secondary power line 2ii3, the lamp 219 for the photo-electric sensing system is energized. Furthermore, the rectiier 220 is energized, supplying power to the photocell circuit comprising the photocell 143 and the operating coil 217 of the photocell relay PCR. Because the photocell 143 is illuminated by the lamp 219, the relay PCR` is energized, with the result that the normally closed contacts 218 of the photo-electrically operated relay are opened. Consequently, control relay CE2 cannot be energized. Since the control relay CK2 is not yet energized, each of the time delay relays TDRil and TDR2 is energized, the operating coils 207' and 211 of these two relays being connected across the power lines 262 and 203 through the normally closed contacts 21:5 of the relay CE2.

Actuation of the time delay relay TDRl closes the contacts 268, establishing a holding circuit for the main control relay CE1 through the contacts 208. Accordingly, when the switch l1 subsequently opens, the motor M is not dc-energized and the secondary power line 203 is not de-energized. Rather, the main control relay CRl is held in its actuated or energized condition until the time delay relay TDRl drops out, as described hereinafter. Energization of the time delay relay TDR?. closes the contacts 212 of this relay, but the kicker solenoid 230 is not energized because the operating circuit thereof remains open, ,the contacts 215 of the control relay CRZ not having been .closed as yet.

Th actuation `of the control relay CRl by closing ot the main trigger switch 41 is also eiective to energize the operating coil 232 for the clutch 103 that controls the deposit numbering operation. Thus, at the beginning of operation of a control system, this clutch coil is energized through the normally closed contacts 223 of the control relay CRS. lThe clutch remains energized until the deposit envelope advances into the protective device to an extent sufficient to close the second trigger switch 106 connected in the energizing circuit of the control relay CRS. When this happens, the contacts 223 are opened, deenergizing the clutch coil 232 and interrupting operation o the numbering device 76 which applies numbers t-o the deposit envelopes. The second trigger switch 106` is positioned at a location such that the clutch coil is de-enerized in time to interrupt operation of the numbering mechanism at its initial or home position, so that it will be ready for the next numbering operation. Energiza tion of the control relay CRS is also eiective to close the contacts 222, providing a holding circuit which maintains this relay energized until the end of a complete control operation.

rthereafter, the deposit envelope passes between the lamp 219 and the photocell 143 as it is impelled down the chute to the night depository vault. As a consequence, the relay CR is de-energized and the normally closed contacts 21d of this relay are permitted to close. The closing of the contacts 218 affords an energizing circuit for the control relay CE2, the operating coil 214 of the relay (SR2 being connected in series with the contacts 21S across the power lines 202 and 203. Energization of the control relay CK2 is effective to close the normally open contacts 215 and to open the contacts 21d.

When the relay CRZ is energized, the closing of the contacts 215 is effective to energize both the sheet feed solenoid 142 and the kicker solenoid The opening of the contacts 216 of the relay CK2, on the other hand, is effective to cle-energize the operating coils 267 and 2il1 of the two time delay relays TDR?. and TDR2. However, these relays do not drop out immediately, due to their time-delay operating characteristics; rather, the contacts 228 and 212 remain closed.

After a very short interval or" time, sufcient only to initiate movement of the top blank from the stack of receipt blanks in the hopper 117, the time delay relay TDRZ drops out, fle-energizing the kicker solenoid 230. Consequently, the kicker device 151 is not eiiective to feed a second receipt blank into the receiptissuing station of the protective device.

Subsequently, after a substantially greater period of time, the time delay relay TDRl drops out, so that the contacts 298 are opened. When this happens, the energizing circuit for the main control relay CR1 is opened, so that the secondary power line 203 is de-energized, due to opening of the relay contacts 205. Of course, the motor M is also de-energized. With the operating circuit to the secondary power line 223 opened, all of the other control and operating devices of the system illustrated in FIG. 5 are effectively de-energized, so that the complete control circuit is effectively returned to its initial operating condition and is ready for the next deposit to be made. 1t may be that the time delay interval required for the time delay relay TDRi, corresponding to the time required to number and issue a receipt, will exceed the time required for the deposit envelope to pass between the lamp 219 and the photocell 143, depending upon the operating speed of the receipt-issuing portion of the protective device. lf this is the case, it may be necessary to provide for some time delay in opening of the contacts 218. However, in most instances, using deposit envelopes of any standard size, the time required for the en- Velope to pass completely between the lamp 219 and the photocell 143 should be adequate to complete the receiptnurnbering operation.

lt will be recognized that the described A.C. powered control system of FIG. 5 could be readily replaced by a 'preferable to connect the control circuit to the auxiliary power system to assure operation in the event of a power failure. Furthermore, it is not necessary touse the particular control circuit of FIG. any generally equivalent control scheme may be adopted without in any way departing from the invention.

Hence, while I have described and illustratedthe preferredembodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that this is capable of variation and modication, and ltherefore do not Wish to be limited to the precise details set forth, but desire to avail myself of such changes and alterations4 as fall within the purview of the following claims.

lclaim:

l. ln a depository of the kind having an inlet opening for receiving-articles to be deposited, a protection system comprising: transport means for automatically transferring al deposit article from said inlet opening toward a storage area, said transport means including opposed conveyor members for frictionaliy engaging an article therebetween; power` means for driving said convey-or members; means, includinga sensing device disposed adjacent said inlet opening, for sensing the placement of an article therein and energizing said power means to drive said conveyor members; receipt-issuing means' for issuing a receipt from said depository in response to the movement of an article from saidinlet openingtoward said storage area, each of said transport and receipt-issuing means including a numbering device for applying correlated numbers to each article and the-corresponding receipt; and means for actuating said receipt-issuing means only after a deposit article has passed completely through saidtransport means, including a photosensitive sensing device located a substantial distance from said transport means andiahead oi' said storage area.v

2. Ina depository. of the kind having an inlet openingl for receiving articles to be deposited, a protection systern comprising: transportmeans for automaticallyv transerring a deposit article from said inlet opening toward a storage'area, said transport means including opposed conveyor members for fricti-onally engaging an article therebetween; power means for driving said conveyor members; means, including a sensing, device disposed adjacent said inlet opening, for sensing the placement of an article therein and energizing said power means to drive said conveyor members; receipt-issuing means for issuing a receipt;'sensing means, comprising a photoelectric sensing device, for sensing the transfer of a deposit article from said transport means to said storage area; and control means,y operatively associatedwith said sensing means, for actuating saidreceipt-issuing means in response to movement of a deposit article past said sensing means, said photoelectric device being spaced from said transport means by a distance sufficient to assure complete passage of av deposit article therethrough before the receiptissuing means is actuated.

3. In a depository of the kind having an inlet opening for receiving articles to be deposited, a protection system comprising: transport means for automatically transferring a deposit article from said inlet opening to a storage area, said transport means including opposed conveyor members for frictionally engaging an article therebetween; power means for driving said conveyor members;

means, including a sensing device disposed adjacent said inlet opening, for sensing the placement of ank article therein and energizing saidpower means to drive said conveyor. members; afchute forA conducting an article from the transport means to the storage area; receipt-issuing means for issuing a receipt from said depository through an outlet-,opening in said depository; sensing means, including aphOtG-electric sensing device disposed in said chute, for

sensing the transfer of an article from said transport means through said chute; and electrically actuated con-v trol means operatively associated with said sensingmeans, for driving said receipt-issuing mechanism in response to movement of an article past said photo-electric sensingV device, said photo-electric device being located a suflicient distance from saidr transport means to insure that an article is passedcompletely'therethrough prior to energizationiof the receipt-issuing means by said control means.

4. In a depository of the kindhaving any inlet opening for receiving articles to be deposited, a protection system comprising:v transport meansforautomatically transferring a deposit article from: said inlet opening toward a storage area, said transport means including a conveyor belt member, a plurality of drive roll members, and means for resiliently biasingisaid. drive roll members toward said'conveyor belt to frictionally engage an article between said roll and belt members; power means for driving said conveyor belt and roller members; means, comprising a sensing switch located adjacent said inlet opening, for sensing the placement of an article therein and energizing said power means in response thereto; ak

connecting passageway, through which deposit articles are passed from said transport means to said storagearea; a second sensing device, comprising a photocell located in said passageway, for` sensing movement of a deposit anticle completely beyond a predetermined point: in said passageway; and means, actuated by said second sensing device, for issuing a receipt from said depository in responsel to the movement of an article from said inlet opening into said storage area.

5. In a bank or similar depository of the kind having an inlet opening for receiving articles to be deposited, a protective system comprising: transport means for automatically transferring a deposit article from said inlet opening to a storage area,I saidtransport means including opposed conveyor members for frictionally engaging an article therebetween; power means including gear and chain drive means for drivingl said conveyor members;

sensing means, including a sensingy device located adjacent said inlet opening, for sensing the placement'of a deposit article therein and energizing said power means to drive said conveyor members; receipt-issuingy means for issuing a receipt from said depository through an outlet opening, said receipt-issuing means including a receipt transport, and gear and chain d-rive means for driving said receipt transport; additional gear means movable into meshing engagement with the gear means of both of said transports for interconnecting said receipt transport for drive with said package transport means; and control means responsive to the movement of a deposit article fromA said transport means for moving said additional gear means into said meshing engagement.

6. ln a depository having an inlet opening for receiving articles to be deposited', a protective system comprising: transport means for automatically transferring a package from said inlet opening toward a storage area; power means. for driving said transport. means; sensing means, located adjacent said inlet opening, for sensing the placement of an article therein and for energizing said power means to drive said transport means; receipt-issuing means for issuing a receipt from said depository; numberingy means for applying correlated numbers to a deposit article` and a corresponding receipt; means for preventing withdrawal of a package from said inlet opening, including a roller formed with a serrated periphery; second sensing means comprisinga photoelectric sensing device located intermediate said transport means and said storage area, for sensing the transfer of a deposit article from said transport meansV to said storage area; andcontrol meansV operatively associated with said second sensing means for driving said receipt-issuing means in response to movement of a deposit article past said second sensing means, said second sensing means and said control meansbeing arranged to prevent actuation of said UNITED STATES PATENTS Hipwel Mar. 12, 1918 Kline Aug. 26, 1924 Murtaug'n Feb. 27, 1934 14 Murtaugh Feb. 11, 1936 Ogden Sept. 29, 1938 Keane Aug. 15, 1939 Thatcher Mar. 11, 1941 Ryan et a1. Nov. 28, 1944 Binns Oct. 23, 1951 Murtaugh July 29, 1952 Weber May 1J 1956

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3836980 *May 3, 1973Sep 17, 1974Diebold IncRemote depository construction
US3897901 *Jun 10, 1974Aug 5, 1975Diebold IncRotary depository construction
US4067267 *Oct 21, 1974Jan 10, 1978Docutel CorporationDepository system
US4085687 *Jan 12, 1976Apr 25, 1978Diebold, IncorporatedRemote envelope depository construction
US4130238 *Oct 17, 1977Dec 19, 1978Williams John BFare box
US4308804 *Nov 8, 1979Jan 5, 1982Honeywell Information Systems Inc.Automatic cash depository
US4537125 *Jun 25, 1984Aug 27, 1985Electronique Serge DassaultEndless drive belt apparatus for processing card tickets with magnetic track
US4597330 *Nov 28, 1984Jul 1, 1986Diebold, IncorporatedDepository envelope printing mechanism
US4795087 *Nov 13, 1987Jan 3, 1989Procak Kenneth AFare box
US5016546 *Feb 17, 1989May 21, 1991Ascom Autelca AgDevice for the insertion, storage, and removal of objects to be stored in strongboxes and of sheet-like material
WO1986003289A1 *Nov 14, 1985Jun 5, 1986Diebold IncDepository envelope printing mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification109/24.1, 346/22, 101/66
International ClassificationG07D11/00, E05G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE05G2700/00, E05G1/00, G07D11/0096
European ClassificationE05G1/00, G07D11/00M4