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Publication numberUS3079096 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 26, 1963
Filing dateJan 11, 1960
Priority dateJan 11, 1960
Also published asDE1227312B, DE1236914B
Publication numberUS 3079096 A, US 3079096A, US-A-3079096, US3079096 A, US3079096A
InventorsMcconnell David P
Original AssigneeMining Res Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Crushing apparatus
US 3079096 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 26, 1963 D. P. M CONNELL CRUSHING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 11, 1960 J FG.

Feb. 26, 1963 D. P. MCCONNELL 3,079,096

CRUSHING APPARATUS Filed Jan. 11, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 8 INVENTOR. 04100 A Maw/M524 United States Patent Ofifice dfi'ihfiQii Patented Feb. 26, 1963 3,6726% CRUSHENG APPARATUd David P. McConneii, San Gabriel, Calif, assignor to Mining Research tlorp, Los Angeles, Calif a corporation of California Fiied Jan. 11, 25360, Ser. No. 1,740 16' Ciaims. (Cl. 241-218) This invention relates to rock crushing machines of the vibratory jaw type.

it is an object of this invention to provide a rock crusher of low weight and small bulk that will produce an efiicient crushing action and a crushing rate comparable to that of known rock crushers of much greater size, weight and bulk, while utilizing considerably less power than such larger crushers.

It is another object of this invention to provide a rock crusher of the character described wherein novel mounting means for vibratory crusher jaws as well as novel means for eifecting synchronized vibratory movement of the jaws toward and away from one another are factors making it possible to provide the above noted objective.

Another object of this invention is to provide a rock crusher wherein the aforesaid novel mounting means for supporting the vibratory crusher jaws in the frame structure of the crusher is of simple and sturdy construction, consists of comparatively few parts capable of long service without replacement, and makes it unnecessary to employ springs and associated bars and pivotal connections as heretofore used in this art to support vibratory crusher jaws.

A further object is the provision of a rock crusher wherein a frame structure consisting of a base frame and a floating frame resiliently supported thereon, together with opposed crusher jaws, novel mounting means for the jaws and novel vibrating means are constructed, arranged and interrelated to provide in a particularly efiicacious manner the advantages herein noted.

Yet another object is to provide a rock crusher wherein the crusher jaws are floatingly supported for vibratory movement in the desired opposed relation by novel mounting means disposed adjacent the lower ends of the jaws in a manner making it unnecessary to connect the upper portions of the jaws with the frame structure, thereby providing greater freedom of the jaws for a more effective vibratory movement thereof.

An additional object is the provision of a rock crusher such as described wherein yieldable stop means is interposed between the frame structure and the upper ends of the jaws for contact with the jaws during vibratory movement thereof to limit movement of the jaws in a direction away from one another as well as effect a rebound action augmenting the vibratory movement.

Another object of this invention is the provision of an improved rock crusher wherein simply constructed members each formed of a body of resilient material in the nature of rubber together with shoes embracing the resilient members, are interposed between the crusher jaws and the frame structure of the crusher to provide for a reliable support of the jaws as well as for the desired floating vibratory movement thereof.

Another object is to provide an improved rock crusher of the character next above described wherein the resilient members in the nature of rubber and forming parts of the mounting means for the jaws, are rotatably supported so as to turn during vibratory movement of the jaws and thereby prevent spot wear of the yieldable members where contacted by the shoes.

Yet another object is the provision of a rock crusher wherein the mounting means for the crusher jaws advantageously includes pneumatic rubber tires or similar inflated elements.

A further object of this invention is the provision of a rock crusher wherein pneumatic tires may be employed as yieldable stops opposite the upper ends of the jaws, these tires limiting movement of the upper ends of the jaws away from one another and together, the jaw supporting tires providing a rebound action augmenting the vibratory movement of the jaws.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be hereinafter described or will become apparent to those skilled in the art, and the novel features of the invention will be defined in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation of a the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the crusher shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken on the line FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 6, 7, 8 and 9 are schematic views showing progressively the relative movements of the crushing jaws;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken on the line 10lt} of FIG. 3; and

FIG. 11 is a sectional view taken on the line of FIG. 3.

The illustrative embodiment of this invention as shown in the accompanying drawings includes a frame structure consisting of a suitably fabricated skeleton base frame 1 and a fabricated floating frame 2. The base frame includes opposed upper and lower side bars 3 rigidly joined at their ends by upright frame members 4, each of which latter has an upper cross member 5 and a base member 5a projecting longitudinally. The floating frame 2 as here shown, comprises a pair of upright opposed side plates 6 rigidly joined by upper and lower cross members 7 and ti.

As a means for resiliently supporting the floating frame 2 on the base frame 1, a plurality of coiled springs 9 are interposed between the upper cross members 5 of the base frame and the upper cross members 7 of the floating frame, being held in place by suitable retaining cups 10.

A pair of like opposed crusher jaws 11 are mounted on the floating frame 2 for floating vibratory movement toward and away from one another through the medium of novel mounting means which will be hereinafter fully described, there also being novel means to be hereinafter fully described, for eifec-ting a synchronized vibratory movement of the jaws to provide a powerful crushing action with low power.

Each of the crusher jaws if is provided with a replaceable face plate 12 of suitable steel removably secured to a backing plate 13 by means of countersunk bolts 14 and 14a, there being spacer bars 16 between these plates held in place by these bolts. The bolts 14 are accessible on the exposed faces of the face plates while the bolts 14a are accessible from the rear of the jaws to facilitate replacement of the face plates. The jaws 11 are mounted in opposed upright position with their opposed face plates 12 converging toward a point above their lower ends where they nearly meet as indicated at tl e throat between plates 12 at 17. From this point the plates 12 diverge somewhat to their lower ends. This formation makes it possible to provide a most effective crushing action and rate of crushmg.

The support of the crusher jaws 11 for vibratory movement in the floating frame 2 is effected by mounting means fixed on the jaws and cooperating with mounting means fixed on the floating frame. One of the aforesaid mounting means is formed of members 19 of compressible and resilient material such as rubber, while the other mounting rock crusher embodying apropos means is in the form of rigid members or shoes 2) which embrace the yicldablc members 19 in a manner supporting the jaws thereon and at the same time permitting limited universal movement of the jaws relative thereto and to the floating frame. As here shown, the yieldable mounting members 19 are mounted on the floating frame, while the shoes 2% are fixed to the jaws. It is to be understood, however, that the yieldable members It? could be mounted on the jaws and the shoes 29' fixed on the floating frame, illustration of this reversal being deemed unnecessary.

Referring more specifically to the means for mounting the jaws in place, it is seen that as here shown the yieldablemembers 19 are in the form of pneumatic rubber tires and will be hereafter referred to as tires'19, and that the shoes 2t) are in the form of rigidannular members or bands which loosely surround tires 19 with portions materially spaced therefrom in a manner supporting the jaws yet permitting limited lost motion universal vibratory movement of the jaws relative to the tires and. at the same time holding the jaws against dislodgment from the tires, thereby retaining the jaws on the floating frame.

In order that the jaws be permitted the desired vibra tory movement, each jaw is supported at its lower end so that the upper end is free. Accordingly, as here-shown,

a pair of the tires 19 and a shoe 2%) are provided for each jaw, the tires being mounted rotatably on a shaft 22 journalled in bearings 23 mounted on the side plate 6 of the floating frame 2. The two tires 19 are disposed laterally of the associated jaw and are embraced by the shoe 20 carried by the jaw and arranged as best shown in FIG. 4. The shoe 2th for each jaw is fixed thereto as by welding and normally rests on the associated tire 19 so that each jaw is supported in the generally upright but outwardly inclined position shown in FIG. 4.

The bearings 23 are constructed and arranged in any suitable manner in brackets 23a on one side plate 6 so that they may be adjusted in response to appropriate manipulation of adjusting screws 24-. Adjustment of the bearings 23 in one direction will move the shafts 22 and tires 19 thereon so as to move the jaws toward one another. Adjustment of the hearings in the opposite direction will increase the spacing of the jaws. These adjustments make it possible to set the crusher jaws 11 in the spaced relation best suited for crushing a particular material and for the type of crushing desired. To this end plates 6 are provided with elongated shaft openings 22a through which shafts 22; project. In addition, fasteners 23b for brackets 23a extend through elongated opening 230 in plates 6, the openings 230 being parallel to shaft opening 2211. Thus, bearing brackets 23a are adjustably mounted upon the plates 6 and are shiftable toward one another by adjuster screws 2d to reduce the maximum opening of throat 17 between crusher face plates 12.

As the upper ends of the jaws are free, yieldable resilient means are provided between the upper ends of the jaws and the floating frame 2 to limit the movement of the jaws away from one another and to efiect a rebound action when the jaws abut the yieldable means during vibratory movement. For this purpose a pair of pneumatic rubber tires 26 corresponding to the tires 19 is provided opposite the upper end of each crusher jaw in position to be engaged by the up er end of the back plate of the jaw during vibratory movement thereof. The tires 26 are rotatably mounted on shafts 27 supported in bearing blocks 28 adjustably mounted on the floating frame 2. Adjusting screws 29 are operable to adjust the bearings 28 for moving the tires toward and away from the jaws according to the desired spacing of the upper ends of the jaws. .To this end the bearing blocks 28 are shiftably supported upon brackets 28a welded or otherwise suitably supported at the upper corners of plate 6. Brackets 23a are provided with elongated slots 281) through which fasteners 28c extend so that the maximum space between the upper ends of the jaws 11 is determined by adjustor screws 29 which position tires 26.

Means may be employed for limiting movement of the opposed crusher jaws 11 toward one another and as shown in FEGS. 1, 2 and 4 may comprise for each jaw a stop plate 26:: fixed as by welding to the outer end of a supporting arm b welded to the backing plate 13 of the jaw and extending therefrom between the associated tires 26 to dispose the plate 25:: in position to engage the outer sides of the tires 26 below the axis of the tires. This stop means will not interfere with the desired lost motion vibratory movement of the jaws as will be appar cut with reference to FIG. 4.

Means are provided in accordance with this invention for vibrating the jaws in unison toward and away from each other. As here shown, this means includes for each jaw a rotary shaft 38 mounted in bearings 3-1 fixed as by welding on the backing plate of each jaw and provided with a weight 32 eccentrically mounted thereon. Each shaft extends freely through a large opening 33 in one. of the side plates 6 of the floating frame so as to have considerable movement relative to this side plate without contact therewith, and is connected by a universal joint 34 with a drive shaft 35 composed of telescopically joined, relatively axially movab-le sections 35a. Each shaft 35 is coupled by a universal joint 36 with a shaft 37. Each shaft 37 is suitably journalled in a drive box 39 supported on an upright frame member 49 mounted on a lateral extension 41 of the base frame 1. An electric motor 42 is mounted on the extension 4-1 of the base frame 1, and through pulleys 43 and 44 and drive belts 4-5, drives one of the shafts 37 which latter, as seen with reference to FIG. 5, drives a sprocket 46 engaged with a chain 47 which extends around sprockets 4'8 and 49 of equal size and mounted on the other shaft 37 and an idler shaft 50, respectively, in the box 39. With this exemplary drive it will be seen that the two shafts 39 for the crusher jaws may be synchronously rotated, it being noted that the weights 32 on the shafts 30 are correspondingly eccentrically positioned and that upon rotation of the shafts 30 at the same rate, the two crusher jaws 11 are moved in unison toward and away from one another.

The desired rigidity and strength of the jaws 11 particularly as to the bearings 31 and the shoes 20 welded to the backing plates 13 of the jaws, may be provided by means of rigid web portions 31a joining these bearings to the upper portions of the shoes 29 as by being welded thereto. In this connection it should be noted that the upright frame members d at the ends of the base frame 1 are open to afford access to the shoes 29 and that the latter are provided with openings Ztla and 2611 so that access may be had to the lower bolts 14a when it is desired to replace the face plates 12 of the jaws. Access to the upper bolts 14 is had in the space between the opposed jaws, it being noted that the bolts 14 thread into the bearings 31 whereas the bolts 14a are threaded into the face plates 12.

In the operation of the crusher, the jaws 11 are vibrated with a gyratory movement in unison toward and away from one another, for example as schematically illustrated in FIGS. 6, 7, 8 and 9, wherein it is indicated that the shaft 36 for the right hand jaw 11 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction while the shaft 3% for the left hand jaw 11 is rotated in a clockwise direction. Both of the shafts 36 are rotated at the same rate, and as the eccentric weights 32. are correspondingly located on the two shafts, the jaws will be given a gyratory vibratory movement upwardly in unison away from one another and downwardly in unison towards one another in a manner causing the particles being crushed to be moved in a downward direction between the jaws during the crushing action, thereby resulting in the desired crushing action as well as an effective crushing rate.

The type and rate of crushing to be efiected may be varied according to the spacing of the jaws 11 and the direction of rotation of the shafts 3%) on which the eccentric weights 32 are mounted. The spacing of the jaws may be varied as desired by appropriate adjustment in the manner hereinbefore noted, of the bearings for the shafts supporting the tires 19 and 26. The motor 42' may be of the reversible type whereby the direction of rotation of the shafts 36 may be changed at will to rotate the shafts in the direction opposite that shown in FIGS. 6-9.

With reference to the schematic showing in FIGS. 6-9, FIG. 6 for example represents a position of the jaws 11 at the start or end of a crushing action, it being noted that the annular shoes 29 rest on the tops only of the tires 19 and are otherwise spaced from the tires, the jaws abut or substantially abut at the throat 17, the stop plates 26:: abut the lower outer sector of the upper tires 26, and the upper ends of the jaws are spaced from the upper tires 26. When the shafts 30 have rotated the weights 32 through 90 degrees from the position shown in FIG. 6, to the position shown in FIG. 7, the jaws 11 are moved upwardly somewhat and away from one another substantially the extent indicated relative to the tires 19 and 26, the shoes having been forced against the tires 19 in the zone of their inner midsector while the upper ends of the jaws are likewise forced against the upper tires 26.

FIG. 8 shows the positions of the jaws and associated parts after the shafts have moved the eccentric weights 1530 degrees from the position shown in FIG. 6, it being noted that the upward movement of the jaws has increased from that shown in FIG. 7 while the spacing of the jaws has lessened, and although the shoes 20 are urged against the tires 19 in their lower inner sectors, while plates 26a are still spaced from tires 26.

FIG. 9 shows the position of the jaws and associated parts after the weights 3-2 have moved 270 degrees from the position shown in FIG. 6, the jaws having been moved downwardly and closer together than they were as shown in FIG. 8 so as to effect a crushing action, the upper ends of the jaws being then free from contact with the upper tires 26, the plates 26a now engaging tires 26, and shoes 20 contacting tires 19 in the upper inner sector, as the throat 17 diminishes.

Movement of the shafts 39 another 90 degrees from the position shown in FIG. 9 will bring the jaws and associated elements to the positions shown in FIG. 6.

In consideration of the fact that the jaws 11 are substantially freely floating and move with great rapidity between the positions shown in FIGS. 6-9 and are forcibly engaged against the resilient tires 19 and 26, it is apparent that the jaws have imparted thereto a rapid gyr-atory vibratory movement which produces a most effective crushing action and crushing rate. Such gyratory motion and the progressive engagement of shoes 20 with the tires 26 at points spaced about the periphery of the tires 19, that is, progressively from the upper sector as shown in FIG. 6 to the upper outer sector as shown in FIG. 9, as the eccentric weight 32 proceeds through each revolution, induces rotation of the tires 19 with consequent long life. Likewise, intermittent engagement of the crusher jaws 11 with the tires 26 induces rotation of the latter with attendant long life.

It is important to note that in supporting the two crusher jaws at their lower ends by means of the pneumatic tires 19 and shoes 20 with the upper ends of the jaws free to move toward and away from one another but limited as desired as to movement away from one another according to the setting of the upper sets of pneumatic tires 26, the two jaws are given a pronounced gyratory vibratory movement in unison and at high speed when the shafts 3'0 are synchronously rotated in the direction as indicated in FIGS. 6-9, as well as when direction of rotation of these shafts is reversed.

Vibratory movement of the jaws in accordance with this invention makes it possible to provide a most effective crushing force utilizing a motor of comparatively 6 small horse power, due to the resilient action of the pneumatic tires and the freedom of movement permitted the jaws.

The particular resilient mounting means for the jaws, the manner in which the jaws are vibrated, and the manner in which the floating frame is resiliently supported, are factors which minimize the vibration transmitted to the base frame. This makes it unnecessary to provide any special form of foundation for the crusher, and also makes it unnecessary to employ a heavy cast frame structure for the crusher.

While specific structural details have been shown and described, it should be understood that changes and alterations may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A crusher comprising: a supporting frame structure; a pair of opposed downwardly convergent crusher jaws defining therebetween a space for passage of material; support means at the upper and lower ends of one of said jaws fioatingly supporting said one jaw in said frame structure; said support means at one of the ends of said one jaw including a resilient member and a member having spaced portions adjacent opposite portions of said resilient member and spaced apart a distance materially greater than the spacing between said opposite portions of said resilient member whereby there is lost motion between said spaced portions and said resilient member, said spaced portions being alternately engageable with said resilient member as said jaw vibrates; one of said members being carried by said jaw and the other of said members being carried by said frame structure; means for imparting vibration to said one jaw; and means supporting the other of said jaws in said frame structure.

2. The crusher as defined in claim 1, wherein said resilient member is of circular form and said other member extends circularly about said resilient member.

3. A crusher comprising: a supporting frame structure; a pair of opposed downwardly convergent crusher jaws defining therebetween a space for passage of material; support means at the upper and lower ends of said jaws fioatingly supporting said jaws in said frame structure; said support means at one end of one of said jaws including a resilient member and a member having spaced portions adjacent opposite portions of said resilient member and spaced apart a distance materially greater than the spacing between said opposite portions of said resilient members whereby there is lost motion between said spaced portions and said resilient member, said spaced portions being alternately engageable with said resilient members as said jaws vibrate; one of said members being carried by said one jaw and the other of said members being carried by the frame structure; and means for imparting vibration to at least one of said jaws.

4. A crusher as defined in claim 3, wherein said resilient member is of circular form and said other member extends circularly about said resilient member.

5 A crusher comprising: a supporting frame structure; a pair of opposed downwardly convergent crusher jaws defining therebetween a space for passage of materials; means fioatingly supporting one of said jaws in said frame structure for vibratory motion including a wheel rotatably supported in said frame structure and rotatable by said jaw responsive to vibratory movement of said jaw; means for imparting vibration to said one jaw; and means for supporting the other jaw in said frame structure.

6. A crusher comprising: a supporting frame structure; a pair of opposed downwardly convergent crusher jaws defining therebetween a space for passage of materials; means at the lower end of one of said jaws fioatingly supporting said jaw in said frame structure for vibratory movement; means connected to said jaw for vibrating the same; resilient revolvable means adjacent the upper end of said one jaw for limiting movement of said one jaw away from the other of said jaws at the upper ends screens of. said jaws; and means supporting the other of said jaws in said frame structure.

7. A crusher as defined in claim 6, wherein the means fioatingly supporting the lower end of said one jaw coniprises a resilient revoivable member and a member loosely engaged with said last mentioned resiliently revolvable member; one of said members being carried by said "frame structure and the other of said members being carried by said jaw.

8. A crusher comprising: a frame structure; a pair of crusher jaws disposed within said fra to structure; said jaws having downwardly convergiugcrusher faces defining between their upper ends an entrance opening and near their lower ends a discharge throat; upoer and lower yieldable support means interposed between at least one of said crusher jaws and said frame structure; at least one of said yieldable support means including a resilient wheel;

means mounting said wheel for rotation relative to said frame structure; impact means carried by said crusher. jaw to permit limited relative movement between saidcrusher jaw and said wheelrand a. vibrator interposed between saidupper and lower yieldao'le. support means for imparting vibrational force to the crusher jaw supported'by'said upper and lower yieldabie means.

9. A crusher comprising: a. frame structure; a pair of crusher jaws disposed within said frame structure; said jaws ha 'ing downwardlyconverging crusher facesdefining between their upper ends an entrance opening and near their lower ends a discharge throat; upper and lower yieldable means interposed between each of said crusher jaws and-said frame structure; at least one of said yieldable support means for each-of saidcrusher jaws including a resilient wheel; means mounting said wheel for rotation relative to, said frame. structure; impact means carried by the corresponding crusher jaw to permit limited relative translation movement between said crusher jaw and wheel; anda vibrator disposed between said upper and lower yieldable. support means for imparting vibrations force to said crusher jaws.

it). A crusher comprisin i a frame structure; a pair of crusher jaws disposed within said frame structure; said jaws having downwardly converging crusher faces defining between their upper. ends. an entrance opening and near their lower ends a discharge throat; upper and lower yieldable support means interposed between each of said crusher jaws and said frame, structure;'each of said yieldable support means including aresilient wheel; means mounting said wheelfor free rotation relative to said frame structure; and impact means carried by said crusher jaws to permit limitedrelative translation movement between said crusher aws 'and wheeis; said impact means being disposedv to cause intermittent rotation of said wheels thereby to distribute impactsvabout the peripheries of said, wheel's.

References Cited'in the file of'this patent UNITED; STATES," PATENTS 472,367 Knapp Apr; 5, 1892 906,271 Palmer'et'al. Dec. 3, 1908 1,936,742 Youtzey' Nov. 28, 19-33 2,652;9S5 Links Sept. 22, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US472367 *May 21, 1891Apr 5, 1892 Crushing and grinding mill
US906271 *Nov 6, 1907Dec 8, 1908Huntley & Palmers LtdDough-kneader.
US1936742 *Aug 4, 1927Nov 28, 1933Youtsey Floyd SApparatus for comminuting materials
US2652985 *Sep 21, 1949Sep 22, 1953Gerhard LinkeJaw crusher with opposed jaws driven by unbalanced weights
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4196862 *Sep 6, 1978Apr 8, 1980Ituo TagawaApparatus for crushing building materials
US4679742 *Nov 18, 1985Jul 14, 1987Ian Gordon RodgerCrusher having opposed and balanced driver jaws
US4749136 *Jan 28, 1986Jun 7, 1988Laurence V. TurleyJaw crushing apparatus
US4752040 *Dec 18, 1986Jun 21, 1988Laurence U. TurleyJaw crusher with drop-in jaws
US4756483 *Dec 18, 1986Jul 12, 1988Laurence U. TurleyJaw crusher with multiple drive means
EP0272157A2 *Dec 18, 1987Jun 22, 1988Tidco Group LimitedCrushing apparatus
WO2006125465A1 *Sep 19, 2005Nov 30, 2006Pro C Te MaCrusher for recycling scrap materials for use in the processing of marble, granite and the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/218, 241/266, 241/290
International ClassificationB02C1/00, B02C1/02, B02C1/10, B02C1/06
Cooperative ClassificationB02C1/02, B02C1/06, B02C1/10
European ClassificationB02C1/02, B02C1/06, B02C1/10