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Publication numberUS3085512 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1963
Filing dateMar 8, 1961
Priority dateMar 8, 1961
Publication numberUS 3085512 A, US 3085512A, US-A-3085512, US3085512 A, US3085512A
InventorsAlyanak Edward J, Eiszner Jr William H
Original AssigneeBendix Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid pump
US 3085512 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 16, 1963 E. J. ALYANAK ETAL 3,085,512

FLUID PUMP Filed March 8, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheer. l

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AT TOR/Vf Y' April 16, 1963 E. J. ALYANAK ETAL FLUID PUMP 2 Sheets-Sheen'. 2

Filed March 8. 1961 United States Patent O 3,085,512 FLUID PUMP Edward J. Alyauak aad William Il. Eiszner, lr., Mishawalra, Ind., assignors to The Bendix Corporation, Misliawaira, Ind., a corporation of Delaware Filed Mar. S, 1961, Ser. No. 94,385 S Claims. (Cl. 103-49) This invention relates to pumps and more particularly to a igas driven hydraulic pump for use in a recirculating hydraulic system.

An object of this invention to provide a hot gas hydraulic pump device which, through means of sequentially operated multiple cylinders, utilizes the simplicity of a blowdown type of system (a non-recirculating system wherein the hydraulic uid is exhausted), but includes means for operating in a closed hydraulic cycle.

Another object of this invention is to provide a device tor converting ygas pressure directly to hydraulic pressure in a continuous manner.

More specically, it is an object of this invention to provide a device which utilizes the pressurized gas emitted by a burning propellant to pressurize the face of a piston having hydraulic fluid on the opposite face thereof.

Another object of this invention is to provide means for diverting the propellant gas `from a lirst cylinder, which has discharged the hydraulic Huid therein, to a second cylinder, which has lbeen refilled with hydraulic uid from a low pressure reservoir.

A further object of this invention is to provide a device in which the prime mover and pump are in effect a single mechanical unit, thereby eliminating the necessity for separate prime movers or turbines.

A still yfurther object of this invention is to provide a hot gas hydraulic pump which can be readily designed to operate at low mechanical speeds with inherent mechanical design advantages.

Another object of 4this invention is to provide a hot gas hydraulic pump suitable lfor use on missiles.

The above and other objects and yfeatures of the invention will become apparent Ifrom the following description of the mechanism taken in connection with the accompanying drawings which form a part of this specilication and in which:

FIGURE l is a sectional view of a fluid pump constructed in accordance with the present invention and vshown in association with a hydraulic circuit;

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view taken along -line 2 2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken substantially along line 3 3 of FIGURE 1 with the nozzle disengaged from all of the cylinder sleeves;

iFIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4--4 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken along line 5--5 of FIGURE 4 showing the nozzle just beginning to enter the conical opening in the sleeve; and

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view taken along line 6 6 of FIGURE l.

Referring to FIGURE l it will be seen that the numeral 12 indicates a gas driven hydraulic pump incorporated in a hydraulic system which includes an accumulator 14, a hydraulic motor and control 116 which may be connected to swivel nozzles or control surfaces of a missile, a low pressure reservoir 1S, a relief valve 20, and the requisite pipe lines.

The pump 16 comprises a housing 22 having tour axially extending bores 24 each of which includes a cylindrical sleeve 26 which is -slidable in its bore, a piston 28 which is slidable within the sleeve, and a spring 30 which urges the piston towards one end of the sleeve 26. Pro- Patented Apr. 16, 1963 lCC truding lfrom the outer surface of the sleeve is a pin 32 which extends into a slot 3'4 4formed in housing 22 ill order to prevent the sleeve trom rotating. Located at the other end of the sleeve is a iiange 38 which has a radially outwardly extending portion `for limiting axial movement of the sleeve in one direction by abutment with shoulder 40 and in the opposite direction by abutment with shoulder 41. A radially inwardly extending portion of flange 38 serves as a stop `for the piston 28 at one end of the sleeve and an inwardly extending ilange 42 serves as a stop for piston 28 at the opposite end of the sleeve.

The piston 23 divides the bore 24 into two variable volume chambers 44 and 46', .the rst of which communicates with a pressurized gas and the second of which communicates with the hydraulic circuit shown in FIG- URE l via inlet port 48, which contains a check valve 50, and outlet port 52, which contains a check valve 54. A receptacle 56 is suitably connected to housing 22 and contains a suitable high pressure burning propellant which serves as the gas pressure source -for the pump. A relief valve 5S is provided Ifor over-pressure protection as well as rburning rate control, since most suitable propellants burn at a taster rate as the pressure therearound increases.

A rotatable distributor plate 6i), having only a single nozzle 62 extending therefrom for sequentially engaging the end of each of the sleeves 26', is operatively connected to the housing and directs the hot pressurized gas emitted by the burning propellant to the appropriate chamber 44 via passages 68 and annular recess 69. In order to cause indexing of the distributor nozzle l62 from one sleeve 26 to another, a plurality of angularly disposed peripheral jet passages 64 and 66' are `formed in the wall of the distributor for 4driving the distributor. Since there is continuous ow through the jet passages 64, a positive torque will be exerted against the distributor plate at all times. f

`Operation of the device will be as follows: Initially all of chambers 46 are 'full of hydraulic fluid as a result of system charging.y If the nozzle 62 of distributor plate `60 is not engaged with one `of the sleeves 26, the rst exhaust of propellant gas through jet passages '64 and 66 will lock it in position. Thus, when the propellant is ignited the nozzle will engage one of the sleeves and pressurized gas will tlow into chamber d4 of the engaged sleeve. The piston 23 will be displaced towards llange 3S and will cause the hydraulic fluid in chamber 46 to leave the pump via outlet port V52 and charge the accumulator 14. When piston 28 hits the ange 38, the sleeve will be displaced to the right and the sleeve will become disengaged `from the nozzle 62. The lilow of gas through the peripheral jet passages '64 and 66 will cause the distributor plate to rotate until the nozzle 62 hits the sloped surface 7@ (as shown in FIGURE 5), slows and locks into the conical opening in the sleeve 26. The pumping stroke will then be repeated. In the meantime, the piston 28 in the cylinder previously evacuated of hydraulic iiuid will be returned to a position wherein it will abut the flange 42 and hydraulic tluid will llow into the chamber 46 from the reservoir 18 via inlet port `118 Ifor the next hydraulic motors which cause a reduction in the accumu- Ilator pressure, the propellant burning pressure will be maintained even with the hydraulic system pressure drop.

The system pressure drop will reduce the pressure against which the pistons are working and will permit an increase in the rate of system acceptance of pressurized hydraulic uid. As the hydraulic system pressure increases, the net force across the piston will be reduced and with consequent reduced piston velocities, the hydraulic ow rate will likewise decrease. In a static condition of no hydraulllic demand, the piston will move very slowly, if at a The several practical advantages which tlow from our hot gas hydraulic pump are -believed to be obvious from the above, and other advantages may suggest themselves to those who are familiar with the art to which this invention relates.

Furthermore, although our invention has been described in connection with a specic embodiment, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes may be made in the form, structure, and arrangement of parts without departing from the spirit of the invention. Accordingly, we do not desire to be limited to the specific embodiment disclosed herein primarily for purposes of illustration, but instead desire protection -falling within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described the various features of the invention what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A fluid pump comprising a housing having a plurality of axially extending bores formed therein, piston means slidable in each of said bores, said piston means dividing each of said bores into tirst and second variable volume chamber means, compartment means `formed in said housing for containing a burning propellant which emits a pressurized gaseous fluid, passage means for communicating said rst chamber means with said pressurized gaseous uid, inlet and outlet ports for permitting tlow of a hydraulic uid into and out of said second chamber means, means for urging said piston means towards said first chamber means, rotatable distributor means operatively connected to said housing for sequentially engaging each of said bores and communicating the iirst chamber means formed therein with said pressurized gaseous tluid to cause movement of said piston means and consequent discharge of said hydraulic fluid from said second chamber means, and a plurality of peripheral jet passages located in said distributor means for per mitting tlow of said gaseous iluid therethrough and thereby causing rotation and engagement of said distributor means with one of the disengaged bores after discharge of the hydraulic fluid from the second chamber of the bore previously engaged by said distributor means.

2. A fluid pump comprising a housing having a plurality of axially extending bores formed therein, piston means slidable in each of said bores, said piston means dividing each of said bores into first and second variable volume chamber means, passage means for communicating said iirst chamber means with a pressurized gaseous fluid, inlet and outlet ports for permitting tlow of a hydraulic iluid into and out of second chamber means, resilient means for urging said piston means towards said rst chamber means, a rotatable distributor operatively connected to said housing, said distributor having at least one nozzle opening for sequentially engaging each of said bores and communicating the tirst chamber means formed therein with said pressurized gaseous fluid to cause movement of said piston means and consequent discharge of said hydraulic fluid from said second chamber means, and a plurality of peripheral jet passages operatively connected to said distributor for permitting flow of said gaseous uid therethrough and thereby causing said nozzle to rotate and engage one of the disengaged bores after discharge of the hydraulic uid from the second chamber of the bore previously engaged by the nozzle.

3. A iluid pump comprising a housing having a plurality of axially extending bores formed therein, a sleeve slidable in each of said bores, stop means located at each end of said sleeve, piston means located in said sleeve and slidable between said stop means, said piston means dividing each of said ybores into first and second variable volume chamber means, passage means for communicating said first chamber means with a pressurized gaseous fluid, inlet and outlet ports for permitting ow of a hydraulic liuid into and out of said second chamber means, resilient -means -for urging said piston means towards said iirst chamber means, distributor means operatively connected to said housing for sequentially engaging each sleeve in said bores and communicating the first chamber means associated -therewith with said pressurized gaseous tluid, said pressurization of said rst chamber means causing movement of said piston means and consequent discharge of said hydraulic fluid lfrom said second chamber means, and motor means for causing rotation and engagement of said distributor means with one of the disengaged sleeves after said piston means contacts the stop means of the sleeve in engagement with said distribution means and causes said sleeve to become disengaged therefrom.

4. A iluid pump comprising a housing having a plurality of axially extending bores formed therein, hydraulic tiuid inlet and outlet ports communicating with each of said bores, a sleeve slidable in each of said bores, said sleeve having one end thereof open `for communicating with said hydraulic tiuid inlet and outlet ports and the other end thereof open for communicating with a pressurized gaseous tiuid, stop means located at each end of said sleeve, piston means located in said sleeve and slidable between said stop means, said piston means having one side thereof in communication with the hydraulic uid supplied via the inlet port and the other side thereof in communication with said gaseous tiuid, resilient means for urging said piston means towards the open end of said sleeve communicatingwith said gaseous fluid, a receptacle operatively connected to said housing, said receptacle containing a burning propellant for providing said pressurized gaseous uid, a rotatable distributor plate operatively connected to said housing and said container, said distributor plate 'having at least one nozzle for sequentially engaging one of the open ends of each of said sleeves and communicating pressurized gaseous fluid with one side of each of the piston means to thereby cause movement thereof and consequent discharge of the hydraulic tluid on the opposite side of said piston means via. said outlet port, and means operatively connected to said distributor plate for causing rotation thereof from one sleeve to another after said piston means contacts said stop means and causes the engaged sleeve to become disengaged from said nozzle.

5. A ltluid pump as delined in claim 4 wherein said means `for causing rotation of said distributor plate includes a plurality of peripheral jet passages formed inthe wall of said plate yfor permitting escape of said gaseous fluid to the atmosphere.

6. A tiuid pump as defined in claim 4 wherein valve means are operatively connected to said receptacle for regulating the gaseous tiuid pressure therein.

7. A fluid pump as defined in claim 4 wherein means are operatively connected to said sleeves for limiting movement thereof within said bores.

8. A tluid pump as defined in claim 4 wherein check valves are operatively connected to said inlet and outlet ports for permitting dow in only one direction.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,081,020 Coyne Dec. 9, 1913 2,698,580 Evans Jan. 4, 1955 2,762,307 Orloff Sept. l1, 1956 2,845,030 Le Febvre et al. July 29, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1081020 *Apr 8, 1912Dec 9, 1913Clark Brothers DePump.
US2698580 *Jan 23, 1951Jan 4, 1955Cav LtdPump
US2762307 *Sep 2, 1952Sep 11, 1956British Messier LtdRotary engines
US2845030 *Apr 6, 1955Jul 29, 1958Bendix Aviat CorpScavenge pump
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3262395 *Jun 10, 1963Jul 26, 1966Morando Jorge AHydraulic transformer
US3431747 *Dec 1, 1966Mar 11, 1969Hadi T HashemiEngine for exchanging energy between high and low pressure systems
US4591314 *Jul 9, 1984May 27, 1986Sundstrand CorporationHydraulic power supply system utilizing a solid propellant gas generator
US4599044 *Jan 7, 1985Jul 8, 1986The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyElectronic feedback area control system for TVC gas generator
US4714411 *Jun 16, 1986Dec 22, 1987Normalair-Garrett (Holdings) LimitedFluid pressure intensifier device
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/347, 137/625.46, 137/625.11, 137/624.13, 137/625.68, 60/39.47, 417/381, 417/539
International ClassificationF04B9/129, F01B3/00, F04B9/00, F04B9/137
Cooperative ClassificationF01B3/0008, F04B9/129, F04B9/1376
European ClassificationF04B9/137C, F01B3/00A3, F04B9/129