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Publication numberUS3083836 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 2, 1963
Filing dateFeb 1, 1962
Priority dateFeb 1, 1962
Publication numberUS 3083836 A, US 3083836A, US-A-3083836, US3083836 A, US3083836A
InventorsRichard T Bussemer
Original AssigneeLouis Griff, Paul London
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Freezer rack
US 3083836 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 2, 1963 R. T. BUSSEMER I 3,083,836

FREEZER RACK Filed Feb. 1, 1962 4/ m a M 2 W R 8 WM QMMJ M/ f l om 5 a b 2 w 4 ATTORNEY llnited in tiates Patent 3,633,836 FREEZER RAK Richard T. liussemer, Roslyn, la., assignor of one-third each to Paul London and Louis Griff, both of Philadelphia, Pa.

Filed Feb. 1, 1%2, Eer. No. 170,598 3 Claims. (Cl. 211-134) This invention relates to an article support, and more particularly, to a rack adapted to be utilized in freezers or other refrigerated apparatus wherein it is desired to provide a support for numerous small items.

When the article support of the present invention is utilized as a freezer rack, it may be disposed within a refrigerated compartment to support articles such as packages of frozen food or the like. The freezer rack of the present invention is an integrated structure providing a plurality of channels in parallel planes. One of the channels will be free from shelves. Each of the remaining channels will have one or more shelves disposed therein.

The freezer rack of the present invention is preferably made from wire having a non-toxic coating thereon which prevents or detracts from the ability of the articles to adhere to the rack. The parallel stacking channels are formed by closed substantially rectangular loops which are disposed in spaced upright parallel planes. A bottom tray and braces extending between adjacent loops are interconnected therewith to maintain the loops in assembled relationship. The rack of the present invention includes one channel which is unobstructed so that it may accommodate large packages. The remaining channels are provided with shelves so that the rack of the present invention may accommodate the various types and sizes of packages utilized commercially to package frozen foods and the like. The rack of the present invention facilitates storing packages of frozen articles in a more orderly and efficient fashion so that the articles may be readily removed from. the rack when desired.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel article support.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel freezer rack.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel freezer rack which detracts from the tendency of the articles to adhere or become frozen to the rack.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a freezer rack which may be economically produced and efficiently support articles in a frozen compartment in an orderly manner.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel freezer rack which provides a plurality of channels for receiving packages of different sizes.

Other objects will appear hereinafter.

For the purpose of illustrating the invention there is shown in the drawings a form which is presently preferred; it being understood, however, that this invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the freezer rack of the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is a front elevation view of the freezer rack illustrated in FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a right end view of the rack illustrated in FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4 is a transverse sectional View of a brace taken along the lines 4-4 in FIGURE 3.

Referring to the drawing in detail, wherein like numerals indicate like elements, there is shown in FIGURE 1 a freezer rack designated generally as is.

The freezer rack 10 includes a plurality of substantially rectangular endless loops 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20. While five loops have been illustrated, it will be appreciated Patented Apr. 2, 1963 that a larger or smaller number of loops may be utilized. The loops l2-2ll are disposed in spaced substantially parallel planes. It will be noted that the substantially rectangular loops 12-29 have spaced parallel vertical upright portions 6 and 8 which are shorter than the horizontally disposed portions 2 and 4 connecting the lower and upper ends respectively of upright portions 6 and 8. The horizontally disposed portions of the loops correspond with the depth of the rack and the upright portions correspond with the height of the rack.

The entire rack 10 is made from wire as will be made clear hereinafter. The loops 12-20 may be made from wire as follows. Elongated strips of wire will be precut to a predetermined length. The wires may be bent around a form so that the ends of the wires are juxtaposed to each other. Thereafter, the ends may be metallurgically joined by brazing, soldering, butt welding, etc.

The loops 12-20 are maintained in an upright disposition in spaced substantially parallel planes partially by a bottom tray 22. The bottom tray 22 includes spaced substantially parallel side runners 24 and 2.6. The runners 2 i and 26 are in abutting contact with and fixedly secured to an inner surface of a horizontally disposed portion of the loops 12-20. In constructing the rack ill, I have secured the runners 24 and 26 to the loops 12-20 by spot welding overlapping portions. A plurality of struts 28 extend between and overlap the side runners 24 and 26. The struts 23 are preferably secured at their ends to the runners 24 and 26 by spot welding overlapping portions. It will be noted that the longitudinal axes of the struts 28 are parallel to the planes of the loops 12-29.

The struts 28 extend from front to rear on the rack 10. Hence, the struts appear as circles in a front elevation view of the rack to, see FIGURE 2. The direction in which the struts 28 extend facilitates sliding packaged articles onto the rack 10 and removing the same.

A runner 39 is in abutting contact with and fixedly secured to an upright portion of each of the loops 12-20. The runner 30 is preferably fixedly secured to the loops 12-29 by spot welding overlapping portions. 'It will be noted that the longitudinal axis of the runner 30 is perpendicular to the planes of the loops l2-2l). A runner 32 overlaps and is fixedly secured to an upright portion of the loops 14-20. The runners 30 and 32 cooperate with the bottom tray 22' to assist in maintaining the loops 12-29 in upright spaced planes.

The space above the bottom tray 22 and between adjacent loops constitute channels within which. articles may be disposed. The channel between loops 18 and 20 is provided with two shelves disposed above the bottom tray 22. The first shelf includes a brace 34. The brace 34 extends between and is metallurgically joined to the upright portion of the loops ltd and 2G. The brace 34 is parallel to and lies in the same horizontal plane as the runner 32. Struts 36 extend between the runner 32 and the brace 34. The ends of the struts 36 are metallurgically joined to overlapping portions of the runner 32 and brace 34.

The second shelf between the loops l3 and 2b is spaced from and overlies the first shelf. The second shelf includes a brace 33 extending between and fixedly secured to an upright portion of the loops 18 and 2d. The ends of the brace 38 are preferably metallurgically joined to overlapping portions of the loops l8 and 2d. The brace 38 is parallel to and lies in the same horizontal plane as the runner 3d. Struts dil extend between the runner 3d and brace 38. The ends of the struts as are preferably metallurgically joined to overlapping portions of the runner 3b and brace 33.

The space between loops 16 and i5 is preferably free from any shelves except for the shelf formed by the bottom tray .22. This channel may be utilized to store large bulky items. [For example, a one-half gallon package of ice cream may be disposed Within the channel between loops 16 and 1 8.

.A brace 42 extends across an upright portion of the loops 12-16 adjacent the front of the rack '10. A brace 44extendsacross an upright portion of the loops 12-16 at the rear of the rack 10. The braces 42 and 44 are preferably metallurgically joined to overlapping portions of the loops -f.-2=16. Struts 46 extend between the braces 42 and 44. The ends of the struts 46 are preferably metallurgically joined to overlapping portions of the braces 42 and 44.

Hence, it will be noted that the channel formed by loops 12 and 14 is provided with a shelf formed by the bottom tray 22 and a shelf formed by the braces 42 and 44. Similar shelves are provided between the loops 14 and 16. The width of the channel between the loops 14 and 416 is substantially identical with the width of the channelbetween loops 18 and 20. The width of the channel between loops 1'2 and 1 4 is substantially identical with the width-of the channel between loops 16 and 18.

Struts 48 and 48' extend across upright portions of the loop 12. The struts 48 and 48' are on opposite sides of the shelf formed by the braces 42 and 44. Loop 14 is provided with strutsSO and 5d corresponding with the struts 48 and 48, respectively. The struts'4-8, 48', 50 and 50 prevent articles from shifting from one channel to the next adjacent channel.

The entire rack is-,preferably made from a multilayer wire material. For purposes of illustration, a sectional view of strut 46 is illustrated in FIGURE 4. It will be'appreciated that all components ofthe rack 10 have a cross sectional view corresponding with the illustration in FIGURE 4. Hence, it will be noted that all components include a metal core 52 surroundedby a primer coat'54. The primer coat 54 may be any organic coating such as-a latexprimer coating. The primer coat 54 is surrounded by a layer of a vinyl resin. For example, the layer 56 may be a layer of polyvinyl chloride. The layers 54 and 56 may be applied in any conventional manner such as spraying, dipping, etc. The layer 56 prevents or reduces the tendency of the articles to adhere or become frozen to the rack 10.

The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof and, accordingly, reference should be made to the appended claims, rather than to the foregoing specification as indicating the scope of the invention.

' I claim:

1. A wire rack comprising first, second, third and fourth closed loops, said loops being substantially rectangularand being disposed in spaced parallel planes,

runners metallurgically bonded to the horizontal portion of each loop, a pair of spaced horizontal runners fixedly secured to an upright portion of each loop, a brace extending between an upright portion of said first and second loops at an end of said loops remote from said runners, a brace extending between an upright portion of said third and fourth loops at an end of said loops remote from said runners, struts extending between each brace and one of said runners to form a shelf between the first and second loops and between the third and fourth loops, and struts extending between the runners secured to a horizontal portion of each loop, said last mentioned struts having a longitudinal axis parallelto the planes of said loops, and the space between said second and third loops being free from any obstruction.

2. A rack in accordance with claim 1 wherein the loops, runners and struts are made from a wire core, said wire core being encased within -a layer of polyvinyl chloride resin.

3. A freezer rack comprising a pair of spaced vertical parallel supports, said supports including first, second and third legs, said first and third legs being vertical, said second legs being horizontal and joining said first and third legs at the upper ends thereof, a first plurality of horizontal cross braces joining-the first legs ofsaid pair of vertical supports, said first plurality of cross braces being equally spaced along the length of said first legs, a second-plurality of horizontal cross braces extending between the third legs of said pair of vertical supports, said second plurality of cross braces being spaced in horizontal planescorresponding to the horizontal planes of said first cross braces, and a plurality of pairs of shelf braces metallurgically bonded to each of said first and second cross braces in the same horizontal plane, said pairs of shelf. braces being parallel to each other, one of each pair of shelf braces being connected between said cross braces one third of the distance between said parallelvertical supports and the other brace of each pair of shelf braces being connected two thirds of the distancebetween the spaced parallel vertical supports, and: the supports, cross braces and shelf braces being made from a wirencore, said wire core being encased within .a layer of a vinyl resin.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,612,937 Mitchell Jan. *4, 1927 2,367,218 Joyce Jan. 16, 1945 2,804,213 FOX Aug. 27, 1957 2,850,172 'Beckner Sept. 2, 1958 2,930,486 Hoover Mar. 29, 1960 2,981,440 Lilja ,Apr. 25, 1961

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1612937 *Aug 6, 1926Jan 4, 1927Union Steel Prod CoDisplay rack
US2367218 *Jun 5, 1942Jan 16, 1945Joyce IncTrackway work station rack combination
US2804213 *Mar 25, 1953Aug 27, 1957Hobart Mfg CoRack construction for dishwashing machines
US2850172 *May 31, 1956Sep 2, 1958Wire Tex CorpStorage racks
US2930486 *Dec 16, 1957Mar 29, 1960Fibreboard Paper Products CorpStorage and display racks
US2981440 *Jun 23, 1958Apr 25, 1961Commercial Wire Products CompaWire bottle carrier
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3318461 *May 10, 1965May 9, 1967Howard J MarschakDisplay stand
US3446361 *Dec 23, 1966May 27, 1969United States Steel CorpRack and method of making the same
US5222612 *Feb 26, 1992Jun 29, 1993Binder Peter MShelf for laboratory cabinets
US6981454 *Oct 18, 2002Jan 3, 2006Cambro Manufacturing Co.Center post and system for a rack
US7617941 *Aug 1, 2006Nov 17, 2009Sabritas, S. De R.L. De C.V.Modular wire display rack
US8353412Jun 7, 2012Jan 15, 2013Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete GmbhInsert for a dish basket for an automatic dishwasher
US8839965Apr 29, 2013Sep 23, 2014John Christian BennecheAdjustable, insertable semi-flexible shelf within a compartment
DE4106065A1 *Feb 27, 1991Sep 3, 1992Binder Wtb Labortech GmbhEinschiebegitter fuer laborschraenke
DE4342892A1 *Dec 16, 1993Jun 22, 1995Licentia GmbhKühlgerät
WO2011085049A2Jan 6, 2011Jul 14, 2011Benneche John CAn insertable semi-flexible shelf within a compartment
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/134, 220/486, 220/491, 211/181.1
International ClassificationF25D25/02, B65D6/02
Cooperative ClassificationF25D25/022, F25D2325/023, B65D7/065
European ClassificationB65D7/06B, F25D25/02B