Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3083021 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1963
Filing dateJul 5, 1960
Priority dateJul 5, 1960
Publication numberUS 3083021 A, US 3083021A, US-A-3083021, US3083021 A, US3083021A
InventorsReilly John E
Original AssigneeReilly John E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf course
US 3083021 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 26, 1963 J. E. REMY 3,083,021

GOLF COURSE Filed July 5, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet l FG I INVENTOR.

dof/NE. /FE/LL Y "MMM Mamh 26, 1963 J. E. REILLY 3,083,021

GOLF COURSE Filed July 5, 1960 f D@ d W3 SHSF ATTOKNEX.

March 26, 1963 J. E. REILLY 3,083,021

GOLF COURSE Filed July 5, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 l l l l I W l l l l lll l 50 52 JNVENTOR.

JOHN E. RE/Lw BY United States Patent O 3,633,621 @SLE COURSE John E. Reilly, Levittown, NX. (Zit- William Road, North Massapequa, NX.) Filed .Ioly 5, 19nd, Ser. No. @9,683 5 Ciairns. (Cl. 273-176) This invention relates to golf courses and, more particularly, to a golf course arrangement for minimizing the time required for play and for minimizing the amount of walking required therefor.

Ordinarily, the number of players which a conventional golf course will accommodate is extremely limited due to the fact that each succeeding group of players must wait until the field ahead is clear before teeing od or approaching the green. This not only extends the amount of time required to play the round of golf, but also requires a larger expanse of land, and requires the players to walk a distance of three and one-half to four miles for each round of play. It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a special purpose golf course having conventional tees, fairways, greens, and the like, which are arranged in a special manner which will allow for more rapid play, with minimum walking, and which may be laid out upon a relatively small parcel of land.

Still a further object of the present invention is to provide a commercial type of golf course which can be operated on a twenty-hour a day basis, will accommodate a relatively large number of players, and which can be substantially automatically controlled by the allotment of balls allowed for each hole.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide a special purpose golf course of the type described, in which the players never enter upon the fairways, thus minimizing the amount of walking required, and avoiding lapses of time between each group of players moving around the course.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a golf course which is extremely safe for use by beginner and advanced players, and which will require a minimum amount of upkeep and maintenance while handling a capacity number of players.

A more specific object of the present invention is to provide a special purpose golf course of the type described, in which putting areas identical tothe putting areas of the main fairway are disposed adjacent to the tee area of each fairway, so that upon teeing olf, each group of players may then move to the putting area thus freeing the fairway area for the next group of players.

Another specific object of the present invention is to provide a golf course of the aforementioned type, in which the fairways for each hole are disposed in substantially parallel side by side relationship with the tee area at one common end and the target green area for each wood shot at the opposite common end of the fairways, and including further a putting green area spaced apart from each fairway accessible to the tee :area of each fairway, whereby the players may move directly to such putting green area for final approach and putting shots immediately following the tee and second shots from the fairway, in which each putting green `area is an identical reproduction of the main lgreen area of each fairway so that such final approach and putting shots may be taken from substantially identical positions as the lie of the ball in the fairway or main green area, without requiring the players to enter upon the fairways.

All lof the foregoing and still further objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from a study of the following specification, taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the layout of an 18-hole 3,983,021 Patented Mar. 26, 1953 golf course, made in accordance with one form of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary plan View of certain parts of the arrangement shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary plan view of a modied arrangement of a golf course made in accordance with the present invention.

Referring now to the drawing, and more particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2 thereof, a layout 10 for a golf course made in accordance with one form of the present invention is shown to include a single group of fairways F1,

F2 FIS, arranged in side-by-side parallel relationship.

Each fairway has a tee area T1, T2 T18, at one end and a target green area Gllvi, GZM GlM, for

wood shots, at the opposite end. Each fairway is further provided with main hazards HIM, H2M HISM, adjacent to each respective target green area. In addition, some of the fairways, such as the three and four p-ar holes, are provided with individual fairway greens GIF, GZF etc., and associated fairway hazards HlF, HZF etc., that are shaped and arranged substantially identically to the `corresponding target green `and main hazard areas `of each respective fairway. These fairway greens and hazard areas are disposed intermediate each respective tee land target green area for purposes hereinafter more fully described.

A putting green area GIP, GZP GSP and accompanying hazards HlP, H2P HISP, are spaced apart from the tee area T1, T2 T18, of each fairway. Each of these putting green and hazard areas is identical to the target green and hazard area of each respective fairway, and identical to each fairway green and hazard area of those fairways having such fairway green and hazard areas, in the direction of approach from each respective tee area.

Each fairway is further provided with a fairway or second shot area Sil, S2, S3 S18, immediately adjacent to the respective ytee area T1, T2 T18 of each fairway, which fairway shot area is to be used in a manner hereinafter more fully described.

Additional hazards, such as water hazards 20, and rough areas may be provided wherever desired on each of the fairways of the golf course. In addition, the centrally located club house 3G may -be provided with sufficient parking space 32` for a large number of vehicles, and may include practice putting greens 34 for use by the players. A circuitous path 3o leads from the club house 30: toward the first fairway F1, vwnere another practice green 38 is disposed and which may `be used by players waiting their turn at the first tee Tl. A number of cross paths 4d extending between opposite sides of the circuitous path 36 are provided for the convenience of the players desiring to return to the club house in the middle of a round of play.

Each tee area T1, T2, etc., is provided with a facility 42, which may be used as a shelter, and for dispensing balls to each of the players approaching the next tee during the round of play. Such facility may include an attendant or an automatic dispensing device which will dispense a predetermined number of golf -balls to each player entering upon the tee area of each fairway, for purposes hereinafter more fully described.

One, two, three, or four players may participate as a party for each round of play. Starting at the first tee, an attendant or other dispensing device will supply each player with a specific number of gilf balls to play the rst hole which, for a par four hole includes five golf balls apiece. Each palyer will take the rst shot from the tee T1 and the distance thereof noted, such as by reference to indicating markers along the length of the fairway,

shrubs, or other similar markers. The markers are preferably coated with an iridescent paint which will be clearly visible druing daylight playing and also during night time play under restricted lighting conditions. After driving the first shot from the tee Tl toward the target green area GIM, each player then has a choice of playing a second shot from the tee area T1. to a fairway marker corresponding in distance to the distance between the lie of his drive shot and the target green GlM; or the player may, instead, move to the fairway shot area S1 and play directly to the closer fairway target green GIF, with the object of making up only the yardage which would be required to place his iirst tee shot from its present lie onto the target green GIM.

After taking the second shot, the players of the party move to the putting green area GIP and place their balls in approximately the same position as the lie of their second shots relative to the target green area G1M or fairway green area GIF. Since the arrangement of the greens and hazards of each of the main, fairway, and putting green areas are identical in the direction of approach, the placement of the ball for the third stroke is substantially identical as would be the case if the players had entered upon the fairway F1 to take this third shot. In taking the third shot, each player will thus be required to chip or otherwise approach the putting green GlP, and following which the players will putt out in a conventional manner. All of the players in that party then proceed to the next tee area T2, where each player is given three golf balls for that hole. The reason that each player is provided with only three additionalballs is that each player has at least one golf ball remaining from the last hole which was used for chipping and putting. This extra ball will be used o'n'the second hole lif needed. When moving to a par three hole, however, each player receives two balls, giving him a total of three balls. lf a ball is hit out of bounds or into water, the player is allowed a second tee shot. He now lies two and moves to any one of the corresponding areas at the rear of the tee such as the appoarching area, chipping area, traps, or putting green to finish out the hole.

It will now be recognized that play on this course is continuous, with no time Wasted for players to clear the. fairway or putting green ahead, whereupon each succeeding party may tee c-ff immediately following the tee and second shots of each preceding group of players. As a result, each party may take all of the shots required for a full hole of play in a matter of a few minutes, with a minimum amount of walking, and with a minimum amount of delay searching or looking for lost balls. The circuitous path 36 provides a convenient directional control for the players and enables the players to return to the club house when ever desired. Each of the Vfairways is preferably approximately 300 yards long and 45 yards wide, thus providing the spaciousness and layout of `full scale golf courses. The various tee areas', green areas, and fairways may also be contoured in any desired manner to add to the authenticity and reality of the golf source. Since the players do not move over the actual fairways and target green areas, such require a minimum amount of upkeep and maintenance even though the golf course is capable of handling capacity numbers of players.

Reference is now made to FIG. 3 of the drawing, which illustrates an 18-hole golf course 50' of as lightly modified form of an arrangement in which two nine hole groups of fairways 52 and 54 are arranged in back to back relationship with the tee areas thereof lying toward the center Vof the arrangement. Thus, the putting and chipping area of one group of fairways 52 lies immediately adjacent to the chipping and putting areas 6l?f of the second group of fairways 54, which chipping and putting areas 60, 62, may be separated by a row of shrubs or trees S6. A circuitous path 58 extends around the entire 18 holes of the arrangement between the respective tee area and putting area of each fairway. In this a1'- rangement, the club house 64 is preferably located at the end of the golf course so as to be conventiently accessible to the first and 18th holes of play. This arrangement does not require a relatively long and narrow type of land arrangement required in the embodiment shown in FIGS. l and 2, but requires a parcel of land more square in outline.

It will also be recognized that in dispensing the correct number of balls to each player, the playing time of a complete round of golf can be carefully controlled since each player will be limited in the number of strokes that he can take during each hole. Also, by avoiding the necessity for any of the players to enter upon the fairways, the hazard of playing is minimized at the same time that the speed of play is increased.

While this invention has been described with particular reference to the construction shown in the drawing, it is to be understood that such is not to be construed as imparting limitations upon the invention, which is best deiined by the claims appended hereto.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and ldesire to securejby Letters Patent:

l. A golf `course having adjacent parallel fairways, said fairways comprising holes of vari-ed pars with corresponding varied distances, each hole having a tee area with the fairway associated therewith extending forwardly, laterally and rearwardly thereof, a distant target green situated at the far `end of the fairway opposite said tee, and a putting or playing green situated to the rear of said tee, said putting green being of identical size, shape and contour as its associated target green and further including an approach area between the tee and the putting green. 2. A golf course in accordance with claim l, further comprising ldistance markers located along the edge of the fair-way for each hole.

3. A golf course in accordance with claim 2, further comprising means to malte said markers :distinguishable under natural and artificial light.

4. A golf course lcomprising multiple fairways each having a maximum of two target greens and having adjacent to and to the rear of each fairway and extending oppositely Vfrom said target greens, a playing green, a putting green for each fairway, said putting green land target greens being identical in size, shape and contour, markers distinguishable in natural and artificial light, running parallel to the side of both the fairway and the playing green.

5. A golf course having adjacent parallel fairways, said fairways comprising holes of varied pars with corresponding varied distances, each hole having a tee with the fairway associated therewith extending forwardly, laterally and rearwardly thereof, la distant target green at the far end of the fairway opposite said tee, a second target green located laterally of the drive line between said tee and said distant target green, said second target green being closer than said distant target green, a putting or playing green to the rear of said tee and having `an approach area between the putting lgreen and said tee, said second target green and said putting green being identical in size, shape and contour to said `distant tar-get green, distance markers located along the edge of the fairway for each hole.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,851,423 Ely Mar. 29, 1932 2,003,074 Gage May 28, 1935 '2,455,806 Reach Dec. 7, 1948 2,490,961 Hendry Dec. 13, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1851423 *Sep 30, 1930Mar 29, 1932Ely Oscar LGolf game
US2003074 *Feb 1, 1933May 28, 1935Kellogg HuntingtonGolf playing field
US2455806 *Nov 20, 1947Dec 7, 1948Reach Milton BConstruction of fields for playing golf
US2490961 *Aug 25, 1948Dec 13, 1949Judson Hendry AdoniramGolf practice range
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3695619 *Sep 7, 1971Oct 3, 1972Brobston ScottGolf course with target greens and separate putting greens
US4129300 *Nov 18, 1976Dec 12, 1978Magnuson Arthur PCompact golf course
US4872686 *Sep 23, 1987Oct 10, 1989Trasko Theodore WGolf course and method of playing a golf game
US4928973 *Sep 16, 1987May 29, 1990Ralph PerryMethod and course for playing a golf-like game
US4988105 *May 23, 1989Jan 29, 1991Ralph PerryMethod and course for playing a golf-like game
US5163683 *Sep 24, 1991Nov 17, 1992Gordon OswaldGolf park
US5184824 *Jun 28, 1991Feb 9, 1993Riedinger Thomas RGolf facility and method
US6409607Apr 20, 1999Jun 25, 2002Jeffrey M. LibitGolf courses and methods of playing golf
US7137901 *Dec 29, 2005Nov 21, 2006Innovative Golf SolutionsCompact golf facility and a method of playing a golf game
US7479073Apr 27, 2007Jan 20, 2009Woodrow Lloyd PelleySimulated golf game
US7651404 *Jun 5, 2008Jan 26, 2010Gerald LarsonSelect pace golf course
EP0270696A1 *Dec 4, 1986Jun 15, 1988Theodore W. TraskoGolf course and method of playing a golf game
WO1989002298A1 *Sep 15, 1988Mar 23, 1989Ralph PerryA method and course for playing a golf-like game
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/169
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/3697
European ClassificationA63B69/36T2