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Publication numberUS3080621 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 12, 1963
Filing dateApr 7, 1960
Priority dateApr 7, 1960
Publication numberUS 3080621 A, US 3080621A, US-A-3080621, US3080621 A, US3080621A
InventorsBernard E Mendelsohn
Original AssigneeBernard E Mendelsohn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Storm window
US 3080621 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 12, 1963 B. E. MENDELSOHN STORM WINDOW Filed April 7, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. BERNARD E. MENDELSOHN BY [MM My A1 7,

FIG. 7

ATTOR N EYS March 12, 1963 B. E. MENDELSOHN. 3,080,621

STORM WINDOW Filed April '7, 1960 4 Shets-Sheet 2 34 L T l I 7 82 37 3a 22 FIG. 3

INVENTOR.

BERNARD E. MENDELSOHN BY 7 E'MM M4,, 1J

ATTORNEYS March 12, 1963 B. E. MENDELSOHN 3,080,621

STORM wmoow Filed April 7, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet s n2 n4 FIG. IO

84 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 34 INVENTOR. BERNARD E.MENDELSOHN A 2 4) u F|G.l6 'w ATTORNEYS March 12, 1963 B. E. MENDELSOHN 3,080,621

STORM wmnow Filed April 7, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 IN V EN TOR.

BERNARD E. MENDELSOHN BY EWM y, 41

ATTORNEYS Filled Apr. '7, 19%, Ser- No. 20,770 17 Claims. (Cl. 26-55) This invention relates to storm windows and is a co ntinuation-in-part of my earlier application Serial No. 849,799 filed October 30, 1953, entitled, Storm Window.

In my earlier application, supra, I disclose a multisash aluminum storm window having many of the attributes of the two general classes of aluminum storm windows found in the prior art, namely, the track-type and tilt-type storm windows. The invention herein disclosed is an improvement upon that window.

In the more conventional tilt-type windows, the window frames have a stepped cross section providing separate bearing surfaces for the sides of each sash. By virtue of the stepped arrangement of the frame, the front and rear faces of the'sash sides are not surrounded by the frame as is the case with track-type windows but rather onlythe outside face of the sash sides are engaged by the frame. Therefore, in the absence of special connectors the sashes may be lifted or drawn inwardly off the frame without any special manipulation of the sashes. Retractible connectors are universally provided on the sashes, which engage the frame to hold the sashes on the bearing surfaces. When these connectors are retracted, the windows may be drawn inwardly as described. While these types of windows are most satisfactory from the standpoint of ease of removal for cleaning, repairing, etc., they do not provide the protection against the elements, which is derived from the track-type windows,

In my prior application, supra, I disclose a storm sash having flanges secured to its sides, which extend into tracks formed in the frame to provide the type of protection derived from track-type windows. The flange on one side of the sash is retractible, that.is,'it may be drawn into the sash side to allow the sash to be withdrawn from the frame. Although the other flange on the opposite side of the sash is fixed, the window may be withdrawn by pivoting the sash through approximately five or ten degrees about a vertical axis defined by the fixed tates atent flange, to free the other side of the sash from the frame.

Thereafter the sash may be moved translationally in its own plane to free the fixed flange from its corresponding sideofthe frame. 7 1

While the window disclosed in my earlier application fulfilled the objects set forth in that application, the several manipulations required on the part of the operator, as described above, to remove the sash from the frame are somewhat awkward, particularly when the sashes are large.

In the present invention, the flanges provided on each I side of the sash are retractible, that is, each may be drawn into the sides of the sashes, thus allowing the sashes to be removed in the same manner as the prior art tilt-type windows. That is, upon manipulating actuators connected to the ends of the flanges, the bottom of the sash may be drawn inwardly olf its bearing surface so that the sash lies in substantially a horizontal plane. Thereafter, by raising one side of the sash just-a; slight amount, the connectors retaining the top of the sash on may be successively manipulated to a it lies within the side member of the sash; FIGS. 11-14 are pictorial views suggesting the suc-' 2 the bearing surfaces maybe freed from the frame and the sash maybe withdrawn. Thus, I provide a storm window which may be manipulated with the same ease as the prior art tilt-type windows but which nevertheless provides the protection against the elements derived both from the track-type windows of the prior art and of the windows disclosed in applicants earlier application,

' supra.

The. objects and features of my invention along with its incident advantages will be better understood and appreciated from the following detailed description of one embodiment thereof, selected for purposes of illustration and shown in the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary elevation view of the inside of a sash of a storm window constructed in accordance with my invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view taken along the corresponding section line of FIGURE 1 showing the sash assembled in a frame;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary elevation view, partially in section, of the lower left corner of the sash, viewed from the inside;

.FIG. 4 is a detailed view of the bracket and latch mechanism used in the upper left corner of the sash of no.1;

' FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view taken along the corresponding section line in FIGURE 4;

FIG. 6 is a side view of the bracket and latch mechanism shown inFIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a cross sectional view of the bracxet and latch mechanism employed in the lower left corner of the sash shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is across sectional view taken along the cor- I responding section line in'FIG. -l and rotated clockwise degrees;

FIGS. 9" and 10 are elevation views similar to FIG. 1 and; together suggest the manner in which the flange posltion wherein cessive steps required to withdraw a sash from the frame;

FIG. 15 is a cross sectional view taken along the corresponding section line in FIGURE 1;

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary cross sectional view ofa sash and frame showing the manner in which the bottom of the sash is held in the frame;

The sashshown in FIG. 1 includes an upper horizontal member 20, a lower horizontal member 22, a side member 24 and a glass 26 framed by the upper and lower horizontal members and the side member. While only one side member of the sash is shown, it is to be understood that the right side member (not shown) of the sash, is identical to and forms a mirror image of the side member 24 illustrated.

The top and bottom members 20 and 22 of the sash are provided with U-shaped portions 36 which receive the edge of glass 26 in a rubber gasket 31. InFIG. 15,

the cross section of the upper horizontal member 20 is I illustrated and the U-shaped portion 30 is clearly shown, and it will be appreciated that the lower horizontal member 22 is merely a mirror image of the top member.

Extending upwardly from the U-shaped section 30 of the upper horizontal member 20 is an L-shaped portion 32 which defines with the topof the U-shaped'portion a recess 34. This recess is shaped to receive, the horizontal arm 36 of the corner bracket 35 shown in FIG- URES 4-6. Similarly, the recess 34 provided in the lower horizontal member 22 receives the horizontal portion 38 of the bracket 37 shown in FIG. 7.

The vertical side member 24 of the sash is generally H-shaped in cross section as shown in FIGS. 2 and 8. The inner portion 40 of the H-shaped section received the edge of the glass 26 and the gasket 31 while the outer portion 42 receives the vertical arms 44 and 45 of the brackets 35 and 37 respectively, as well as the flange 46 which is substantially coextensive with the sash side. Thus, to connect the upper horizontal member 20 with the vertical member 24, the horizontal arm 36 of bracket 35 is slipped into the recess 34 provided in the horizontal member 20 and the vertical .arm 44 of the bracket is thereafter slipped into the outer portion 42 of the vertical member. The horizontal 'arm 36 of the bracket 35 is retained in the recess 34 by the small inwardly extending lip 50 (see FIGURE 15). When so assembled, the mitered ends of the horizontal member and the vertical member 24 are joined together to form a continuous frame about the glass. In the same manner, the lower horizontal member 22 is joined with the side member 24 by bracket 37. In FIG. 6 it will be noted that the vertical arm 44 of the bracket 35 is L-shaped, and when this arm is disposed within the outer section 42 of the vertical side member, its plate 52 extends behind the flange 54 provided as an integral part of the side memher to prevent that leg from slipping out of the side member. The inwardly extending lip 56 which narrows the opening into the outer section 42 of the side member further serves to retain the vertical arm 44 ofbracket 35 in position.

Formed as an integral part of the corner bracket 35 is an outwardly extending pin 60 which extends upwardly through a slot (not shown) formed in the end of the top face of L-shaped section 32 of upper horizontal member 20. This pin 60 as is explained in detail below, serves to retain the top of the sash within the window frame independent of the flange 46. Disposed parallel to the pin 60 and extending through the horizontal arm 36 of the corner bracket 35 is a latch 62 having a thumb grip 64. The latch 62 is free to slide within limits through the horizontal arm 36 andis guided along its; path by the three sides 66, 68 and 70 of that arm. The latch 62 carries a downwardly extending boss 72 which engages a latch. However, this frictional retardation of the movernent may readily be overcome by actuating the latch by means of the thumb grip 64. Referring to FIGS. 1 and 4, the reader will recognize that when the latch 62 is moved to the-right as viewed in those figures, the boss 72 engaging the notch 74 in the flange 46 will carry that flange to the right into the recess of the outer portion 42 of the side member 24.

A latch 80 substantially identical to the latch 62 is slidably mounted within the horizontal arm 38 of the lower corner bracket 37. The latch 80 has an enlarged head 82 formed at its outer end and is provided with a recess 84 in its mid-portion which houses a spring 86. One end of the spring 86 bears against the latch itself while the other end engages a shoulder 88 formed at the right end of the horizontal arm 38 of the bracket 37. Thus, the spring 86 urges the latch 80 to the left as viewed in FIG. 7. In FIG. 1 it will be noted that attached to the enlarged head 82 of the latch 80 is a boss 90 disposed within a notch 92 formed in the lower end of the flange 46. Thus, while the latch 62 controls the position of the upper end of the flange 46, the

latch controls the position of the lower portion of the flange. Moreover, while the upper portion of the flange 46 may be disposed in any selected position without retaining control of the latch 62, the lower portion of the flange 46 is biased to an extended position and only by retaining control of the latch 89 may the flange be held in any other position.

It will be noted in FIGS. 2 and 8 that the flange 46 is loosely fitted within the outer portion 42 of the H-shaped vertical side member 24. Because the flange 46 is loosely disposed within that section, it is desirable to provide the flange 46 with a non-metallic coating such as rubber to prevent rattling. It is most desirable that the flange 46 fit loosely within the opening. in the vertical member for if the flange had a'snug fit therein, any dirt which collected within that outer portion of the sash side would cause the flange to bind and make actuation difficult.

In FIGS. 9 and 10, I have illustrated the manner in which the flange 46 may be withdrawn into the vertical side member 24 of the sash. These views coupled with that of FIG. 1 illustrate three positions of the flange. In FIG. 1 it will be noted that the flange 46 extends an appreciable distance outwardly beyond the edge of the side member 24. To draw the flange 46 into the vertical member, the upper latch 62 should first be pulled to the right. When so actuated, the upper end of the flange 46 is drawn totally within the member 24 as shown in FIG. 9. It will be noted in that figure, however, that the pin 60 which is integrally formed with the bracket 35 does not move. To complete the withdrawal of the flange 46 into the vertical member 24 of the frame, the operator must move the lower latch 80 to the right as suggested in FIGURE 10. This action not only completely draws the flange 46 into the side member 24 but in addition 'draws the head 82 of the latch 80m a position wherein it does not extend outwardly of the outer edge of that vertical side member. It will be appreciated that the identical structure described is found on the other vertical side member (not shown) of the sash. Thus, both flanges movably mounted along the sides of the sash may be drawn within the side members when actuated in the manner suggested in FIGS. 9 and 10.

Having described the details of the sash, I will now describe the manner in which the sash is assembled in the window frame. In FIG. 2 a cross section of one side 1000f the frame is shown. This side may be made of aluminum and extruded in long sections and later cut to the proper length. The side 100 includes an outwardly extending flange 102 which may be attached by an conventional means to the permanent window casing. When so mounted, the inner surface 104 lies against the outer face of the casing and thus, the sash which is shown in part in that figure is spaced asubstantial distance from the permanent window (not shown). The side member 100 of the window frame is provided with four panels 106, t

108, and 112 oriented in a stepped afrangmcnt the center of the complete window frame, (to fight as shown in FIG. 2) beyond the inner edge of panel 1 and similarly, panel 110 extends inwardly beyondpalifi 108,'and panel 108 in turn extends inwardly beyond panel 106. The inner face of each panel, and more particularly that portion of each panel which extends inwardly beyond the end of the next inner panel, serves as a bearing surface for the side members of the sash. Thus, the inner surface 114 of the panel 112 serves as a bearing surface upon which the side member 24 of the sash shown rides up and down within the frame. The other side member (not shown) of the sash rides on an identical bearing sur face formed on the other side of the frame (not shown) to provide a firm backing support for the assembly. Disposed in a recess 116 on the outer surface of the side member 24 of the sash is a length of weather stripping 118 forming a seal between the outer surface of the side member 24 and the bearing surface 114..

The inner edge of each of the panels 106, 108 and 110 carry an outwardly turned lip 120, 122 and 124 respectively, which serve to guide the edges of the side members 24 and prevent the sashes from shifting laterally on the bearing surfaces. It will be noted in FIG. 2 that the side member 24 of the sash does not extend into the space between the panels llti and 112 but rather is prevented from doing so by the lip 124. t

In the conventional tilt-type windows found in the prior art, the upper portions of the side members of the sashes are retained on the bearing surfaces by the type ate the two latches at the top corners of the sash as suggested in FIG. 11 to move the flanges 46 to the position.

shown in FIG. 9. Because the latches are not biased to a particular position, the flanges will remain in that posi V latches in the withdrawn position, the flanges 46 will re-.

of pins as suggested at 50 which extend outwardlyfromthe sides of the sashes into the spacebetween the; panels 11%) and 112 and bear against the outer edgeof the lip 124. The heads 82 forming part of. the latches in the lower corner brackets similarly" bear against the outer edges of the lips 124 on each side of the frame to retain the lower portion of the sash on the bearing surfaces. Thus, to remove the sashes of the prior art tilt-type windows from the frame, it is necessary to actuate the latches on the bottom of the sash to free the bottom of the sashes, and hereafter, by tilting the sashes the pins 60 may be removed or disengaged from the outer edges of the lip 124. This is suggested in the pictorial views of FIGS. 12-14. A cross section of the frame and side member of a sash of the prior art tilt-type windows would be similar to the cross section shown in FIG. 2 without the flange 46.

From this description of the prior art it will be recognized that only the upper and lower extremes of the side members of the sash are firmly held against the bearing surfaces and no mechanical means is incorporated to urge the intermediate portions of the side members against those surfaces and'form a track-type connection between the sash and frame. Thus, any warping of theside members or distortion of those members under the influence of pressure applied totheir outer surfaces may readily move the intermediate or central portions of the side members off the bearing surfaces to create an opening through which air may flow. As in my earlier applications, supra, the flange 46 is provided to prevent this. Any distortion, bending or warping of the side members will cause the flanges 46 to bear against the outer edges of the lips 124 and form a virtual seal about the side edges of the side members to prevent air from flowing around the sashes to the interior of the storm window. The flanges 46 which under normal conditions fit loosely between the adjacent panels of the frame and may readily be moved up and down with the sash, and as well, may be moved into the side members 24, nevertheless, are available to form the weather seal when required.

' While in FIG. 2 but onesash is illustrated, it should be understood that a second window sash will ride on the inner face of the panel 110 and bear against the lip 122.

A third sash normally carrying screening will ride on the inner surface of the panel 1% and its edge will bear against the lip 12%. The two additional sashes not illustratedin FIG. 2 will have side members substantially identical to those illustrated and include the flanges 46 which normally extend between their bearing surfaces and the next inner panels.

The advantages of having each flange on the sash movable as opposed to the arrangements suggestedin my earlier application, supra, will be described indetail in connection, with FIGS. 9-14. When but one of the flanges is movable,- a rather awkward manipulation is required on the part of the operator to remove the sash from the frame. However, the sash with the two movable flanges may but with one additional manipulation on the part of the operator be removed in the same general manner as the tilt-type windows of the prior art.

Assume that the sash shown in FIG. 1 is disposed within the window frame and its flanges on each of its side members extends out of the side members and into the space between the adjacent panels of the frame as in FIG. 2. To remove the sash, the operator will first actu mainin the position shown in FIG. 10 within the side members of the sash. At the same time, the heads 82 formed on the extremities of the latches will be drawn a into the side members and off the outer edges of the lips on the ends of the panels of the frame. Therefore, the operator while holding the latches in the withdrawn position may swing the window sash inwardly at its bottom. When so moved, only the pins which bear against the outer edges of the lips of the frame have any connection with the frame itself. Having moved the bottom of the sash inwardly a sufficient distance to free the heads 82 from the window frame, the operator may then release the latches, and grasp the sash in the manner suggested in FIG. 13. Thereafter, the sash may be removed by lifting one side as suggested in FIG. 14.

To remount the sash within the fra me, the sequence of steps need only be reversed. Thus, the operator first positions the pins 66 within the adjacent panels in the manner shown in FIG. 14-and then retracts the latches 30 at both of the bottom corners until the sash lies flush against its bearing surfaces. 'Thereafter, upon release the latches at the bottom of the sash, the heads 82 pass .into the space bettween the adjacent panels and engage the outer edges of the lips. When this is done, the flanges 46 liein the position shown in FIG. 9. Thereafter, when the sash is mounted, the operator should outwardly ac-,

tuate the two latches 62 at the top of the sashes to move the flanges 46 to their fully extended position wherein they lie throughout their length within the space between the adjacent panels. Having so actuated the flanges 46, it will provide the protection sought about the edges of the vertical side members of the sash.

Theheads 82 formed on the latches 37 perform one additional function not previously mentioned. That is, not only do they serve to retain the lower portion of'the sash against the bearing surfaces but in addition serve to hold the sash in selected raised positions within the frame. This is accomplished by forming a series; of spaced notches (not shown) on the outer edges-of the lips 120, 122 and 124 which receive the heads 82. When the heads register with su'ch notches, it is necessary to is my intention that the breadth of this invention be de termined by the appended claims and their equivalents.

What is claimed is: 1. In a storm window, a sash having upper and lower horizontal members and side members, vertical channels formed in the end faces of the side members, movable flanges disposed in the channels and substantially coextensive with the side members, means including springs yieldably urging the lower portion of eachfof the flanges out of the channels, said means being movable against the springs to draw the lower portions of the flanges into the channels, means engaging the upper ends of the flanges for moving their upper portions in and out of the channels, and means separate from the'fianges and extending outwardly from the topand bottom of the 7 side members for retaining the sash within a storm window frame.

2. in a storm Window as defined in claim 1, a frame surrounding the sash and having a pairvof coplanar bearing surfaces upon which the side members of the sash. lie, tracks .on each side of the, frame disposed outwardly ofthe end faces of the side members of the sash, said flanges extending into and fitting loosely within the tracks, and the last-named means fitting tightly within the tracks to retain the sash on the bearing surfaces.

3. In a storm window, a sash having upper and lower horizontal members and vertical side members, channels formed in and coextensive with the end faces of the side members, flanges disposed in each of the channels and substantially coextensive with the side members, said flanges fitting loosely within the channels, a lip formed as a part of one side of each channel for guiding movement of the flanges, first actuators secured to the lower portions of each flange for moving the lower portions of said. flanges in and out of the channels, second actuators secured to the upper portion of each flange'for moving the upper portions of the flanges in and out of the channels, and means separate from the flanges and extending outwardly from the top and bottom of the side members for retaining the sash within a storm window frame.

4. In a storm window as defined in claim 3, the first: actuators including biasing means yieldably holding the lower portions of the flanges out of the channels, andthe second actuators being free of biasing means.

5. A storm window comprising a rectangular frame: having coplanar bearing surfaces on each side, a sash disposed within the frame and having sides lying against the bearing surfaces, tracks formed on each side of the frame outwardly beyond the bearing surfaces and the end faces of the sides of the sash, channels formed in the end faces of the sides of the sash, flanges disposed in the channels and coextensive with the sides of the sash, said flanges being substantially thinner than the width of the tracks, actuating means secured to the bottom portions of the flanges yieldably biasing the bottom portions into the tracks, and nonbiased actuating means secured to the upper portions of the flanges for moving the upper portions in and out of the tracks.

6. A storm window comprising a rectangular, frame having coplanar bearing surfaces on each side, a sash disposed within the frame and having sides lying against the bearing surfaces, tracks formed on each side of the frame outwardly beyond the bearing surfaces and theend faces of the sides of the sash, channelsformed in the end faces of the sides of the sash, flanges disposed in the channels and coextensive with the sides of the sash, actuating means secured to the bottom portions of the flanges yieldably biasing the bottom portions into the tracks, nonbiased actuating means secured to the upper portions of the flanges for moving the upper portions in and out of the trucks, the first recited actuating means including retaining means .firmly engaging the tracks to retain the lower portions .of the sash against the hearing surfaces, and fixed pins secured to the sash and extending outwardly beyond the end faces of the sash sides into the tracks for retaining the top of the sash against the bearing surfaces.

7. A storm window as defined in claim 6 further characterized by the retaining means moving with the lower portion of the flange in and out of the tracks and chan nels.

8. A storm window as defined in claim 7 further characterized by said flanges fitting loosely within the channels and tracks.

9. A storm window as defined in claim 8 further .characterized by said flanges being rubber coated to prevent rattling of the flanges in the tracks andchannels.

l0. A window sash comprisingupper and lower horizontal frame memb s a dv tica s e ram m mb a channel formed in the outer edge of at least one side member, a vertical flange coextensive with that side member and fittable within the channel, an actuator including biasing means secured to one end of the flange and yield- ;ably biasing that end of the flange out of the channel, .and an unbiased second actuator operable independent of the first recited actuator and secured to the other end of the flange for moving that end of the flange in and out of the channel.

11. A window sash as defined in claim 10 further characterized by the first-recited actuator being secured to the lower end of the flange and the second actuator being secured to the top of the flange.

12. A storm window comprising a rectangular frame having coplanar bearing surfaces on each side, a sash disposed within the frame and having sides lying against the bearing surfaces, tracks formed on each side of the frame outwardly beyond the bearing surfaces and the end faces of the sides of the sash, channels formed in the end faces of the sides of the sash, flanges disposed in the channels and substantially coextensive with the sides of the sash, actuating means secured to the flanges for mov ing the flanges in and out of the tracks, and means forming part of the frame engaging the end faces of the sides of the sash on but one side of the flanges for preventing the sides of the sash from entering the tracks.

13. A storm window as defined in claim 12 further characterized by means separate from the flanges and extending outwardly from the top and bottom of the sides of the sash for retaining the sash against the bearing surfaces.

14. A storm window comprising a frame having a bearing surface on at least one side, a sash disposed within the frame and having a side lying against the bearing surface, a track formed on said one side of the frame out wardly beyond the bearing surface and the end face of the side of the sash, a channel formed in the end face of the side of the sash, a flange disposed in the channel and substantially coextensive with the side of the sash, actuating means secured to the bottom portion of the flange yieldably biasing the bottom portion into the track, nonbiased actuating means secured to the upper portion of the flange for moving the upper portion in and out of the track,

said first recited actuating means including retaining means firmly engaging the track to retain the lower portion of the sash against the bearing surface, and a fixed pin secured to the sash and extending outwardly beyond the end face of the sash side into the track for retaining the top of the sash against the bearing surface.

15. In a storm window, a sash havingupper and lower horizontal members and side members, movable flanges mounted on and substantially coextensive with the side members, means including springs yieldably urging the lower portion of each of the flanges outwardly on the side members, said means being movable against the springs to draw the lower portions of the flanges inwardbearing surfaces upon which the side members of the sash lie, tracks on each side of the frame disposed outwardly of the side members of the sash, said flanges extending into and fitting loosely within the tracks, and the last named means fitting tightly within the tracks to retain the sash on the bearing surfaces.

17. In a storm window, a sash having upper and lower horizontal members and side members, movable flanges mounted on and substantially coextensive with the side members, biasing means engaging one end of each flange and urging those ends of the flanges outwardly on the side members, actuating means engaging those ends of References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS the flanges for moving those ends against the biasing 444,409 Pomeroy Jan. 6, means inwardly on the side members, means engaging 5 729,665 Robbe June 2, the other ends of the flanges for moving said other ends 1,150,365 Heinsohn Aug. 17,1915 outwardly and inwardly on the side members, and means 1,619,501 Evans Mar. 1', 1927 separate from the flanges and extending outwardly from 1,653,184 Kolumbus Dec. 20, 1927 the top and bottom of the side members for retaining 2,709,840 Snobeck June 7, 1955 the sash within a storm window frame.

Zappone et al Dec. 27, 1955

Patent Citations
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US444409 *Apr 25, 1889Jan 6, 1891 Adjustable window-screen
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3280889 *Apr 9, 1962Oct 25, 1966Wahlfeld Mfg CoStorm window casing
US3339957 *Oct 22, 1965Sep 5, 1967Panoramic Hardware 1965 IncWindow lock
US3342514 *Mar 31, 1965Sep 19, 1967Win Chek Ind IncFrame corner structure
US3676956 *Jun 22, 1971Jul 18, 1972Densmore D J CoReadily removable window with weather-stripping
US3709533 *Nov 6, 1970Jan 9, 1973H WaltersCombination corner lock and hanger
US5671958 *Jun 28, 1996Sep 30, 1997Szapucki; Matthew PeterSnap on latch mechanism for a sash window
US6155615 *Jul 22, 1998Dec 5, 2000Ashland Products, Inc.Tilt-latch for a sash window
US6183024May 7, 1999Feb 6, 2001Ashland Products, Inc.Tilt-latch for a sash window
US6230443May 5, 1999May 15, 2001Ashland Products, Inc.Hardware mounting
US6485070Oct 26, 2000Nov 26, 2002Ashland Products, Inc.Tilt-latch for a sash window
US6722712Mar 11, 2002Apr 20, 2004Ashland Products, Inc.Tilt-latch for a sash window
US6832792Aug 14, 2002Dec 21, 2004Newell Operating CompanyActuator for a tilt-latch for a sash window
US6874826Nov 14, 2000Apr 5, 2005Ashland Products, Inc.Actuator for a tilt-latch for a sash window
US6948278Dec 4, 2000Sep 27, 2005Ashland Products, Inc.Adjustable tilt-latch for a sash window
US7171784Apr 10, 2003Feb 6, 2007Newell Operating CompanyTilt-latch for a sash window
US7222458Mar 14, 2005May 29, 2007Newell Operating CompanyActuator for a tilt-latch for a sash window
US7431355Jun 23, 2006Oct 7, 2008Newell Operating CompanyTilt-latch for a sash window
US8083269 *May 2, 2008Dec 27, 2011Vanguard Plastics Ltd.Apparatus for effecting an initial, predetermined translation of a closed sliding door
USRE37916Sep 29, 1999Dec 3, 2002Ashland Products, Inc.Snap on latch mechanism for a sash window
DE19749517C2 *Nov 8, 1997Feb 8, 2001Solitec Systemtechnik GmbhFliegenschutzgitter
DE29621112U1 *Dec 5, 1996Jan 23, 1997Solitec Systemtechnik GmbhFliegenschutzgitter
Classifications
U.S. Classification49/454, 292/DIG.350, 292/175
International ClassificationE06B3/26, E06B3/44
Cooperative ClassificationE06B2003/4453, E06B3/44, E06B3/5063, E06B2003/2615, Y10S292/35, E06B3/2605
European ClassificationE06B3/50G2, E06B3/26C, E06B3/44