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Publication numberUS3085681 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1963
Filing dateJul 16, 1959
Priority dateJul 16, 1959
Publication numberUS 3085681 A, US 3085681A, US-A-3085681, US3085681 A, US3085681A
InventorsFazzari Henry L
Original AssigneeFazzari Henry L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Compounding and packaging unit
US 3085681 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 16, 1963 H. L. FAzzARl COMPOUNDING AND PACKAGING UMH.'

Filed July 16. 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. i Henry L. f'ajjarf AYTORNEK April 16, 1963 H. L. FAzzARl 3,085,681

COMPOUNDING AND PACKAGING UNIT Filed July 16. 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 mlimml/Hmimu Prg/5 JNVENTOR. Henry L. Fdjjdm A TTG RNE Y.

United States Patent Oh 3,085,681 Patented Apr. 16, 1963 ice 3,085,681 COMPOUNDYNG ANl) PACKAGING UNIT Henry L. Fazzan', New York, N.Y. (KS3- 30 16th Ave., Flushing 55, N.Y.) Filed July 16, 1959, Ser. N 827,483 6 Claims. (Cl. 20G- 47) This invention relates to a unit for so packaging the several ingredients or components of an ultimate cornand contemplated by this invention.

By packaging the several ingredients produce the desired ultimate compound.

With the above and other objects in View, as will be apparent the invention consists in the construction, compound or mixture;

FIG. 5 is an elevation of another type of packaging or compounding unit made in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 6 is a like elevation of still another embodiment of a packaging and compounding unit following the teachings hereof;

FIG. 8 is an edge elevation of part of the tear tab to illustrate a modification thereof to facilitate the engagement thereof.

as an example, it being understood that the packaging and compounding of other resins and/or materials may be carried out in the subject unit without change or variation save perhaps in size and capacity.

To carry out this invention several envelopes or conthe outer envelope or container for blending or mixing Though several materials,

transparent, clear, strong, thin and is incompatible to the ingredients to be compounded within the unit.

Since one is provided for each ingredient to be compounded or mlXed with the contents of the outer envelope 10 the number of such ingredients determined by its specic function and capacity. As, in the quantity of epoxy resin exceeds the quantity of the hardener or activator required,

cylinder or envelope yl0.

By reversing the position of the envelope 10 i.e., bringing its open end uppermost, it may receive and hold a measured quantity of epoxy resin. After the overall or outer envelope 10 is partially lled with epoxy resin through its remaining open end that end is heat sealed or cemented, as at 16, thereby confining the epoxy resin and the subsidiary envelope 11 in the outer or overall envelope 10. It is advisable to only partially fill the outer envelope 10 to thereby allow ample space for the blending and mixing of the contents of envelope 10 with the contents of subsidiary envelope `11 when released into the outer or overall envelope 10 by manipulation of the unit.

In order to open the inner or subsidiary envelope 11 to allow its contents to escape into the overall or outer envelope 10 a tear tab `17 is heat sealed or cemented to and along the outer surface of one side of said envelope. This tear tab is a relatively long, narrow strip or tape of polyethylene having one end portion 17 resting flush against and sealed throughout its length to the material of the envelope 11. The opposite end portion 17, which is unattached to the envelope 11, is then bent over the remainder of the tear tab 17 to project beyond the inner end of the subsidiary envelope 1l. Any pull on the end portion 17" of the tear tab 17 will cause that portion 17 of such tab sealed or cemented to the envelope 11 to tear the latter and allow its contents to escape into the envelope 10. To insure the successful operation of the tear tab 17 without breaking, it is made of polyethylene somewhat thicker than the polyethylene of which the envelopes 10 and 11 are fabricated.

Of course any required number of subsidiary envelopes 11 may be enclosed in and secured to the outer envelope 10, in which event each may be provided with its individual tear tab 17. on the outer or overall envelope not illustrated for it would be identical with the tear tab 17 shown on the inner or secondary envelope construction and operation. Indeed, as the outer envelope 10 of the unit usually is fully accessible, a tear tab is not necessary since it may be easily cut or otherwise opened when it is desired to release the compound blended or mixed therein. However when the subject compounding unit is enclosed or covered as in the impregnating kit disclosed in copending application Serial No. 810,468. filed May l, 1959, a tear tab 17 on the outer envelope 10 would be advantageous if not essential.

In FIGS. 5 and 6 the outer or end portion 17" of the tear tab 17 is free and may be grasped and manipulated through the wall of the outer envelope 10. The end portion 17" of the tear tab 17 shown in FIG. 5 may be plain; or its extremity 17a may be folded back for a short distance to rest hush against the body of end portion `17" Where it can be heat sealed or cemented to create a double thickness at the terminal of said free end portion all as shown in FIG. 8. This would facilitate grasping the tear tab 17 as above described.

In FIG. 6 the free extremity of end portion 17" is looped through a ring 18 of any suitable material, preferably synthetic resin or like material. Thereafter such extremity is heat sealed or cemented to the portion 17 above the ring 18 as at 19. nently secured to the free end portion tab 17 and provides means to facilitate the engagement of the end portion 17 through the wall of the outer or overall envelope `10.

In FIGS. 1 to 4 inc., the unit is so arranged that the tear tab 17 may be pulled to open the inner or subsidiary envelope 1t1 and release its contents without direct or indirect manual engagement of such tab. Taking advantage of the pliability and flexibility of the polyethylene of which the envelopes or containers are fabricated the outer or overall envelope or telescoped by forming a lap or fold 20 around the wall thereof medially of its ends. This lap or fold 20 is disposed inwardly of the envelope 10 to closely underlie the wall thereof as shown in FIGS. l and 4. At that point in the assembly of the unit one end of the outer envelope 10 is open while its opposite end contains the secondary or subsidiary envelope 11 which is hxedly held in place by the engagement of its anchoring tab 14 in the seal 15 that closes that end of envelope 10. The end portion 17" of the tear tab 17 is only long enough to just reach the open end of the Outer envelope 10 after the fold 20 is made and located. Thus, after the outer envelope 10 has received its quota of epoxy resin, the extremity of this relatively short tear tab end portion 17" is engaged by and in the seal 16 which closes that end of the outer envelope 10.

It is apparent from the foregoing that the shortened or telescoped outer envelope 10 is so arranged that the length of the end portion 17'I of the tear tab 17 plus the length of the contained inner or secondary envelope 11 substantially equals the shortened or telescoped length of said outer envelope 1t) and is appreciably less than the normal or expanded length of said outer envelope 10. Hence by grasping the ends 15 and 16 of the shortened outer envelope 10 and exerting a longitudinal pull thereon the outer envelope 10 is restored to its normal length and the tear tab 17 is consequently drawn to tear open the inner envelope 11.

What is claimed is:

1. A packaging and compounding unit comprising a pair of sealed envelopes fabricated of relatively thin, ilexible material each containing a component of a mixture, one envelope being disposed within the other, a strip of material, constituting a tear tab, having one end portion xedly secured to the outer face of the wall of the inner of said envelopes and its opposite end portion projecting beyond the end of said inner envelope, means for temporarily shortening the outer envelope and means for securing the extremity of the free end portion of the strip to the adjoining end of the shortened outer envelope.

2. A packaging and compounding unit comprising a relatively long outer envelope, a smaller and shorter inner envelope disposed in and anchored at one end to an end of the outer envelope, a strip of material iixedly attached at one end portion to the inner end of the inner envelope and having its free end extending toward the opposite end of the outer envelope, and a fold in the wall of the outer envelope disposed inwardly thereof and reducing the length of said outer envelope, whereby the extremity of said strip may be secured to the adjoining extremity of the outer envelope.

3. A packaging and compounding unit comprising a relatively long outer envelope, a smaller and shorter inner envelope disposed in and anchored at one end to an end of the outer envelope, a strip of material fixedly attached at one end portion to the inner end of the inner envelope and having its free end extending toward the opposite end of the outer envelope, and a fold in the wall of the outer envelope and reducing the length of said outer envelope, thereby disposing the extremity of said strip adjacent to the extremity of the outer envelope, and means for securing the extremity of the strip to the adjacent extremity of the outer envelope whereby a pull is exerted on the strip to tear the inner envelope upon restoring the outer envelope to its normal length by moving its ends in opposite directions.

4. A packaging and compounding unit comprising a relatively long outer envelope and a shorter, smaller inner envelope, said inner envelope being disposed in and anchored at one end to an end of the outer envelope, a fold formed in the wall of the outer envelope medially of its ends and disposed inwardly of and thereby telescoping such envelope, and a strip of material having one end portion fixedly secured to the wall of the inner envelope adjoining its inner end and its opposite end portion being just long enough to reach the opposite end of the outer envelope when telescoped where its extremity is permanently secured.

5. A packaging and compounding unit comprising two sealed envelopes each containing and isolating a component of a mixture, one whereof being the smaller is disposed in and anchored to one end of the larger outer envelope, a fold formed in the wall of the outer envelope 3,085,681 thereby shortening its length, and a tear tab secured at outer tube to close it and simultaneously secure the exone end portion along the surface of the wall at one end tremity of said strip thereto.

of the inner envelope and having the extremity of its op- References Cited in the me of this patent outer envelope opposite to the inner envelope with sub- 5 UNITED STATES PATENTS stantially all slack removed therefrom. 1,705.335 Toch Man 19J 1929 6. The meth d of assembly and packing a packaging 1,957,903 011611 May 8, 1934 and compounding unit comprising a relatively small inner 2,157,169 Foster May 9y 1939 envelope and a larger outer envelope consisting in sealing 2,360,597 '17015015111' Och 17, 1944 one end of a small tube of llexible material, so attaching 10 2,418,397 Conyer Aprl 1, 1947 a strip of flexible material to the outer surface of the 2,609,880 Dyet Sept. 9, 1952 smaller tube that one end portion thereof projects freely 2,714,974 Sawer Aug 9, 1955 beyond the end of said tube, filling said tube through its 2,719,623 Ivanoff 0,515a 4, 1955 open end, sealing such open end adjacent to the extremity 3851104 Greenspan May 5, 1959 of said tube thereby creating an anchoring tab, inserting 2,883,187 voege May 25j 1959 the filled smaller tube in one end of a larger tube of the 2,894,510 Benamy 1u1y 14, 1959 same material, having both of its ends open, with the an- 2 898 744 Robbins Aug 11J 1959 choring tab of the smaller tube located in transverse alxgn- J ment with the extremity of said larger tube, sealing that FOREIGN PATENTS end of the larger outer tube to close the same and simul- 556,445 Italy Feb. 6, 1957 taneously secure the anchoring tab of the inner smaller 697,723 Great Britain Sept. 30, 1953 tube to the end of the larger outer tube, reversing the 763,292 Great Britain Dec. 12, 1956 outer tube and partially filling it through its remaining 1,054,170 France Oct. 7, 1953 open end, forming a fold in the wall of the outer tube to shorten it and bring the extremity of the strip aforesaid OTHER REFERENCES in substantial transverse alignment with the open end of Twin-Tube Adhesive, Modern Packaging, July 1956,

the outer tube, and finally sealing the open end of the pages 82 and 83.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1706335 *Jun 3, 1927Mar 19, 1929Standard Varnish WorksReceptacle for paints, etc.
US1957903 *Apr 27, 1931May 8, 1934Allene B OdellWrapping material
US2157169 *Sep 27, 1937May 9, 1939Ruth FosterHeat bag
US2360597 *Oct 31, 1942Oct 17, 1944Topolski Walter LMerchandise wrapping
US2418397 *Mar 15, 1944Apr 1, 1947American Cyanamid CoLife jacket dye marker
US2609880 *Mar 4, 1948Sep 9, 1952Joseph G DyerApparatus for sealing wells
US2714974 *Oct 24, 1949Aug 9, 1955Sawyer John WCompartmented container for liquids
US2719628 *Jun 10, 1953Oct 4, 1955Ivanoff John VMethod and means for tinting paints
US2885104 *Oct 11, 1956May 5, 1959Greenspan IrvingBottle with disposable cartridge
US2888187 *Jul 22, 1953May 26, 1959Bemis Bro Bag CoBag
US2894510 *Feb 25, 1954Jul 14, 1959Fenwal Lab IncSealing closures for fluid containers
US2898744 *Jun 15, 1956Aug 11, 1959Kwik Kold Of America IncChemical freezing package
FR1054170A * Title not available
GB697723A * Title not available
GB763292A * Title not available
IT556445B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3392826 *Jan 19, 1967Jul 16, 1968Roy Y. PowlanSurgical plaster dressing package
US3429429 *Jul 17, 1967Feb 25, 1969Poitras Edward JCompartmented package
US3680689 *Jul 15, 1970Aug 1, 1972Stadex AbEnclosure with progressively destructible seal
US3871357 *Oct 10, 1973Mar 18, 1975Grosso AttilioSelf-warming container for precooked foods
US3940905 *Aug 2, 1974Mar 2, 1976Perry 3Rd Thomas WilliamMethod and apparatus for making a thermal compress
US7618406Jan 22, 2007Nov 17, 2009Baxter International, Inc.Break seal before access dual chamber bag
US7651290May 9, 2005Jan 26, 2010Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Device with pull tab activation
US7950864Dec 13, 2005May 31, 2011Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Device with internal pull tab activation
US8235965Aug 25, 2009Aug 7, 2012Baxter International, Inc.Embedded access dual chamber bag
US8915359 *Jun 15, 2011Dec 23, 2014David DiLibertoContainer having a tearable packet therein
US20100257681 *Oct 14, 2010Chia-Ching LinFluid receiving device with a wiping layer and a manufacturing method thereof
US20110308977 *Dec 22, 2011David DiLibertoContainer having a tearable packet therein
WO2007070332A2 *Dec 7, 2006Jun 21, 2007Kimberly Clark CoWater-dispersible device with pull tab activation
WO2008091438A1 *Nov 28, 2007Jul 31, 2008Baxter IntBreak seal before access dual chamber bag
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/222
International ClassificationB65D81/32
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/3272
European ClassificationB65D81/32H2