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Publication numberUS3080980 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 12, 1963
Filing dateAug 28, 1961
Priority dateAug 28, 1961
Publication numberUS 3080980 A, US 3080980A, US-A-3080980, US3080980 A, US3080980A
InventorsWilliam Gibbons Joseph
Original AssigneeWilliam Gibbons Joseph
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable shelf bracket assembly
US 3080980 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 12, 1963 J. w. GIBBoNs ADJUSTABLE SHELF BR1 \.CKET ASSEMBLY Filed Aug. 28. 196;

March l2, 1963 .1. w. GIBBoNs 3,080,980

ADJUSTABLE SHELF BRACKET ASSEMBLY Filed Aug. 2,8, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 J. W. GIBBONS ADJUSTABLE SHELF BRACKET ASSEMBLY Marchy 12, 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Aug. 28, 1961 United States Patent O 3,080,980 ADJUSTABLE SHELF BRACKET ASSEMBLY Joseph William Gibbons, 8119 W. Lake St., River Forest, Ill. Filed Ang. 23, 1961Ser. No. 134,309 6 Claims. (Cl. 242-225) FIGURE 1 is a view in perspective of an assembled embodiment of lthe present invention showing its use in connection with shelving andas a means for supporting lights;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view of a supporting channel, with the supporting bracket inserted;

FIGURE 3. is a fragmentary perspective view of the supporting channel showing the supporting bracket being turned for adjustment into the channel;

FIGURE 4 is a cross-sectional view of the supporting channel with the supporting bracket in place;

FIGURE 5 is a cross-sectional view of two supporting channels in back-to-back relationship with a supporting bracket shown in position in one of said supporting channels;

FIGURE 6 is a front elevational view of the supporting bracket positioned with respect to the supporting channel, with dotted lines indicating the twisting ofv the supporting bracket which is necessary to achieve attachment;

FIGURE 7 is a modified form of the =shelfsupporting bracket showing the left-hand member which may be used with a supporting channel appropriately formed in accordance with FIGURE 16; v

FIGURE 8 -is a cross-sectionalview showing a lefthanded and right-handed shelf-supporting bracket in position with respect to a supporting indicated in FIGURE 16; l

FIGUREV9 is a cross-sectional view showing the shelfchannel of the type supporting bracket of FIGURE 7 in position with respect porting channel in a position to achieve 90-degree an- Y 1 gularity with respect thereto;

FIGURE 13 is yet another modification .of the shelfsupporting bracket showing another means of achieving angularity -between the bracket and the supporting channel;

FIGURE 14 is a top plan view -of the supporting bracket shown in FIGURE 13, pantly broken away to expo-sc the securing means; i

FIGURE 15 is a cross-sectional view of the adjustable supporting channel bar assembly; Y

FIGURE 16 is a front elevational fragmentary` view of a portion of the supporting channel shown punched to receive the left-handed and right-handed shelfsupporting brackets seen in FIGURE 8; v

FIGUREv 17' is a sectional view of two vsupporting .spective in FIGS. 2 and 3, and which assumes the con- 3,080,989 Patented Mar. 12, 1963 lCC 2 channel members shown back-toback and showing the spring-supporting member in position; and

FIGURE 18 is a perspective view of the spring-supporting member.

Functional design in furniture and in household features has long sought to join the newest developments of our technological age relating to materials and manufacture with the simplicity and versatility of function previously achieved with more lavish, expensive and inflexible design.

Particularly, the developments in various forms of extruded aluminum, which lends itself to various coloring techniques to effectively blend with a wide range of household colors, has been the harbinger of a new age or period in functional design.

Further, the use of aluminum in its various color-s, hues and shapes has been augmented by the return to lthe natural wood colors which provides both color and tex-ture to room decor.

This so-cal1ed functional trend has further lent itself to the do-ityourself tendency, reecting as it does the increased cost of custom installation. However, that which is essentially functional is not always essentially simple -enough to permit assembly by everyone and, further, lis not always adaptable or ilexible enough Vto encompass the wide range of uses thought to be so desirable in our modern way of life.

Thus, my invention relates to a complete shelf assembly which can be simply installed to provide shelving for books, bric-a-brac, sculptures, statuettes, and even lamps which may be placed upon the shelving/or supported from the base structure, which assembly may be placed adjacent an existing wall or where no wall exists 4toiserve as an area divider as well. Y

M-ore particularly, as shown in my FIG. l, an embodiment of the assembly is seen to be comprised of three upright or vertical channel bar units 1, 3, and 5, on which .are supported a plural-ity of shelf-supporting brackets indicated 'by the numeral 7. As shown in this ligure, the 'assembly is supported between the floor and the ceiling and is used in the'center of the room to divide the area. For thi-s reason paneling of glass or wood may be supported on the assembly, as is shown at 9. Further, it

'is to be noted that the shelving 11 may Vbe supported to extend in opposite directions from the assembly to provide utility to both areas divided by the assembly.

Also indicated in FIG. 1 are overhead lamps 15 which tmay v'besupported from the assembly.

Of prime importance in such as assembly is the proper design pf the vertical channel bar units. Due to the fact that houses, apartments, and any other type of buildings-tend to settle, as well as to intrinsic fabrica-ting errors of minor dimension, oorsand ceilings do not tend to'be perfectly parallel but rather tend to vary signilicantly as to distance between them at Various points vthroughout any given room.

Since the shelf bracket assembly of the instant inveni 'tion is designed to be supported by the vertical channel Vwall, it is most desirable that these vertical channel bar units be easily adapted for either use.

For this reason, I have selected a single channel bar which may be simply extruded from aluminum or other similarmetal into an elongated shape, as seen in pertiguration shown in FIGS. 5 and 17 in cross-section.

More particularly, each of these vertical channel bars4 17 is seen to be generally box-like in configuration with a vertically extending open channel 19 which permits the receipt of mounting portions of the shelf brackets. I will henceforth refer to this open channel portion 19 of the vertical channel bar 17 as the front end of the bar, and the opposing portion as the rear end. The rear end is seen to be comprised. of a rear portion 21, the central portion of which extends outwardy toward the front end of the bar to define an elongated recess in the rear side of the channel bar which is substantially rectangular in cross-section. From the opposing sides of the rear portion 21, two anges 23 and 2S, respectively, extend forwardly substantially parallel to each other. At the forwardmost end of each of saidv flanges 23 and 25, the flanges turn inwardly toward each other and extend at an angle toward the rear of each of. the channel bars to dene ears 27 and 29. The spaced ears are seen to be provided with guide walls 31 and 33 which extend forwardly from the inner end of the ears to dene the open receiving channel 19.

Because of this particular cross-sectional'configuration of the vertical channel' bars 17, they are particularly adaptable to be used either singly or inpairs, as shown in FIGS. and 17. When used in pairs, the twov rear ends ofthe vertical channel. bars are placed together, and the elongated recessed portion of the rear of' each joined together to define a centrally located tubular portion for the receipt of the adjustment apparatus to be described.

While the vertical channel bars may be joined together adjacent their bases by means of spot welding, this is not to be preferred particularly when aluminum is being used since aluminum, and anodized aluminum particularly, will be diseolored by the spot welding. Therefore, one of the vertical channel bars in each pair is appropriately formed with two male spline members 2S formed on the spaced portions of the base and extending longitudinally of the bars. The other vertical channel bar member is provided with an elongated, vertically extending pair of female openings formed in the spaced bases which receive the male members when the male members are slid vertically downwardly from the top, as viewedl in FIG. 17. Although the splining means shown at 28 in FIG. 17 are semi-circular, it is to be understood that any splining configuration could he used which. permits the two members to be joined by vertically sliding one splined portion into the other from the top of one of the channel bars and which includes a base configuration portion which prohibits the joined members from being separated by other than a vertical slidingmovement.

As is seen in FIGS. 3, 4, 5`and16, the central portion of. the base opposite to the open receiving channel 19 may be provided with centrally and vertically spaced circular aperturesv 35, or with vertically spaced slot pairs 37, as seen inl FIGS. 16 and 17. The choice as to whether circular apertures 35 or the pairs of slots 37 will be used depends upon the type of mountingv unit which is desired to be used with the shelf bracket.

After the complementary vertical channel bars 17 and 17rzhave been joined together, the hollow tubeV defined by the juxtaposed central portions of the vertical channel bars may receive the floor brace unit 39 and the ceiling brace unit 41, as shown in FIG. 15.

The tioor brace unit 39 is comprised of a tubular section 43 which is substantially square in cross-section and whose overall outer dimensions may be slidably received within the tubular recess defined bythe juxtaposed vertical channel bars 17 and 17a. At the lower end of the tubular section 43 is a retainer 4S. which may be telescopically forced into the tubular section 43erv otherwise aiiixed thereto but which is recessed to appropriately receive a hard rubber contact stop i7 to achieve non-skid relationship with the iloor. The. upper end of the tubular section 43 is received within the lower end of the juxtaposed channel bars 17 and 17a, and is provided with opposing apertures for the receipt of a key 63, to be described, which extends through the respective opposed openings in the base walls of the vertical channel bars and which retains the door brace unit within the vertical channel bar. Because of the plurality of openings in the channels 17 and 17a, the use of the key 6s permits a wide variety of vertical adjustments.

A ceiling brace unit 41 is comprised of a tubular section 51 which is also substantially square in cross-section and of suliicient overall dimension to be slidably received within the upper end of the tubular recess defined by the juxtaposed channel bars 17 and 17a. The upper end ofl the tubular section 51 is closed by an end cap 53 which may be secured therein in any conventional manner, such as welding, force fitting, etc. The end cap 53 is provided: with a central threaded bore 55' which receives bolt- 57, the upper end of which is secured to a suction cup 59 to secure the channel bar unit with respect to the ceiling.

The lower end of the tubular section 51 rests upon a compression spring 61 which is supported at the lower end upon a key 63.

The key 63, as shown in detail in perspective in FIG. 18, is seenas particularly adapted for use with the pairs of slots 37 shown in the vertical channel bar depicted in FIG. 16. It is to be understood that without departing from the scope of this invention a key similar t0 that shown in FIG. 18, but having only a sing'e leg, couldbe used to accommodate the circular apertures 35 shown in the vertical channel bar 17 depicted in FIG. 6.

The key 63 is seen to be generally U-shaped in configuration, providing two outwardly extending parallel legs 65 and 67 joined at one end, as shown at 69, to form a base to which is attached the elongated probe 71 at the end of which is a spherical ball 73- to permit easy insertion of the key into the corresponding pairs of slots j 37 located oppositely when the two vertical channel bars 17 and 17a are placed in juxtaposition, as aoredescribed. To secure the key within the juxtaposed channel bars 17, 17a, the lower edges of each of the respective legs 65 and 67 are provided with correlative spaced undercuts 75, 77, which rest upon the edges of the bars which form the respective pairs of slots 37. These undercuts prevent the key 63 from slipping out of the juxtaposed channel bars17 and 17a. Further, because of the numerous pairs of vertically spaced slots 37, the key may be selectively positioned vertically to achieve a wide vertical range ofvadjustments for supporting the compression spring 61 and the tubular section 51 and, consequently, the ceiling adjusting suction cup 59. Further, because of thev attachment of the suction cup to the end cap 53, by means of the bolt S7 received within the threaded bore 55l of the end cap, an additional range of adjustments can be provided to. accommodate very finev variances in spacing. between the floor and the ceiling. Thus, the Vcrtical'channel bar unit is provided with three separate and complementary adjusting means to accommodate variations in distance, namely, that provided by the lower tubular section 43 in relation to the floor as a result of the placement-of the key in relationship to the aperture within the tubular section 43, the appropriate placing of the key 63.in the pairs of slots 37, and finally, bymeans of the threadably secured suction cup 59.

A bracer, such as that shown in FIG. 10, may be secured between adjacent vertical channel bar units, as shown in FIG. 1 at 79, to afford additional stability to the unit.

The shelf-supporting brackets 7, which are shown supporting the shelving'with respect to the vertical channel bar units 1, 3 and 5, may be-of two different types depending upon whether the base of the vertical channel bars 17 is provided with circular apertures 35er pairs of slotsA as seen at 37. The embodiments of the shelf-supporting brackets shown in FIGS. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 13 are for use with the circular apertures, and the embodiments shown.

in FIGS. 7, 8, 9, 11 and 12 are adapted for use with the pairs of slots 37.

The use of the pairs of spaced slots 37 and the embodiments of the shelf-supporting brackets for use with that arrangement, were developed specifically to permit some shelves to be secured at an angle with respect to the door and ceiling, while having adjacent shelving parallel with respect thereto. l

The wide range of possibilities which this allows will become more evident from a consideration of the fact that the shelf-supporting brackets designed for use in this arrangement, as shown in FIG. 8, are to be used in pairs.

In FIG. 7 is seen the left-handed member of the shelfsupporting bracket, the right-handed member being the mirror image of that bracket. The shelf-supporting bracket 81 is seen to be comprised generally of a mounting plate 83, an angle iron supporting base 85, and a retention tab 87.

More particularly, the mounting plate 83 is generally.

rectangular in configuration and is provided with two vertically spaced, rearwardly extending and downwardly projecting hooks 89 and 91 for mounting with the vertical channel bars 17. To this mounting plate 83 forwardly of these hooks, at a distance approximately equal to the distance between the forwardly projecting portion of the base of the vertical channel bar 17 and the forwardmost edge of the flange 23, is secured the forwardly projecting angle iron 85 the bottpm edge of which is slightly tapered and the upper flat surface of which provides a mounting surface for shelving. It is to be noted that the thickness of they angle iron 85 along the base is substantially equal to the width of the guide wall 33.

The retention tab 87 is secured with respect to the rear edge of the angle iron 85 and projects rearwardly, this tab being spaced from the adjacent mounting plate 83 sufliciently to receive the end of the guide wall 33 therebetween.

As best seen in FIG. 9, when the shelf-supporting bracket 81 is to be inserted within the vertical channel bar 17, the hooks 89 and 91 are inserted through a pair of the vertically spaced pairs of slots 37 on one side of the channel, which, it will be noted, are sufficiently elongated vertically to receive the entire hook therewithin, the hook being allowed to drop down over the edge of the channel bar defining the slots and the retention tab 87 extending around the wall 33. When the shelf-supporting bracket 81 is in this position, it is to be noted that the retention tab prevents horizontal movement of the bracket with respect to the channel bar 17, the hooks 89 and 91 providing support for the shelf and any loads which are being borne by the shelf. Further, should the edge of the shelving be jarred slightly from beneath, as is apt to occur during usage, the closeit between the hooks 89, 91 and the forwardly projecting base portion of the channel bar 17 prevent the shelf-supporting bracket from becoming dislodged from its supporting position. Further, because of the plurality of vertically spaced pairs of slots 37, the shelf-supporting bracket 81 may be adjustably aixed to the vertical channel bar 17 at a plurality of desirable heights.

The right-hand shelf-supporting bracket 93, the to-p view of which is seen in FIG. 8, is merely the mirror image of the shelf-supporting bracket 81 previously described and may be inserted and adjusted in the same manner. While the shelf-supporting bracket 81 has been shown with the angle iron supporting bar affording a platform which is substantially normal to the plane of the channel bar 17 and consequently substantially parallel to the surfaces of the fioor and ceiling respectively, becauseof this unique dual arrangement of shelf-supporting brackets, either shelf bracket 81 or 93 may be provided with an angle iron having a supporting platform at any angle, thus providing shelving which throughout its length may be Varied as to angularity without disturbing the aestheti effect or the supporting function of the. device.

- 6 4 In FIGS. 11 and 12 is shown a variation of the shelf Abracket to be used with the pairs of spaced slots 37 which enable the shelf-supporting bracket 95 to intrinsically provide a plurality of adjustable angular positions with respect ot the channel bars.

In this arrangement, a single angle iron unit may be provided having an upper flat platform surface 97 as one arm of the angle, the rear end of the other arm of the angle being formed to provide the mounting means. This mounting means is comprised of an upper key which extends rearwardly and curves upwardly, and a lower key spaced therefrom which is also curved rearwardly and upwardly, the lower key having a greater radius of curvanture than the upper key. The lower key is provided with two slots 99 and 101 spaced along the lower circumference thereof for a purpose to be described.

The upper key 103 is received within the upper of two adjacent vertically spaced slots 37, the rear end of the hook permitting the support bracket 95 to be pivoted without becoming dislodged so that the slot 99 or the slot 101 respectively may be moved to rest upon the upper surface of the lower slot in the channel bar, the slots 99 and 101 being spaced angularly along the lower circumference of the lower key to provide, respectively, an angularityrof the platform surface of 75 degrees and 90` degrees with respect to the channel bar 17. Further, the lower key 105 may be inserted completely through the lower slot, and the rear edge 107 of the angle iron brought to rest on the base of the channel to provide an angularity of 105 degrees with respect to the vertical channel bar 17. The most effective support bracket which has yet been found for use in connection with the vertical channel bars 17 provided with the single set of centrally spaced circular apertures is that seen in FIGS. 2, 3, 4 and 5.

In this support bracket an elongated, generally rectangular supporting flange 109 is appropriately provided with apertures 111 for the attachment of appropriate shelving 11, as Seen in FIG.V 1. A This supporting means The mounting base 113 of the supporting bracket is I' likewise of generally rectangular configuration and is angled substantially at 90 degrees with respect to the supporting flange 109. A generally T-shaped dog 115 extends outwardly from and in the same plane with the supporting flange 109 and extends rearwardly beyond the mounting plate 113. This T-shaped dog may be formed integrally from the supporting ange 109 or may be secured thereto by welding or any appropriate means. However, the oppositely notchedl portions 117 and 119 must be of sufficient depth and length to permit the retaining head 121 to be received within the channel bar opening, as shown in FIG. 5.

The rearwardmost end of the retaining headis provided centrally with a rearwardly projecting stud 123.

The lower end of the base of the supporting bracket is provided with a tapered, downwardly and rearwardly projecting tongue 125 adapted to be received and forced within the open channel 19 between the opposing guide walls 31 and 33 thereof.

In order to increase the rigidity ofthe supporting bracket, a web 127 may be secured with respect to the base 113 and the underside of supporting flange 109. As indicated in FIG. 2, this web 127 is tapered outwardly toward the end of the supporting bracket.

In actual use, the supporting bracket will be grasped by the supporting flange 109 and rotated into the position shown in FIG. 3 and thrust into the opening 19 until the engagement stud 123 is positioned in the selected aperture 35. The supporting bracket is then rotated around its axis into the position shown in FIG. 2, in which position the retaining head 121 extends beyond the retaining ears 27 and 29 to prevent the supporting bracket from moving axially outwardly from the vertical channel bar unit. Engagement stud 123 extends into a. selected aperture 35 and prevents the supporting bracket from being able to move vertically in relationship to the vertical channel bar unit while permitting a small degree of rotation of the bracket to permit the tapered tongue 125 to be forced into position between the guide walls 31 and 33 to decrease the possibility of the brackets being dislodged by random bumps and jars from the under side. Further, it is to be noted that even though the tongue 125 were moved outwardly by a jar on the underside of the bracket, the close tolerance between the retaining head 121 and the retaining ears 27 and 29 maintain the engagement stud 123 in place within the aperture 35, preventing the supporting bracket from slipping vertically in relationship to the vertical channel bar units. Thus, this particular supporting bracket, used in this particular environment, is quite impossible to completely dislodge either vertically or horizontally by accident, removal necessitating a conscious twisting action of the entire supporting bracket. FIGS. 13 and 14 show a further attachment which can be used with the basic supporting bracket to achieve a wide variety of angular positions. As shown in FIGS. 13 and 14 a supporting flange is rotatably mounted on the base structure to permit rotation vertically upwardly or downwardly and to be secured in a variety of positions by a bolt which may be put through apertures appropriately formed in the supporting flange and the extension of the base as seen in FGURE 14.

I claim:

l. In an adjustable shelf bracket assembly, the cornbination of a vertical channel bar which in cross-section includes a rear portion, two flanges each extending forwardly at opposing ends of said rear portion and each turning inwardly toward the other at the forward end to form ears, the innermost edges of said ears projecting forwardly to form guide walls defining an open receiving channel, the central portion of said rear portion being offset inwardly and being provided with longitudinally, spaced and aligned apertures throughout the length thereof, and a support bracket comprising a supporting means and a mounting means structurally secured to said supporting means, said mounting means including a mounting base generally parallel to and resting on the ends of said guide walls, a T-shaped dog extending rearwardly from the upper portion of said mounting base and into said receiving channel, the head of said T-shaped dog terminating in a rearwardly projecting s-tud extending into one of said apertures, said head being retained within said channel bar by said ears and being removable by turning said bracket axially until said head is substantially aligned with said longitudinal channel opening.

2. ln an adjustable shelf bracket assembly, the cornbination of a vertical channel bar which in cross-section includes a rear portion, two flanges each extending forwardly at opposing ends of said rear portion and each turning inwardly toward the other at the forward end to form ears, the innermost edges of said ears projecting forwardly to form guide walls defining an open receiving channel, the central portion of said rear portion being otset inwardly and being provided with longitudinally spaced and aligned apertures throughout the length thereof, and a support bracket comprising a supporting means and a mounting means structurally secured to said supporting means, said mounting means including a mounting base generally parallel to and resting on the ends of said guide walls, a T-shaped dog extending rearwardly from the upper portion of said mounting base and into said receiving channel, the head of said T-shaped dog terminating in a rearwardly projecting stud extending into one of said apertures, said head being retained within said channel bar by said ears and being removable by turning said bracket axially until said head is substantially aligned with said longitudinal channel opening, the lower end of said base forming a tongue tapered downwardly and rearwardly to be forced between said guide walls.

3. In an adjustable shelf bracket assembly, the cornbination of a vertical channel oar which in cross-section includes a rear portion, two flanges each extending forwardly at opposing ends of said rear portion and each turning inwardly toward the other at the forward end to form ears, the innermost edges of said ears projecting forwardly to form guide walls defining an open receiving channel, the central portion of said rear portion being offset inwardly and being provided with longitudinally spaced and aligned apertures throughout the length thereof, and a support bracket comprising a supporting means and a mounting means structurally secured to said supporting means, said mounting means including a mounting base generally parallel to and resting on the ends of said guide walls, a T-shaped dog extending rearwardly from the upper portion of said mounting base and into said receiving channel, the head of said T-shaped dog terminating in a rearwardly projecting stud extending into one of said apertures, said head being retained within said channel bar by said ears and being removable by turning said bracket axially until said head is substantially aligned with said longitudinal channel opening, the lower end of said base forming a tongue extending downwardly and rearwardly between said guide walls.

4. ln an adjustable shelf bracket assembly, the combination of a vertical channel bar which in cross-section includes a rear portion, two flanges each extending forwardly at opposing ends of said rear portion and each turning toward each other at the forward end to form ears, the innermost edges of said ears projecting forwardly to form guide walls detining an open receiving channel, the central portion of said rear portion being offset inwardly and provided with a pair of vertically spaced and horizontally aligned aperture series, and a support bracket comprising a supporting means, mounting means structurally secured to said supporting means, said means including a plate extending between said guide walls and terminating in two vertically spaced, rearwardly extending and downwardly projecting hooks received respectively within two adjacent vertically spaced apertures of one of said series, and a tab having one end secured to said support bracket and the other end projecting rearwardly around the outer side of one of said guide walls to hold said support bracket in close proximity thereto.

5. ln an adjustable shelf bracket assembly, the combination of a vertical channel bar which in cross-section includes a rear portion, two flanges each extending forwardly at opposing ends of said rear portion and each turning toward the other at the forward end to form ears, the innermost edges of said ears projecting forwardly to form guide walls deining an open receiving channel, the central portion of said rear portion being offset inwardly and formed with a pair of vertically spaced and horizontally aligned aperture series, and a support bracket comprising a supporting means including a supporting platform, a strengthening web extending vertically downwardly from said platform, a mounting plate having one end secured on said web and the other end terminating in two vertically spaced, rearwardly extending and downwardly projecting hooks received respectively within two adjacent vertically spaced apertures of one of said series, and a tab having one end secured to said web and the other end projecting rearwardly in spaced relationship to said mounting plate and around the outer side of one of said guide walls to hold said support bracket in close proximity thereto.

6. In an adjustable shelf bracket assembly, the cornbination of a vertical channel bar which in cross-section includes a rear portion, two flanges each extending forwardly at opposing ends of said rear portion and each turning toward the other at the forward end to form ears, the innermost edges of said ears projecting forwardly to form guide walls defining an open receiving channel, the central portion of said rear portion being oiset inwardly and formed with a pair of vertically spaced and horizontally aligned aperture series, and a pair of support 9 brackets each comprising a supporting means including a supporting platform, a web extending downwardly beneath said platform, a mounting plate Ahaving one end secured to said web and extending between said guide walls, said mounting plate terminating at the other end in two vertically spaced, rearwardly extending and downwardly projecting hooks, the hooks of one of saidmounting plates being received within two adjacent vertically spaced apertures of one of said series, and the hooks of the other of said mounting plates being received respectively within two adjacent vertically spaced apertures of the other of said series, a tab having one end secured to the web of one of said support brackets and the other end projecting rearwardly around the outer side of one of said guide walls, and a second tab having one end secured to the web ofthe other of said support brackets, the other end of said tab projecting rearwardly around the outer side of the other of said guide walls, said tabs holding each of said support brackets in close proximity with respect to one of said guide walls. v

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Classifications
U.S. Classification248/222.52, 248/200.1, 248/235, 108/152, 248/242, 211/187, 248/243
International ClassificationA47B57/00, A47B57/30
Cooperative ClassificationA47B57/30
European ClassificationA47B57/30