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Publication numberUS3082680 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1963
Filing dateFeb 6, 1961
Priority dateFeb 6, 1961
Publication numberUS 3082680 A, US 3082680A, US-A-3082680, US3082680 A, US3082680A
InventorsNevin Ira, Arthur I Fader
Original AssigneeBakers Pride Oven Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Smoke hood
US 3082680 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Marek 26, 1963 I. NEVIN ETAL Y3,082,680

SMOKE HOOD Filed Feb. 6, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 March 26', 1963 l. NEVIN Em. 3,082,680

SMOKE HOOD Filed Feb. 6, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 i z "fjtil-"li- 62 l v i 50 Y 52 56 54 i* n 54 INVENTORS lll ||i 11;. /IPA /VEl//A/ H Il 11,40 l' Arr/ya@ n F455? March 26, 1963 l. Nr-:vrN ETAL SMOKE HOOD 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Feb. 6. 1961 United States Patent O 3,632,689 SMKE HOOD Era Nevin, Eastchester, and Arthur I. Fader, Scarsdale, NH., assignors to Baisers Pride @veu Co., line., New York, NX., a corporation of New York Filed Feb. 6, i951, Ser. No. 87,194 10 Claims. (Cl. @ti- 115) This invention relates to smoke hoods, and more particularly to an extensible hood.

It .is common to provide a hood over a broiler or stove, the said hood usually leading through an exhaust duct to the outside of the building. The bottom of the hood is elevated some distance above the broiler or stove, with consequent escape of s-oil and fumes. The primary obiect of the present invention is to generally improve such hoods, and to overcome the foregoing dilticulty.

A more particular object is to provide a hood having an extension which reaches down from the hood, and which provides back and side walls, the `front of the extension remaining open. Such a barrier or baffle may :be somewhat unsightly, and even if not when new, will soon become so because of grease and soot. ln accordance with a further yfeature and object of the present invention, the extension is so mounted that .it may be folded up into the hood for concealment when not in use.

To `accomplish the foregoing general objects, and other objects which will hereinafter appear, our invention resides in the extensible hood elements and their relation one to another, as are hereinafter more Iparticularly described in the following specification. The specilication is accompanied by drawing in which:

FIG. l is a perspective view of an extensible hood em bodying features of our invention;

FlG. 2 is a perspective view with the extension raised up into the hood;

FIG. 3 is `a vertical section taken approximately in the plane of the line 3--3 of PIG. 1, and drawn to larger scale;

FIG. 4 is a vertical section taken approximately in the plane of the line 4 4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary section looking in the direction of the arrows 5 5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a perspective View like FIG. 1, but showing another for-m ofthe invention;

FlG. 7 is like FlG. 6, but shows the extension folded up into the hood;

FIG. 8 is a vertical section taken approximately in the plane of the line 8-3 of FIG. 6 and drawn to larger scale;

FlG. 9 is a vertical section taken approximately in the plane of the line 9-9 of FIG. 8;

FG. 10 is a bottom View, with the extension in down position, and drawn to reduced scale;

FIG. ll is a perspective view showing still another form of the invention;

FIG. 12 is -a similar View, but with the extension raised into and concealed by the hood;

FIG. 13 is a vertical section taken in the plane of the line l3-l3 of FIG. 1l; and

FIG. 14 is a vertical section taken approximately in the plane of the line 1li-14 of FIG. 13.

Referring to the drawing, and more particularly to FlGS. l and 2, the extensible hood comprises a stationary upper portion 12 which is open at the bottom, and a movable lower portion 14. There is a means, in this case a hinge 16, to support the lower portion in a position depending from the upper portion. The lower portion 14 is so dimensioned and mounted that it may be moved up into the upper portion 12 when not in use, as shown in FlG. 2. There is also a releasable means (13 in FlGS. 3-5) to hold the lower portion in its raised position. ln

ZS Patented Mar. 26, lQS

preferred form the upper portion l2 has four sides and is open at the bottom, while the lower portion 14 has a back and two sides, it being open at the front.

ln the species of the invention shown in FiGS. 1-5, the upper edge of the back 2t) of the lower portion is hinged at lo to the rear lower edge 22 of the upper portion. The lower portion is turned bodily upward on the hinge 16, which may be a piano-type hinge extending all .the way lfrom one side of the hood to the other, as is shown in FlG. 4.

Considering the arrangement in greater detail, the hood 12 has a back 22, sides 24 and 26, a top 28, and a front wall 3d which may slope rearwardly, except at the bottom 32 where it is vertical. The hood is usually connected to the outside of the building by a suitable duct, which may connect to the top, or the bach, or either side of the hood, depending upon the particular installation. This duct is usually rrectangular in cross section, but in FIG. 3 (and TGS. 8 and 13) abroken line circle 34 is intended merely to schematically suggest the existence of some form of duct.

A grease filter lil may be mounted part way up the hood. This is supported at the back on a suitable ledge 42, and is further held in position at the sides by releasable buttery clamps d4, which are pivoted so that they can be turned aside to release the grease lter for removal .and replacement by a new one. When turned to the position shown in FlGS. 3 and 4 they support the lilter in horizontal position. When the clamps are released the filter may be turned downward, as shown in broken lines at 49 in FlG. 3.

The bottom edge of the upper portion i2 of the hood preferably is bent inward and upward, as shown at 46 in FIG. 3. The piano hinge 16 is secured to the resulting back edge, and 4the buttery clamps 18 are pivoted on the inturned `side edges. The clamps are shown in their released position in FIGS'. 3 and 4, the extension 14 being down. However, it will be understood that when the extension 14 is turned up to the broken line position 14' (PEG. 3), the clamps 18 are turned inward, as shown by the change from 18 to 18' in FIG. 5, thereby underlying the then raised extension. In some cases the extension, ,when lowered, will reach the stove. In other cases it may be spaced somewhat from the stove, and in such case it is desirable to provide motion limiting stops, such as the outturned ears indicated at 43 in FlGS. 2, 3 and 4. These rest on the reversely folded edge of the upper portion of the hood, as indicated in broken lines at 48 in FIG. 4.

Another species of the invention is shown in FlGS. 6-l0 of the drawing. ln this form the walls of the lower portion are each so separately hinged that all of said walls may be `turned to a generally horizontal position extending across the open bottom `of the upper portion. As here illustrated, the rear edges of the side walls 50 and 52 are hinged at 54 to the side edges of the rear wall S6. The top edge of the rear wall 56 is hinged at 58 to the lower rear edge dii of the upper portion. To raise the extension, the side walls Sil and 52 are turned toward one another on their hinges 54, following which the rear wall 56 bearing the side walls 'Sti and 52, is turned upward to horizontal position. It is there held by turning the butteriiy clamps 62 inward from the released position shown in FIGS. 8 and 9 to a transverse position such that they underlie the wall 56. If desired, stops like 48 in FIG. 3 may be provided on the sides Si! and 52.

We have designed a similar but slightly variant form in which all three piano hinges are `disposed horizontally at the top edges of the sides and back of the lower hood portion. ln such case the sides 5h and 52 are preliminarily turned upward on their individual horizontal piano hinges, to a generally horizontal position, following which the rear wall is turned upward on its piano hinge to J underlie the upturned side walls, whereupon the butterfly clamps may be turned inward Ito support the raised walls.

Still another form of the invention is shown in FIGS. ll-l4 of the drawing. In this form the lower hood portion is bodily slidable upward into the upper portion. Referring to the drawing, the lower portion comprises a rear wall "i0, and side walls 72 and 74 which are immovably related to the rear wall 7 0. All three walls may be bent outward at their upper edge, as shown at 7 6, to limit the downward movement of the hood extension. When the extension is slid upward it may be held in raised position by turning the butterfly clamps 7S inward from the released position shown in FlGS. 13 and 14, to a transverse position in which they underlie the bottom edge of the extension.

We have designed a variant of this hood which combines the vertical piano hinges of FIG. 8 with the sliding action here shown. More specifically, the sides are hinged on Vertical piano hinges to the back, so that they may be turned against the back. The fiat assembly of three sides then may be slid upward adjacent the back of the hood, and finally held in raised position in any desired fashion, most simply by turning buttertly clamps from released to holding position -beneath the bottom of the raised extension. In such case the buttertiy clamps are located immediately adjacent the back of the hood, instead of being relatively far forward, as here illustrated.

It is believed that the construction and method of use of our improved extensible hood, as well as the advantages thereof, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description. In that description the term stove is not intended to exclude broilers, with which the extensible hood is particularly useful, and for which it was especially designed, because broilers give oli a great deal of smoke. It will also be apparent that while we have shown and Adescribed our invention in several preferred forms, changes may be made in the structures shown, without departing from the scope of the invention as sought to be defined in the following claims.

We claim:

l. An extensible smoke hood, said hood comprising a stationary upper portion which is closed on four sides and open at the bottom, and a movable lower portion comprising an upright back and two upright sides, the front of said lower portion being open, the bottom peripheral edge of the upper portion being turned inward, means including said inwardly turned edge of said upper portion `and means on said lower portion cooperating with said inwardly turned edge of said upper portion to support the lower portion in a position depending from the upper portion, said lower portion being so dimensioned and mounted that it may be moved up into the upper portion when not in use, and releasable means to hold the lower portion in said upper position.

2. An extensible smoke hood, said hood comprising a stationary upper portion having four sides and which is open at the bottom, and a movable lower portion comprising an upright back and two upright sides, the front of said lower portion being open, the bottom peripheral edge of the upper portion being turned inward, means including said inwardly turned edge of said upper portion and outwardly projecting stops on said lower portion bearing downward against said inwardly turned edge of said upper portion to support the lower portion in a position depending from the upper portion, said lower portion e. being so dimensioned and mounted that it may be moved up into the upper portion when not in use, `and relcasable means in the upper portion to hold the lower portion in said upper position.

3. An extensible hood as defined in claim 1 in which the upper edge of the back of the lower portion is hinged to the rear lower edge of the upper portion, whereby said hood may be turned bodily upward on said hinge into the upper portion, said hinge helping support the lower portion on the upper portion.

4. An extensible hood as defined in claim 2 in which the sides of the lower portion extend forward from and are immovable relative to the back of the lower portion, and in which the upper edge of said back is hinged to the rear lower edge of the upper portion, whereby said hood may be turned bodily upward on said hinge into the upper portion, said hinge helping support the lower portion on the upper portion.

5. An extensible hood as defined in claim 1 in which the walls of the lower por-tion are each so separately hinged that all of said walls may be turned to a generally horizontal position extending across the open bottom of the upper portion, at least one of said hinges being secured to the upper portion, and helping support the lower portion on the upper portion.

6. An extensible hood as defined in `claim 2 in which the sides and the back of the lower portion are each so separately hinged that all three of said walls may be turned to a generally horizontal position extending across the open bottom of the upper portion, at least one of said hinges being secured to the upper portion, and helping support the lower portion on the upper portion.

7. An extensible hood as dened in claim 2 in which the sides and the back `of the lower portion are each so separately hinged that all three of said walls may be turned to a generally horizontal position extending across the open bottom of the upper portion, the rear edges of the side walls being hinged to the side edges of the rear wall of the lower portion, and the top edge of the rear wall of the lower portion being hinged to the lower rear edge of the upper portion, said latter hinge helping support the lower portion on the upper portion.

8. An extensible hood as dened in claim l in which the lower portion fits slidably within the inturned edge of the upper portion, whereby the lower portion is bodily slidable upward into the upper portion.

9. An extensible hood as deiined in claim 2 in which the lower portion tits slidably within the inturned edge of the upper portion, whereby the lower portion is bodily slidable upward into the upper portion.

10. An extensible hood as detined in claim 2 in which the side walls of the lower portion extend forward from and are immovably related to the rear wall of the lower portion, and in which the lower portion tits slidably within the inturned edge of the upper portion, whereby the lower portion is bodily slidable upward into the upper portion.`

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,341,245 Sonntag Feb. 8, 1944 2,582,884 Nicol Jan. 15, 1952 2,809,575 Floyd Oct. 15, 1957 2,905,073 Aveni Sept. 22, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2341245 *Jun 12, 1941Feb 8, 1944Bernhard SonntagKitchen air cleaner and purifier
US2582884 *Sep 30, 1949Jan 15, 1952Herbert E NicolCooking range hood
US2809575 *May 3, 1954Oct 15, 1957Marion FloydRetractable stove hood
US2905073 *Feb 9, 1956Sep 22, 1959Anthony AveniCollapsible hood
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3520115 *Jun 24, 1968Jul 14, 1970American Air Filter CoCollapsible hood assembly
US3999471 *Feb 24, 1975Dec 28, 1976American Air Filter Company, Inc.Filter hood device
US4231769 *Feb 21, 1978Nov 4, 1980Ahlrich Willard KFiltered ventilating system
US4614177 *May 3, 1984Sep 30, 1986Broan Mfg. Co., Inc.Multi feature range hood
US5133691 *Jan 30, 1991Jul 28, 1992Ab Ph. Nederman & Co.Suction hood for injurious gases
EP0146722A1 *Oct 27, 1984Jul 3, 1985JASO M÷belwerke GmbHFumes evacuation device for kitchens
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/299.00D, 55/DIG.360
International ClassificationF24C15/20
Cooperative ClassificationF24C15/20, Y10S55/36
European ClassificationF24C15/20