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Publication numberUS3086510 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1963
Filing dateMar 15, 1961
Priority dateMar 15, 1961
Publication numberUS 3086510 A, US 3086510A, US-A-3086510, US3086510 A, US3086510A
InventorsKranak John A
Original AssigneeKranak John A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for holding stone for facing
US 3086510 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 23, 1963 .J` A. KRANAK 3,086,510

APPARATUS FOR HOLDING STONE FOR FACING Filed March 15, 1961 HIS A TTORNEYS United States Patent O 43,086,510 APPARATUS FOR HOLDING STONE FOR FACING .lohn A. Kranak, R.D. 1, Hanlin Station, Pa. Filed Mar. 15, 19671, Ser. No. 95,867 3 Claims. (Cl. 12S-35) This invention relatesto .a 4stone facing apparatus, more particularly to `a novel means for holding semi-precious stone to Ifacilitate facing 'the stone.

The facing of stone for interior or exterior decoration of buildings has been an art limited to skilled stone masons. The generally `accepted method of facing stone Itoday is a free-hand method wherein a skilled mason places the stone to be faced on a .table and scribes a line on the stone using a straight edge. Using the line as `a guide, the mason faces the stone with .a regular masons chisel .and hammer. This method is not only time-consuming but isinaccurate even when practiced by a skilled stone mason. Frequently the faced stone does not have the front edges in the same vertical plane when faced by .the free-'hand method. Small deviations of this character `are not noticeable -to the eye when looking at each stone individually, but when a group of stones are laid, .the finished wall may be noticeably out of line.

My invention provides a device which enables unskilled workers and even people deprived of sight to face stone more accurately than heretofore possible even by a skill-ed :mason using the free-hand method. Essentially, it consists of la pair of lVice members between which the stone to be vfaced is held. The outer edges of the vice members are positioned in the same vertical plane. The edges :are straight, thereby providing a guide line for the mason. .'Ihe vice members are rotatable to enable the mason `to readily face both along the top and bottom edges.

In the drawings I have shown the presently preferred embodiment of my invention in which:

yFIGURE yl is a front elevation -of my stone facing appara-tus;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevation of .my invention;

FIGURE 3 is a yfront elevation of my device on a reduced scale showing `the device being rotated; and

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURE 3 showing the device `after the rotation is completed land the stone is in position to complete the facing operations.

Referring to the drawings, I have shown my stone facing device attached to -a table 10. My device includes a pair of 'vice or 4holding members .12 and 14. These members are preferably angle irons, each having a bearing side, 1-6 and l18 respectively, and a support side, 20 and 22, which is `at right angles to the bearing side. The two bearing sides are at 4and 4are positioned in planes parallel .to each other with the outer edges thereof, 24 and 26, being s-traight and terminating in =the same vertlcal plane.

The members are held in the proper position by pilot pins 28 which travel through bosses 30 located at each end of the bearing sides of the angle irons. A plurality of holes through the lower portion of the bosses and a matching hole through lthe pilot pins provide a means for adjusting the device to hold `stones of various thicknesses. Keeper pins 32 pass through these holes and hold the pilot pins in position. For thick stones, the pins 32 pass -through holes in the bosses which are close to the bearing side of the vice member. For facing thin stones, the pins pass through holes rat a distance from the vice member.

The apparatus is -fastened to the table by means of two additional angle irons. IClip angle 34 is fastened to Aeach other.

ice

vice member r14 by .any suitable .means such Vas welding. The second Aangle iron 36 has one leg fastened to the clip angle 34 vby -pivot bolt 38 and the .other leg fastened to table 1-0.

A'clip angle 40 is also fastened, generally welded, to vice member 12. One leg of-clip angle I40 and one leg of clip angle 34 'are in planes substantially parallel 'to A threaded 'bolt 42. Vextends `through the openings in the parallel legs. A wing nut 44 is .fastened to the bolt. By tightening wing nut 44 the distance between the bearing sides of members 12 and 14 may be reduced. In this manner a stone l45 positioned between thebearing sides may be held firmly in position. Stops 47 fastened to vice member .14 cooperate with a portion of clip angle y40` which extends below the support side 20 of member 12 to position .the stone 45 between members 12 .and -14 to the correct depth.

A coil spring 46 is placed around bolt 42 between clip irons 34 and 40. Coil springs 48 tit around pilot pins 28 between the vice members .12 Iand l14. These springs cooperate to completely release the vice members from the stone when the wing nut is loosened.

In operation, the stone to be faced is placed between the vice members :12 and .14 .and wing nut -44 tightened -to hold the stone. The outer edges of the vice members dene the lines on which the mason will face the stone. The stone mason with a chisel faces the stone .along -the upper face using the edge of the upper vice member aas 4a guide line. After this is completed, the bolt 38 is loosened and the device rotated 180 (as shown in FIGURES 3 .and 4), thereby putting the unyfaced edge at the top where it is readily `accessible to the mason. The mason -then faces the other side using the other edge of the vice member as a guide line. After the stone is completely faced, the device is returned to its `original position (with the wing-nut up) .and wing nut 44 loosened. Springs 46 and 48 will make sure that the stone is completely released from the vice action .and the stone may be readily removed.

While I have described the presently preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that it may be otherwise embodied within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

d. Apparatus for holding s-tone while facing the stone, said apparatus comprising: a pair of angle irons, each iron having .a flat bearing side having a straight edge, means for holding said irons in operative relationship wherein the bearing sides :are disposed opposite to and parallel with each other .and the straight edges of the irons are in the same vertical plane, means yfor increasing and decreasing the distance between the bearing sides of the irons, and means for rotating the irons degrees said las-t mentioned means being attached to the edge of one of said angle irons which is opposite the straight edge thereof so tha-t said straight edge is unobstructed in order to provide ready access to the stone.

2. Apparatus for holding stone while facing the same, said apparatus comprising: .a pair `of angle irons, each angle iron having a flat bearing side terminating in a straight edge, a pair yof pilot pins passing through opposed ends of lthe angle irons, said pins holding the straight edges of .the angle irons in the same vertical plane, support members attached to each angle iron, said support members holding the bearing surfaces of said angle iron parallel to each other, means for increasing and decreasing the distance between the bearing surfaces of the 'angle irons; .and means for rotating said angle irons at least 180 degrees.

3. Apparatus for holding and positioning stone while facing the stone, said apparatus comprising: a pair of vice members, each member having a Hat bearing side terminating in a straight edge, a pair of pilot pins passing through opposed ends of the angle irons, said pins holding the straight edges of the angle irons in the same vertical plane, support members attached to each angle iron, said support members holding the bearing surfaces of said angle iron parallel to each other, stops axed to one of the vice members to position a stone between the vice members, means for increasing and decreasing -the distance between ythe bearing surfaces of the angle irons; and means for rotating said angle irons at least 180 degrees.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS McBee Aug. 1, Root May 18, Jenkins Feb. 6, Abegg Aug. 11, Zeun Apr. 5, Heinrich Nov. 7, Marshall Mar. 4, Sasgen July 13, Van -Hoose July 9, Arvay Ian. 6,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US796346 *Dec 6, 1904Aug 1, 1905Charles F McbeeBinding-machine for way-bills, &c.
US922338 *Jul 21, 1908May 18, 1909William M LaytonCombination tenoning and boring machine.
US1215160 *May 11, 1914Feb 6, 1917George H JenkinsBookbinding appliance.
US1818291 *Feb 16, 1929Aug 11, 1931Abegg Walter AVise
US1853341 *Jan 15, 1930Apr 12, 1932Alexander DjidichAntirust solution for radiators
US2362067 *Jul 3, 1943Nov 7, 1944Heinrich Robert OQuick-adjustable vise
US2416703 *Jun 22, 1945Mar 4, 1947Marshall Wilbert PCrystal indexing fixture
US2445188 *Jul 9, 1945Jul 13, 1948Grand Specialties CompanyQuick-clamping vise
US2798475 *Jun 18, 1956Jul 9, 1957Agatan Stone And Machinery ComStone cutting machine
US2867204 *May 1, 1958Jan 6, 1959Joseph ArvayStone facers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3963230 *Nov 11, 1974Jun 15, 1976Jankowski Jr John JStud and beam clamp
Classifications
U.S. Classification125/35, 269/84, 269/208, 269/256, 269/160
International ClassificationB28D7/04, B28D7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB28D7/04
European ClassificationB28D7/04