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Publication numberUS3081906 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1963
Filing dateApr 1, 1959
Priority dateApr 1, 1959
Publication numberUS 3081906 A, US 3081906A, US-A-3081906, US3081906 A, US3081906A
InventorsJohn Henchert
Original AssigneeContinental Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container
US 3081906 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 19, 1963 Filed April 1. 1959 J. HENCHERT CONTAINER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 JOHN HENCHERT ATTORNEYS Mam}! 1953 J. HENCHERT 3,081,906

CONTAINER Filed April 1, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 37 FIG. 4

INVENTOR JOH/v HE/VCHERT ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,081,906 CONTAINER John Henchert, River Forest, Ill., assignor to Continental Can Company, Inc., New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Apr. 1, 1959, Ser. No. 803,514 2 Claims. (Cl. Mil-67) The invention relates to new and useful improvements in the forming of containers, and primarily seeks to provide a novel connection between an open end of a container body and a closure.

In the manufacture of containers of the dispensing type wherein the contents of the containers are pressurized, it is necessary that a complete and lasting seal be formed between the container body and the top closure. At the present time, the bodies of containers of this type are provided at the upper edge thereof with an enlarged reinforcing portion and the closure has a peripheral downwardly opening channel in which the upper end of the container body is received. A suitable sealing material is disposed within the channel, and in the formation of the connection between the closure and the container body, the sealing material is compressed by engaging the channel portion of the closure with a chuck and exerting a downward pressure thereon. While in this compressed state, the upstanding wall of the closure is expanded outwardly beneath the enlarged upper portion of the can body to lock the closure in place. However, heretofore, the inner surface of the can body has sloped upwardly and inwardly with the result that when the upstanding wall of the closure in the area which has been expanded springs back, as metal will do, the inward movement of the expanded portion of the closure permits a like upward movement of the closure with respect to the container body. This permits the channel portion of the closure to move upwardly and thus relieve the compression which is placed on the sealing material. In many instances, this spring back and the resultant upward movement of the closure is excessive, with the result that a minute leak will exist. In such instances, when the contents of the container are to be dispensed, there will be no pressure within the container to dispense the contents. Obviously, such defective containers are undesirable and must be avoided.

It is therefore another object of the invention to provide a connection between a closure and a container body of the type described above wherein the connection is of such a nature that the springing back of the expanded portion of the upstanding wall of the closure will in no way release the closure for upward movement relative to the container body, thus retaining the originally formed seal between the closure and the container body.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a novel connection between a can body and a closure for one end of the can body, the can body being provided with a reinforced upper edge portion which projects slightly inwardly and has a substantially flat seating surface on the underside thereof, which seating surface is disposed normal to the axis of the can body, and the closure including a downwardly opening peripheral channel engaged over the upper edge portion of the can body, and an upstanding wall which is outwardly expanded beneath the upper edge portion and engaged with the seating surface to prevent relative upward movement of the closure with respect to the can body.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel closure-to-can-body connection for containers which are intended to be internally pressurized, the connection being of a nature which is readily adaptable to can bodies which are made either by an impact extrusion process and have thickened upper edge portions, or which are formed from 3,081,996 Patented Mar. 19, 1963 sheet material and have an upper edge portion in the form of a curl, the connection being of such a nature that the desired seal between the closure and the can body may be maintained.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a novel ciosure-to-can-body connection wherein the can body is provided with an enlarged reinforced upper edge portion which is so shaped that a flat seating surface is defined on the underside thereof, with the seating surface being disposed substantially normal to the axis of the can body, and the closure including a peripheral downwardly opening channel received over the upper edge portion of the can body, a sealing material disposed within the channel and compressed between the material of the channel and. the upper edge of the can body, and the closure further including an upstanding wall which has a portion thereof outwardly expanded immediately below and engaging the seating surface to prevent relative upward movement of the closure with respect to the can body so that the initial compressed state of the sealing material effected by downwardly urging the channel ofthe closure prior to the expanding of the upstanding wall, is maintained.

With the above, and other objects in view that will hereinafter appear, the nature of the invention will be more clearly understood by reference to the following detailed description, the appended claims, and the several views illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

IGURE 1 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken through the upper portion of an extruded can body and a closure with the channel of the closure engaged by a chuck.

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view similar to FIGURE 1, and shows the closure with the upstanding wall thereof being expanded by a tool during the closing operation.

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view similar to FIGURE 1, and shows the final connection between the can body and the closure.

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view similar to FIGURE 1 and taken through the upper portion of a can body which is formed from sheet material and wherein the upper edge thereof is in the form of a curl.

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary vertical sectional View similar to FIGURE 4, and shows the upstanding wall of the closure being deformed beneath the curl by a tool which expands a portion of the upstanding wall.

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken through the container of FIGURE 4, and shows the details of the final connection between the closure and the can body after the tools used in the closing operation have been removed.

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG- URES l, 2 and 3, the can body is generally referred to by the numeral 5, and the closure is generally referred to by the numeral 6. The can body 5 is formed by an impact extrusion process, which in itself forms no part of this invention, and includes a cylindrical body portion 7 which terminates in a thickened frusto-conical upper portion 8. The upper end of the container body 5 is open and is defined by a thick upper edge portion 9. The upper edge portion 9 is continuous with the exterior surface of the can body 5, but projects inwardly into the opening of the can body, as at 10. The upper edge portion 9 includes a lower part 11 which is integrally united with the upper portion 8. The lower part 11 is of a reduced thickness and includes a generally vertical inner surface 12. The underside of the projecting part 10 is flat and forms a seating surface 13 which is disposed at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the can body 5.

The closure 6 includes an annular bottom portion 14 which terminates at its inner edge in an integral upstanding mounting portion 15 for a dispensing nozzle (not shown). The bottom portion 14 of the closure 6 terminates at its outer edge in an upstanding wall 16 which is cylindrical. In turn, the upstanding Wall 16 terminates at its upper edge in a peripheral downwardly opening channel 17. The channel 17 may be considered as including an upper bight portion 18, an outer depending skirt 19, and an inner depending skirt 20 which is actually a continuation of the upstanding wall 16.

In the formation of the connection between the closure 6 and the container body 5, a suitable sealing material 21 is disposed either in the channel 17 or on the upper surface of the upper edge portion 9. The closure 6 is then assembled on the container body in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 1, with the upper edge portion 9 being received in the channel 17. After the components of the container are so assembled, they then pass into a conventional type of closing machine which includes a chuck 22. The chuck 22 is moved into pressure engagement with the upper surface of the channel 17 and urges the closure 6 downwardly with respect to the container body 5. As a result, the sealing material 21 is compressed between the channel 17 and the upper edge portion of the container body 5. In order that the seal between the closure 6 and the container body 5 may be a permanent one, it is desired that the sealing material be retained in its compressed state. This is accomplished by so interlocking the closure 6 with the container body 5 so "as to prevent upward movement of the closure 6 with respect to the container body 5.

Reference is now had to FIGURE 2 wherein a conventional tool 23 is illustrated in position expanding the upper part of the upstanding wall 16 immediately below the inwardly projecting part of the upper edge portion 9. It is to be noted that the skirt portion is urged outwardly around the underside of the inwardly projecting part 10, and that a part of the skirt portion 20 and a part of the upstanding Wall 16 are so deformed so as to engage the seating surface 13. The outward expansion of the upstanding wall 16 is such that it is disposed slightly spaced from the vertical surface 12. By so outwardly expanding the skirt portion 20 and the upstanding wall 16, the closure 6 is interlocked with the can body 5 in such a manner that upward movement. of the closure 6 relative to the can body 5 is prevented.

The completed connection between the closure 6 and the can body 5 is best illustrated in FIGURE 3. 'It is to be noted that after the closing operation, the upstanding Wall 16 has sprung back, but the springing thereof is inwardly away from the vertical surface 12. The material of the closure 6 has no tendency whatsoever to spring downwardly, and upward springing thereof is prevented by the engagement of the expanded portion with the seating surface 13. The inward movement of the upstanding wall 16 in the expanded area has no effect whatsoever on the relationship between the channel 17 and the upper edge portion 9, with the result that the sealing material 21 is retained in its compressed state and the desired seal between the closure 6 and the coutainer body 5 is maintained.

A second form of the invention is illustrated in FIG- URES 4, 5 and 6. In this form of the invention, the container body is generally referred to by the numeral 24, and is formed from thin flat sheet stock. The container body 24 has all of the portions thereof of a constant thickness, and includes a body wall portion 25, a generally frusto-conical upper portion 26, and a reinforced upper edge portion defining an opening in the top of the container body 24. The upper edge portion is in the form of a curl 27, which projects inwardly, and which is rolled outwardly, as is best shown in FIGURE 4. The shape of the curl 27 is such that it provides a flat seating surface 28 on the underside thereof, which seating surface is dis- 1 posed substantially at right angles to the vertical axis of the container body 24.

The open upper end of the container body 24 is closed by a closure generally referred to by the numeral 29. The closure 29 may be identical with the closure 6, but for purposes of description, it will be assumed to be slightly different and thus given separate reference numerals.

The closure 29 includes an annular bottom portion 30 which terminates at its inner edge in an integral mounting portion .31 for a dispensing valve (not shown). The bottom portion 30 terminates at its outer edge in an upstanding wall 32, which, in turn, terminates at its upper edge in a peripheral downwardly opening channel generally referred to by the numeral 33. The channel 33 includes an upper bigh-t portion 34, a depending outer skirt 35, and a depending inner skirt 36. The inner skirt 36 is, in fact, a continuation of the upstanding wall 32.

The closure 29 is first assembled on the upper end of the container body 24 in the manner best illustrated in FIGURE 4. In this position, the curl 27 is received within the channel 33. After the closure 29 and the container body 24 have been assembled, they are passed through a closing machine which includes a chuck 37. It is to be noted that the configuration of the chuck 37 is such that when it engages the outer skirt portion 35, the outer skirt portion 35 is deformed inwardly to conform to the shape of the corresponding part of the curl 27. Also, a downward pressure is exerted onto the channel 33 by the chuck 37 so as to bring about a slight compressing of the curl 27 in a vertical direction.

After the chuck 37 has become properly seated on the channel 33, a conventional expanding tool 38 engages the upper part of the upstanding wall 32 to expand the upstanding wall 32 outwardly beneath the curl 27, with the result that the inner skirt portion 36 is curved about the underside of the curl 27 and conforms to the shape of the corresponding part of the curl 27 At the same time, a part of the inner skirt portion and a part of the upstanding Wall 32 are deformed to engage the fiat seating surface 28. These deformed parts of the skirt portion 36 and the upstanding wall 32 tightly bear against the seating surface 28 and upward movement thereof is prevented.

After the tool 38 has been removed, the closure 29 has the tendency to spring back and assumes the position illustrated in FIGURE 6. It is to be noted that the expanded portion of the upstanding wall 32 has sprung back only inwardly. There is no tendency for the expanded portion of the upstanding wall 32 to spring back downwardly, and upward springing back is prevented by the seating surface 28. Thus, the desired compressed engagement between the curl Z7 and portions of the closure 29, primarily formed by the channel 33, is maintained. Furthermore, because of the tendency of the curl 27 to spring back to its original shape, a tight seal between the curl 27 and the closure 29 is maintained.

From the foregoing, it will be readily apparent that by forming the container body with a seating surface for the expanded part of the upstanding wall of the closure in such a manner that the seating surface is disposed substantially at right angles to the vertical axis of the container body, when the upstanding wall is expanded into engagement with the seating surface, the contact between the expanded portion of the upstanding wall and the seating surface is such that upward movement of the closure with respect to the container body is prevented. Thus, the interlocked and sealed components of the closure and container body remain the same after being released from the closing mechanism, even though the expanded portion of the closure does spring in a certain amount.

At this time, it is pointed out that although no sealing material has been illustrated in conjunction with the con nection between the closure 29 and the container body 24, if it is deemed advisable, a sealing material, such as 5 the sealing material 21, may be disposed within the channel 33 between the channel 33 and the curl 27.

While two forms of the invention have been shown for the purposes of illustration, it is to be clearly understood that various changes in the details of construction and arrangement of par-ts may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A container closure assembly comprising a container body having an open upper end including a reinforced upper edge portion, said upper edge portion presenting an inner downwardly disposed seating surface located below said reinforced upper edge portion, said seating surface being disposed at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the container body, and a generally cupshaped closure for said container body upper end, said closure including an upstanding wall portion disposed within said container open end, said wall portion terminating at its upper end in a downwardly directed peripheral channel receiving said upper edge portion, an upper part of said upstanding wall portion being outwardly directed and in face-to-face engagement with said seating surface to retain said channel in sealed engagement with said upper edge portion, said container body being formed of extruded material and said upper edge portion being of a greater thickness than the adjacent portion of said container body.

2. A container closure assembly comprising a container body having an open upper end including a reinforced upper edge portion, said upper edge portion presenting an inner downwardly disposed seating surface located below said reinforced upper edge portion, said seating surface being disposed at right angles to the longi tudinal axis of the container body, and a generally cupshaped closure for said container body upper end, said closure including an upstanding wall portion disposed within said container open end, said wall portion termi hating at its upper end in a downwardly directed peripheral channel receiving said upper edge portion, an upper part of said upstanding wall portion being outwardly di rected and in face-to-face engagement with said seating surface to retain said channel in sealed engagement with said upper edge portion, said container body being formed of generally constant thickness sheet material and said upper edge portion being defined by an inwardly projecting outwardly turned curl.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 362,991 Norton May 17, 887 2,060,145 Vogel Nov. 10, 1936 2,322,843 Deane June 29, 1943 2,684,778 Staller July 27, 1954 2,685,989 Samuels Aug. 10, 1954 2,856,102 Remington et a1 Oct. 14, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US362991 *May 17, 1887Himself And Oliver wnoeton
US2060145 *Oct 19, 1935Nov 10, 1936Martin Vogel WilliamCan closure and method of making the same
US2322843 *Jan 31, 1940Jun 29, 1943Gerard C DeaneCombination container and cap remover
US2684778 *Dec 16, 1950Jul 27, 1954Jan Karel StallerClosure for containers subjected to internal pressure
US2685989 *Jun 16, 1950Aug 10, 1954Maryland Devices IncPressure dispensing valve actuator
US2856102 *Feb 18, 1955Oct 14, 1958Peerless Tube CompanyPressure dispensing container
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3231152 *Oct 8, 1963Jan 25, 1966American Can CoPressure container
US3450305 *Oct 12, 1966Jun 17, 1969Continental Can CoVenting means for containers
US4561555 *Dec 13, 1984Dec 31, 1985Continental Plastic Beverage Bottles, Inc.Plastic container having enlarged free end portion for receiving a metal end unit by double seaming
US4792067 *May 13, 1985Dec 20, 1988Pittway CorporationMounting cup
US4813576 *May 12, 1986Mar 21, 1989Pittway CorporationMounting cup
US4895269 *Apr 25, 1988Jan 23, 1990Cade Daniel WPaint bucket
US4958757 *Dec 19, 1988Sep 25, 1990Pittway CorporationFerrule for sealing with a container
US5016785 *Jun 28, 1990May 21, 1991Pittway Corp.Skirtless mounting cup
US7017772 *Mar 13, 2003Mar 28, 2006S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Pressure container
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/615
Cooperative ClassificationB65D7/34
European ClassificationB65D7/34