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Publication numberUS3083670 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 2, 1963
Filing dateDec 18, 1959
Priority dateDec 18, 1959
Publication numberUS 3083670 A, US 3083670A, US-A-3083670, US3083670 A, US3083670A
InventorsHarlander Leslie A, Henry Kozlowski
Original AssigneeMatson Navigation Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cargo container securing means and system
US 3083670 A
Images(4)
Previous page
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. A. HARLANDER ETAL 3,083,670

CARGO CONTAINER SECURING MEANS AND SYSTEM Filed Dec. 18, 1959 April 2, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTORS LESLIE A. HARLANDER BY HENRY KOZLOWSKI gr w fifla Zf/wa/ April 2, 1963 A. HARLANDER ETAL 3,033,670

CARGO CONTAINER SECURING MEANS AND SYSTEM Filed Dec. 18, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 22%f{ 7 r n 20 7/@ flin INVENTORS LESLIE A. HARLANDER BY H ENRY KOZLOWSKI April 2, 1963 L. A. HARLANDER ETAL 3,083,670

CARGO CONTAINER SECURING MEANS AND SYSTEM Filed Dec. 18, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 33 F/G .9 Flo 3l\ 3 INVENTORS m LESLIE A. HARLANDER HENRY KOZLOWSKI 1607/4 waa/ April 2, 1963 L. A. HARLANDER ETAL 3,083,670

CARGO CONTAINER SECURING MEANS AND SYSTEM Filed Dec. 18, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTORS LESLIE A. HARLANDER HENRY KOZLOWSKI United States Patent 3,083,67 Patented Apr. 2, I953 5,933,6'7h CAR'GQ CGN'IAENEP. SEQURING MEANS SYSTEM Leslie A. Harlander, Grinda, and Henry Koalowslri, San

Francisco, *Calii, as ignors to Matson Navigation Company, San Francisco, Calif.

Filed Dec. 13, 1959, Ser. No. 86%,558 11 Claims. {CL 114-75) This invention relates to cargo container securing means and to a system of handling and securing such containers on the deck of a ship or other craft or vehicle.

One of the objects of this invention is the provision of improved means for positioning and for securely, but releasably, holding cargo or freight containers on the deck of a ship or the like.

Anther object of the invention is the provision of means for positioning freight containers accurately one on the other and for holding them against relative movement laterally and for positioning and holding the lowermost of such containers on the deck of a ship or the like.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of means for positioning and holding a plurality of stacks of freight containers together on the deck of a ship or the like in spaced relation and against lateral and vertical displacement of the containers in each stack relative to each other and against lateral displacement of the stacks relative to each other.

An additional object of the invention is the provision of rugged, safe, and reliable means fixed on the deck of a ship and on a freight container adapted to cooperate for self centering the means on the container on the means that is fixed on the deck, within a relatively wide range, upon lowering the container onto the means that is tired on the deck, and which last mentioned means provide a minimum of obstruction on deck when deck cargo other than such containers is on deck.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a lashing system utilizing a minimum number of lashings, and means on the contm'ner for securely but releasably holding a plurality of containers on the deck of a ship with the containers stacked at least two high, and with the stacks spaced apart.

In the sysem of shipping cargo or freight in relatively large containers, such as those of a size adapted to constitute the removable body of a truck trailer, an example of which is shown in copending application Serial No. 828,330, filed July 20, 1959, by Leslie A. d-larlander and Roy K. Walther, now Patent No. 3,034,825, such containers may be hoisted onto a deck by means such as is shown in copending application Serial No. 837,002, filed August 31, 1959, by Leslie A. Harlander and Kenneth F. Dewing.

While such containers are stowed below deck in the usual manner, they may also :be carried on the upper deck, and when so carried it is essential that they be accurately positioned and that they be 'held against lateral movement under the pitch and roll of the ship.

Where the hatch covers are used for supporting such containers it is desirable that said hatches be closed and covered with tarpaulins and said containers be held on such tarpaulins against lateral shifting under the roll and pitch of the ship.

Furthermore, in many instances, it is desirable that the containers of the above general type be in stacks, at least two high, on the upper deck, and relatively close together.

The present invention provides strong, simple, safe, reliable and easily operated means for eificiently positioning and securing large containers of the above type on the deck of a ship, either in stacks or single, and in the most desired manner.

Other objects and advantages will appear in the description and in the drawings.

In the drawings,

FIG. 1 is a simplified, end elevational view of several pairs of containers in two-high relation, secured together and to the deck on which they are supported.

FIG. 2 is a reduced simplified side view of one of the containers.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of one of the four lower corner castings of each container as seen from one of the lateral sides of the containers, and which view shows the aligned openings in the casting and in a positioning cone that is secured to the deck, which casting and cone are adapted to receive a removable locking pin, the latter not being shown.

FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 3 but with the locking pin in place.

FIG. 5 is a simplified elevational View of a plurality of containers secured in position over a tarpaulin covered hatch cover.

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of a positioning cone that is secured to the deck at one side of a hatch.

FIG. 7 is a top plan view of a beam adapted to support containers over a hatch, the view being broken out and reduced in length to accommodate it to the sheet, and the ends of which beam are adapted to fit over the cones of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary side elevational view of one end of the beam of FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a top plan view, broken in length, of a type of supporting beam for supporting containers over a hatch where the outside containers project beyond the hatch.

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken along line lit-ill of FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary elevational view of one end of the beam of FIG. 10 supported on a hatch, with several containers indicated in dot-dash lines.

FIG. 12 is a side elevation view of one of the positioning cones adapted to be positioned in one end of the beam of FIG. 9.

FIG. 13 is an elevational view of the positioning cone adapted to be positioned in the end of the beam of FIG. 9 that is opposite to the cone of FIG. 12.

FIG. 14 shows an adjacent pair of positioning cones secured to a pedestal that, in turn, is secured to a deck.

FIG. 15 is an isometric view of one of the upper corner castings on a container with a holding hook at a lateral side of the container in engagement with the corner casting.

FIG. 16 is an isometric reduced size view of a double male fitting adapted to be used between the adjacent corner castings of a pair of containers disposed one on top of the other.

FIG. 17 is an isometric View of an upper corner casting showing one of the hooks of the means for connecting together the upper ends of adjacent containers, which hook is in engagement with said casting.

FIG. 18 is a top plan view of one of the corner castings on the container.

In detail, the container that is employed may be substantially the same as is disclosed in the aforesaid ap plication Serial No. 828,330 having opposed side walls 1 (FIG. 2) opposed end walls 3 (FIGS. 1, 5) (one of which comprises hingedly supported doors), a top wall and a floor or bottom wall. This container is preferably rectangular and horizontally elongated and has frame members along its vertical and horizontal corners termimating in upper corner castings generally designated 4 (FIGS. 1, 2) and lower corner castings generally designated 5.

These corner castings are integrally connected with the vertical and horizontal frame members of the conwhen a container'is lowered thereon.

tainer and while they function to connect said frame members, they have been specially designated for employment in combination with securing means for securing the containers during transport thereof, whether in -a one-high arrangement or in superposed relation,

Each of the lower corner castings 5 is hollow and 1s substantially'rectang-ular'having vertical walls 6 that face oppositely outwardlyat the opposite ends of the container. The wall-in each lower corner casting opposite 'to wall-6 isdesignated 7 (FIGy -l).

The other two opposed walls of each lowerjcorner casting may be imperforate; and the lower wall of each lower corner casting is formed with a circular opening. Thus each lower corner castingyprovides a downwardly opening recess, and'the lower surfaces'of all of the lower -corner castings are disposed in the'sarne horizontal plane.

The wall 6 in each lower'corner casting is formed with a vertically elongated opening 9 (FIG. 3), which may be of substantially key=hole out-linewith the restricted'portion uppermost, or it may be modified tobe of generally egg or tear-drop shape with a restricted upper end'portion that progressively becomes larger in a downward direction to an enlarged lower portion.

The wall 7 is formed with acircular opening 10 (FIG. 3) that is coaxial with and of substantially the zontally into openings 9, 14 from outside wall 6 to extend across the space between walls 6, 6 when'the spur 12 is uppermost and adjacent the trailing end of the pin.

The spur will pass through the restricted upper portion of the opening 9 and then upon the pin being rotated so the spur be lowermost, thepincannot be withdrawn .until again rotated to bring'the .spur'iuppermost, Normally the pin will automatically rotate-under the influence of'gravity to a position with the handle extending'downwardly. Pinqll is preferably bent at the end 13, adjacent to spur 12, to a position extending at right-angles to the main body ofsaid pin and-to the same sidegof the pin as the side from which spur-12 projects. By this structure, the pin will-automatically stay'in lockedrelation to the lower corner'casting due to the influenceof gravity on the handle 13. I,

The function of this pin is to releasably lock each of the lower corner pieces to what-may be called a positioning cone. l

These cones are designated and each comprises a horizontal metal plate 14 having the cone 15 rigid therewith extending upwardly from it-s upper side with the apex of the cone uppermost. These cones may be of circular, horizontal cross sectional contour with'the base adapted to be received in the. lower open end of each casting 5 with slight clearance, as SCEH'dIl FIG. 4, and in which position the lower free edges of each casting 5 will be supported on plate 14 around the cone.

Each plate andcone thereon are integral, and the cone is preferably solid. Each plate 14 is preferably welded .or otherwise suitably-secured to the deck ofa ship, or the like, and the positioning cones are arranged so that they will be received in the four lower corner castings Inasmuch'as the containers must" be supported-hori- V zontal, the'upper surface of the plates of all the cones for adjacent containers are in the same horizontal plane. Conesspaced further from the center line-of the deck,

accordingly, must be more elevated than those closer-to .saidline. 7 Two cones 15 are preferably employed on a single plate for the containers of an adjacent pair at either side of such center line and a pedestal 16 (FIG.

.14) may secure, each of these to the deck in elevated thereon or welded thereto.

portions are observed in the present invention, with the range being slightly over two inches.

Each cone is formed with a horizontal open ended bore 17 that is coaxial with the opening 10. This bore 17 is adapted to receive pin 11 when the latter is inserted in openings 9, 10, and thespace betweenthe -wall-6 and the portion offcone 15 adjacent thereto is adequate to receive the spur 12'when the latter is lowermost.

-At this point it may be pointed out that the containers may be positioned on the hatch covers. 'However, it is necessary to retain the weather deck pontoon hatch covers in conjunction with tarpaulins, which prevents the securement of positioning cones directly to the hatch-covers.

Two parallel beam=s-19 (FIG. 5, 7, 8) extend across said cover and over the hatchtarpaulin. Each of these may be of box girder construction made from a channel strip with a cover-plate (lowermost) welded to the sides along their 'free edges (FIG. 10). Welded in each open end of each beam is a heavy plate 20 (FIG. 7) '-that projects from the end in which th'e'plate is secured, Each plate is formed with an opening, with the opening 2'1 in one plate being elongated longitudinally of the beam, and the other opening 22 is circular. U 'Welded to the deck at oppositesides of the 'hatch ar vertically extending'relatively heavy .pedestals 23 (FIG;

6). These may be of any suitable structure such as pipe, and it has been found that the use of generally H beam structure in which the web extends transverselyof beam 1 is satisfactory. A plate 24 is welded to the-upper end plate 24 hasa cone formed of each pedestal, and each These cones are generally designated 25 and each-has va relatively long cylindrical base 26 that extends upwardly from plate 24. The cylindricalportion is disposed within .each of the openingsZl, 22 (FIG. 7).

The cone :portion. above each base portion 26'will project above the plates-20 so that a locking pin may lock the plates to the cones. Such locking pins may be the same in structureas the pins 11 except that they do not have-a spur and the end opposite to the handle is formed with a transverse opening for a cotterpin, "or the like, to pre vent accidental removal of the pin, the handle and pin being indicated indotted line'in FIG. 6 and the plate 20 Also secured oneach beam is a positioning cone 27 (FIG. 7) of the same-kind as already described for use directly on .the deck of .a ship. The plates supporting cones 27 are of uniform thickness, however, and are welded oneach beam 19 and are in pairs, one pair on each beam for each container and positioned to enter the lower corner castings at the ends of each container. The cones'for theadjacent-corner castings on adjacent containers may be secured to a common plate of the type shown in FIG. 14.

The. elongated openings 21' in one of the endsof the beams, and they are at corresponding ends, enables the beams'tobe used where the width between the pedestals may vary, and they also form a floatingconnectionbetween the beams and pedestals to eliminate strains that may otherwise occur during transit of the containers.

It should be noted that thecircular openings 22 form a fairly close fit with the cones that projecttherethrough, whereby onlyone of the. ends of the beams are rigidly held relative to the cones respectively extending therethrough. 7

FIG. 11 indicates the condition where a container extends beyond t-he hatch 18.

In the first place, FIG. 5, the hatch structure is quite simplified, showing no more than the elevated portion. FIG. 11 is more in detail, and shows the upstanding wall 29 around the hatch opening and that supports the hatch cover. The deck at one side of the hatch is indicated at 3%.

Beams 31 (FIG. 9) are used where the containers extends beyond the hatch covers, the opposite end portions of the beams projecting to opposite sides of the hatch. Each of these beams, themselves, may be of the same structure as beams 19, i.e., an inverted channel strip with a cover plate welded to the free lower edges of the sides of the strip (FIG. 14)).

Rigidly secured in each end of each beam 31 is a heavy plate 32. (FIG. 9). Each plate 32 is formed with a relatively large opening 33 that is adapted to receive the cylindrical base portion of a positioning cone.

FIG. 12 shows a cone 34- having a short cylindrical base portion 35, and a much larger and longer base portion 36 extending below the portion 35.

The positioning cone 34 is adapted to project above the upper level of the beam 31 and to extend into the lower corner casting of a container on the beam.

The positioning cone 37 (PEG. 13) at the other end of the beam is smaller in diameter than cone 34 but is also positioned to enter the lower corner casting of the container on the beam, when the base portion 38 is in opening 33.

This cone 37 is a relatively loose fit in the corner casting of the container, and it is formed with a horizontally elongated opening 39 for a locking pin ll, thereby providing for variations in distance as may occur in the normal operation of a ship.

The end plates 32 will rest on plates 42' that, in turn, are welded to pedestals All. The pedestals themselves, may be welded to the deck (FIG. 11).

Other positioning cones (FIG. 16) may be secured on the beam for entering the lower corner castings on adjacent containers.

From the foregoing it is seen that the cones 34, 37 serve the double function of positioning the containers, and of holding the beams in position.

It may also be pointed out that longitudinal axes of the containers extend fore and aft rather than thwartwise.

The upper corner castings, generally designated 4, are rectangular and hollow and open upwardly. Each casting has a pair of downwardly inclined walls 45 (FIGS. 18) or guide plates, that extend from the two opposite side walls of each casting that are in planes at ri angles to the longitudinal axis of the container. The lower edges of these walls 45 are spaced apart and deline the two sides of an elongated opening 46 extending transversely of the longitudinal axis of the container (FIG. 18). The outer side wall 47 of each corner casting that is outermost relative to the container, and that is parallel with its longitudinal axis is formed with a relatively large rectangular opening 48 (FIG. having its lower edge recessed at 49 centrally between its ends. Also the outer end wall 51 of each upper corner casting may be formed with a similar rectangular recess 53 recessed along its lower edge.

The inner wall 54 of each upper corner casting is the wall opposite to outer lateral wall 47, and an inwardly directed flange 55 is along the upper edge of each wall 5d, extending toward outer wall 47. Each such flange is formed with an inwardly opening recess 56 intermediate the ends of each flange.

Where several containers are positioned on deck or on hatch covers in spaced side by side relation with their longitudinal axes extending fore and aft suitable lashing gear is provided for holding them against objectionable movement.

T .e means provided for interconnecting containers of one tier includes what may be termed bridge fittings for providing connections between the upper ends of adjacent containers.

These are generally designated 58 and each fitting comprises corresponding halves connected by a turnbuckle 5%. One of the said halves is shown in FIG. 17 in position connected with one of the upper corner castings 4 of an adjacent pair of containers. One of the halves of each bridge fitting is removably connected with one corner casting on one container of each adjacent pair thereof, and the other half is correspondingly connected with the other corner casting of the other container adjacent thereto.

Referring to FIG. 17 the half shown therein has a clevis 6% connected to one end of a threaded rod 61 which rod is adapted to threadedly engage the threads in one end of a turnbuckle 59 (FIG. 1).

A hook member 62 extends at one end between the arms of clevis 6d and is pivotally supported by said arms on horizontal pivot 63.

When the hook member is in locking position, it extends downwardly from the pivot 63 and has a toggle pin 64 at its lower end extending parallel with the axis of pivot 63 and projecting from opposite sides of the member 62.

The halves of each bridge fitting are separated at the turnbuckle at the commencement of the operation of attaching them to the upper corner castings.

When each half is so separated, the operator may position the hook member over the upper corner casting to which it is to be connected with the toggle pin 64 parallel with the opening 46, or in the dotted line position 65 as seen in FIG. 18. Upon passing the toggle pin downwardly through the opening the member 63 is then turned degrees about a vertical axis and the ends of pin 64 will be below the adjacent edges of the inclined walls 45.

Spaced above the toggle pin 64 and rigid with member 62 are a pair of projections 66 having inclined lower edges substantially corresponding to the inclination of the walls 4-5. These projections are adapted to engage the walls 45 so the member 62 will not drop into the corner casting to an objectionable degree before the turnbuckle is tightened.

Also, member 62 has a projection 67 in the plane thereof and which projection is formed with a notch at its outer end adapted to receive therein the upper portion of the outer wall 47 when the toggle pin 6 is below the lower adjacent edges of walls 45. It may here be noted that wall 47 is formed at its upper end with a thickened portion 68 which may be termed a bar, since it is also used for engagement with the hook of a lifting beam as shown in said copending application Serial No. 837,002. This bar is engaged by the notched end of the projection 67, hence is adequate to take such strains as may be imposed thereon.

When each of the halves in an adjacent pair of corner castings are in position as seen in FIG. 5, the turnbuckle then connects the rods 6-1 and they can be tightened relative to the corner castings.

These bridge fittings are used only on the uppermost containers, when they are in superposed relation, as seen in FIG. 1.

Referring now to FIG. 15, we will describe the means forholding the containers on the positioning cones.

Each upper corner casting, as has been described, has a laterally directed opening 48 therein, and which opening has an upwardly opening recess 49 centrally positioned along its lower edge (FIG. 15).

A hook element 69 is provided for each upper corner casting, which element is relatively fiat with a bill 70 and projects oppositely outwardly of the latter to engage the wall 47 within the corner casting at opposite sides of each recess 49.

Each element 69 has an elongated shank 72 extending at right angles to the bill 7d and downwardly therefrom,

' the lashing 75 adjacent to thelower-end thereof for tensioning the rod and securely lashing the containers in posicastings.

uppermostcontainer and the only difference between the "lashings' -75-will be in their length which will necessarily end portions rigid therewith projecting longitudinally thereof beyond two opposite sides of said cover; supports againstlateral and longitudinalmovementof said portions ofi said supports; and means on said beams projecting "upwardly therefrom adapted to connect with lower por- 7 and the lower end portion of the shank is formed-witha slot 74 extending longitudinally thereof.

Each hook element 69 is connected with the upper-end of awire ropelashing or the like '75 by an eye-76'(FIG. 1)

"that is secured on said upper end-and that extends through each slot 74. 'T'he lower end of each lashing has aconventional hook 77 secured thereto that is adapted to engage a pa deye 78 seeured on the deck. A hexagon turnbuckle screw 79 or other quick tightening means interposed in tion on the positioning cones.

An eye 80 may be secured to each hook element'69 to facilitate lifting it in position on a corner casting (FIG. l5)-and in removing it therefrom inasmuch as these elel5 ments are relatively heavy.

It is seen that each corner casting has an opening 52 and recess 53-formed in the outer wall'51 thereof adjacent to wall 47 This enables the use of end lashing, instead of or in'combination with the side lashing, if desired org'o found necessary.

"From-the foregoing it is seen that the hook elements -69 provide quicklyattached, rugged, and absolutely re- The plate 82 will take the load of the container thereover while cone-83 and projection 84 will retain the upper container in registration over-the lower one.

As seen in FIG. 1 the lashing is connected with the depend upon the number of tiers and whether the containers are located above hatch covers l8.

We claim: a 1.- In combination with the deck of a ship and a hatch cover-closing a hatch opening-formed in-said deck with said cover elevatedabove the level of the deck; a pair of parallel, horizontally spaced beams in side by side relation extending across'said cover; said beams includingopposite rigid with said deck'at said two opposite sides of said cover'on which the said 'endportions are supported; means for releasably holding said endportions on said supports tions of freight containers for removably holding such containers against'lateral shifting relative to said beams. 2. In combination with the deck ofa ship and a hatch cover closing a hatch opening formed in saidde'ckwith said cover elevated above the level Jofthe deck;,a, pair of parallel; horizontally spaced beams in side, by side relation extending across said cover; said beams including opposite end portions rigid therewith projecting longitudinally thereof beyond twoopposite sides of said cover; supports rigid with said deck at said two opposite .sides of said i cover on which the said end portions are supported; means for'holdin'g'said end portions on said supportsrag'ainst lateral and longitudinal movement of said portions of said supports; and means on said beams projecting upwardly therefrom releasably extending into lower portions of freight containers for removably holding such containers against lateral shifting relative to said beams; said last mentioned means comprising cones rigid with said beams having their apices uppermost; freight-containerson said beams; and lower corner castings on each of said containers having-downwardly directed openings thereon into which said cones extend. V

3. In combination with the deck of a ship and a hatch cover closing a hatch opening formed in said deck with 7 said cover elevated above the level of the deck; a pair of parallel, horizontally spaced beams in side by side relation extending across said cover; said beams including opposite end portions rigid therewith projecting longitudinab ly thereof beyond two opposite sides of said cover; supports rigid with said deck at said two opposite sides of said cover on which the said end portionsare supported; means for holding said end portions on said supports against lateral and longitudinal movement of said portions off said supports; and means on said beams projecting upwardly therefrom adapted to engage the lower portions of freight containers for removably holding such containers against lateral shifting relative to said beams; said means for holding said portions on said supports comprising vertically directed openings formed in said end portions and a cone rigid with each of said supports extending through'each of said last mentioned openings. '4. In combination with the deck of a ship and a hatch cover closing a hatch opening formed in said deck with said cover elevated above the level of said deck; a pair of upright rectangular freight containers; supporting'means extending across said cover on which said containers are supported; means rigid with said deck at two opposite sides of said cover on which said supporting means is supported; means on said containers andon said supporting means in cooperative releasable engagement for holding said containers against lateral movement oif said supporting means while permitting said-containers to be lifted therefrom.

5. In combination with the deck of a ship and a hatch cover closing a hatch opening formed in said deck with said cover elevated above the level of said deck; a pair of upright rectangular freight containers; supporting means extending across said cover on which said containersare supported; means rigid with said deck at two opposite sides of said cover on which said supporting means is supported; means on said containers and on said supporting means in cooperative releasable engagement for holding said containers againstlateral movement olf said supporting means while permitting said containers to be lifted therefrom, said last mentioned means including the said means that is rigid with saiddeck. i

6. In combination with the deck of aship and 'a hatch cover closing a hatch opening formed in said deck with said cover elevated above'the level of said'deck; a pair of uprightrectangular freight containers in side by side relation; supporting means extending across said cover on which said containers are supported; means rigid with said deck at two opposite sides of said cover on'which saidusupporting means is supported; means for holding said containers against lateral movement 01? said sup- I porting means While permitting said containers to be lifted therefrom; said containers each having upper corner castings rigid therewith at each of the upper four corners thereof providing an adjacent pair of said castings on said pair of containers inclose relation to each other, the castings on each of said containers having upwardly opening recesses thereon for receiving lifting elements or a lifting mechanism adapted to lift said containers on said supporting means; and coupling means removably positioned withinthe recesses of said adjacent pairs connecting the upper ends of said pair 'of'cont ainers. I

7. In combination withthe deck of a ship and a hatch cover closing ahatoh opening formed in said deck with said cover elevated above the level of said de'ck;a pair of upright rectangular freight containers in side by side relation; supporting means extending across said cover on which said containers are supported; means'for holding said containers against lateral movement oif said supporting means while permitting said containers to be lifted therefrom, said containers each having upper corner castings rigid therewith at each of the upper four corners thereof; each of said upper corner castings being formed with outwardly opening recesses thereon; coupling means extending into the recesses in one of the pair of castings on each container releasably connecting said containers; and means extending into the recesses in the other pair of upper corner castings on each container connected with said deck; said coupling means and said last mentioned means being releasable from said upper corner castings to enable removal of said containers from said supports independently of each other.

8. In combination with a pair of upright, rectangular containers in side by side relation having adjacent, corresponding opposed side walls; a pair of opposed upper corner pieces respectively rigid with said containers at the upper corners thereof at each of the opposite ends of said adjacent side walls; said corner pieces being formed with upwardly opening recesses therein having lateral walls defining lateral sides of said recesses; hook engageing means rigid with each corner piece projecting into said recesses respectively; a hook member separate from said corner pieces extending downwardly into said recesses, means swingably supporting the hook members in each pair of adjacent corner pieces for movement from tight, locking relation with said hook engaging means in each such pair to a released position in which said members are loose in said recesses; connecting means connecting the hook members in each of said pairs of opposed corner pieces for securing said pair of containers together at their upper ends and for holding said hook members in locking relation with said hook engaging means; said connecting means including actuating means movable in opposite directions for simultaneously moving the hook members within the corner pieces of each adjacent pair thereof into locking relation with the hook engaging members in said corner pieces and for holding them in said locking relation, when said actuating means is moved in one of said opposite directions, and for simultaneously moving said hook members from said locking relation to said released position when said actuating means is moved in the other of said opposite directions.

9. In the combination as defined in claim 8; said hook engaging means within each recess in each corner piece comprising inwardly projecting means integral with each corner piece projecting oppositely inwardly into each recess from two opposite sides of the latter to spaced relation intermediate said two opposite sides; said hook member in each recess including a generally vertically disposed arm extending at its lower end between said projecting means; oppositely outwardly extending projections on said lower end of said arm rigid therewith extending below said projecting means for engagement therewith, fulcrum means rigid with said arm of each of said hook members spaced above said projecting means and extending at right angles to the direction in which said projections extend from said arm; each of said fulcrum means extending over and into engagement with the upper surface of each corner piece at one side of the recess therein to enable said swinging of said projections, and said connecting means being connected with the upper end of each arm extending into the adjacent pair of corner pieces at points spaced above said fulcrum means.

10. In a construction as defined in claim 9, each of said arms being rotatable in the space between said projecting means in each corner piece, and said projections on the lower end of each 'arm being movable upwardly through said space when the arm carrying such projecting means is rotated a quarter turn to thereby enable each hook member to be removed from each corner piece.

11. In a construction as defined in claim 8; a pair of outer corner pieces rigid with each container of said pair at the upper corners of each container that are at the ends of the sides of said containers opposite to said adjacent sides thereof; said corner pieces each having an upwardly opening recess and hook engaging means thereing corresponding to the recesses and hook engaging means in the corner pieces of said adjacent pieces whereby additional containers may be locked to said pair of containers in side by side relation to the latter by hook members and connecting means corresponding to the aforesaid hook members and connecting means; one of the :said lateral walls of each of said outer corner pieces being formed with an opening through which a hook element is adapted to pass into each of said outer corner pieces; a hook element removably extending through each of said openings and into each upper outer corner piece, and means rigid with the wall having each of said openings from therein in releasable engagement with each such wall, and tie means connected with each of said hook elements for tightly but releasably connecting each of said hook elements with each of said upper outer corner pieces and with a support on which said pair of containers is adapted to be supported, said adjacent pair of corner pieces and said upper outer corner pieces being free from projections extending laterally outwardly therefrom to enable containers having said corner pieces thereon to be closely positioned in side by side relation.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,638,612 B'aus Aug. 9, 1927 1,940,242 Burgess Dec. 19, 1933 2,032,591 Pride Mar. 3, 1936 2,034,722 Fitch Mar. 24, 1936 2,056,179 Fitch Oct. 6, 1936 2,100,483 lesser Nov. 30, 1937 2,457,841 Smith Jan. 4, 1949 2,569,275 Baker Sept. 25, 1951 2,902,246 Lapsley Sept. 1, 1959 2,919,826 Richter Jan. 5 1960 2,963,310 Abolins Dec. 6, 1960 3,004,784 Selby Oct. 17, 1961 3,027,025 Tantlinger Mar. 27, 1962

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Classifications
U.S. Classification410/85, 414/143.2, 403/408.1, 206/512, 114/201.00R, 220/23.2, 410/81
International ClassificationB63B25/28, B65D90/00, B60P7/13
Cooperative ClassificationB60P7/13, B65D2590/0016, B65D90/0006, B63B25/28
European ClassificationB65D90/00B, B63B25/28, B60P7/13