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Publication numberUS3083389 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 2, 1963
Filing dateOct 9, 1962
Priority dateOct 9, 1962
Publication numberUS 3083389 A, US 3083389A, US-A-3083389, US3083389 A, US3083389A
InventorsKlem R Wittek
Original AssigneeWittek Golf Range Supply Co In
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf ball washer
US 3083389 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 2, 1963 K. R. WITTEK GOLF' BALL WASHER Filed Oct. 9, 1962 April 2, 1963 K. R. wrm-:K

GOLF BALI.. WASHER 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 9, 1962 April 2, 1963 K. R. WITTEK GOLF BALL WASHER 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed 0G12. 9, 1962 INYEN w n/gym j?. lbum/M441, j@ r United States Patent Ofi 3,083,389 Patented Apr. 2, 1953 linois Filed Get. 9, 1962, Ser. No. 229,382 12 Claims. (Cl. 15-9'7) This invention relates to a golf ball washer and has particular relation to an improved golf ball washer of the rotary type and capable of washing large quantities of golf balls in a short time.

Practice driving ranges and the practice areas with which some golf courses are provided are often faced with a considerable problem in keeping the golf balls washed and cleaned, The player who wishes to practice obtains, for example, a pail or basket of golf balls and practices golf shots, driving the balls into a practice field. Frequently a considerable number of people practice simultaneously and, as a result, a large number of golf balls must be available for use. It is often necessary to wash the balls between the time they are used by different people to remove dirt, grass, sand, weeds, rocks and other foreign matter from the surfaces of the balls,

The present invention provides an improved golf ball washer which will effectively wash and work dirt and other foreign matter from the surfaces of large quantities of golf balls in a short time, and a golf ball washer in which the dirt, grass, sand, weeds, rocks, or other foreign matter washed and worked from the surfaces of the balls are discharged from the path of the washer where the Washing and cleaning of the balls takes place without requiring additional operations for removing such foreign matter.

The illustrated embodiment of the present invention comprises a rotatable cylindrical drum and a casing having -a curved surface spaced outwardly from the drum. Spiral rib means is attached to the curved surface of the casing and disposed in the space between the drum and the curved surface. The spiral rib means defines a spiral path for the balls from an inlet through which the balls are introduced into the spiral path adjacent one end of the drum to an outlet from which the balls are discharged from position adjacent the opposite end of the drum. Live molded rubber covers the outer surface of the drum and the interior of the curved surface of the casing and has patterns therein between which the balls are gripped and advanced spirally within the spiral path from the inlet to the outlet. The rotation of the drum relative to the curved surface produces a turning of the balls relative to the drum and the curved surface of the casing for Working dirt and other foreign matter from the surfaces of the balls. The lower portion of the drum rotates within a pan for holding water with a detergent therein for washing the balls with a scrubbing action in their movement through the spiral path from the inlet to the outlet. The curved surface of the casing has an outlet in the bottom thereof through which dirt and other foreign matter removed from the balls is discharged from the spiral path between the drum and the curved surface of the casing.

Another feature resides in the provision of a golf ball Washer of the aforementioned character, wherein the outlet in the bottom of the curved surface of the casing discharges into the pan or vessel which holds the water with detergent.

Another feature resides in the provision of a golf ball Washer wherein the outlet in the bottom of the curved surface of the casing comprises a pair of circumferentially spaced outlet openings extending longitudinally beneath the entire longitudinal extent of the spiral path and each of a width less than the diameters of the golf balls.

Another feature resides in the provision of a golf ball washer, wherein the outlet in the bottom of the curved surface of the casing comprises an outlet opening extending beneath the entire longitudinal extent of the spiral path, and wherein there is a perforated screen covering the outlet opening to prevent passage of the balls through this opening and through which screen dirt and other foreign matter removed from the balls is discharged from the spiral path between the drum and the curved surface.

Another feature resides in the provision of a golf ball washer, wherein the outlet in the bottom of the curved surface of the casing comprises. an opening extending longitudinally beneath the entire longitudinal extent of the spiral path, and wherein there is a member of less width than the opening extending longitudinally through the opening and secured to the ends of the drum with each of the longitudinal edges of the member spaced from the sides of the opening to form a pair of circumferentially spaced outlet openings.

Another feature resides in the provision of a golf ball washer, wherein there is a discharge spout having a perforated bottom over which the balls are discharged from the outlet from the spiral path.

Another feature resides in the provision of a golf ball Washer, wherein the top of the pan is open along one side of the curved surface of the casing and wherein there is -a discharge spout having a perforated bottom over which the balls are discharged from the outlet from the spiral path with the perforated bottom of the discharge spout extending over the opening in the top of the pan.

Another feature resides in the provision of a golf ball washer, wherein there is an upwardly opening hopper for receiving the golf balls and overlying the casing and having a chute for discharging the balls into the inlet end of the spiral path in the direction of rotation of the drum.

Another feature resides in the provision of a golf ball Washer of the character described, wherein the upper half of the casing is hinged for swinging movement to open position for access to the drum.

Another feature resides in the provision of a golf ball washer, wherein the upper half `of the casing is hinged for swinging movement to open position for access to the drum and wherein there is a support elevated above the supporting surface for the washer when the upper half of the casing is closed and movable into cooperation with the supporting surface to support the upper half of the casing when in open position.

Another feature resides in the provision of a golf ball washer, wherein the upper half of the casing is hinged for swinging movement to open position for access to the drum and wherein there is ange means on the top of the pan bridging the junction between the upper and lower parts of the casing externally thereof.

Another feature resides in the provision of -a golf ball washer of the character described, wherein there is a drain outlet opening from the bottom of the pan.

Further features and numerous advantages and adaptations of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, it being understood that the invention is limited only Within the scope or" the appended claims and not to the particular embodiment selected for illustration.

In the drawings:

FIGURE l is a front view of a golf ball washer embodying the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is an end view partially broken away and in section viewed from the left hand end of FlGURE l;

FIGURE 3 is a horizontal sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary sectional View through the bottom of the drum `and the bottom of the curved surface 'of the 'casing and 'showing outlet openings for discharging dirt 'and other foreign matter removed `from the balls from the spiral path between the drum and the curved surface and, into the pan; Y

'FIGURE 5 is aifragtnentary sectional view taken valong the `lirIeS---S'of FIGURE 4; A

FIGURE l61is a fragmentary sectionalvi'ew takenal'ojng the lline 6-*6 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE V7 'is a fragmentaryfsectional the line 7-7 of FIGUREZ; FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary view of the live molded rubber-covering showing one form of 'pattern in the surface thereof;

FIGURE 9 isa view of 'the live molded rubber coverf ing takenalongthe'1ine9-"9 of FIGURE 8; and VFIGURE y1"() 'is a view similarfto FIGURE 4 showing another y"form of Voutlet in the bottom of the curved Vsurface Vof the casing with a perforated 'screen covering 'the outlet opening. Y

Referring 4to the drawings, `the golf ball washer according to the present invention comprises a pan or vessel 1 having 'front and rear walls 2 and 3, iside walls 4 .and a bottom wall 5. The bottom of the vessel 1 .is supported imposition elevated Vabove the ground or other supporting 'sur/face 6 by vsupports 7 at vthe corners thereof.

l'The top of the vessel 1 is open at 8 and fixed `in this opening and depending intopthe 'interior of lthe vessel 1 is the lower 'half 9 oa-casing. I'he lower casing halfhas a semi-cylindrical wall :10 and end walls 11 and is open at the top. Y

The upper half 12 of the casing has a 'semi-'cylindrical wall 13 aud'end walls 14 and is open vat the bottom. The

lView 'taken along upper casinghalf 12 is hinged at 1S forswi'nging movement to open position to allow 'access `to `the interior of the casing and to the 4rotatable cylindrical drum 16 Vwithin the casing as will be presently described. When closed, the lower edges of the semi-cylindrical Wall 13 'and the lower edges of the end vwalls 14 seat upon 'the upper edges of the semi-cylindrical Vwall `10 and the upper edges of the end walls along the 'junction 18. Conveniently re-V leasable latch means 'is Yprovided at V20 nand 21 on the upper 'and lower casing parts 12 and 9 for latching the upper part 12 inV closed 'positiouas shown in FIGURE 2. The upper casing part 12-has a handle 22 'for swinging the 'same to `open position when the latch means is released and for returning the 'same -to closed position.

The drum '16 is of hollow cylindrical Yform'having a cylindrical wall 24 and end walls 25 and is fixed to Vturn with a shaft or shaft Vparts 26 journaled for rotation .in suitable bearings 27 attached, for example,4 at 28 to lthe vessel 1. The shaft or shaft parts 26 'and the drum `16 are rotated by an electric motor 30 and a suitable coupling is provided 'at 32. 'The 'motor 30 is supported on a sup. port 33 onthe vessel 1 and the support 33 is `braced at 34. The outer periphery of the drum 16 is spaced inwardly from the curved surfaces presented by the semi-cylindrical walls 10 and 13. Complementary spiral Vribs 36V are attached to the inner surfaces of the upper and lower .casing parts 12 and 9, for example, by suitable .clips or angular members 38. When the upper casing VVpart ..12 -is closed, the ends ofthe spiral ribs 36 :att-ached thereto meet the ends of the ribs 36 attached to the lower Vcasing part -as shown at 40 in FIGURE 3. Thesemeeting ends 40 are at the junction 18 between .the upper and Alower casing parts 12 and .9.

The spiral ribs r36 are disposed in the space -between the outer periphery of the drum 16 andthe `inner peripheries of the semi-cylindrical walls 1() and 13 and denne a spiral path for the balls from an inlet 42 through which Athe balls are introduced into the .spiral path adjacent one end of thedrum 16 to an outlet 43 from which the balls are discharged vfrom position adjacent the opposite end of the drum 16.

The top of Ythe pan or vessel 1 is open at 45 along one side of the casing `part 9. A `discharge spout 46 is at` spaanse tached to the casing part 12 and delivers the washed and cleaned balls from the 'outlet 43, 'for example, Vto a pail or basket 51 which may be "supported on the ground or other supporting surface 6. The spout 46 is of trough shaped form having upright flanges 48 and a bottom 49 perforated at 50. The perforated bottom of the spout 46 extends over the opening 45 and as a result any water, so forth etc., on the balls willdrop down into the vessel 1.

Mounted upon the upper casing part 12 is an upwardly opening hopper 52 with metal supporting `straps S3 and 54 between lthe hopper and the upper casing part 12. The hopper S2 overliesthe casing part 12 and opens upwardly for receiving the balls :to be washed and cleaned. The bottom'of the Yhopper 52 opens intoa chute 56 which discharges the balls from the hopper into the spiral path between the drum 16 and casing parts 9 and 12 through the inlet 42. The chute 56 discharges the balls into the spiral path in the "direction of rotation of the drum '16 as shown `by 'the arrow A in FIGURE 3.

A drain outlet'SS opens from the bottom ofthe -vessel 1 and forwardly Yfrom the Washer and 'has a 'closure .cap `60 screwed on its forward end. Removal of the cap 60 permits draining the contents of the vessel 1 therefrom. The discharge may be out onto the ground, or into a sewer, or otherwise as desired.

Live molded Yrubber 62 vcovers 'and is secured 'to the outer surface of the cylindrical wall 2`4 ofthe drum 16. Live molded'r'ubber '64 also covers vand is secured 'to 'the irmer surfaces of the semi-cylindrical walls 1t) and 13 of the lower and upper casing parts V9 and 12.

In `FIGURES 6 'and 7 the Vangular 'members 38 are shown as secured to the casing vparts '9 and 12 by fastener means 66 'passing through the rubber coverings and through the walls 10 and 1`3 ofthe casing parts 9 and 12. The spiral ribs 36 Vmay Vbe welded or otherwise se- 'cured to the 'angular members 38.

The live molded 'rubber covering "62 and the Vlive molded rubber lining `64 have patterns -in their opposite surfaces, for example, as shown in :FIGURES 'i8 and 9. In FIGURES 8 and '9 these patterns 'are of cross-Work form with connected generally 'triangular ends and with the inner and outer edges '70 relatively The edges 70 of the covering v62 are spaced from the edges "70 of the lining 64 an amount less than the diameters of the 'golf balls. As a result, the golf balls y'l2 are gripped be-V tween .the edges 70 with some distortion of these edges 70 and are advanced spirally within Vthe spiral path from the inlet 4'2 to the outlet =43.

The surfaces ofthe spiral ribs 36 presented tothe balls 72 are covered with live molded rubber 74 secured to the ribs 36 andhaving -a Apattern in the surface thereof, which may, for example, be similar to the pattern shown in FIGURES 8 -and 9.A The molded rubber cover `62 and the molded Vrubber lining 64 may Ihavecloth-like bases 75 'formed in layers and the molded rubber covering 74 ou the ribs 36 may likewise have a cloth-like `base 76 formed in layers.

In the operation of the machine the vessel lis -illed with watenhaving a suitable detergent in it, for example, to the level shown by :line .l-Bk in FIGURE 2. The motor 30 is turned on by means of al switch 30 to rotate the drum Y16 and the gol-f balls rare introduced .into the open top of the `hopper 5-2 and enter the spiral path between the drum 16 and the casing parts 9 and 12 through the inlet 42. The ,balls 72 are gripped between theedges 70 of the live molded rubber covering V62 and 'lining V64 and are advanced spirally within the spiral path from the inlet 42 to the outlet 43 from which Voutlet V43 the washed balls are discharged through the spout 46.

The lower portion of the drum 16 rotates in -the water with detergent in vessel 1. The rotation of the drum 16 relative .to the rubber covered surfaces of the casing parts 9-and -12 produces a 'turning of the balls relative to the drum I116 andcasing parts 9 and 12 and'relative to the moldedrubber covering 74 on the ribs 36 in the spiral movement of the balls from the inlet 42 to the outlet 43. As a result, the molded rubber edges 70 effectively scrub and work dirt and other foreign matter, such, for example, as rocks, gra-ss, sand, weeds, so forth etc., from the surfaces of the golf balls and out of the dimples in the surfaces of the balls.

The bottom'of the wall 10 of the lower casing part 9 and the molded rubber lining 64 on the inner surface of the wall 1G have an outlet opening 78 therethrough. This opening extends longitudinally beneath the entire longitudinal extent of the spiral path between the drum and casing. A member 80 of less width than the opening 78 and having a live rubber covering 82 on its inner surface, similar to the coverings previously described, extends longitudinally through the opening 78. The edges f the member 80 and its covering -82 are spaced from the sides of the opening 78 as shown in FIGURE 4 to form a pair of circumferentially spaced outlet openings from the spiral path between the drum 16 and the casing parts 9 and 12 into the vessel 1. Thus, dirt and other foreign matter washed, worked, or otherwise removed from the balls are discharged from the spiral path into the vessel 1 for discharge through the drain outlet 58.

The two openings into which the opening 78 is divided by the member 8O and its covering 82 are of widths considerably less than the diameters of the golf balls 72 so that the balls will not be discharged through or become engaged in the discharge openings. The ends of the member `80 are turned inwardly as shown at 84 in FIG- URE and these ends 84 are secured to the ends o-f the lower casing part 9, for example, by screws 485 and nuts 86 -In FIGUR-E 10 the bottom o-f the wall 10 of the lower casing part and the molded rubber lining 64 on the inner surface thereof, have an outlet opening '88 therethrough through which dirt and other foreign matter washed, worked, or otherwise remo-ved from the golf balls is discharged from the spiral path between the drum and casing parts and into the water with detergent containing vessel 1. In this form of the invention, the open- 1ng 88 is covered by a perforated screen 96. The screen 90 prevents passage of the golf balls through the opening 88 and permits dirt and other yforeign matter removed from the halls to discharge from the spiral path between the drum and easing and into the pan or vessel containing water with a detergent.

The ends of the screen 9i) are turned inwardly and secured to the ends of the lower ca-sing part, lfor example, by screws 92.

The top of the pan or vessel 1 has Iilange means 94 which bridges 0r covers the junction between the upper and lower parts of the casing externally thereof when the upper casing part is in closed position as shown in FIG-URE 2.

The strip 53 has an angular member -95 attached thereto. A support 96 is pivoted to this member 95 at 98 and has a lower angular end 99. The support 96 is elevated above the ground or other supporting surface for the washer when the upper half of the casing is closed and the lower angular end 99 o-f the support moves into cooperation with the ground or other supporting surface tosupport the upper half of the casing when in open pos1t1on.

The embodiments of the invention disclosed in the drawings and the specification are for illustrative purposes only, and it is to be expressely understood that said drawings and the specifications are not to be construed as a definition of the limits or scope of the invention, reference being had to the appended claims for that purpose.

I claim:

1. A golf ball washer comprising a rotatable cylindrical drum, a casing having a curved surface spaced outwardly from said drum, spiral rib means attached to the curved surface of said casing and disposed in the space between said drum and said curved surface, said spiral rib means defining a spiral path for the balls `from an inlet through which the balls are introduced into said spiral path adjacent one end of the drum to an outlet from which the balls are discharged from position adjacent the opposite end of the drum, livernolded rubber covering the outer surface of the druml and the-curved surface and having patterns therein between which the balls are gripped and advanced spirally within said spiral path from said inlet to said outlet, the rotation ofthe drum relative to said curved surface producing a turning of the balls relative to the drum and curved surface Afor working dirt and other foreign matter from the surfaces of the balls, and a pan for holding Water with a detergent therein within which the lower portion of the drum rotates for washing the balls with a scrubbing action in their movement through said spiral path from said inlet to said`outlet, said curved surface of said casing having an outlet in the bottom thereof through which dirt and other yforeign matter removed from the balls is discharged from the spiral path between said drum and said curved surface.

2. A golf ball washer according to claim 1, wherein the outlet in the bottom of the curved surface of the oasing discharges into the pan.

3. A golf ball washer according to claim 1, wherein the outlet in the bottom of the curved surface of the casing comprises a pair of circumferentially spaced outlet openings extending longitudinally beneath the entire longitudinal extent of said spiral path and with each of said openings of a width less than the ydiameters of the golf balls.

4. A golf ball washer 'according to `claim 1, wherein the `outlet in the bottom Iof the curved surface of the casing comprises an outlet opening extending beneath the entire longitudinal extent of the spiral path, fand a perforated screen covering said `outlet opening to prevent passage of the balls through said opening and through which screen dirt and other foreign matter removed from the balls is discharged from the spiral path between the drum )and the curved surface.

5. A Igolf ball washer `according to claim l, wherein the outlet in the bottom :of the curved surface of the casing comprises an opening extending longitudinally beneath the entire longitudinal extent of said spiral path, and =a member of less Width than said opening extending longitudinally through said opening and secured to the ends of the drum, each =of the longitudinal edges of said member vbeing spaced from the sides of the opening to form :a pair of circumferentially spaced outlet openings.

6. A Igolf ball washer .according t-o claim l, wherein there is a discharge spout having a perforated bottom over which the balls are discharged from the outlet from said spiral path.

7. A `golf ball Washer yaccording to claim l, wherein the top of the pan is open along one side of the curved surface of the casing, yand a `discharge spout having a perforated bottom `over which the balls are discharged from the outlet from said spiral path, said perforated bottom lof Isaid `discharge spout extending over the opening in the top of the pan.

8. A golf ball washer according to claim 1, wherein there is an upwardly opening hopper :for receiving the golf balls, said hopper :overlying said casing Iand having a chute for discharging the balls into the inlet end of said spiral path in the direction of rotation of the drum.

9. A golf ball washer according to claim 1, wherein the upper half of the casing is hinged for swinging movernent to open position for access to the drum.

10. A golf ball washer according to claim 1, wherein the upper half of the casing is hinged for swinging movement to open position for :access to the drum, and a support elevated above the supporting surface for the washer when the upper half of the casing is closed and movable into cooperation with said supporting surface `to support said upper half of said casing when in yopen position.

V11. A golf ball washer according to claim 1,l wherein the upper half -of -the easing -is fhinged for swinging movement to open position for access to the drum, and ange 5, means. on the top of the pan bridging the junction be- I'tween the upper and lower parts of the casing externally thereof.

12. A golf ball washer ,according to claim 1, wherein there` is a drain outlet opening from the bottom of the 10 pan.

UNITED ,STATES PATENTS Mitchell Aug. 30, 11907 Taplin Apr. 4, 1916' vFloyd et al. M-ar. 31, 1931 Young .w Dec. 3, 19'57 Davy June 12, 19672 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain r- K 1888

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US864018 *May 9, 1906Aug 20, 1907Curran E MitchellWashing-machine.
US1177830 *Jun 25, 1915Apr 4, 1916Alvin TaplinFruit-washing machine.
US1798322 *Apr 9, 1928Mar 31, 1931Percy L BradfordGolf-ball washer
US2814813 *Sep 23, 1955Dec 3, 1957Darl A YoungGolf ball washing machine
US3038186 *Sep 18, 1958Jun 12, 1962Master Machine Corp Of San DieGolf ball washing machine having hopper means for feeding balls and liquid thereto
GB188803625A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4773114 *Nov 2, 1987Sep 27, 1988Derone ThrasherGolf ball washing machine
US4805251 *Jun 2, 1987Feb 21, 1989Hollrock Engineering, Inc.Golf ball washer
US5361440 *Nov 24, 1993Nov 8, 1994Jay Buchbinder Industries, Inc.Play pit ball cleaning device
US5669096 *Apr 8, 1996Sep 23, 1997Intertech CorporationBall cleaning system
US5711330 *Aug 11, 1995Jan 27, 1998S.G.D. Co., Inc.Golf ball washer with integral agitator
US6032312 *Jan 26, 1998Mar 7, 2000Ball-O-Matic, Inc.Object cleaning device
US6389639Oct 28, 1999May 21, 2002Intertech CorporationBall washing apparatus and method
US8813969 *Apr 25, 2008Aug 26, 2014Metso Minerals (Wear Protection) AbSpiral module for a trommel screen
US20100122941 *Apr 25, 2008May 20, 2010Lars FurtenbachSpiral modul for a trommel screen
WO1995014510A1 *Nov 23, 1994Jun 1, 1995Jay Buchbinder Ind IncPlay pit ball cleaning device
WO2011037453A1Sep 24, 2010Mar 31, 2011Amidon B.V.Device for cleaning spherical objects
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/97.1, 15/21.2
International ClassificationA63B47/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2047/046, A63B47/04
European ClassificationA63B47/04