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Publication numberUS3085263 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1963
Filing dateAug 30, 1960
Priority dateAug 30, 1960
Publication numberUS 3085263 A, US 3085263A, US-A-3085263, US3085263 A, US3085263A
InventorsBrown Gaylord B, Yurkinas Joseph W
Original AssigneeBrown Gaylord B, Yurkinas Joseph W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for retrieving sunken objects
US 3085263 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1963' J. w. YURKINAS ETAL 3,085,263

DEVICE FOR RETRIEVING SUNKEN OBJECTS Filed Aug. 30, 1960 INVENTORS.

JOSEPH M Vl/RK/NAS BY GA VLORD 5. BROWN 3,d85,23 Patented Apr. 16, 1963 ice 3 &5 253 DEVICE FOR RETlRfiEVl NG SUNKEN GBSECTS Joseph W. Yurhinas, 1174.7 92nd St, Alto, Mich, and fiayiord B. Brown, 30 Violet St. SW Grand Rapids, 1 1c Filed Aug. 30, 1960, Ser. No. 52,898 3 Claims. (Cl. 9--9) This invention relates to a device for raising sunken objects. More particularly, this invention relates to a device adapted to be mounted on the side of an object, such ,as an outboard motor, providing means both for locating and raisingthe object in the event it drops under the surface of the water.

Up to this time, a suitable means for locating and raising sunken objects has not been devised. For example, when an outboard motor accidentally is dropped into'the water, adiver must be hired to locate the motor if the water is of considerable depth. Such a procedure is quite expensive as it is often difficult to remember at a later date exactly where the motor dropped. Further, when the motor is dropped in salt water, the motor must be retrieved quickly or it ,is severely damaged. Due to the high cost of outboards, insurance rates have risen sharply to cover the loss in the event of such an accident. These are but a few of the reasons a device for locating and raising sunken objects has become necessary.

It is an object of this invention to provide a device for locating and raising sunken objects. The device of this invention is especially useful in assuring one that an outboard motor can be quickly located and raised in the event it accidentally falls into the water. This device is simple in construction and compact in size. It may be shaped to an infinite variety of configurations so that the appearance of the object to which it is mounted is enhanced. Its simplicity in structure assures positive operation and minimal production costs.

These and other objects of this invention will be more fully understood upon reading the following specification in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a boat motor having a pair of the devices comprising this invention mounted thereon;

FIG. 2 is a perspective, exploded view of the device comprising this invention; and

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the device of this invention, a portion thereof being broken away to better show the parts thereof.

Briefly, this invention relates to a device for raising sunken objects, such as an outboard boat motor, which includes a housing attached to the object. A cable is attached to the object and lies within the housing. A float is secured to the free end of the cable, also lying within the housing. At least a portion of this housing is detachable when subjected to water pressure, whereby the float escapes therefrom and rises to the surface of the water, the cable connecting the float and the object.

Referring more specifically to the drawings, reference numeral 1 in FIG. 1 designates an outboard motor, having a pair of devices 10 comprising this invention mounted on the sides thereof. Only one application of this device 165 is shown, the device being used to locate and retrieve a boat motor accidentally dropped to the bottom of a lake and the like. However, it is to be specifically understood that this invention is not limited to this single application. Rather, this device may be used to locate and retrieve any object which has fallen to the bottom of a body of water.

The device 10 includes a housing 11 which is mounted on the boat motor 1. It will be noted that one of the devices it), including the housing 11, is mounted on each side of the boat motor 1. The purpose of this will be more fully explained hereinafter. In the embodiment shown, a base plate 1.2 is secured to the boat motor by means of attachment screws 13. A reel 14 is aflixed to the base plate 12, the reel being rotatable about its spindle 15. A cable .16 is secured to the reel 14, the cable being coiled therearound and threaded through an eye 17. A float 18 is secured to the free end of the cable 16.

The reel 14, cable 16 and float 1$ are of a size such that they are enveloped by the housing 11 and lie therein when the housing is attached to the base plate 12. The housing 11 includes a diaphragm 20, which is of a thickness such that it will rupture upon being exposed to water pressure. The housing itself is attached to the base plate 12 by means of any one of several well-known water soluble glues. Preferably, the connection between the housing and the base plate is waterproofed at the outside of the housing to prevent accidental dislodging of the housing as water splashes against it during use of the motor. It should be noted that it is not necessary that the entire housing be removable from the motor. Rather, it is only necessary that a portion thereof be removable, that portion being of a size sufficient to allow the float -18 to pass out of the housing as will be more fully explained hereinafter.

The operation of the device 10 will now be described in detail. One such device is mounted at each side of the cowling of an outboard boat motor 1. As stated previously, the devices 16 may be shaped to a configuration to complement the design of the particular motor to which it is attached. In the event this motor is accidentally dropped into the water during use, the device 10 functions as follows. When the diaphragm 20 in the housing 11 is subjected to water pressure, it will rupture. As water flows into the interior of the housing 11, it contacts the water soluble glue used to mount the housing 11 on the base plate 12. The housing then becomes detached therefrom and the float 1% immediately rises toward the surface of the water, unwinding the cable '16 from the reel 14 as it rises. The eye 17 guides the cable 16, assuring that it will not become entangled as the float 18 rises. Thus, upon reaching the surface of the water, the float 18 identifies the spotv where the motor has fallen. Further, upon grasping the cable 16, the motor may then be raised to the surface of the water. It will be noted that a device 10 has been placed on each side of the motor .1, assuring that a float will rise to the surface of the water regardless of which side the motor happens to fall on as it lies on the bottom of the body of water.

In another form of this invention, the area A within the husing '11 may be filled with a water reactable, gas forming chemical to assure the removal of the housing 11 very quickly after the diaphragm 20 ruptures. By a water reactable, gas forming chemical we mean a chemical such as calcium carbide (CaC which releases acetylene gas upon being exposed to water. This expanding gas will literally force the housing loose from its attachment when used in precise, easily calculated amounts. Sodium or potassium metal compounds would be other examples of such water reactant, gas forming chemicals of which there are many in existence.

It will be noted that this invention has provided a device for locating and retrieving sunken objects with a minimum of effort. The deviceis simple in construction and positive in operation. It may be quickly and simply mounted to an object, ready for use in the event the object sinks into the water. As soon as the housing is removed from the device, either by means of weakening its connection by water soluble glue or by the reactant force of a gas forming chemical, the float rises to the surface of the water. This both identifies the spot where the object has fallen and the cable provides the means for raising the object back to the surface of the water.

While only certain embodiments of this invention have been shown and described, itmay be possible to practice the invention through the utilization of other embodiments without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. Such other embodiments are included as a part of this invention as defined by the following claims.

We claim:

1. A'device for raising sunken objects, comprising: a housing attached to the object; a cable attached to the object and lying within the housing; a float attached to the free end of the cable and lying within said housing; a diaphragm positioned in a wall of said housing, said diaphragm breakable upon being subjected to water pressure; and at least a portion of said housing attached to the object with water soluble glue whereby said portion of said housing becomes detached when the object is submerged under water and said diaphragm breaks, said float rising to the surface and said cable connecting said float and the object.

2. A device for raising sunken objects, comprising: a

housing attached to the object; a cable attached to the I object and lying within the housing; a float attached to the free end of the cable and lying within said housing; a diaphragm positioned in a wall of said housing, said diaphragm breakable upon being subjected to water pressure; a water reactable, gas forming chemical in said housing; and at least a portion of said housing attached to the object with water soluble glue whereby said portion of said housing becomes detached when the object is submerged under water and said diaphragm breaks, subjecting said chemical to water, said float rising to the surface and said cable connecting said float and the object.

3. A device for raising sunken objects, comprising: a housing attached to the object; a reel mounted on the object and positioned Within said housing, a cable attached to said reel and coiled therearound within said housing; a float attached to the free end of the cable and lying within said housing; a diaphragm positioned in a wall of said housing, said diaphragm breakable upon being subjected to water pressure; and at least a portion of said housing attached to the object with water soluble glue whereby said portion of said housing becomes detached when the object is submerged under water and said diaphragm breaks, said float rising to the surface and said cable connecting said float and the object.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,476,387 Atwell Dec. 4, 1923 11,719,838 Haselton July 9, 1929 1,935,229 Neal Nov. 14, 1933 2,198,755. Berndt Apr. 30, 1940 2,754,525 Johnson July 17, 1956 2,903,718 W'right Sept. 15, .1957 2,806,231 Hofmeister Sept. 17, 1957 2,935,750 Gruenberg May 10, 1960

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1476387 *Jun 20, 1923Dec 4, 1923Atwell Frederick WLife-saving apparatus
US1719838 *Aug 6, 1927Jul 9, 1929 Marking device
US1935229 *Jul 30, 1932Nov 14, 1933W G JesterEmergency safety appliance for bathers
US2198755 *May 10, 1938Apr 30, 1940Berndt Ralph HDevice for locating and recovering sunken articles
US2754525 *Aug 10, 1955Jul 17, 1956Thomas M NicklesFloat device
US2806231 *Jul 17, 1956Sep 17, 1957Hofmeister Carl RSubmerged article marker and retriever
US2903718 *Feb 13, 1958Sep 15, 1959Jr Zelma H WrightAutomatic marker buoy
US2935750 *Apr 1, 1957May 10, 1960Grueuberg Ivor JDevice for retrieving objects
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4619066 *Jan 30, 1985Oct 28, 1986Kirkland Donald RFloat release devices
US5209112 *Feb 28, 1991May 11, 1993Battelle Memorial InstituteExpendable oceanographic sensor apparatus
US7487614 *Jan 27, 2006Feb 10, 2009Seth WalkerRadio controlled gill net recovery transmitters
Classifications
U.S. Classification441/8
International ClassificationB63B22/14, B63B22/10, B63B22/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63B22/10, B63B22/14, B63B2209/06
European ClassificationB63B22/14, B63B22/10