Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3084626 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1963
Filing dateJan 6, 1961
Priority dateJan 6, 1961
Publication numberUS 3084626 A, US 3084626A, US-A-3084626, US3084626 A, US3084626A
InventorsStobb Anton R
Original AssigneeStobb Anton R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for method for wiping a printing cylinder
US 3084626 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR WIPING A PRINTING CYLINDER Filed Jan. 6, 1961 26 c 5 37 67 3 g 46 B 4 3 M 4 2 3 36 I f c 64 z/vl/g/vro/a' 1 g 247 E ANTON R. STO'BB 32 3/ UZTORA/EY United States Patent 3,084,626 APPARATUS AND METHQD FQR WlllNG A PRINTING CYLENEER Anton R. Stohh, 3507 S. Elmwood Drive, Racine, Wis. Filed Jan. 6, 1961, Set. No. 80,999 7 Claims (Cl. 101-425) This invention relates to apparatus and method for wiping a printing cylinder.

This particular invention is concerned with the cleaning of a printing cylinder, and more especially, it is concerned with removing the ink from. the blanket of an offset printing press or in removing the ink from the printing cylinder. Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide an improved method and apparatus for cleaning a rotating printing cylinder.

A more specific object of this invention is to provide an inexpensive, compact, and simple but highly efficient method and apparatus for contacting the circumference of a printing cylinder with a cleaning lluid and also a wiping material for the purpose of cleaning the cylinder.

Still another object of this invention is to accomplish the foregoing objects and to efiect the cleaning action dur-. ing the time that the web of printing paper is not actually being printed upon, such time being when the web rolls are being changed and the printing machine is normally slowed in its operation. Thus, in accomplishing this object, both the change of the printing roll webs and the cleaning of the printing cylinders are simultaneously completed-so that only a minimum of time and disturbance in the printing operation is required.

Also, in addition to the foregoing object, it is an object of this invention to provide a cleaning and wiping device for a printing cylinder such that when the printing cylinders are tripped for moving them out of printing position with a web of paper, the wiping mechanism will automatically be actuated to perform its function of moving a wiping material over the circumference of the printing cylinder, and further a cleaning fluid will be automatically applied to the printing cylinder for removing the ink therefrom in the wiping action.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent upon reading the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

' FIG. 31 is an end view of a preferred embodiment of this invention and diagrammatically showing certain parts and with certain parts broken away.

FIG. 2 is a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 with parts thereof broken away and it being substantially a sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of FIG. 1.

The same reference numerals refer to the same parts throughout the several views. Printing cylinders 10 are shown with the usual blankets or plates 11 mounted thereon for creating the desired impression on the web of paper indicated at 12. Of course the web will be moving through the printing machine and the cylinders 10 will be rotating in the direction shown by the arrows indicated A. These printing cylinders 10' are of a conventional construction and are therefore not more completely shown, and it will be further understood that they are cylinders of the type which can he tripped or moved out of rolling contact inthe position shown in FIG. 1 so that they are at that time not actually transferring their impressions to the web 12, and this is conventional for this type of printing cylinder.

It will then further be noted that a wiping cylinder or support member 13 is rotatably disposed adjacent the lower cylinder 10 to be rotated in the direction shown by the arrow indicated B such that the web of wiping material, preferably a crepe paper, is passed over the blanket or printing plate 11 on the printing cylinder 10 to wipe the blanket clean of ink and any other matter threon. Thus, the wiping cylinder 13 is rotatably mounted on a shaft 14 which in turn is disposed upon support arms 16 of which there are two pairs as shown in FIG. 2. Therefore, both ends of the wiping cylinder 13, namely the shaft end 14 and the shaft end 17 are rotatably mounted in the arms 16. Also, the arms 16 are pivotally mounted on a shaft 1-8 which in turn is supported upon the frame or base structure 19 which is stationarily disposed in a suitable manner.

It will thus be understood that the two pairs of arms 16 can be pivoted about the shafts 18 to be swung toward and away from the lower cylinder 10. One end of a rod 21 is pivotally engaged through a shaft 22 with the arms 16 while the opposite end of the rod 21 is threadedly engaged with a nut 23. Thus, the shaft or rod 21 has a threaded section indicated 24 which extends into the nut 23, and it will be also noted that the nut 23 is on one side of the support or frame 19 While a collar 26 is on the other side of the frame 19, and the rod 21 extends through these pieces as shown. A compression coil spring 27 is disposed between a yoke or connector 28, on one end of the rod 21, and the collar 26 so that the spring 27 yieldingly urges the arms 16 into a counterclockwise position as viewed in FIG. 1 and thus the cylinder 13 is spring loaded against the printing cylinder 10. It will therefore be also understood that the rod 21 can slide through the collar 26 when the arms 16 are urged in a clockwise direction about the center of pivot at shaft 18, and the threaded shaft 21 and the nut 23 provide an actuating means for moving the wiping cylinder 13 into and out of contact with the printing cylinder 10.

At this time it will also be mentioned that a crepe paper or the like supply roll 31 is rotatably mounted on its shaft and core 32 while a rewind or wind-up roll 33 is similarly rotatably mounted on its shaft or core 534. The shafts 32 and 34 of course extend across the respective rolls 31 and 33 and they are rotatably supported in a rocker arm 36 which has sockets or bearings 37 therein for easy insertion and removal of the shaft ends with regard to shafts 32 and 34. Thus it will be understood that a web of crepe paper or other wiping material will extend from the supply roll 31 and around most of the circumference of the wiping cylinder 13 and between that cylinder and the printing cylinder 19 and continue on to wind up on the rewind roll 33.

It will further be noted that the rocker arm or support member 36 is both rotatably and linearly movably mounted on the support arms 16 by virtue of a trunnion or shaft 38 projecting to two sides of the arms 36 and into a slot 39 in the two pairs of arms 16. The shaft 38 preferably provides a central spacer 41 between the two arms 16 so that the rocker arm 36 is rotatably and slideably mounted between the arms 16. Further, a tension coil spring 42 connects between the opposite ends of the arm 36 and around a cylindrical support or she-ave 43' mounted on the shaft 14. Thus the spring 42 urges the two rolls 31 and 33 toward the wiping cylinder 13 so that the two rolls are in rolling contact with the cylinder and they therefore rotate in the direction shown by the arrows C on the rolls 31 and 33. This arrangement of rolling contact between the rolls and the wiping cylinder, of course insures that the Web of wiping material will be continuously passed around with the rotation of the wiping cylinder 13 for clean wiping of the blanket 11. The ends of the spring 42 can be connected to the arm 36 by means of the pins 46 located in the arm 36 as shown.

It will also be noted that a stud 47 extends between the pairs of arms 16 and a spacer 43 is disposed between the arms 16 so that the stud 47 can maintain the assembly while permitting the desired space between the arms 16 for the pivotal and slideable relation of the rocker arm 36 with the support arms 16.

The drawings further show a sprocket 54 is rotatably mounted on the shaft 18 and a second sprocket 55 is 52 are mounted on the shaft 18 and this in turn is shown to pivotally support the arms 1% oil the shaft 18.

The drawings further show a fluid supply line or pipe 53 extending between the two pairs of arms 16, and a fluid supply line 54 is shown entering the pipe 53 to carry a cleaning fluid into the pipe. This fluid may be kerosene or water or naphtha or any similar, suitable cleaning fluid for dissolving or removing the ink from the blanket 11. A spray nozzle or outlet 56 extends forwardly of the pipe 53 and is directed toward the printing cylinder 1d such that when pressure is applied to the pipe 53, a spray of the cleaning fluid will be released to the printing blanket 11. It is preferred that several such outlets or spray nozzles 56 be disposed across the width of the apparatus as shown in FIG. 2 and thus the entire blanket 11 is wetted with the cleaning fluid. Spray shields 57 and 53 are also mounted in the frame 19 to protect the surrounding parts and paper from receiving the cleaning fluid when sprayed.

It will also be noted that a valve indicated at 59 is disposed in the fluid line 54 for controlling the pressure in the pipe 53 and therefore the outlet of the cleaning fluid through the nozzle 56 and onto the blanket 11. Further, an electric switch 61 is shown connected to the motor 49 by means of the wire 62, and a wire 63 extends beyond the switch into an electric control which is electrically connected to the electric control operating the printing cylinder 1'3. Since the control of the printing cylinder 10 is conventional, as mentioned, no further parts thereof are shown and no further description thereof is deemed to be necessary, however it will be readily understood by one skilled in the art that upon tripping the cylinders w, they separate as mentioned and as shown in FIG. 1 and when this occurs, the valve 59 is actuated by a solenoid, indicated 69 to open the valve so that the pressure of the cleaning fluid enters the pipe 53 and the cylinder it? is then sprayed as desired and also the switch '61 is closed so that the motor 49 is operated to rotate the wiping cylinder 13. Thus, the operation of the wiping cylinder 13 and the spray nozzles 56 are automatic upon tripping of the printing cylinders it Still further, it is preferred that the valve 59 be initially closed when the cleaning by the cleaning fluid is completed and secondly, then the motor 49 would be shut off after the wiping cylinder 13 has had opportunity to wipe all of the cleaning fluid from the blanket 11.

FIG. 1 further includes the upper portion of the apparatus by simply showing only a fragment thereof, such as the arms 16 and the printing cylinder 1%). It will of course be understood that the apparatus described on the lower portion thereof in FIG. 1 is simply duplicated in the upper portion if it is desired to have two printing blankets 11 applied to the paper web 12. Also, FIG. 2 shows the wiping material 64 trained over the wiping cylinder 13 rmd extending across the length thereof.

An electric switch 66 is diagrammatically shown and it can be used for controlling the tripping of the printing cylinders 16 and connections 67 would extend to the conventional mechanism, which is generally pneumatic, used for the tripping purpose. It will also be noted that the Wires 63 connect between the switches all and 66 such that upon actuating the switch 66, the switch 61 could be energized or closed to energize the motor 49, as mentioned. Also, the switch 61 could have electrical wires 68 extending therefrom to a solenoid 69 which actuates the valve 59 in the fluid supply line 54. The switch '61 could have a time delay mechanism in it so that the operation of the solenoid 69 was such that it would next be actuated to close the valve 54 and therefore stop the spray of fluid onto the blanket 11 prior to the time that the motor 49 is stopped and thus the wiping action 13 would continue to wipe the blanket dry before the wiping and cleaning action is needed. These electrical connections and parts are conventional in their elements and are therefore only shown diagrammatically in combination with this invention.

It will also be obvious that the wiping action can be carried on without tripping the printing cylinders by manually moving the wiping cylinder about the trunnions 18 by the adjusting nut 23.

While a specific method and apparatus have been shown and described, it should be obvious that certain changes could be made therein and the invention should therefore be limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A wiping mechanism for a rotary printing cylinder of the type movable away from the web of paper when electrically tripped, comprising in combination a wiping support disposable parallel to said printing cylinder and being in contact therewith for supporting a cleaning material against the circumference of said printing cylinder when the latter is electrically tripped, a cleaning fluid supply line disposed adjacent said printing cylinder for wetting the latter, and an electrically operated valve disposed in said supply line for opening and closing the latter in synchronization with the tripping of said printing cylinder.

2. A wiping mechanism for a rotary printing cylinder of the type movable away from the web of paper when electrically tripped, comprising in combination a rotary wiping cylinder disposable parallel to said printing cylinder and being rotably mounted in rolling contact therewith for supporting a cleaning material against the circumference of said wiping cylinder and in contact with said printing cylinder when the latter is tripped, a crepe paper web supply roll and a wind-up roll both rotatably mounted adjacent said wiping cylinder, a cleaning fluid supply line disposed adjacent said printing cylinder for wetting the latter, an electrically operated valve disposed in said supply line for opening and closing the latter in synchronization with the tripping of said printing cylinder, and an electric motor connected to said wiping cylinder in a manner to rotate the latter in synchronization with the tripping of said cylinder.

3. A cleaning and wiping mechanism for a rotary printing cylinder, comprising in combination a wiping cylinder disposable parallel to said printing cylinder and being rotatably mounted in rolling contact therewith for supporting a cleaning material against the circumference of said printing cylinder, a cleaning fluid supply line disposed adjacent said printing cylinder for directing fluid onto an area across said printing cylinder, drive means connected to said wiping cylinder for rotating the latter at a speed relative to the speed of said printing cylinder and in a direction toward said area on said printing cylinder, a rocker arm rotatably and linearly movably mounted adjacent and with respect to said wiping cylinder and having roll receiving sockets on opposite ends thereof, a supply roll and a re-wind roll rotatably mounted in said sockets to be in rolling contact with said wiping cylinder, said cleaning material consisting of a web of material trained over said wiping cylinder and extending from said supply roll to said re-wind roll, and means attached to said rocker arm for urging the latter toward said wiping cylinder according to the diameters of said rolls.

4. A cleaning and wiping mechanism for a rotary printing cylinder, comprising in combination a pivotal mounting member, a wiping cylinder disposable parallel to said printing cylinder and being rotatably mounted in said mounting member in rolling contact with said printing cylinder for supporting a cleaning material against the circumference of said printing cylinder, a cleaning fluid supply line disposed adjacent said printing cylinder for directing fluid onto an area across said printing cylinder, drive means connected to said wiping cylinder for rotating the latter at a speed relative to the speed of said printing cylinder and in a direction toward said area on said printing cylinder, a rocker arm rotatably and linearly movably mounted on said mounting member adjacent and with respect to said wiping cylinder and having roll receiving sockets on opposite ends thereof, adjustable resilient means connected to said pivotal mounting memher for yieldingly urging the latter toward said printing cylinder, a supply roll and a re-wind roll rotatably mounted in said sockets to be in rolling contact with said wiping cylinder, said cleaning material consisting of a web of material trained over said wiping cylinder and extending from said supply roll to said re-wind roll, and means attached to said rocker arm for urging the latter toward said wiping cylinder according to the diameters of said rolls.

5. A wiping mechanism for a rotary printing cylinder, comprising a pivot arm, a wiping cylinder mounted on said pivot arm and capable of being disposed axially parallel to said printing cylinder and being rotatably mounted to be in rolling contact therewith for supporting a Web of cleaning material trained over the circumference of said wiping cylinder and in contact with said printing cylinder, a cleaning fluid supply line disposed adjacent said printing cylinder for wetting the latter, prime mover means connected to said Wiping cylinder for rotating the latter at a speed relative to the rotation of said printing cylinder, a support mounted on said pivot arm, means attached to each of the ends of said web and mounted on said support for respective pulling and feeding of said web in synchronization with said wiping cylinder.

6. A wiping mechanism for a rotary printing cylinder, comprising in combination a support member movably mounted for movement toward and away from said printing cylinder, a wiping cylinder mounted on said support member to be parallel to said printing cylinder and being rotatably mounted in rolling contact therewith for supporting a cleaning material against the circumference of said printing cylinder, a prime mover, self-adjusting drive means connected between said prime mover and said wiping cylinder for rotating the latter at a speed relative to the speed of said printing cylinder in all positions of said wiping cylinder, a supply roll and a re-wind roll rotatably mounted on said support member to be in rolling contact with said wiping cylinder to be rotatable and movable with the latter, said cleaning material consisting of a web of material trained over said wiping cylinder and extending from said supply roll to said re-wind roll in rolling contact directions on said wiping cylinder and both said rolls.

7. A cleaning and wiping mechanism for a rotary printing cylinder, comprising in combination a support member pivotally mounted for movement toward and away from said printing cylinder, a wiping cylinder mounted on said support member and disposable parallel to said printing cylinder and being rotatably mounted in rolling contact with said printing cylinder for supporting a cleaning material against the circumference of said printing cylinder, yielding means attached to said support member for yielding urging the latter toward said printing cylinder, a cleaning fluid supply line disposed adjacent said printing cylinder for directing fluid onto an area across said printing cylinder, drive means connected to said wiping cylinder for rotating the latter at a speed relative to the speed of said printing cylinder and in a direction toward said area on said printing cylinder, a supply roll and a re-win-d roll rotatably and movably mounted on said support member to be in rolling contact with said wiping cylinder, said cleaning material consisting of a web of material trained over said wiping cylinder and extending from said supply roll to said re-wind roll in a direction of rolling contact throughout its extent, and resilient means connected between said support member and said rolls for urging the latter into rolling contact with said wiping cylinder.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 693,044 Miehle Feb. 11, 1902 794,487 Brod July 11, 1905 1,442,098 Sague Jan. 16, 1923 1,563,382 Legg Dec. 1, 1925 2,347,619 Taylor Apr. 2 5, 1944 2,525,982 Wescott Oct. 17, 1950 2,705,455 Buttner Apr. 5, 1955 2,970,535 Schrnutz Feb. 7, 1961 FOREIGN PATENTS 565,510 France Nov. 7, 1923

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US693044 *Jun 24, 1901Feb 11, 1902Robert MiehleOffset mechanism for printing-presses.
US794487 *Apr 28, 1903Jul 11, 1905Louis A BrodPrinting-press.
US1442098 *Oct 20, 1921Jan 16, 1923George SaguePrinting press
US1563382 *Jan 5, 1923Dec 1, 1925Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoGraphic recording device
US2347619 *Apr 21, 1942Apr 25, 1944Goss Printing Press Co LtdRotary inking mechanism and process
US2525982 *Apr 27, 1948Oct 17, 1950Addressograph MultigraphApparatus for cleaning printing surfaces in offset printing machines
US2705455 *May 31, 1950Apr 5, 1955Schnellpressenfab HeidelbergMeans for cleaning the inking roller system of platen type printing presses
US2970535 *Jun 13, 1955Feb 7, 1961Schmutz Mfg Company IncRotary device for printing, slitting and rewinding elongated webs
FR565510A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3280733 *Nov 4, 1964Oct 25, 1966Adamovske Strojirny NpDampening device of a printing machine
US3463082 *Apr 5, 1966Aug 26, 1969Agfa Gevaert AgOffset printing machine with wiping sheet for removing ink from blanket cylinder
US3467011 *Aug 16, 1966Sep 16, 1969Agfa Gevaert AgWiping arrangement
US3952654 *Apr 8, 1974Apr 27, 1976Evans Robert EAutomatic blanket wash-up system
US4015307 *Nov 20, 1974Apr 5, 1977Oxy-Dry Sprayer CorporationApparatus for cleaning rotating cylindrical surfaces
US4135448 *Jun 30, 1977Jan 23, 1979Moestue Hans JMechanism for cleaning a cylinder of an offset lithographic printing press
US5243910 *Apr 10, 1992Sep 14, 1993B. Bunch Company, Inc.Wash assembly for ink train
US5758577 *Jul 18, 1996Jun 2, 1998Komori CorporationCylinder cleaning apparatus for printing press
US5842418 *Sep 24, 1997Dec 1, 1998Seratek LlcApparatus and method for cleaning a roller
US8220389 *Oct 17, 2008Jul 17, 2012Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Tray surface cleaning device
US20090151583 *Oct 17, 2008Jun 18, 2009Dangelewicz John ATray Surface Cleaning Device
DE1536445B1 *Mar 8, 1967Jun 18, 1970Gestetner LtdVorrichtung zum Auftragen einer Fluessigkeit auf eine Druckmaschinenwalze
DE4206181A1 *Feb 28, 1992Sep 2, 1993Baldwin Gegenheimer GmbhVorrichtung zur aufbringung von reinigungsfluessigkeit auf einen zylinder einer rotationsdruckmaschine
EP0557607A1 *Dec 12, 1992Sep 1, 1993Baldwin-Gegenheimer GmbHCleaning device for a cylinder of a rotary printing machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/425, 101/147, 101/156
International ClassificationB41F35/06
Cooperative ClassificationB41F35/06
European ClassificationB41F35/06