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Publication numberUS3082289 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1963
Filing dateApr 14, 1960
Priority dateApr 14, 1960
Also published asDE1218032B
Publication numberUS 3082289 A, US 3082289A, US-A-3082289, US3082289 A, US3082289A
InventorsOliver L Allen
Original AssigneeElectrolux Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flexible conduits
US 3082289 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 19, 1963 o. ALLEN 3,032,289

FLEXIBLE CONDUITS Filed April 14, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. OLIVEE C Hus/v HIS ATTORNEY March 19, 1963 o. L. ALLEN FLEXIBLE commons Filed April 14, 1960 Sheet 2 m m m w.

Hrs AIToRNEIf United States Patent 3,082,289 FLEXIBLE CONDUITS Oliver L. Allen, Riverside, Conn, assignor to Electrolux Corporation, Old Greenwich, Conn, a corporation of Delaware Filed Apr. 14, 1960, Ser. No. 22,146 10 Claims. (Cl. 174-47) My invention relates to hose or other flexible conduit and more particularly to a hose of substantial diameter in which is incorporated an electric cord.

When such a hose is bent the linear distance along the surface of the hose on the inside of the bend is necessarily less than the linear distance along the outside of the bend, this being made possible by contracting and stretching of the hose material at the respective sides if the material is elastic, as it usually is, accompanied by deepening and flattening of corrugations at the respective sides of the hose. Consequently, if an ordinary copper conductor is incorporated in the side wall of a hose, copper being substantially inelastic, it will not permit the stretching of the material in the event the conductor is on the outside of the bend, while if it is on the inside it will not contract but will be bent into short loops so sharply that it may be weakened to the breaking point after a relatively few bends.

It has been suggested to incorporate the conductors in a spiral within the hose, but this requires a conductor length many times that of the hose which not only adds to the cost and weight, but also increases the voltage drop through the conductor.

In accordance with the present invention there is incorporated in the side wall of the hose a stretchable electric conductor, such as that disclosed in Patent No. 2,013,- 211 issued September 3, 1935 to Karl Herkenberg, the conductor being stretched before being secured to the hose sufiiciently so that when the hose is bent with the con ductor on the inside of the bend the conductor may contract so as to retain its original straight form, except of course for the fact that it curves with the hose. If the hose is bent with the conductor on the outside of the bend it can of course stretch further, thus permitting a free bending of the hose without subjecting the conductor to any damaging stress.

One advantageous application of my invention is to tank type vacuum cleaners when it is desired to transmit electricity from the main unit to a motor located in a nozzle which is connected to the unit by means of a suction hose, although it is to be understood that my invention may be used with various other types of hose.

Further objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent from the following description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings which form part of this specification and of Which;

FIG. 1 is a side view, partially broken away, of a vac uum cleaner hose embodying my invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view on an enlarged scale of a section of the hose illustrated in FIG. 1 and showing a reverse bend in the hose;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a slightly modified form of hose and is taken on the line 33 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional View taken on the line 4-4 of FIG. 3;

' FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 2, but showing my invention embodied in a different type of suction hose;

FIG. 6 is a view on a smaller scale and partially in cross-section of the hose illustrated in FIG. 5, but showing coupling members at the ends of the hose, the crosssectional portion being taken on the line 66 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional View taken on the line 7-7 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a top view of a portion of the hose shown in FIGS. 6 and 7; and

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIGS. 2 and 5, but showing my invention embodied in a third form of hose.

Referring more particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2, reference character 10 designates generally a flexible hose which is provided at one end with a push connector 12 for removably connecting it to a vacuum cleaner, and at the other end with a rigid tubular member 14 for connecting it to a suction cleaning tool.

The construction of the flexible hose 10 is shown more particularly in FIG. 2. It includes a tubular member 16 made of fabric impregnated with rubber or other suitable material to make it airtight. The fabric is preferably cut on the bias so that it is somewhat elastic in the lengthwise direction of the hose. Within the tubular member 16 is a supporting spiral wire 18 made of steel or othermaterial of suitable strength. The turns of the spiral 18 are preferably secured to the inner surface of the tubular member 16, as by vulcanizing during the construction of the hose. A cord or string of jute 20 or other suitable material is spirally wound around the outside of the tubular member 16, the turns of the string 20 being in between the turns of the spiral 18, as is clearly shown in FIG. 2.

Prior to winding the string 20 around the tubular member 16 a piece of stretchable two conductor cord 22 is laid along side of the hollow body and extends in a straight line substantially parallel to the center line of the hollow body. This stretchable cord may be of the type disclosed in the aforesaid Patent No. 2,013,211. Conductor cords of this type may be stretched up to 200% or more of their original length. Prior to winding the string 2% around the hollow body 16 and the cord 22, the latter is elongated to the extent and for the reason which will subsequently be explained. The string 20 thereupon serves to secure the conductor cord 22 to the tubular body 16 at spaced points along the length of the cord, namely at each point where the cord is held between the tubular 'body 16 and a turn of the string 20.

Thereafter, the tubular body with the conductor cord attached is provided with a braided cover 24 by means of a well known braiding machine. The ends of the cord adjacent to the opposite ends of the hose are not secured in place by the string 26, but are covered by the braiding 24. However, these ends may be brought out through the braiding, -as is shown in FIG. 1, by inserting a hook shaped instrument between the strands of the braiding, catching the free end of the conductor cord and pulling it out. A male plug 26 may be secured to one end of the cord, any desired length of free cord 2.2a being provided. The other end 22b of the conductor cord may be secured to a receptacle 28 which is fixed to the end of the hose by means of the clamp 30'. When in use, the push connector is engaged with a suitable inlet opening in the vacuum cleaner unit and the plug 26 is inserted in an electrical outlet on the unit, the free portion 22a permitting a certain amount of swiveling of the push connector 12 in the inlet opening. A suitable cord from the nozzle is provided with a male plug which is inserted in the receptacle 28, thus completing the circuit from the unit to the nozzle.

As will be seen from FIG. 2, when the hose extends straight the distance A between successive turns of the spiral 18 is approximately 7 of an inch. On the other hand, the distance B between adjacent turns of the supporting spiral 18 at the inside of the bent portion of the hose is only about of an inch while the distance C between adjacent turns of the spiral 18 at the outside of the bend is approximately 4, of an inch. This means that if the conductor cord 22 is on the inside of the bend it must contract from %6 of an inch to ,4,, or approximately 33%.

3 In order to be able to do this it must have been elongated at least 33% of its normal unstretched length before it was secured to the tubular body by means of the string 20. If the conductor cord is on the outside of the bend it must stretch about the same amount, or 33%, which readily may take place, as it is capable of a total elonga tion of at least 200% The embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4 is the same as that previously shown, with the exception that the stretchable conductor cord 22 is disposed between the overlapping edges 16a and 16!) which form the longitudinally extending seam of the fabric of the tubular body 16. An advantage of this arrangement is that the outer edge 16!) of the seam provides additional protection for the cord 22. As in the previous embodiment, a braided cover 24 lencases the tubular body 16 and the stretchable cord 22.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 5 through 8, the tubular body of the hose is designated by reference character 32 and is a tube of flexible plastic material. This tube is supported against collapse by the stiff spiral wire 18. Disposed between adjacent turns of the spiral and the inner surface of the tubular member 32 is the stretchable cord 22. As was the case in the previous embodiments, the cord 22 is elongated prior to being secured between the turns of the spiral and the tubular body by an amount sufiicient so that when the hose is bent with the cord on the inside of the bend it may contract and thus remain substantially parallel to the center line of the hose.

Inasmuch as the plastic tubular member 32 constitutes the airtight portion of the hose, it is not practical to bring the cord 22 through it to the outside thereof adjacent to the ends of the hose, as this would permit leakage of air. As is shown in FIGS. 6, 7 and 8, the cord is continued to the ends of the tubular body 32, the ends being secured within the push connector 12 and the rigid tubular member 14, respectively, as was the case in FIG. 1. As is shown at the right-hand end of FIG. 6, and in FIGS. 7 and 8, the cord after it emerges from the tubular member 32 is bent back on itself and extends along the outer surface of the tubular member to a point beyond the end of the push connector 12. Preferably, Ia semi-cylindrical member 34- of rubber or plastic is placed over the hose at this end and has a relatively thin portion 35 extending between the hose and the inner surface of the push connector. The thin portion is formed with a groove 36 connecting with a channel 37 in the thicker part of member 34 within which extends the cord 22. The cord is preferably provided with a free section 22a to the end of which is connected the plug 26.

The same construction may be employed at the opposite end of the hose, with the exception that the free section 22b of the cord is connected to a receptacle 38.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 9 the hose comprises an inner tubular member 40 of airtight flexible plastic material and an outer body 42 of similar material between which is disposed a reinforcing fabric 44. The stretchable cord 22 is disposed between the fabric 44 and the inner tubular member 40, it having been elongated prior to being secured therein, as previously described.

In this embodiment the cord may be brought out through openings formed in the outer tubular body 42. adjacent to the ends of the hose, similar to the manner shown in FIG. 2, inasmuch as the inner body 40 is airtight and would prevent leakage. On the other hand, the cord may be continued to the ends of the hose and brought out through semi-circular members as is illustrated in the previous embodiment.

Although the stretchable cord 22 has been referred to as having two conductors, it is to be understood that it may have any desired member from one up, depending upon electrical considerations. Also, even though my invention has been described in connection with various forms of suction hose, it is equally applicable to flexible conduits of other types.

While I have shown and described several more or less specific embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that this has been done for the purpose of illustration only and that the scope of my invention is not to be limited thereby, but is to be determined fromthe appended claims.

What I claim is:

l. in a hose, a hollow tubular body made of flexible material, a stretchable elastic electric cord extending substantially parallel to the center line of said body, and means for securing said cord to said body at closely spaced points, said cord being in sufficiently elongated condition when secured to said body so that when said hose is bent with said cord on the inside of the bend the cord contracts and remains substantially parallel to said center line.

2. In a hose, a hollow tubular body made of flexible material, a spirally wound reinforcing wire within said body, a stretchable elastic electric cord extending substantially parallel to the center line of said body, and means for securing said cord to said body at closely spaced points, said cord being in sufficiently elongated condition when secured to said body so that when said hose is bent with said cord on the inside of the bend the cord contracts and remains substantially parallel to said center line.

3. In a hose, a hollow tubular body made of flexible material, a braided cover around said body, and a stretchable elastic electric cord secured between said body and said cover and extending substantially parallel to the center line of the body, said cord being in sufiiciently elongated condition when secured therebetween so that when said hose-is bent with said cord on the inside of the bend the cord contracts and remains substantially parallel to said center line.

4. in a hose, a hollow tubular body made of flexible material having a longitudinally extending overlapped seam, and a stretchable elastic electric cord secured between the overlapped portions of said material, said cord being in sufficiently elongated condition when secured between said portions so that when the hose is bent with said cord on the inside of the bend the cord contracts and remains substantially parallel to said seam.

5. In a hose, a hollow tubular body made of flexible material, a spirally wound reinforcing wire within said body, a braided cover around said body, and a stretchable elastic electric cord between said body and said cover and extending substantially parallel to the center line of said body, said cord being in sufficiently elongated condition when secured therebetween so that when said hose is bent with said cord on the inside of the bend the cord contracts and remains substantially parallel to said center line.

6. In a hose, a hollow tubular body made of flexible material, a spirally wound reinforcing wire within said body, a stretchable elastic electric cord extending substanially parallel to the center line of said body, and a string wound spirally around said body to secure said cord thereto at closely spaced points, said cord being in sufiiciently elongated condition when secured to said body so that when said hose is bent with said cord on the inside of the bend the cord contracts and remains substantially parallel to said center line.

7. In a hose, a hollow tubular body made of flexible material, a braided cover around said body, a stretchable elastic electric cord secured between said body and said cover, said cord being in sufliciently elongated condition when secured therebctween so that when said hose is bent with said cord on the inside of the bend the cord contracts and remains substantially parallel to said center line, said cord extending outwardly through said cover adjacent to the opposite ends of the hose, and electrical connector members secured to the ends of said cord outside said cover.

8. In a hose, a hollow tubular body made of flexible airtight plastic material, a spirally wound reinforcing wire within said body, and a stretchable elastic electric cord secured at spaced points to said body by being disposed dition when secured to said body so that when said hose is bent with said cord on the inside of the bend the cord contracts and remains substantially parallel to said center line.

9. -In a hose, a hollow tubular body made of flexible airtight plastic material, a stretchable elastic electric cord secured at spaced points within said body, said cord extending substantially parallel to the center line of said body and being in suificiently elongated condition when secured thereto so that when said hose is bent with said cord on the inside of the bend the cord contracts and remains substantially parallel to said center line, a coupling member telescopically secured over each end of said body, the ends of said cord projecting out of said body at each end thereof and extending back between the outer surface of said body and the respective coupling member and beyond the latter, and electrical connector members secured to the ends of said cord.

10. In a hose, a first hollow tubular body made of flexible airtight plastic material, a spirally wound reinforcing wire -wit-hin said body, a second hollow tubular body around said first body, and a stretchable elastic electric cord disposed between said bodies and extending substantially parallel to the center line of said hose, said cord being secured to said bodies by the force exerted by successive turns of said spiral wire and being in sufiiciently elongated condition when secured to said bodies so that when said hose is bent with said cord on the inside of the bend the cord contracts and remains substantially parallel to said center line.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,516,452 Neuschel Nov. 18, 1924 1,734,605 Smith Nov. 5, 1929 2,013,211 Herkenberg Sept. 3, 1935 2,103,758 Seyfried Dec. 28, 1937 2,197,910 Ament Apr. 23, 1940 2,436,726 Moyer Feb. 24, 1948 2,602,608 Darling July 8, 1957 2,883,513 Schnabel Apr. 21, 1959 2,890,264 Duff June 9, 1959 2,917,568 Moorrnan et al Dec. 15, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 29,645-1904 Great Britain Dec. 30, 1905 797,499 Great Britain July 2, 1958 1,192,442 France Oct. 26, 1959

Patent Citations
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US1516452 *Oct 18, 1923Nov 18, 1924Duraflex Metal Hose CoCoupling for gasoline hose
US1734605 *Aug 21, 1926Nov 5, 1929Smith Lucy CCord take-up and protector
US2013211 *Oct 9, 1933Sep 3, 1935Herkenberg KarlProcess for the production of extensible electric conductors
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3245852 *Mar 26, 1963Apr 12, 1966Hoover CoMethod and apparatus for making single ply and multi-ply corrugated hose
US3965526 *Nov 12, 1973Jun 29, 1976Doubleday Eric GSuction hose with conductor means for electrical current
US4064355 *Nov 8, 1976Dec 20, 1977Dayco CorporationPolymeric flexible hose construction and method of making same
US4132576 *Sep 26, 1977Jan 2, 1979Dayco CorporationMethod of making polymeric flexible hose construction
US5612999 *Mar 4, 1992Mar 18, 1997Gardenhour, Jr.; Charles E.Coiled cord holding assembly
US7226302Sep 22, 2003Jun 5, 2007Scotech Systems Inc.Vacuum cleaner current-carrying hose connection system
CN1856268BApr 29, 2004May 12, 2010诗歌技术系统有限公司Vacuum cleaner current-carrying hose connection system
WO2005027705A1 *Apr 29, 2004Mar 31, 2005Carter Phillip NVacuum cleaner current-carrying hose connection system
WO2011010121A1 *Jul 6, 2010Jan 27, 2011Dyson Technology LimitedA surface cleaning appliance
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/47, 174/69, 138/138, 156/143
International ClassificationA47L9/24, B29D23/18, H01B7/00, F16L11/118
Cooperative ClassificationB29D23/18, H01B7/0072, F16L11/1185, A47L9/246, B29K2021/00, A47L9/24
European ClassificationH01B7/00K, A47L9/24, F16L11/118B, A47L9/24B4, B29D23/18