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Publication numberUS3086492 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1963
Filing dateOct 31, 1960
Priority dateOct 31, 1960
Publication numberUS 3086492 A, US 3086492A, US-A-3086492, US3086492 A, US3086492A
InventorsHolley John M
Original AssigneeHolley John M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Propulsion apparatus
US 3086492 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 3 J. M. HOLLEY 3,086,492

' PROPULSION APPARATUS Filed Oct. 51 1960 United States Patent 3,086,492 PROPULSION APPARATUS John M. I-Iolley, 3622 Lakeside Court, Tucker, Ga. Filed 'Oct. 31-, 1960, Ser- No. 66,064 2 Claims. (Cl; I15'28) This invention relates to propulsion apparatus and, moreparticularly, to apparatus for trolling ,small boats.

It is'an object-of:this invention to provide novel propulsion:apparatus' for smallzboats, andthe like. Another object isto providepropulsionapparatus of the character described in which an advantageous adjustment feature is incorporated whereby the propulsionapparatus may be operated at maximum efficiency irrespective of the environment, i.e., the character: of'the. craft, the character ofthe water. surface, etc. Still another object isto-provider novel propulsion apparatus formounting on the transom ofia smallboatih. whichanovel fin is provided on a propeller shaft. or tube. Other objects" and advantages of this invention may be. seen in the details of construction and operation set down in this specification.

The invention, in conjunction with anillustrative embodiment thereof, will be explained inthe accompanying drawing, in which FIG. 1 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a small boat equipped with the inventive apparatus;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the apparatus-equipped boat of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary top plan view of the rearmost portion of the apparatus seen in FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary elevational view, partially in section, of an intermediate portion of the propulsion apparatus.

-In the illustration given and with particular reference to FIG. 2, the numeral designates generally a small boat, while the numeral 11 designates generally the propulsion apparatus embodying teachings of the invention. The propulsion apparatus 11 is equipped with a fin 12 at the extreme rear end thereof (also see FIG. 1), and the boat 10 is propelled by moving the apparatus 11 over a horizontal arc shown by the broken line arrows associated with the handle portion 13.

Now referring to FIG. 2, it will be seen that the propul sion apparatus 11 includes an elongated member 14 which conveniently can be constructed of lightweight tubing. Optimally, diameter stock may be employed. Thus, a conventional rubber handle grip 13 may be readily installed at the forward end of the member 14. The member 14 is seen to include a horizontally-disposed portion 15 at one end thereof and a second horizontally-disposed portion 16 at the other end thereof. Intermediate the portions 15 and 16 is a vertically-inclined portion 17, giving the member .14 a generally Z-shape. The horizontal portion 15 is equipped with a pair of aligned openings .18 through which a bolt 19 extends in a generally vertical direction.

The bolt 19 is provided as part of a bracket generally designated 20 and which may be secured in the fashion shown to the transom 21 of the small boat 10. The bracket 20 also includes washers 22 mounted on the bolt 19 and the member 14 is con-fined on the bolt 19 by means of a wing-nut 23. It will be appreciated that the bolt 19 may be equipped with a shoulder or other abutment means for restricting the lower washer 22 against downward movement, thereby immobilizing the washer and confining the member 14 in the position shown. The openings 22 thus provide bearings for the member -14 so that the member 14 can be moved over a generally horizontal are for the desirable pivotal movement developing movement of the small boat 10.

The portion 16 at the sternmost portion of the mem- 2 her 14'-is-equipped-.withthe fin '12, and for that purpose the fin 12 at its'forward end isequipped with alongitudinally-extending, generally cylindrical integral portion '24 (see'also FIG. 3). generally horizontally-extending bores 25 aligned with openings 26in the end'portion. 16 0f the member 14.

Bolts 27 extend'through the aligned openings 25 and 26.

to secure-the fin 12relative to the portion 16, the bolts 27being' retained in place by' means of wing-nuts-28.

The fin 12' itself is desirably constructed of a flexible material such as rubber, and is seen to-be bifurcated as at 29. The recess providing the bifurcation 29 is midway of theiheight of the fin-.12 and'thus divides the fin into an upper. portion '30 and lower portion 31. portion .30- and 31- is equipped with a-pair of generally longitudinally-disposed, laterally, extending ribs- 32 and 33, respectively. A third pair of ribs 34 is provided between-the upper pair of ribs 32 and thelower pair of ribs. 33, the ribs 34'being aligned:with the apex of the recess providing the bifurcation 29-.

Ascan be most readily appreciated from aconsideration of'FIG. '1, the fin 12; is outwardly flared, i.e.-, the upper and lower edges 35 and 36, respectively, diverge in proceeding away from-the portion-24. Byreference. toaFIG. 3, it-will be seen that the flat sides=3-7 and 38 ofthe :fin 12 converge. in proceeding away from the cylindrical received portion 24.

Means are provided in the intermediate portion 17 for varying the length of the member 14. This adjustment means can be readily appreciated from a consideration of FIG. 4. The portion 17 is seen to include two tubular portions, the rearmost being designated in FIG. 4 by the numeral 39, and the more forward portion being designated by the numeral 40. As can be seen from FIG. 4,

- the tubular element 40 is received within the tubular element 39. The forward end of the element 39 is seen to be equipped with male threads 41 and threadedly received over the element 39 is a sleeve or coupling element 42 which is equipped with female threads designated 43. The extreme forward end 39a of the element 39 is seen to be equipped with a plurality of circumferentially-spac ed, longitudinally-extending slits 44.

In operation, threading of the coupling 42 on the element 39 urges the tongue-like portions 45- necessarily developed by the slits 44 into gripping relation with the element 40. By unthreading the coupling 42, the gripping relationship is relieved and the element 39 can be moved relative to the element 40 to provide a difierent degree of telescoping.

Desirably, the element 40 is equipped with an annular flange 46 at the rearmost end thereof. The outer telescoping element 39 is equipped with cooperating flange means in the form of element 47, which together necessarily restrict the degree to which the element 40 can be withdrawn from the element 39. Desirably, a second coupling arrangement may be provided in the horizontal portion 15 as at 48 (see FIG. 1).

In the operation of the device, the handle 13 is grasped by the operator as one would grasp a tiller, and moved in a reciprocal fashion over a horizontal are about the pivot provided by the bolt 19. By loosening the locking bolt 20a provided as part of bracket 20, the entire device 11 may be removed from a small boat for installation on another boat or storage. When the same is installed on a boat having a higher or lower transom, advantageously the length and the degree of penetration of the apparatus 11 may be altered. This is conveniently achieved by unthreading the coupling 42 to permit the tongue-like por tions 45 to release their grip on the element 40. Thereafter, the element 39 may be repositioned to give a greater or shorter length to the element 14' and, at the same time,

Patented. Apr. 23,1 963.

The portion 24 is equipped with- Each a difierent degree of water penetration. In some instances, a change of water penetration may be advisable because of the character of the water surface, i.e., extreme waves, or the like. The change in length of the device also makes for different leverages when the same aredesired.

The construction and contour of the fin 12 also work for efiicient operation in that the bifurcated stern end of the fin develops a lashing action at the end of each horizontal arc.

While, in the foregoing specification, I have set forth a detailed description of an embodiment of the invention for the purpose of illustrating the same, many variations in the details herein given will be appreciated by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. In propulsion apparatus for mounting on a small boat transom, an elongated, generally Z-shaped member defined by generally horizontally extending integral legs at the ends thereof and an intermediate, vertically inclined portion coupling said legs, pivot means on one of said legs for moving said member through a generally horizontal are when said pivot means is secured to said transom, a generally vertically disposed, fiat resilient bifurcated fin secured to the other of said legs and extending away therefrom, said fin means tapering in thickness in proceeding away from said inclined portion and tapering in width in proceeding toward said inclined portion, said inclined portion comprising a hollow tubular element and a second element telescopically received therein, the

end of said tubular element receiving said second element being equipped with longitudinally-disposed, circumferentially spaced slits, and sleeve means releasably mounted on said tubular element urging the slit-equipped end of said tubular element into gripping engagement with said second element.

2. In propulsion apparatus for small boats, and the like, an elongated member equipped with a handle at one end and fin mounting means at the other end, a bracket on said member adjacent to but spaced from said one end for attaching said member to said boat for pivotal movement in a generally horizontal plane, a fin on said fin-mounting means, said fin being disposed in a generally vertical plane and constructed of flexible material, said fin having its thickness dimension disposed generally horizontally, said thickness dimension decreasing horizontally away from said fin mounting means, and means between said bracket and fin for varying the portion of said member between said bracket and fin, said portion being angularly upwardly inclined when said handle means and said fin have their long dimension disposed generally horizontally.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 635,95 Anderson Oct. 31, 1899 1,324,722 Bergen Dec. 9, 1919 2,292,609 Buehler Aug. 11, 1942 2,525,349 Gulley Oct. 10, 1950

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US635951 *Jul 5, 1899Oct 31, 1899Anthony N AndersonBoat-propeller.
US1324722 *Dec 11, 1917Dec 9, 1919 Submarine
US2292609 *Mar 11, 1940Aug 11, 1942Mcconnell Petermann Co IncBoat propeller
US2525349 *Jun 13, 1947Oct 10, 1950Gulley Newton SFoot operated boat propulsion means
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3370560 *May 27, 1966Feb 27, 1968Markus Lucht FriedrichSailing vessels
US3834343 *Nov 14, 1972Sep 10, 1974Hopkins WArticulated sculling oar
US3857356 *Jul 27, 1973Dec 31, 1974Jewett HFrontward-rowing boat spanning angular oars having self-surfacing blades
US3970032 *Dec 9, 1974Jul 20, 1976Phillips Wayne RPaddle
US4385579 *Jul 28, 1980May 31, 1983Baulard Caugan GerardSailing craft
US4688994 *Oct 14, 1986Aug 25, 1987Innerspace CorporationWatercraft propulsion device
US5348503 *Oct 22, 1993Sep 20, 1994Ryszard FechtnerUnderwater paddle and vertical fin for swimmer
US5746631 *Jan 11, 1996May 5, 1998Mccarthy; Peter T.High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6050868 *Feb 10, 1998Apr 18, 2000Mccarthy; Peter T.High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6095879 *May 13, 1999Aug 1, 2000Mccarthy; Peter T.Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US6146224 *May 18, 1999Nov 14, 2000Mccarthy; Peter T.High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6371821Nov 14, 2000Apr 16, 2002Nature's Wing Fin Designs, LlcHigh efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6413133Aug 1, 2000Jul 2, 2002Mccarthy Peter T.Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US6482059Feb 1, 2001Nov 19, 2002Mccarthy Peter T.High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6497597Mar 5, 2002Dec 24, 2002Mccarthy Peter T.High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6585548Jan 4, 2002Jul 1, 2003Mccarthy Peter T.High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6607411Jan 4, 2002Aug 19, 2003Mccarthy Peter T.High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6712656Dec 28, 2001Mar 30, 2004Mccarthy Peter T.Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US6719599Nov 19, 2002Apr 13, 2004Mccarthy Peter T.High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6755706 *Jan 14, 2003Jun 29, 2004Yun Tzer LinStructure of fin shaped soft paddle
US6843693May 9, 2001Jan 18, 2005Mccarthy Peter T.Methods for creating large scale focused blade deflections
US6884134Jul 18, 2003Apr 26, 2005Mccarthy Peter T.High deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US6918805Jan 22, 2004Jul 19, 2005Mccarthy Peter T.Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US7018256Jun 25, 2004Mar 28, 2006Mccarthy Peter TMethods for creating large scale focused blade deflections
US7101240Nov 13, 2003Sep 5, 2006Mccarthy Peter THigh efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US7112108Aug 26, 2005Sep 26, 2006Mcmullen Bruce William JamesWater craft
US7223140 *Dec 11, 2003May 29, 2007Atsushi DoiSculling oar
US7396267Aug 24, 2006Jul 8, 2008Parker Jack WWatercraft rowing fin system
US7465205Jul 19, 2006Dec 16, 2008Mccarthy Peter TMethods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US7581997Sep 5, 2007Sep 1, 2009Mccarthy Peter TMethod for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US7601041Aug 21, 2006Oct 13, 2009Mccarthy Peter THigh deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US7862395Sep 7, 2007Jan 4, 2011Mccarthy Peter TMethods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US8419487Aug 13, 2010Apr 16, 2013Jack ParkerInternally mounted watercraft rowing fin system
US20020025744 *May 9, 2001Feb 28, 2002Mccarthy Peter T.Methods for creating large scale focused blade deflections
US20040127117 *Jul 18, 2003Jul 1, 2004Mccarthy Peter T.High deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US20040152376 *Jan 22, 2004Aug 5, 2004Mccarthy Peter T.Methods for creating consistent large scale blade blade deflections
US20040248481 *Nov 13, 2003Dec 9, 2004Mccarthy Peter T.High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US20050176318 *Apr 11, 2005Aug 11, 2005Mccarthy Peter T.High deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US20050181689 *Apr 15, 2005Aug 18, 2005Mccarthy Peter T.Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US20060042531 *Aug 26, 2005Mar 2, 2006Mcmullen Bruce W JWater craft
US20060148341 *Dec 11, 2003Jul 6, 2006Atsushi DoiOar
US20070037459 *Oct 20, 2006Feb 15, 2007Mccarthy Peter THigh deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US20070049140 *Aug 21, 2006Mar 1, 2007Mccarthy Peter THigh deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US20070173142 *Jul 19, 2006Jul 26, 2007Mccarthy Peter TMethods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US20070173143 *Jul 19, 2006Jul 26, 2007Mccarthy Peter THigh efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US20080045095 *Sep 7, 2007Feb 21, 2008Mccarthy Peter TMethods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US20110039460 *Aug 13, 2010Feb 17, 2011Jack ParkerInternally mounted watercraft rowing fin system
Classifications
U.S. Classification440/15, 416/79
International ClassificationB63H16/04, B63H16/00, B65H16/04, B65H16/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65H16/04, B63H16/04
European ClassificationB63H16/04, B65H16/04