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Publication numberUS3086530 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1963
Filing dateDec 7, 1959
Priority dateDec 10, 1958
Also published asDE1863283U
Publication numberUS 3086530 A, US 3086530A, US-A-3086530, US3086530 A, US3086530A
InventorsWalter Groom
Original AssigneeAllen & Hanburys Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical multiple puncture devices
US 3086530 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 23, 1963 w. GROOM 3,086,530

SURGICAL MULTIPLE PUNCTURE DEVICES Filed Dec. 7, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR yaw BY M ATTORNEY April 23, 1963 w. GROOM SURGICAL MULTIPLE PUNCTURE DEVICES 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 7, 1959 FIG.3

INVENTOR ATTORNEY United States Patent SURGICAL MULTIPLE PUNCTURE DEVICES Walter Groom, Colindale, England, assignor to Allen &

Hanburys Limited, London, England, a company of Great Britain Filed Dec. 7, 1959, Ser. No. 857,679 Claims priority, application Great Britain Dec. 10, 1958 1 Claim. (Cl. 128329) This invention relates to a surgical multiple puncture device, that is to say a device which can be used to puncture the skin of a patient in a number of places in a single operation.

The invention provides an improved such device comprising a body which is open at one end, a needle carrier block longitudinally slidable in the body, a plurality of needles for puncturing the skin of a patient, the said needles being removably secured in the block with their Working ends protruding from the block and the open end of the body, means for displacing the block and the needles carried by it in a working stroke in which the needles can puncture the skin of a patient, and means for adjustably limiting the depth which the needles can penetrate the skin of a patient.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a sectional elevation of an embodiment of the invention,

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged view of part of the device illustrated in FIGURE 1, and

FIGURE 3 is a section on line A-A of FIGURE 2.

In the illustrated embodiment of the invention, a surgical multiple puncture device, which is particularly useful as a tuberculin scarifier, comprises a cylindrical body or barrel 1 which has an open end formed with an inturned flange or rim 2 and is closed at the other end by a plug 3 which is screwed in the body 1 and can be removed to give access to the interior of the body. The plug supports a finger grip 4 as well as closing the end of the body.

A cylindrical needle carrier block 5 has a sliding fit inside the body 1 and has one end portion of smaller diameter than the remainder of the block so that this smaller portion can be made to protrude from the open end of the body 1 by suitable longitudinal movement of the carrier block, such movement being limited by the engagement of the rim 2 at the open end of the body 1 with the larger portion of the carrier block 5. The carrier block 5 has a plurality of longitudinal passages 6. A needle 7 of length greater than the carrier block 5 is located in each of these passages 6 with its sharp or working end protruding from the block and the open end of the body 1. The needles have cylindrical heads 8 which fit on the inner surface of the block 5 to prevent movement of the needles relative to the block in the outward direction. The needles 7 are held against inward movement relative to the block 5 by the head of a needleretaining screw 9 which screws into the block.

Alternatively, the passages 6 can have countersunk recessed inner ends and the needles 7 can have frustoconical heads located in their recesses so as to be flush with the inner end face of the block.

Sleeve 12 is rotatably positioned on the outer surface of the cylindrical body 1, and a helical slot 13 as seen in FIGS. 2 and 3 is formed through the wall of the body. The larger portion of the needle carrier block 5 has a radial bore 10 formed therein. A screw pin 11 is threaded into a suitable threaded aperture in sleeve 12 and extends radially inwardly through the helical slot in the body, and the inner end of the screw pin fits loosely within the bore 10 of the carrier block 5. Accordingly,

"ice

rotation of sleeve 12 with respect to body 1 will cause the sleeve to move longitudinally with respect to the body, and at the same time carrier block 5 will turn with the sleeve due to the interconnection between the sleeve and the carrier block through the pin 11.

A guide plate 14 is positioned outwards of the open end of the body 1 and is adapted to be placed on the skin of a patient. This guide plate 14 is provided with a plurality of holes 15 at least equal in number to the number of needles 7 and so positioned that the working ends of the needles 7 can pass through them into the skin of the patient. The guide plate is supported by arms 16 fixed to the rotatable sleeve 12 so that rotation of the sleeve alters the longitudinal and angular positions of the guide plate with respect to the body. A second screw pin 17 is mounted in the sleeve 12 opposite the pin 11 and is movable in a helical slot 18 in the body 1. A return plunger 19 fixed to the guide plate 14 and loaded by a spring 20 is movable in an axial bore in the carrier block 5 and urges the carrier block in the inward direction.

The amount by which the needles can penetrate the skin depends on the position of the guide plate 14 relative to the body 1 at the commencement of the operation and this in turn depends on the angular position of the sleeve 12 on the body. Means can be provided for positively locating the sleeve in any one of a number of desired positions. For example, a spring-loaded pin carried by the sleeve can engage in any one of a number of recesses in the body. An operating mechanism indicated generally by reference numeral 21 is provided for urging the carrier block and needle 7 outward in a Working stroke. This operating mechanism includes a striker rod 22 which engages the head of retaining screw 9. It will be understood that the operating mechanism may be of any typical conventional and well-known construction and does not form a part of the present invention. After the working stroke has been completed, the needle carrier block is returned to its initial position under the influence of spring 20.

When utilizing the device, the sleeve 12 is rotatably adjusted with respect to body 1, whereby pins 11 and 17 moving in the respective slots 13- and 18 will cause the sleeve 12 to be shifted axially with respect to body 1. Sleeve 12 carries the guide plate '14 through the intermediary of arms 16 whereby longitudinal shifting of the sleeve will cause the guide plate 14 to be shifted axially with respect to body 1. The amount of axial shifting of guide plate 14 will serve to adjust the amount of penetration of the needles into the skin of a patient. As sleeve 12 is rotated to obtain such axial adjustment, the carrier block 5 is also rotated in unison with sleeve 12 through the intermediary of pin 11, pin 11 in its associated slot 10 allowing relative movement of the pin with respect to the block. Since the carrier block and the needles are rotated along with sleeve 12 and guide plate 14, this ensures that the needles will always be aligned with the slots in the guide plate so that the needles may freely pass through the guide plate to penetrate the skin of a patient.

What I claim is:

A surgical multiple puncture device comprising a substantially cylindrical hollow body having an inturned flange at one thereof, said flange defining a central opening at said end of the body, a removable plug secured in the opposite end of said body, a substantially cylindrigal needle carrier block slidably fitted Within said body and having an enlarged portion which is of greater diameter than the central opening in said one end of the body and including a smaller portion which is movable through said open end of the body, movement of said block in an outward direction being limited by engagement of the enlarged portion of the block with said inturned flange on the body, said block having a plurality of passages extending longitudinally therethrough, needles positioned within said passages with the sharp Working end of the needles protruding from the block and the open end of the body, said needles each having an enlarged head formed thereon of greater diameter than the passages in said block for limiting outward movement of the needles relative to the block, needle retaining screw means detachably secured to said block and engaging said enlarged heads of the needles for limiting inward movement of the needles relative to the block, said needle retaining screw means being positioned for engagement with said plug, said body having a helical slot formed therethrough, a sleeve rotatably positioned about said body, pin means operatively connected with said sleeve and extending through said helical slot in the body, said block having a radially extending bore which receives the inner end of said pin means whereby rotation of said sleeve also produces rotation of said block, guide plate means positioned outwardly of the open end of the body, said guide plate means having a plurality of holes formed therethrough at least equal in number to the number of needles supported by said block and so positioned that the Working end of the needles can pass through the holes in the guide plate, said guide plate being supported by said rotatable sleeve so that rotation of the sleeve alters not only the angular and longitudinal position of the sleeve, but also the angular and longitudinal position of the guide plate with respect to the body, and resilient means for urging said block continuously in an inward direction so as to retract said needles, and means for moving said block and said needles outwardly in a working stroke in which said needles can puncture the skin of the patient.

References Cited in the file of this patent FOREIGN PATENTS

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification606/186, 30/367, 604/46
International ClassificationA61B17/20
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/205
European ClassificationA61B17/20B