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Publication numberUS3085752 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1963
Filing dateDec 19, 1960
Priority dateDec 19, 1960
Publication numberUS 3085752 A, US 3085752A, US-A-3085752, US3085752 A, US3085752A
InventorsDrell Leonard B
Original AssigneeMert & Dougherty De
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pressure dispenser
US 3085752 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 16, 1963 l.. s. DRELL 3,085,752

PRESSURE DISPENSER Filed Deo. 19, 1960 w. Z Qfg'l United States Patent O 3,935,752 PRESSURE DISPENSER Leonard B. Droll, Glencoe, lill., assigner to De Mert d: Dougherty, a corporation of illinois Filed Dec. 19, 196i), Ser. No. '76,661 11 Claims. (Cl. 239-308) This invention relates to dispensers for liquid mediums `and pulverulent solids. More particularly, it is concerned wtih the -entrainment of materials in a flowing gas stream and discharge thereof in a directed stream. Still more particularly it deals with :an assemblage of apparatus wherein gas under pressure is maintained separate from and out of contact with the material which the gas is adapted to dispense until the moment of discharge.

The :apparatus of this invention basically consists of a container for propellant gas under pressure and a separate holder enclosing the material to be dispensed. A ilexible retaining member holds the propellant container and the holder for material to be dispensed in a cooperative side-by-side arrangement whereby the gas is discharged from the container of gas under pressure adjacent the outlet o-f a tubular member which communicates' with a point adjacent the bottom of the holder.

Due to the relative positioning of the gas discharge outlet with relation to the outlet of the tubular member communicating wit-h the interior of the holder, propellant 'blowing by the end of the tubular member creates a vacuum at the tube outlet whereby the material in the holder is raised to the tip of the outlet tube and dispensed in a directed stream.

In this cooperative arrangement, the discharged gas becomes the entrainer and carrier for materials to be dispensed. A separate holder for material to be dispensed and an independent source of propellant provides flexibility and economy in the dispensing operation. This type of dispenser is useful vfor spraying of a wide variety of products but is particularly advantageous for uses which involve a multiplicity of different spray jobs of comparatively small magnitude and involving the entire gamut of products which may be suitable for spraying. The same propellant container may be used with, for example, a liquid, such as paint, varnish, polish, insecticides, deodorants, lubricants or water for dampening clothes to be ironed; or a powder such as talcum, foot powder, powdered insecticide, etc. Other products suitable for spraying will readily come to mind to those familiar with this art. l

It is known in the art that various liquids and solids could be dispensed if .the gaseous mediums were mixed with the materials to -be dispensed or sprayed. Insecticides, paints, foods and the like are commonly sold in the form of so-called bombs which are containers for the material to `be dispensed having suflicient strength to hold the propellant gas under the required pressure. lIn these containers, the propellant is mixed with and/or absorbed in the uid composition to be dispensed.

Where the products are mixed and allowed to stand in storage, it is necessary that the gaseous medium and the material to be dispensed be compatible, i.e., that the gaseous medium does not deleteriously aiect the flavor if the material is a food, does not cause coagulation of liquid if the material is a lacquer, etc. In each instance the compatible combination has been sold as a single container item and it has been necessary to purchase a different pressurized package for each different job. Most of such products are used to only a partial extent of their capacity, and then are stored for future use.

With the dispenser of this inventi-on, containers holding material to be sprayed may be easily interchanged, or a single container may be filled with a diiferent spray material after cleaning. Whenever the propellant container becomes exhausted, it may be replaced with another similar container. With the combination of containers yarranged in accordance with this invention, containers for a single propellant and the holder for materails to be dispensed may be changed with the holder ybeing cleaned before filling the holder with new material or a group of similar holders each filled with a different, for example, colored lacquer, may be interchanged quickly as needed. On the other hand, when the propellant in the propellant container becomes exhausted, the propellant container may be replaced with another similar item.

Materials generally recognized to bze useful as propellants in the pressurized dispenser lield are useful for the purposes of this invention. inasmuch as the contact between the propellant and the material to be dispensed is an almost instantaneous one, the problem of compatibility of propellant and material to be dispensed is a negligible factor and .a wide variety of propellants not eretofore having utility also can be used. Typical useful propellants are the gaseous hydrocarbons, such as propane, butane, isobutane, and the like, and the saturated uorinated or chlorinated or chloriiuorinated hydrocarbons such as l,ldifluorethane, 1monochlor1,ldi fluorethane, mono-iluortrichlormethane, monochlordiuormethane, dichlordiil-uormethane, 1,2-dichlor-1,1,2,2-tetraiiuorethane, and the like.

While mixtures of the various propellants may be used, the c-omponents of the mixture must vaporize at approximately the `same temperature. If the mixtures have divergent boiling points, each component will exert its own pressure until such time as the higher boiling propellant is exhausted. For this reason, it is preferred to us-e individual propellants, and particularly to use dichlordiiluormethane (Freon 12) which exerts a vapor pressure of about 70 p.s.i. at :a temperature of about 70 F.

The propellant container is held in proper cooperative arrangement with the holder of material to 4be dispensed by a retainer member which comprises a support adapted to tit snugly around all or most of the peripheral surface of sa propellant `container and is provided with a portion adapted to support and to position a standard size bottle or other suitable material holder in predetermined relationship to the propellant container so that -the discharge pipe or tube projecting through the closure means for the standard size bottle cooperates with the discharge nozzle of the propellant container. This retainer member is preferably constructed of heavy gauge wire but may be formed of metal tubing or other suitable material of construction.

The lateral position of the holder is controlled by the support portion of the retaining member which forms a receiving pocket for said holder. Preferably the pocket is formed between an arcuate section of a support portion of the wire retaining member which project laterally from the propellant container a distance slightly less than the diameter of the holder from said container. Thus, when the holder is positioned in the retaining member, the resilience of the wire causes the holder to be pressed against the peripheral surface of the propellant container or to a position parallel thereto. This pressure is exerted diametrically of the container. This pressuring feature is important because it insures accurate positioning of the holder relative to the gas release nozzle of the propellant container.

The top of the holder for material to vbe dispensed is closed by suitable means such as a screw cap. The cap carries a dispensing unit comprising a bracket having a vertically disposed Venturi tube and a small horizontally extending gas discharge nozzle. The gas discharge nozzle of the holder terminates in closely spaced relationship to the Upper end of the Venturi tube. This relationship is maintained constant by a flat Strengthener web which is preferably integral with .the bracket and supports both the transversely positioned gas discharge nozzle and the upper end of the Venturi tube to prevent either of them from moving and altering their positions.

The orifice of the tube through which the material to be dispensed flows and the orifice of the gas discharge nozzle may be varied in size depending upon the interrelated factors of vapor pressure of the propellant, greater flow of gas through the gas orifice, rate of tiow through the tube orifice of material to be dispensed, the viscosity of the material if the material is a liquid, or the density of the material if the material is a solid and, finally, the distance the material to be dispensed must be lifted to reach the outer lip of the tube, etc.

When using a propellant such as dichlorodifiuoro methane (Freon 12), a gas orifice in thc range between 0.018 and 0.022 inch may be used in conjunction with a Venturi tube orifice having an opening in the range between 0.035 and 0.048 inch for spraying socalled brush enamels diluted with only of thinner when the holder has a depth no greater than that of the propellant container.

Orifice sizes outside the ranges shown previously may be used with other materials, for example, with pulverulent solids. Due to the nature of powders, it is often necessary to fluidize these materials by passage of gas through them to cause the solids to flow to and upwards through the outlet pipe. When such fiuidizing is necessary, a small amount of gas is supplied to the bottom of the holder for solid material through a bleed or bypass line. Such a line diverts a portion of the gas being delivered from the propellant container so that it passes through the holder and assists in moving the solids to the outlet of the Venturi tube where the main body of gas issuing from the horizontally disposed gas discharge nozzle entrains the solids and moves them in a directed stream. The amount of gas passing through the holder generally does not exceed 10% of the total amount of gas being delivered from the propellant container and it is preferably limited to about 5%.

A tubular member made from any suitable material, for example, rubber or polyethylene, connects the rear end of the gas discharge nozzle with the outer end of the outlet from the propellant container. The length of the fiexible tube is preferably such that when the assembly is completed t'ne spacing of the holder from the propellant container causes a slight axially directed pressure to be exerted against the ends of the flexible tube, i.e., the length of the flexible tube causes it to be under longitudinally directed compressing force to counteract the pressure of the gas which tends to break the tube loose from the nipples fitting internally of the ends of this tube and by which the tube is secured for passage of gas. Ifthe flexible tube is not designed to withstand the pressure of the gas system, a slight expansion will break the seal between the fiexible tube and one of the discharge nozzles, with the result that the tube will be blown off one of its connections. The endwise pressure against the ends of the flexible tube helps to prevent either end of the tube from being blown off the nipple of the nozzle to which it is secured.

Material to be dispensed moves upward through a tubular member which generally is sectionalized into a Venturi tube section and a so-called dip tube section, although the tube may be of unitary construction. The dip tube section has its upper end secured to the lower end of the Venturi tube. The dip tube extends into the container and terminates adjacent the bottom of said holder. The gas discharged from the propellant container passes adjacent the upper end of the Venturi tube to create a suction that lifts the material to be dispensed from the container through the Venturi tube and sprays it outwardly in the form of small droplets.

The dispensing unit is inexpensive because the material holder and the propellant container are both items of standard manufacture. The retaining member may be used indefinitely. The screw cap with the bracket, the dip tube and the tubular member attached thereto, may also be used with other holders of the same size, or with the same holder if it is either reiilled or cleaned and filled with other materials to be dispensed. IPreferably the gas release mechanism of the propellant container is removable to facilitate replacement of the propellant containers when the propellant is completely consumed.

The removability of the gas discharge mechanism also facilitates interchangeability of the holders for the materials to be dispensed, because the screw cap of the holder may be turned to remove it when the end of the tubular member with the gas discharge mechanism attached ,to it is removed from the propellant container. Otherwise it would be necessary to detach the flexible tube from one of the discharge nozzles before the screw cap could be removed from the container. lf it is desired to save the unused portion of a material of which a portion has been dispensed, the container may be closed by a conventional screw cap of the proper size.

The complete structure is more fully described in the following specification, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE l is a side elevational view of an assembly embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of the assembly shown in FIGURE l;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the assembly shown in FIGURE l; and

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary cross section view of the cap for the holder in which the material to be dispensed is contained, with the discharge mechanism for dispensing the material from the container.

Referring to the drawings, a conventional propellant container 1 is provided with a gas release mechanism or button 2 Vhaving a gas discharge nozzle 3. The gas rclease mechanism has a plunger 2 engageable with a dispensing valve (not shown) in the propellant container to cause pressurized propellant material to flow from the container through the gas release nozzle 3. A suitable `gas release valve is fully disclosed in my prior Patent No. 2,806,739. It will be understood that the specific construction of the propellant container is not part of the present invention. A removable gas release mechanism is desirable because of `the advantage it affords in connection with the interchangeability of the container and the replacement of used propellant containers but most of the advantages of the invention can be utilized with a structure in which the gas release mechanism is not removable from the propellant container.

A tubular member 4- has one end tted over the gas release nozzle 3, as indicated at Tube 4 is preferably of suitable flexible material, such as polyethylene, saran, synthetic elastomers, for example, butadiene rubber or may be made of natural rubber or any other similar resilient material that is chemically inert to the propellant material. The iiexible tube is preferably sealed to the gas release nozzle 3, but may be removably secured to said nozzle. The tubular member must be removably secured at one of its ends if the spray head is not removable from the propellant container.

A wire retaining member 7 may be made of a single length of wire bent into the desired shape, but preferably is formed of two parts 8 and 9 which are welded together. Part 8 includes a substantially circular loop 10 that lits around the peripheral surface of the propellant container 1. The wire at the ends of the loop is bent to extend downwardly to provide two vertical sections 1d, and bent additionally to provide two horizontal sections 12, and two more vertical sections 13 that are spaced laterally from the propellant container. The vertical sections 11 are juxtaposed against the peripheral surface of the propellant container `and add stability to the structure of the wire retaining member. The horizontal sections 12 provide a vertical stop and a bottom support for a holder 14 adapted to hold the material to be dispensed.

Part 9 of the wire retaining member 7 is bent to provide an arcuate section 15, two vertical sections 16, and two angularly extending sections 17 that are welded to the downturned vertical sections 13. The angularly extending sections .'17 are bent upwardly, so that the lowermost portions 1S of the retaining member have smooth rounded surfaces that are flush with the bottom of the propellant container when the retaining member is positioned to secure a material holder 14 in assembled relationship with the propellant container. The vertical sections 16 are preferably positioned slightly inwardly toward the propellant container and the resilience of the wire causes a diametrically disposed pressure against the holder 14, tending to push it toward the propellant container and hold the dispensing unit at a substantially fixed position relative to the gas outlet from the propellant container.

The arcuate curvature of section 15 ts snugly against the peripheral surface of a material holder 1t of standard size. When a holder 14 is to be assembled with a propellant container 1, the bottom of the material holder is pushed between the propellant container and the vertical sections 16 of the wire retaining member, thereby forcing the arcuate section 15 slightly outward. The material holder 14 is then pressed downwardly until it is seated on the horizontal sections l12 and the lowermost portions 18 of the wire retaining member are in engagement with the supporting surface on which the propellant container is positioned. The resilience of part 9 of the wire retaining member insures a snug lit of the arcuate section 15 against the material holder 14, and also insures the proper spatial relationship between the upper edge of material holder 14 and the discharge nozzle 3.

A screw cap 19 adapted to close the top of the material holder 14 has a dispensing unit mounted thereon. Although other types of closure members can be used for the holder 14', it is preferred to use a screw cap because of the greater degree of accuracy that can be attained in spacing the nozzle of the Screw cap in predetermined relationship to the release nozzle 3. The cap 19 is provided with an annular sealing gasket Ztl and a vent 2,1.

The dispensing unit comprises a bracket 22 that 1s rigidly mounted on screw cap 19 by fa projection 2 3 that projects through an aperture 24 and by the projection 2S of a Venturi tube 26 that projects through an aperture 27 spaced from aperture 24. The projection 23 and the Venturi tube 26 are preferably both integral with the dispensing unit. The lower end of projection 23 is peened over the adjacent edge of .the cap, as indicated at 28. dip tube 29 is secured to the lower end of the Venturi tube 26 and extends downwardly therefrom into the holder 14. The lower end of the dip tube is positioned adjacent the bottom of the holder.

The shape of the bracket 2.2 is not critical since its only function is to support the discharge nozzle and the Venturi tube in a specic, predetermined relationship. In the drawings, bracket 22 is shown as being L-shaped, with a horizontally disposed leg 31 ilush against the top of the cap 19 and a Vertical leg 32 projecting upwardly at right angles to the horizontal leg.

Venturi tube 26 projects upwardly above the horizontal leg 31 and has `a restr-icted throat 3?)` adjacent its upper end. The horizontally disposed discharge nozzle 3i) extends laterally in opposite directions .from the Vertical leg 32 land has an orifice 34 extending throughout its length. The outer end of orice 34 terminates in close proximity tothe upper end of .the Venturi tube. In addition to effecting the movement of the material to be sprayed to the ltop of Venturi tube 26 the spatial relationship of the adjacent ends of the Venturi tube and orice 34 is important to the proper functioning of the dispenser because it is one of the factors that determines the proportions of the propellant to the spray material that may be used. A web 35 that is integral with the dispensing unit structure extends between the upper portion of the Venturi tube, the portion of the nozzle 30 adjacent the upper portion of the Venturi tube, and the adjacent surfaces of the bracket. Web 35 prevents alteration of the spatial relationship between the Venturi tube and the discharge nozzle 30.

The operation of the dispensing assembly is simple. The dip tube tand the liexible tube, together with the gas release mechanism of the propellant container are handled as a unit. When the container holds the material to be sprayed, the screw cap is threaded on the open top of lthe container. The plunger of the gas release mechanism is then inserted into the valve opening of the propel: lant container. When the plunger is pressed downwardly the propellant flows through the discharge nozzle of the plunger, the ilexible tube connecting the plunger and the discharge nozzle and past the outlet of Venturi tube 26. As the propellant flows out of the discharge nozzle it creates a suction -to draw the material through the Venturi tube. The material to be dispensed is entrained in the propellant and is discharged in the from of a spray of droplets if the material is a liquid.

Although I have described a preferred embodiment of the invention in considerable detail, it will be understood that the description is Iintended to be illustrative, rather than restrictive, as many details of construction may be modiiied or changed without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. Accordingly, I do not desire to be restricted -to the exact construction described.

I claim:

1. A dispensing assembly comprising a propellant container adapted to contain a pressurized propellant, a gas release nozzle projecting from a valve on said container, a holder for material to be dispensed, a dispensing mechanism consisting of an outlet tube for material in said holder `and a transversely positioned gas discharge nozzle mounted -on said holder, a flexible tube connecting Said gas discharge nozzle to said gas release nozzle, and a unitary resilient retaining member adapted to position said holder in predetermined relationship to said container, said retaining member being adapted to exert pressure against said holder urging it toward said container, the length of said tube being such that the pressure against said holder is exerted against both ends of said tube to hold it against displacement.

2. A dispensing assembly comp-rising a propellant container adapted to ycontain pressurized propellant, :a gas release nozzle projecting from a Valve on said container, `a holder adapted to enclose material to be dispensed, closure means for said holder, a dispensing mechanism consistiug of a Venturi tube extending from 4a point adjacent the bottom of said holder to a point outside the closure means for said holder and a transversely positioned gas discharge nozzle mounted on the top of said holder, a flexible tube connecting said gas discharge nozzle to said ygas release nozzle, and a unitary resilient wire retaining ymember having arcuate sections engageable with portions of the peripheral surfaces of said holder and said container, the lateral distance between diametrically opposite points on said arcuate sections being less than the combined length of the diameters of said 'container and said holder, whereby said retaining member is adapted to exert pressure urging said container and holder toward each other, said container and said holder being spaced to exert pressure tagainst both ends of said flexible tube to prevent displacement of either end of said tube.

3. A dispensing assembly comprising a propellant container adapted to contain a pressurized propellant, a gas release nozzle projecting from a valve on said container, a holder adapted to enclose material to be dispensed, a cap mounted on said holder, a bracket secured to saic cap, a horizontally disposed gas discharge nozzle and a vertically disposed tube integral with said bracket, the outer ends of said tube and said gas discharge nozzle being in close proximity to each other, whereby propellant material flowing through said gas discharge nozzle under pressure creates suction sufficient to move material held in said holder through said vertically disposed tube, a exible tube connecting said gas release nozzle `and said gas discharge nozzle, and a unitary resilient retaining member adapted to position said holder and said container in predetermined relationship with said nozzles exerting pressure against the opposite ends of said flexible tube to hold it against displacement.

4. A dispensing assembly comprising a propellant container adapted to contain a pressurized propellant, a valve mounted on said container, a gas release plunger having a nozzle projecting therefrom, said plunger being engageable with said valve to release propellant from said container through said nozzle, a holder adapted to enclose material to be dispensed, a cap mounted on said holder, a bracket rigidly secured to said cap, a horizontally disposed gas discharge nozzle and a vertically disposed tube integral with said bracket, a web integral with said bracket for holding said tube and said gas discharge nozzle in xed relationship to each other whereby propellant material owing through said gas discharge nozzle under pressure creates suction suicient to move material enclosed in said holder, a flexible tube connecting said nozzle on said plunger and said gas discharge nozzle, and a unitary resilient retaining member adapted to hold said container and said holder in predetermined relationship, the length of said flexible tube being so related to the distance between said nozzles that said nozzles exert pressure against the opposite ends of said ilexible tube to hold it against displacement.

5. A dispensing assembly comprising a propellant container adapted to contain a pressurized propellant, a discharge nozzle projecting from said container, a holder adapted to enclose material to be dispensed, a cap mounted on said container, a bracket rigidly secured to said cap, a horizontally disposed gas discharge nozzle and a vertically disposed tube integral with said bracket, said vertically disposed tube communicating with said holder, the outer ends of said tube and said gas discharge nozzle terminating in close proximity to each other,

whereby propellant material llowing through said second mentioned discharge nozzle under pressure creates suction sucient to move material held in said container through said vertically disposed tube, a rigid web interconnecting said tube and said second mentioned discharge nozzle, a unitary resilient retaining member adapted to hold said container and said holder in predetermined relationship, and a flexible tube connecting said irst and second mentioned discharge nozzles whereby propellant material ilowing through said iirst mentioned discharge nozzle is directed through said second mentioned discharge nozzle, the length of said flexible tube being so related to the distance between said rst and second mentioned discharge nozzles that said nozzles exert pressure against the opposite ends of said exible tube to hold it against displacement by internal pressure exerted against it by propellant material llowing therethrough under pressure.

6. A dispensing assembly comprising a propellant container adapted to contain a pressurized propellant, a dispensing valve mounted adjacent the top of said can, a gas release plunger having a discharge nozzle projecting therefrom, said plunger being engageable with said valve to dispense propellant from said container through said discharge nozzle, a holder adapted to enclose material to be dispensed, said holder being of less height than said container, a dispensing unit mounted on the top of said container consisting of an outlet tube for material in said holder and a transversely positioned gas discharge nozzle, a unitary resilient wire retaining member adapted to hold said holder and said container in predetermined relationship with the gas discharge nozzle in approximately the same horizontal plane as said plunger and a flexible tube connecting said gas discharge nozzle and said nozzle on said plunger, whereby propellant material discharged through said plunger is adapted to pass through said dispensing unit to discharge liquid material from said holder in the form of a spray of tine droplets.

7. A dispensing assembly comprising a propellant container adapted to contain a pressurized propellant, a dispensing valve mounted on said container, a manually operable gas release unit having a discharge nozzle projecting from said dispensing valve, said release unit being engageable with said valve to dispense propellant from said container through said discharge nozzle, a holder for material to be dispensed, said holder being of less height than said container, a dispensing unit mounted on top of said container, a unitary resilient wire retaining member adapted to hold said holder and said container in predetermined relationship with said dispensing unit in approximately the same horizontal plane as said gas release unit, and a flexible tube connecting said discharge nozzle and said dispensing unit whereby propellant material discharged through said discharge nozzle is adapted to pass through the dispensing unit to deliver liquid material from said container in the form of a spray of droplets, said retaining member being adapted to exert pressure against said holder urging it toward said container, the length of said tube being such that the pressure against said holder is exerted against both ends of said tube to resist internal pressure exerted by said propellant and tending to displace either end of said tube.

8. An integral retaining member for holding two containers in predetermined relationship, said retaining member having two oppositely disposed arcuate sections adapted to engage portions of the peripheral surface of each of said containers, a horizontally disposed section between said arcuate sections for supporting the bottom of one of said containers in vertically spaced relationship to the bottom of said other container, and a vertically disposed section extending downwardly below said horizontally disposed section to provide a support member spaced laterally from the section adapted to hold the lowermost of said containers.

9. An integral resilient retaining member forfholding two containers in predetermined relationship, said retaining member having two oppositely disposed arcuate sections adapted to engage diametrically opposed portions of the peripheral surface of each of said containers, the lateral distance between diametrically opposite points on said arcuate sections being less than the length of the combined diameters of the two containers to be held by said retaining member, whereby said retaining member exerts lateral pressure against containers mounted therein to urge them toward each other, and a horizontally disposed section between said arcuate sections for supporting the bottom of one of said containers in vertically spaced relationship to the bottom of said other container.

l0. An integral resilent retaining member for holding two containers in predetermined relationship, aid retaining member having arcuate sections adapted to cngage portions of the peripheral surfaces of each of said containers, the lateral distance between oppositely disposed points on said arcuate sections being less than the length of the combined diameters of the two containers to be held by said retaining member, whereby said retaining member presses said containers toward each other, a horizontally disposed section between said arcuate sections for supporting the bottom of one of said containers in vertically spaced relationship to the bottom of said other container, and a vertically disposed section extending downwardly below said horizontally disposed section to provide a support member spaced laterally from the section adapted to hold the lowermost of said containers.

lil. An integral resilient wire retaining member for holding a propellant container having a horizontally directed gas release nozzle at the top and a material container with a horizontally positioned gas discharge nozzle directing gas ow adjacent the lip of a vertically positioned Venturi tube said retaining member having arcuate sections adapted to engage diametrically opposed portions of the peripheral surfaces of said containers, the lateral distance between oppositely disposed points on said arcuate sections being less than the length of the combined diameters of said containers to be held by said retaining member, whereby said retaining member presses said material container and said propellant container into contact along a vertical line, a horizontally disposed section between said arcuate sections for supporting the bottom of one of the contacting containers in vertically spaced relationship to the bottom of the other container and thereby bring the gas release nozzle and the gas discharge nozzle into horizontal alignment, and a cvertically disposed section extending downwardly below said horizontally disposed section to provide a support member spaced laterally from the section adapted to hold the lowermost of said containers.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 436,589 Hoell Sept. 16, 1890 1,365,689 Haywood Jan. 18, 192'1 1,459,002 Swift June 19, 1923 2,635,921 Deutsch Apr. 21, 1953 2,892,317 Holmes June 30; 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US436580 *Jul 25, 1890Sep 16, 1890 Atomizer
US1365689 *Aug 20, 1919Jan 18, 1921American Paper Goods CompanyDispensing appliance
US1459002 *Sep 4, 1920Jun 19, 1923Us Envelope CoCarton support for drinking cups
US2635921 *Jul 24, 1950Apr 21, 1953Electric Sprayit CompanySelf-feeding spray gun
US2892317 *Apr 12, 1956Jun 30, 1959Holmes Hiram MSpray gun
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3162370 *Apr 8, 1963Dec 22, 1964Sprayon ProductsContainer, atomizer and adapter spraying device
US3180578 *Apr 22, 1963Apr 27, 1965Hagadorn Elmore WSpraying apparatus having cap, nipple and sleeve construction
US3305134 *Oct 21, 1965Feb 21, 1967Union Carbide CorpAutomatic spray device
US3591088 *Dec 31, 1968Jul 6, 1971Green EdwardAtomizer sprayhead construction
US5255852 *Jul 20, 1992Oct 26, 1993The Testor CorporationSpray-type dispensing apparatus
US6561437 *Jan 25, 2001May 13, 2003Alan M. SchulmanWater and fertilizer dispenser
US7159796Oct 8, 2002Jan 9, 2007L'orealDevice for spraying a substance onto a medium
US7607591Oct 24, 2006Oct 27, 2009Hallmark Cards, IncorporatedAirbrush
US20120153047 *Jun 22, 2011Jun 21, 2012Damon RoseReusable spray apparatus
EP1957203A1 *Oct 18, 2006Aug 20, 2008DataDot Technology LimitedThe application of microdots and other identifiers to an article
WO2000010644A1 *Aug 19, 1999Mar 2, 2000Adam P MorrisonHolster apparatus for operatively securing a liquid-containing pouch to a container of propellant
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/308, D23/226, 239/303, 239/426, 248/302, 248/213.2
International ClassificationB65D83/14, B05B7/24
Cooperative ClassificationB05B7/2421, B65D83/60, B05B7/2429
European ClassificationB65D83/60, B05B7/24A3B4, B05B7/24A3S
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 14, 1995ASAssignment
Owner name: NBD BANK, ILLINOIS
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:DEMERT & DOUGHERTY;REEL/FRAME:007476/0520
Effective date: 19950727
Aug 11, 1995ASAssignment
Owner name: DEMERT & DOUGHERTY, ILLINOIS
Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LASALLE NATIONAL BANK;REEL/FRAME:007476/0099
Effective date: 19950727