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Publication numberUS3083977 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 2, 1963
Filing dateMay 22, 1961
Priority dateMay 22, 1961
Publication numberUS 3083977 A, US 3083977A, US-A-3083977, US3083977 A, US3083977A
InventorsDunston James M
Original AssigneeDunston James M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metal edging for skis
US 3083977 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 2, 1963 J. M. DUNs'roN 3,083,977

METAL EDGING FOR SKIS Filed May 22, 1961 INVENTOR W%5Mu% ATTORNEY United States Patent O 3,083,977 METAL EDGING FR SKIS James M. Dunston, Natick, Mass., assigner to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Army Filed May 22, 1961, Ser. No. 111,873 8 Ciaims. (Cl. ZBO-11.13) (Granted under Title 35, U.S. Code (1952), sec. 266) The invention described herein, if patented, may be manufactured and used by or for the Government for governmental purposes, without the payment to me of any royalty thereon,

The present invention relates to Metal Edging for Skis. It has to do particularly with an improved metallic edging which can be quickly, easily and clampingly attached to both longitudinal sides of a wooden ski to provide superior running surfaces therefor, without requiring the use of screws, pins, or other attaching devices, heretofore employed for such purpose.

It is essential, especially for skiing under conditions of downhill skiing and over ice crested surfaces, that the ski have a square, sharp edge along each side of its running surface so that the sharp edge will bite into the iced surface, thereby permitting the skier to negotiate turns and control his direction. Hard ymetal edges are necessary to resist wear and preserve the desired sharp edge.

Presently known means and methods to provide the desirable sharp edges include the attaching of metal strips in a rabbet routed section of each edge of the ski by means of nails or screws. Such means rely upon friction between the screw or pin and the -wood of the ski to stay tight enough to hold the edging properly in place. Since wood is an unstable material and is affected by exposure to conditions of moisture, and also due to normal flexing during use of the skis, these holding devices do not achieve their intended purpose and permit the metal edging to come off the ski.

With a view toward obviating the defects inherent in previously known skis, it is an important object of the present invention to provide an improved metal edging for a ski which is capable of being clampingly mounted on the wooden ski edge without requiring the use of screws, drive pins, or other attaching devices.

A further and important object of the invention is to provide an improved metal edging which can be clampingly mounted on and affixed to the edge of the wooden ski to provide the ski with a square, sharp edge along each side of its running surface, in which the metal edging is so constructed, proportioned, and arranged on the ski, that it cannot be knocked loose, or separated from the ski during flexing thereof in use, by hard objects on the course with which it might come into contact.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and novel metal ski edging in the form of a plurality of relatively short end-to-end members having interlitting portions and which extend continuously along both longitudinal sides or edges of the solid or laminated wood ski from a point adjacent the toe area to the heel thereof, in which the members are so formed and proportioned that the inherent flexibility of the wooden ski is unaffected by the addition of said edging.

A further object of the invention is to provide a ski edging, and a blank from which the edging is formed, wherein said edging may be clampingly mounted upon the ski by the application of force, causing portions of the blank to embed themselves into the wooden body of the ski, followed by the application of bending pressure, thus causing other portions thereof to conform to the shape or contour of the ski body and secure said edging to the same.

Another object of the invention is to provide a ski edg- 3,083,977 Patented Apr. 2, 1953 Fice ing as aforesaid in which the base portion thereof is formed from a heavier gauge metal than .the remainder of the edging; another object being to provide a twopiece, secured-together, unitary ski edging in which the bendable portion is formed from a rust-resistant steel and is of a lighter gauge than the base portion thereof,

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved ski edging of the foregoing character which is of simple structure, easy and inexpensive to manufacture by mass production methods, and one which may be clampingly mounted upon the wooden body of a ski with ease and facility.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description and appended claims when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawing forming a part of this specification wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts in the several views.

In said drawing:

'FIGURE l is a perspective view of a wooden ski having the ski edging of the present invention affixed to both longitudinal side edges thereof;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary longitudinal side edge view, on an enlarged scale, of the near or right side or edge of the ski of FIGURE 1, showing a complete edging unit, or member, with end-to-end disposed fragments of the two next adjacent edging members;

FIGURE 3 is a top plan View of one of the edging members, or units, embodying the present invention;

IEIGURE 4 is a fragmentary detail sectional View, illustrating the relationship of the clampingly or grippinglymounted edging to the ski body, taken substantially along the line 4-4 of FIGURE 2, looking in the direction of the arrows;

`FGURE 5 is a detail end elevational view, partly in section, and generally similar to FIGURE 4, showing one of the edging members in the process of being clampingly attached to a ski;

FIGURE 6 is a top plan view of a metal blank used to produce one of the edging members embodying the present invention;

IFIGURE 7 is a fragmentary longitudinal side or edge elevational view showing in detail a portion of the longitudinal rabbet and an adjacent pair of upright edge slots, or routed grooves formed in one longitudinal side edge of a wooden ski;

FIGURE 8 is a transverse vertical sectional view, partly broken away, of the wooden ski of FIGURE 7, and taken along the line 3 8 of FIGURE 7, looking in the direction of the arrows; and

FIGURE 9 is an enlarged detail side elevational view of a fragment of the wood ski of FIGURE l, showing adjacent cooperating portions of an end-to-end pair or ski edging members or units embodying the invention.

Before explaining in detail the present invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawing, since the invention is capable yof other embodiments and of being practiced or carried out in various ways. It is to be understood yalso that the phraseology or terminology employed herein is for the purpose of description vand not :of limitation, and it is not intended to limit the invention claimed herein beyond the requirements of the prior art.

With reference now to the drawing, a preferred embodiment of the present invention is shown therein. Shown as a whole at 10, in FIG. 1, is a conventional wooden ski which may be solid or laminated, upon the longitudinal sides or edges of which the novel metal edging of the present invention has been mounted.

Each of the individual edging members or units, as seen in FIGS. 1 through 5 and 9; is designated as a whole at 20 and in use is mounted upon the longitudinal side or edge of the conventional Wooden ski The edging member has portions which lit into a longitudinal rabbet` and other portions which fit into connecting vertical routed grooves or slots, all such being formed in the longitudinal sides or edges of the wooden ski body, as will be explained fully below. Portions of the longitudinal rabbets and several of the grooves are illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8 of the drawing.

One of the metal blanks from which an edging member, assembly, or unit 20 is formed or shaped, may be seen in FIG. 6. The blank 25 is preferably formed from non-corrosive steel and comprises, as shown, an oblong body portion 26 having at one end an outward projection or tongue 27. The body 26 is notched out at spaced points along its top longitudinal edge, as viewed in FIG. 6. The notches 28 dene spaced pointed prongs or spurs 29, five such being shown. Two clamp members `or arms 30 project laterally from opposite ends of the body portion 26 at the lower longitudinal edge of said body portion and terminate at their free or lead ends in a plurality of sharp teeth 31. The elongated clamp members or arms 30 are preferably provided with crosswise-arranged scores or markings 32 to indicate fold or bend locations to facilitate the mounting yand securing of the completed edging member upon a wooden ski, one step or position of the folding or bending operation being illustrated in FIG. 5.

To complete one of the two-piece ski edging members or units 20, the body portion 26 of blank 25 is placed atwise upon an oblong steel base or plate member 33 which, as shown, is formed from heavier gauge steel and is thus thicker and stiffer than the corrosion-resistant steel of the blank 25. This can be clearly seen in FIGS. 2, 4, 5 and 9 of the drawing. The members 26 and 33- may be secured together in any suitable manner, as by spot welding, as indicated at 34 in FIG. 3. As best seen in FIG. 2, the body member or portion 26 is welded to the under plate 33 in such a position that the end tongue or projection 27 thereof overhangs the adjacent end of the plate 33, While the opposite end of said body portion 26 is positioned inwardly from the adjacent opposite end portion 33a of the under or base plate 33, as may be. seen clearly in enlarged FIG. 9.

In FIGS. 7 and 8 fragments of a wooden ski 15, solid or laminated, are shown. A longitudinally extending rabbet or groove 16 formed in the side wall and under edge of the ski 15 extends from a point adjacent to, but somewhat to the rear of, the toe portion 13 and continuously to the heel portion 14 of said ski, as viewed in FIG. 1. There is a similar rabbet, or groove 16 at each longitudinal side and surface-engaging edge of ski 15 (FIG. 8). These rabbets may be formed by a routing tool, or in any other suitable and convenient manner. The longitudinal rabbets or grooves 16 are intersected at regular intervals by pairs of upright or perpendicular grooves 17 which may also be formed by a routing tool, or gouge, or in any other suitable manner. It will be understood that only a single upright or perpendicular groove 17 is provided at the toe and heel ends 13 and 14, respectively, of the longitudinal rabbet 16 formed in each longitudinal side and edge of the wooden ski 15.

To provide the longitudinal grooves or rabbets 16, 16, the wood ski 15 is preferably routed from a point approximately three (3) inches from the toe 13 throughout the full length of the ski to the heel 14 thereof. It is also routed at one and eleven-sixteenths lll/1G) linch intervals at 17 perpendicular to the longitudinal rabbets 16, 16 and to the running surface, to provide spaced pairs of upright grooves 17, 17 one pair of which grooves vmay be seen in FIG. 7.

The mounting of the metal edging members or units 20 on the wooden ski 15 is accomplished by starting at the limit of the routing portion at the toe end 13 and slipping the partially shaped unit 2t) over the ski edge and then' pressing on base 33 sutliciently to force prongs or spurs 29 into the wooden ski. While ski 15 and the unit 20 are held rmly, the teeth 31 of arms 30 are driven into the wood at the top surface of the ski. This operation is repeated with successive edging members or units 20 until the entire length of the longitudinal groove 16 is lled to the heel end 14 of the ski, with the various members 20 being positioned in end-to-end relationship. It is to be understood, of course, that `before each of the members 20 is clampingly mounted upon the wooden ski, as above explained, the row of spurs or sharp prongs 29 are bent at substantially a right angle to the body portion 26 of metal blank 25, see, for example, FIG. 5, so they can be4 forced into the wood at the under side of ski 15.

It is to be noted also, see particularly FIGS. 2 and 9, that the tongue 27 at the left end of each edging member 20, overlaps the adjacent end portion 33a of the next rearwardly placed member 20 and iits in the space -between the routing or groove 16 and the upper surface of steel base plate 33. Thus, the tongues 27 serve to lock the adjacent edging members 20 together.

As shown in the drawing, `merely for purposes of illustration, see FIGS. 2, 3, 6 and 9, all tongues 27 are at the left of the edging units or members 20. This is the preferred arrangement for the right side of the ski body 15, with tongues 27 pointing toward the heel portion 14 of said body. For the left side application, the -tongues 27 are disposed at the same end of the members 20 but all point toward the toe portion 13 of the ski along said left side.

The reverse arrangement of the end-to-end locked-together units or edging assemblies 20 is such that during flexing of the ski in use, there will be no openings created between the units 20 which might allow a hard object when struck to loosen and pull the edging member ol the ski.`

Whereas the units or edging members 20 have been shown and described as two-part, or laminated steel assemblies, it will be understood that these members could be formed in one piece, so llong as certain portions thereof are capable of being bent, folded, or otherwise shaped to t into the grooves or rabbets and routings of the wooden ski and to clampingly grip and tit the ski edges and running 'surfaces so as to be tlush, or substantially ush with the exposed surfaces thereof.

The locations of the score lines 32 of blank 25 may vary in accordance with the thickness, size, or shape of the wooden ski with which the edging is to be used. Moreover, the number, shape, size and location of the sharp prongs or spurs 29 may also be varied within the scope and purview of the present invention.

I claim:

l. A metal ski edging adapted to be set into a longitudinal rabbet and a pair of spaced upright edge grooves formed in the outer edge portion of the wooden body of a ski to clampingly engage the same, said metal edging comprising a rigid base, spaced spurs upstanding from one longitudinal edge of said base and adapted to penetrate the under surface portion of the ski, a clamp member having teeth at its free end extending upward from each end of the base at the opposite longitudinal edge thereof, said base and said clamp members being disposed in said rabbet and said upright edge grooves, respectively, and `said clamp members being adapted to be bent by the application of pressure thereto to move them into position with -a portion thereof being disposed in overlying contact with the top surface of the ski and to force their teeth into the same, said teeth and said spaced spurs providing gripping means for securing said edging to said wooden body.

2. A metal -ski edging adapted to be clamped to the wooden body of a ski to form wear-resistant outer edge portions of the ski running surface and edges in which the wooden body Ihas a longitudinal rabbet and a series of pairs of spaced transverse edge grooves formed in the outer edge portion of the running surface thereof, said metal ski edging comprising a ilat rigid base portion having spaced spurs projecting from one longitudinal edge thereof and adapted to penetrate the lower surface of the ski, a clamp member having teeth at its outer end and extending at substantially a right angle from each end of the base at the opposite longitudinal edge thereof, said base portion and its pair of ciarnp members being disposed in said rabbet and in a pair of said transverse edge grooves, respectively, said clamp members having portions thereof in overlying iatwise contact with the upper surface portion of said ski body `and having their teeth penetrating said upper surface portion whereby, in conjunction with said spaced spurs, to securely clamp said edging to said ski body.

3. A ski having in combination a wooden body and a metal ski edging cla'mpingly engaging the same to form wear-resistant outer edge portions ofthe ski running surface and edges, said wooden body having toe and heel portions and upper and lower surfaces, each of said outer edge portions having a longitudinal rabbet formed therein and extending from a point adjacent to said toe portion rearwardly to said heel portion and also having formed therein a series of pairs of spaced perpendicular grooves extending throughout the length of lsaid rabbet, said metal ski edging comprising a laminated flat body member composed or" an oblong steel base and a corrosion-resistant steel blank superimposed upon the steel base and welded thereto, said blank having spaced spurs extending perpendicularly therefrom along one longitudinal edge thereof and ladapted to penetrate the lower surface of the ski body, a clamp meinber having teeth at its outer end and extending at substantially a right angle from each end of the Isuperimposed steel blank along the other longitudinal edge thereof, said laminated at body member and said pair of clamp members being disposed in said rabbet and in a pair of said transverse edge grooves, respectively, said clamp members having portions thereof in atwise contact with the upper surface of ysaid ski body and having their teeth penetrating said upper surface portion whereby, together with said lsjpaced spurs, to securely clamp said edging to said ski ody.

4. The combination defined by claim 3, wherein a plurality of the -rnetal ski edging units extend in endwise abutting relationship throughout the length of the ski body from said point at the toe portion to lsaid heel portion of the wooden body of said ski.

5. A ski having in combination a wooden body and a metal ski edging clampingly engaging the same to form wear-resistant outer edge portions of the ski running surface and edges, said wooden body having toe and heel portions and upper and lower surface portions, each of said outer edge portions having a longitudinal rabbet formed therein and extending from a point adjacent to said toe portion rearwardly to said heel portion and also having formed therein a series of pairs of spaced perpendicular grooves arranged throughout the length of said rabbet, said metal ski edging comprising a laminated flat body member composed of an oblong steel base and a corrosion-resistant steel plate superimposed upon the steel base and welded thereto so that an end thereof will project outwardly beyond a corresponding end of said base to provide a tongue, said blank having spaced spurs extending perpendicularly therefrom along one longitudinal edge thereof and adapted to penetrate the lower portion of the ski body, a clamp member having teeth at its outer end and extending at substantiallyv a right angle from each end of the superimposed steel plate along the other longitudinal edge thereof, said laminated flat body member and said pair of clamp members being disposed in said rabbet and in a pair of said transverse edge grooves, respectively, said clamp members having portions thereof in tlatwise contact with the upper surface of said ski body and having their teeth penetrating said upper surface portion whereby, together with said spaced spurs, to securely clamp said edging to said ski body, with the projecting end of the steel plate overl-ying the adjacent end portion of the next adjacent steel base.

6. The combination dened by claim 5, wherein a plurality of the metal ski edging units extend in endwise abutting relationship at both longitudinal sides of the wooden body from said point at the toe portion to said heel portion, and wherein the projecting tongue of each of the corrosion-resistant steel plates overlaps the adjacent end portion of the next oblong steel base of an adjacent metal ski edging.

7. The combina-tion defined by claim 6, wherein the projecting tongues af all of the ski edgings at one longitudinal side of the ski body are directed toward the toe portion thereof, and wherein the tongues of all of the ski edgings at the other longitudinal side thereof are directed toward the heel of said ski body.

8. A flat metal blank for use as one part of a two-part ski edging, comprising an oblong body portion having spaced edge notches and a series of spaced spurs extending outwardly from said notches along one longitudinal edge'of said oblong body portion, land a pair of elongated clamp-forming members extending outwardly in the opposite direction from the other longitudinal body edge, one of said elongated clamp-forming members having its outside edge ush with the 4adjacent end of the oblong body portion, the other clamp forming member projecting from a point located inward from the opposite end of said oblong bod-y to provide a tongue-like projection at i said opposite end extending at substantially a right angle to the adjacent clamp-forming member, the free ends of both elongated clamp-forming members having teeth formed thereon.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,126,452 Suits Aug. 9, .|1938 2,157,325 Currier May 9, 1939 2,295,185 Serr Sept. 78, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS 166,825 Switzerland Apr. 2, 1934 312,243 Switzerland Feb. 29, I1956 80,888 Norway Oct. 20, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2126152 *Jun 26, 1935Aug 9, 1938Suits Chauncey GSki
US2157325 *Dec 28, 1936May 9, 1939Currier Lorenzo GSki
US2295185 *Mar 26, 1941Sep 8, 1942Eric PusinelliSki edge
CH166825A * Title not available
CH312243A * Title not available
NO80888A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3637226 *Feb 10, 1970Jan 25, 1972Simon KarlSki
US3893681 *Mar 30, 1973Jul 8, 1975Tensor CorpSki
US4778710 *Apr 1, 1985Oct 18, 1988Friedrich DeutschOne-piece ski edge with integrated tip and/or end protection
US5141243 *Jan 22, 1990Aug 25, 1992Pacific Coast Composites, Inc.Alpine ski with a simplified construction
US5474146 *Mar 1, 1993Dec 12, 1995Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaSnow vehicle
US7641215Feb 26, 2007Jan 5, 2010Matthew Wade EllisonSki and snowboard equipment system
US8075003Dec 30, 2009Dec 13, 2011Matthew Wade EllisonBoot for use with a gliding board
US8251395 *Jul 10, 2006Aug 28, 2012Matthew Wade EllisonGliding boards and methods of modifying gliding boards
US20110285109 *May 18, 2011Nov 24, 2011Allister HornSplitboard with truncated edging
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/608
International ClassificationA63C5/048, A63C5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63C5/048
European ClassificationA63C5/048