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Publication numberUS3086413 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1963
Filing dateAug 22, 1960
Priority dateAug 22, 1960
Publication numberUS 3086413 A, US 3086413A, US-A-3086413, US3086413 A, US3086413A
InventorsMason James C
Original AssigneeMason Carlton Tool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Power operated pipe wrench and spinning means
US 3086413 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 23, 1963 J. c. MASON 3,086,413

POWER OPERATED PIPE WRENCH AND SPINNING MEANS Filed Aug. 22, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 CIA/1455 t: MASH/V,

IN V EN TOR.

April 23, 1963 J. c. MASON 3,086, POWER OPERATED PIPE WRENCH AND SPINNING MEANS Filed Aug. 22, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 2 2 22.4 J1 1- 202 ME: 4. 214 200a. A K

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United States Patent 3,086,413 POWER OPERATED PIPE WRENCH AND SPINNING MEANS James C. Mason, Long Beach, Calif., assignor to Mason- Carlton Tool (10., Paramount, Calif., a corporation Filed Aug. 22, 1960, Ser. No. 50,993 8 Claims. (Cl. 81-53) The present invention relates generally to oil field equipment, and more particularly to a power-driven spinner adapted for. use in conjunction with a conventional tubing tongs to make up a tubing string as the same is being lowered into an oil well.

To make up a tubing string, lengths or stands of tubing are sequentially connected end-to-end to form the string. Slips are provided on the rotary table that support the uppermost length of tubing in the already made-up portion of the string during the time the next stand of tubing is being connected thereto. Each additional stand of tubing is added to the tubing string supported by the slips by rotatably supporting the uppermost length of the stand from a swivel afi'ixed to the traveling block, and rotating the stand to cause the lowermost length therein to threadedly engage the uppermost length of tubing in the madeup string. When such threaded engagement has been effected, the slips are moved to a non-supporting position, and the traveling block is caused to travel downwardly to dispose the upper end of the stand so added at a convenient elevation above the rotary table. The slips are then caused to support the uppermost length of tubing in the stand so added, the swivel is disconnected from the upper end of the tubing stand, and the traveling block raised to a position where the operation can be repeated.

One of the most time-consuming operations in making up a tubing string as previously described is the rotation of the stand of tubing while it is rotatably supported from the swivel. A major object of the present invention is to provide a relatively lightweight power-driven spinner that can be mounted on a conventional, manually operable tubing tongs to cooperate therewith in the rapid make-up of a string of tubing by use of the spinner which is first used to rapidly spin the stand of tubing rotatably sup ported by the swivel relative to the tubing string held in the slips until substantially full threaded engagement is effected between the string and stand, with the tongs thereafter being manually operated to rotate the string at a desired torque in the final make-up of the tubing string.

Another object of the invention is to provide a poweroperated spinner that is sufficiently light in weight as to be easily transported from one job site to another, can be mounted on any conventional tubing tongs in present-day use, is of relatively simple mechanical structure, requires a minimum of maintenance attention, and can be sold or leased at a sufliciently low price as to encourage its widespread use.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a pipe or tube spinner that is simple and easy to use.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following description of a preferred form thereof, and from the accompanying drawings illustrating the same in which:

FIGURE '1 is a perspective view of the power-driven pipe spinner of the present invention mounted on a conventional tubing tongs;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of the spinner shown in a position to rotate a first length of tubing rela tive to a second length of tubing gripped by slips (not shown);

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary perspective view of the supporting portion of the invention;

FIGURE 4 is a top plan view of the invention;

3,086,413 Patented Apr. 23, 1963 FIGURE 5 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the spinner taken on line 5-5 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a combined top plan view and horizontal cross-sectional view of an interiorly disposed spring-loaded latch and toothed half ring with which it is associated;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary vertical cross-sectional view of the spinner taken on line 7-7 of FIGURE 4, showing the spring-loaded latch illustrated in FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 8 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the invention taken on line 8-8 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 9' is a vertical cross-sectional view of the invention taken on line 99 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 10 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the spinner taken on line 10-10 of FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 11 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the invention taken on line 1111 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 12 is a perspective view of the two toothed half rings;

FIGURE .13 is a perspective view of the two die carriers;

FIGURE 14 is a fragmentary horizontal cross-sectional view of the spinner taken on line 1414 of FIGURE 8; and

FIGURE 15 is a fragmentary vertical cross-sectional view of the invention taken on line 1515 of FIGURE 4.

With further reference to the drawings for the general arrangement of the invention, and particularly FIGURES 1-5 inclusive thereof, it will be seen to include a frame member F and a jaw J that is pivotally movable relative thereto. Jaw I is adapted to be secured in a closed position relative to frame member F by a latch L, best seen in FIGURE 4. Frame member F and jaw J are so constructed as to define a circular tubing-receiving opening 0 in which tubing A or like tubular member can be inserted, or from which it may be removed, when jaw I is in an open position relative to frame member F.

Frame member F and jaw J, as can best be seen in FIGURES 5, 8 and 9, are of hollow construction. Two identical semi-circular half rings B are provided which are shown in FIGURE 12. These half rings B are rotata-bly supported within the confines of frame member F and jaw I (FIGURE 4).

a Two identical semi-circular die carriers C are also provided which are shown in abutting contact in FIGURE 13. Carriers C support a number of circumferentially spaced die blocks D. One of the die blocks D is illustrated in FIGURE 8, together with the carriers C which are supported by half rings B. The outermost end surfaces of blocks B situated in opening 0 are of curved convex configuration, and these curved ends slidably engage cam surfaces for-med or otherwise provided on the half rings B.

When half rings B are rotated relative to carrier C, the die blocks D are moved radially inward to engage the exterior surface of tubing B and rotate the same. A fluidactuated motor H is mounted on the upper surface of frame F (FIGURES 1 and 4), and is connected by means of a conduit U to a source of fluid under pressure (not shown). A manually operable valve K shown in FIG- URE 5, directs fluid under pressure from conduit U to motor H only when the jaw J and frame member F are in the closed position. Motor H drives a gear train T (FIGURES 4 and 9) to rotate half rings B. A support Q for the invention above described is shown in FIG- URES 3 and 10, which support maintains members F and I at :a desired elevation relative to conventional tubing tongs E, as may be seen in FIGURE 1. Latch L is pro.- vided with a handle W which permits the latch to be placed in engagement with frame member F or pivoted outwardly to disengage the latch therefrom.

A number of pairs of rollers X rotatably support half rings B, asmay be seen in FIGURE 8. Rollers X are adjustably supported on frame member F and jaw I whereby they may be moved toward or away from half rings B, for reasons to be explained hereinafter. Frame member F includes a bottom wall 28, a side wall 30, and a top wall or cover 32, the edges of which Walls are integrally joined, as illustrated in FIGURE 9. Jaw J is of hollow construction and is defined by a bottom wall 28', side wall 30' and top wall 32'. Rollers X are preferably of the ball or roller bearing type and mounted in pairs on shafts 33. The end portions of each shaft 33 are disposed in longitudinally extending bores 34 formed in bosses 35 that are centered on and rigidly affixed relative to circular indexing plates 36. The bores 34 are off-centered relative to the centers of bosses 35 and plates 36. The end portions of shafts 33 are affixed to at least one of the bosses 35 in which they are disposed by means of a pin 33a, or other fastening means. Should it be desired, commercially available stock bolts can be used in place of shafts 33. Pairs of vertically aligned openings 37 are formed in frame member F and jaw I which are circumferentially spaced around opening 0, with one of the bosses 35 being rotatably disposed in each opening 37.

A number of circumferentially spaced bores 38 are formed in each indexing plate 36, through which bores screws 39 project to engage a number of tapped bores 38a formed in frame F and jaw J around opening 37. Rotation of two vertically aligned indexing plates 36 moves the shaft 33 and roller X associated therewith toward or away from half rings B whereby the pressure contact between the rollers X and half rings B can be controlled. This movement of one of the shafts 33 and the roller X associated therewith toward or away from the half rings B is due to the off center support of the shaft in the bosses 35. Inasmuch as two vertically aligned bosses 35 are rotated in twoopenings 3-7, the shaft 33 and roller X supported by the shaft rotate eccentrically relative to the axis of rotation of the bosses 35 and may accordingly be moved towards or away from half rings B. Movement of rollers X toward half rings B by rotation of indexing plates 36 is also highly desirable in order to compensate for wear on the half rings after prolonged use. Engagement of screw 39 with aligned bores 38 and tapped bores 38a rigidly maintains shafts 33 and rollers X at the desired position relative to half rings B. One-half of a ring gear 41 is affixed to the central exterior surface of each half ring B (FIGURE 12), and this gear maintains rollers X in the spaced relationship shown in FIG- URE 8.

Each half ring B includes a vertical wall 48 from which lower and upper flanges 50 and 52, respectively, project radially inward. Ring gear 41 can be either rigidly affixed to or formed as an integral part of half ring B. The exterior surfaces of walls 48 are in rolling contact with rollers X. A number of circumferentially spaced concave pockets 58 are formed on the interior surfaces of walls 48, and each pocket is adapted to receive an end portion of one of the die blocks D. Arcuate grooves 60 are formed in the upper flanges 52 that slidably receive and rotatably engage a track 57 (FIGURE 8). Upper and lower flanges 52 and 50 also have a number of pairs of vertically aligned slots 62 and 63 respectively formed therein, the centers of which are in alignment with the centers of pockets 58, as may best be seen in FIGURES 8 and 12.

Die carriers C are positioned between the lower and upper flanges 50 and 52. Each carrier C has a number of rectangular, radially ext-ending openings 64 formed therein which are adapted to be aligned with the concave pockets 58. Vertically aligned bores 66 and 68 are formed in each die carrier C that communicate with openings '64. The die blocks D are structurally identical, and each includes a main portion 72 and a die mounting portion 74. Portion 72 is slidably disposed within one of the openings 64 of the die carriers C half rings B, and these main portions 72 are retained within openings 64 by means of vertically extending bolt elements 76 positioned within vertical, radially extending slots 78 formed in each of the main portions 72. A vertically extending wedge-shaped slot 82 is formed in each die-mounting portion 74 which receives one of a number of tubing-engaging dies Y that is preferably formed with a serrated or otherwise roughened exterior tubing-engaging surface. Dies Y are fabricated from a hard, tough material that is resilient to abrasion, and are of such transverse cross section as to be slidably insertable or removable in slots 82. Dies Y are rigidly maintained within the confines of slots 82 by means of screws, or other conventional means (not shown).

Referring to FIGURES 4 and 9, it will be seen that engagement of ring gear 41 with a toothed driving roller 88 causes half rings B to rotate relative to frame F and jaw J when they are in the closed position. Driving roller 88 is rigidly mounted on a first shaft 90 that is rotatably supported by two vertically spaced bearings 91 and 92. Bearing 91 is mounted on wall 28 of frame F and bearing 92 in a recess 92a formed in a base 93 that extends outwardly from the frame member F as shown. A portion of shaft 98 passes through an opening 92b formed in cover 32 as may be seen in FIGURE 9. A pinion 93 is rigidly atfixed to the upper end portion of shaft 90 and is engaged by a driving gear 96 which is rigidly mounted on a shaft 97 that extends downwardly from the motor H. The lower end of shaft 97 is journaled in a bearing 98 that is preferably disposed in a recess formed in the base 93.

The support Q for the invention may best be seen in FIGURES 3, 4, 5 and 10. A first plate 100 is provided that has a heavy stub shaft 102 extending upwardly therefrom. The lower end portion 102a of stub shaft 102 is of maximum diameter, the intermediate portion 102!) thereof is of lesser diameter, and the upper portion 1020 is of still smaller diameter. A threaded member 104 extends upwardly from portion 102c that is adapted to be engaged by a washer 136 and two lock nuts 108.

Two vertically spaced supporting lugs and 110 extend rearwardly from jaw J and pivotally engage portions 102b and 1020 of shaft 102 as may be seen in FIGURE 5. Frame F likewise is provided with two rearwardly extending, vertically spaced, lugs 112 and 112' that are pivotally supported on shaft portions 102b and 102C. Two laterally spaced stops 114 and 116 extend upwardly from plate 100 and serve to limit the pivotal movement of frame F and jaw J relative to one another.

Two spaced arms 118 and 113 extend downwardly from first plate 100 and longitudinally aligned bores 120 and 12 respectively are formed therein. A bolt 122 extends through bores 120 and 120', as well as through two bores 123 and 123', formed in two spaced blocks 124 and 124'. The blocks 124 and 124' are rigidly afiixed to a second plate 126. Four identical compressed helical springs 123 are arranged in pairs on opposite sides of bolt 122. The upper ends of springs 12% abut against the lower surface of first plate 100, and the lower ends against the upper surface of second plate 126. Compressed springs 128 at all times tend to maintain first plate 1% parallel to second plate 126.

The lower surface of second plate 126 rests on a number of spaced transversely disposed rolls 130 that are rotatably supported on shafts 132. The ends of shafts 132 are supported in bores 134 formed in first legs 136 of two parallel elongate members 138 of inverted L- shaped transverse cross-section. Members 138 include second legs 14*) that extend inwardly toward one another to slidably engage second plate 126 and prevent inadvertent displacement thereof from rolls 130. Two identical cross pieces 142 extend between the ends of members 138 and maintain the same in fixed parallel relationship.

Second stop members 144 in the form of pairs of downturned angles are aflixed to the ends of second plate 126. A heavy, rigid, angle-shaped member 146, that includes a first leg 148 and second leg 150 in which an upwardly extending slot 152 is formed, is affixed to the rear portion of members 138 as shown in FIGURE 3. Slot 152 is sufliciently wide as to receive a portion of conventional tongs E within the confines thereof. The downwardly extending portions of second leg 150 on each side of slot 152 prevents rotational movement of the invention relative to the conventional tubing tongs E.

A third plate 154 extends between, and is rigidly affixed to, the lower edges of legs 136 as best seen in FIGURE 5. A heavy pin 156 extends downwardly from third plate 154 and is slidably insertable in a downwardly extending bore 158 formed in arm 160 of conventional tongs E. The arm 160 has a tubular boss 162 formed on the upper surface thereof on which third plate 154 rests. The bore in boss 162 is in alignment with bore 158. Pin 156 extends downwardly through arm 160 and a collar (not shown) or other means is affixed thereto to prevent the pin from being inadvertently displaced from bore 158. The latch L used in holding the jaw J and frame F in the closed position is shown in FIGURE 4.

Two identical, horizontally spaced lugs 164 project outwardly from side wall 30 of jaw I and have vertically aligned bores 166 formed therein. Two identical circular cams 168 are mounted on a vertical shaft 169 and are rotatably and slidably disposed in bores 166. A horizontal handle 170 projects outwardly from shaft 169. A locking member 172 also extends outwardly from shaft 169, with the member 172 when the shaft is rotated clockwise as viewed in FIGURE 4 being brought into frictional sliding contact with a curved cam face 174.

The upper and lower end portions of shaft 169 are journaled in two vertically aligned bores 176 and 176' formed in two parallel, vertically spaced, horizontal latch members 178 and 178. One end of each latch member 178 and 178' is joined by a heavy web 179 from which the handle W projects. A heavy lug 180 projects outwardly from frame member F. By clockwise rotation of latch members 176 and 176' the web 179 can be dis posed adjacent to the heavy lug 180. When the web is so disposed, the jaw I and frame member F can be locked together by pivoting the shaft 169 in a clockwise direction until the locking member 172 is brought into frictional pressure contact with cam face 174. One or more screws 182 are threadably mounted in tapped bores formed in web 179. The screws 182 are adjustable so that the inwardly disposed ends thereof are in frictional pressure contact with heavy lug 180 when locking member 172 is in frictional locking contact with cam face 174. The heavy lug 180 is preferably reinforced by one or more ribs 184 that extend between it and side wall 30 of frame F.

Fluid under pressure is delivered to the valve K through conduit U. Valve K is of conventional construction and includes a horizontally movable actuating member 186', which when in a first position permits fluid to discharge from the valve through conduit 188 to motor H, causing the same to drive the half rings B, die carriers C and die blocks D in a clockwise direction. After actuating motor H, fluid is discharged back to valve K, and from the valve to a conduit Z. When actuating member 186 is in a second position it permits fluid to discharge through valve K and a conduit 190 connected thereto to motor H to cause the same to drive the half rings B, die carriers C and die blocks D in a counterclockwise direction. When actuating member 186 is in a third position the valve K is closed and no fluid can discharge to motor H.

The outermost end of actuating member 186 has a transversely disposed pin 190 mounted thereon that extends through a bore 192 formed in the lower end of a lever 194. Lever 194 is pivotally supported by a second pin 196 which is rigidly supported by a member 198 from a horizontally disposed L-shaped bracket 200. A first leg 200a of bracket 200 is secured by bolts or other 6 fastening means to side wall 30 of frame F. An end portion of second leg 200k of bracket 200 is aflixed to side wall 30.

Safety means 202 to prevent actuation of the motor H when frame member F and jaw I are in the open position is shown in FIGURE 4. The frame member F and jaw J are formed with two end plates 204 and 206 respectively that are in abutting contact when the frame member and jaw are in the closed position. End plate 204 has a horizontal bore 208 extending therethrough that is in alignment with a bore 210 formed in side wall 30. A first rod 212 is slidably mounted in bore 210 and a bore 214 formedin leg 200a. A compressed helical spring 216 encircles the outer end portion of first rod 212. One end of spring 216 bears against leg 200a, with the opposite end thereof bearing against a collar 218 mounted on first rod 212. The spring 216 at all times tends to move first rod 212 toward end plate 206.

An .arm 220 extends from collar 218 that supports a rigid engaging member 222 which can be brought into engagement with the pin only when the actuating member 186 is in the third position. A guide rod 224 extends outwardly from engaging member 222 and is slidably supported in a bore 226 formed in leg 208a, as best seen in FIGURE 4.

' It will be apparent from the above description of safety means 202 that when the actuating member 186 is in the third position, .and the jaw J is moved to an open position, that due to the compression on spring 216, the rod.

212 will tend to move in the same direction until engaging member 222 engages pin 190. Motor H cannot be actuated by use of lever 194 until jaw J is brought into the closed position (FIGURE 4) in which the end plates 204 and 286 are in abutting contact.

For tubing A to be inserted within the confines of opening 0 or removed therefrom, the ends of half rings B and die carriers C must be disposed in a substantially vertical plane 228. Indexing of the half rings B and die carriers C to positions where the abutting ends thereof are in the plane 228 is accomplished by providing a cup-shaped member 230 on the upper surface of wall 28, as shown in FIGURES 6 and 7. A compressed helical spring 232 in member 230 .at all times tends to move a latch member 234 preferably of transverse rectangular cross-section, toward the lower circumferential surface of half rings B and maintains the latch member in pressure contact therewith. One side 234a of latch member 234 is fiat and at the end portion thereof closest to half rings B, flares outwardly slightly at 23411 to develop into a curved end portion 2340 as shown in FIGURE 6. A recess 236 is formed in one of the half rings B at such a location therein that when the recess is engaged by latch member 234, the half rings B are so disposed that the abutting ends thereof lie in a vertical plane 228.

The half rings B and tubing A rotate in a clockwise direction when .a length of the tubing is being rotated relative to another length thereof held in the tubing tongs B. As may be seen in FIGURES 4 and 6, rotation of the half rings B in a clockwise direction is not impeded by the latch member 234. However, when it is desired to indexthe abutting ends of the half rings in the vertical plane 228 so that the jaw J and frame member F may be placed in the open position, the direction of rotation of the half rings is merely reversed. Counterclockwise rotation of the half rings B takes place until the springloaded latch member 234 is forced into recess 236. When latch member 234 enters recess 236, side 234a and flared end 2341] are brought into pressure contact with complementary portions thereof and rotation of half rings B is stopped in the indexed position mentioned hereinabove.

The tubing tongs E on which the invention is mounted are of the conventional, manually-operated type well known in the oil fields, and have two jaws 238 and 240 that grip the tubing to hold it in a non-rotatable position relative to these jaws. Such conventional tubing tongs E spasms are manufactured by Byron Jackson Tools, Inc., 2300 Vernon Avenue, Verno, California. A handle 242 projects outwardly from jaws 238 and 240 to which an inverted L-shaped support 244 is connected by bolts 246, or other fastening means. The upper end of support 244 is connected to a rope or cable 248 that depends from a convenient portion of an oil well derrick (not shown).

Operation of the invention is relatively simple. The length or stand of tubing A is rotatably supported from the top thereof in a vertical position by a swivel (not shown) that in turn is connected to a vertically movable traveling block (not shown). The traveling block is then lowered into a position where the lower end of tubing A will threadedly engage the upper end of a tubing string A, as shown in FIGURE 2, which tubing string is held in a stationary position by slips (not shown).

The spinner as shown in FIGURE 1 is moved to a position where the frame member F and jaw I extend around tubing A, with the frame member F and jaw I thereafter being placed in a closed and locked position by use of the latch L. Tubing A is disposed between jaws 238 and 240 of tongs E, and jaws 238 and 240 are not immediately placed in the closed position. After the frame member F and jaw J are place in the closed position, the safety means 202 (FIGURE 4), is so positioned that handle 194 can be moved to the first position to cause motor H to drive the half rings B, die carriers C and die blocks D in a clockwise direction.

Initial movement of the half rings B by the motor H is sudden, and to such an extent that there is initial relative movement between the die carriers C, die blocks D, and the half rings. Movement of the curved pockets 58 relative to the curved ends of the die blocks D causes inward movement of the die blocks D with subsequent gripping and rotation of the tubing A by the dies Y. After the initial relative movement between the die carriers C, die blocks D and the half rings B, the die carriers, die blocks and half rings rotate in unison until the length of tubing A has been spun into threaded engagement with the tubing string A. Jaws 238 and 240 are then pivoted to a locked and closed position Where they grippingly support the tubing A. Handle 242 (FIG- URE 1) is thereafter grasped and the tongs E manually rotated to apply a torque of desired magnitude on tub ing A to effect a final make-up of the tubing A with tubing string A.

As soon as the length of tubing A is connected to the string of tubing A, the lever 194 is pivoted to the second position with consequent counterclockwise rotation of the half rings B, die carriers C and die blocks D until the half rings rotate and are stopped when the latch member 234 enters recess 236. When rotation of the half rings B is stopped by latch member 234, the abutting ends of the half rings are in alignment with the vertical plane 228. Handle 17% is then pivoted in a counterclockwise direction to the position shown in FIG- URE 4, and latch L is also swung outwardly in the same direction to be disengaged from locking plate 180. Jaw I can thereafter be pivoted to the open position relative to frame member F to permit disengagement of the spinner from the tubing A. When the jaw J is moved to the open position, the spring 216 moves the engaging member 222 into engagement with pin 190. It will be apparent that due to the use of the rolls 130 and springs 128 in the support Q of the spinner, that it can at all times be maintained in a desired horizontal relationship with tongs E.

After the frame member F and jaw I have been placed in the open position, the jaws 238 and 240 are pivoted to an open position. The stand of tubing A is then threadedly connected to tubing A. The swivel (not shown) and traveling block (not shown) are then lowered after the slips (not shown) have been moved to la non-engaging position. The upper end of tubing A is positioned at a convenient elevation above the rotary table (not shown), and the slips so disposed as to engage tubing A and A to support the same from the rotary table. The swivel (not shown) is disconnected from tubing A, and the traveling block (not shown) and swivel raised to a position where another length of tubing A can be connected to the swivel. The operation above described is then sequentially repeated until a string of tubing A of the desired length has been lowered into the well bore (not shown).

From the previous description of the die blocks D, it will be apparent that they may be easily installed on or removed from the spinner of the present invention. Also, a number of sets of die blocks D may be provided for each spinner, with the die blocks in each set being of a different length than those die blocks in the other sets, whereby the invention is adapted for use with tubing of varying size.

The invention herein shown, described and claimed is an improvement and modification of the invention shown and claimed in my copending patent application Serial No. 754,237, entitled Power Operated Pipe Wrench, filed in the United States Patent Ofiice on August 11, 1958, which issued August 30, 1960, under Patent No. 2,950,639.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes may be made in the invention without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, and therefore the invention is not limited by that which is shown in the drawings and described in the specification, but only as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A power-driven spinner capable of rotating a first length of threaded tubing relative to a second length of threaded tubing when said said spinner is mounted on a tubing tongs that includes a handle having two tubing engageable jaws supported therefrom, which spinner is adapted to be used to rotate said first length to effect an initial make-up with said second length, with said engageable jaws being used to engage said first length after said initial make-up and permit the completion of said make-up at a desired torque by means of a rotating force applied to said tongs through said handle, said spinner comprising: a frame member; a jaw pivotally movable relative to said frame member to cooperate therewith in defining an opening wherein said first length of tubing can be disposed; track means formed on said members and encompassing said opening; a pair of support half rings rotatably mounted on said track means; two semi-circular die carriers rotatably mounted on said half rings; a plurality of circumferentially spaced, radially movable die blocks mounted on said die carriers; cam means disposed at fixed positions relative to said half rings, which cam means is slidably engaged by the exterior ends of said die blocks when said die carriers are rotated in either of two possible directions relative to said half rings, with said die blocks being moved inwardly when said slidable movement takes place; latch means for releasably locking said frame and jaw members together in a closed position; power means; transmission means connecting said power means to said half rings to rotate the same with sufficient initial acceleration as to move said die blocks inwardly to frictionally grip said first length and rotate the same relative to said second length; manually operable means for actuating said power means; safety means that only allows said manually operable means to be operated when said frame and jaw members are locked together by said latch means; means for automatically stopping the rotation of said half rings in positions where the abutting faces thereof are in substantially a vertical plane which passes through the abutting faces of said frame and jaw members when the same are in a closed position; and support means for pivotally supporting said frame and jaw members from said handle.

2. A power-driven spinner as defined in claim 1 wherein said power means is a fluid actuated motor and wherein a valve having an actuating member is provided, together with conduit means that connect said valve to said motor and are capable of connecting said valve to a source of fluid under pressure, said actuating member when in a first position permitting fluid to flow to said motor to cause the rotation thereof in a direction to drive said half rings, die carriers and die blocks in a clockwise direction, said actuating member when in a second position permitting fluid to flow to said motor to cause the rotation thereof in a direction to drive said half rings, die carriers and die blocks in a counterclockwise direction, and said actuating member when in a third position preventing the flow of fluid through said valve to said motor.

3. A power-driven spinner as defined in claim 2 wherein said manually operated means includes a lever projecting from said frame member, a support aflixed to said frame member on which said lever is pivo-tally mounted, linkage means pivo-tally connecting said lever to said actuating member with said safety means being a spring-loaded member which normally occupies a first position that prevents movement of said lever to positions where said actuating member is disposed in either said first or second position, and said spring-loaded member being movable to a second position that permits movement of said lever to said first or second position only when said frame member and jaw are in said closed and locked position.

4. A power-driven spinner as defined in claim 3 wherein means are provided to automatically dispose said springloaded member in said second position when said frame member and jaw are placed in said closed and locked position.

5. A power-driven spinner as defined in claim 3 Where in said support means includes a vertically disposed stub shaft, a plurality of vertically space-d horizontal lugs extending outwardly from said frame member and jaw that have vertically aligned bores formed therein through Which said stub shaft extends, a first horizontal plate afiixed to the lower end of said stub shaft, and means for supporting said first plate in a longitudinally movable position above said handle to permit vertical alignment of said opening in said frame member and jaw with an opening being defined by said jaws of said tong when said jaws are in a closed position.

6. A power-driven spinner as defined in claim 5 wherein said means for supporting said first plate includes a second plate situated below said first plate and in parallel relationship thereto; means for connecting said first plate to said second plate; a third plate parallel to said second plate and situated therebelow; means for afiixing said third plate to said handle of said tongs; a plurality of transversely disposed rollers disposed above said third plate and on which rollers said second plate is supported; and means for holding said second plate on said rollers to permit movement of said second plate in a direction that is parallel to the plane in which said third plate is disposed and normal to the longitudinal axes of said rollers.

7. A power-driven spinner as defined in claim 6 wherein said means for connecting said first plate is an arm that extends down from said first plate, a block that extends up from said second plate, a bolt that extends through horizontally aligned bores formed in said leg and block, with a plurality of helical springs being provided that are vertically disposed and have the ends thereof abutting against the under side of said first plate and the upper side of said second plate, with said springs due to the resiliency thereof at all times tending to maintain said first plate in a position parallel to said second plate.

8. A power-driven spinner as defined in claim 6 wherein said means for affixing said third plate to said handle of said tongs is a tubular boss that extends downwardly from said third plate; a pin that extends upwardly from said handle and slidably engages said boss; and a pair of parallel second legs that extend downwardly from said third plate on opposite sides of said handle to prevent said third plate from rotating in a horizontal plane relative thereto.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,639,894 Smith May 26, 1953 2,650,070 Lundeen Aug. 25, 1953 2,846,909 Mason Aug. 12, 1958 2,850,929 Crookston et al. Sept. 9, 1958 2,871,743 Kelley Feb. 3, 1959 2,879,680 Beeman et a1. Mar. 31, 1959 2,933,961 Adams Apr. 26, 1960 2,950,639 Mason Aug. 30, 1960

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Classifications
U.S. Classification81/57.16, 81/56, 81/57.19, 81/57.18
International ClassificationE21B19/00, E21B19/16
Cooperative ClassificationE21B19/16
European ClassificationE21B19/16