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Publication numberUS3086562 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1963
Filing dateNov 10, 1958
Priority dateNov 10, 1958
Publication numberUS 3086562 A, US 3086562A, US-A-3086562, US3086562 A, US3086562A
InventorsPrice Vernard L
Original AssigneeZenith Radio Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coil winding machine
US 3086562 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 23, 1963 v. L. PRICE 3,086,562

COIL WINDING MACHINE Filed Nov. 10, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 f l 2 STARTER i 250VV a /26 START 4 STOP l MAGNETIC rv l P26" /35a I MAGNETIC BRAKE {IT/4o 1-9 i AH351 W5 A TTORNEY April 23, 1963 v. L. PmcE 3,086,562

COIL WINDING MACHINE Filed NOV. 10, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 ff, 3' lh I 1 o: 72 46 70 77 876 .F1622 I 54 I 75 N 525e l y; 73 f K 55 [6b I Il l 52 l .92 22 4 e 9 9 57 56A 24 I o 26 lui- 40 58 27 .90 39 I a9 f1 a, i

TIMER April 23., 1963 v. l.. PRICE con. wINDING MACHINE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Nov. l0. 1958 /NVEA/roR vf/ 2*'21 a ral ab. Pra c@ llnited States Patent 'Oiiice 3,086,562 Patented Apr. 23, 1963 3,036,562 y y COIL WINDING MACHINE Vernard L. Price, Mount Prospect, Ill., assignor to Zenith Radio Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Filed Nov. 10, 1953, Ser. No. 772,989 Claims. (Cl. 14d-92.2)

The present invention is directed to coil-windin-g machines `and is particularly concerned with a machine for fabricating deflection coils employed lto effect scansion of the electron beam in cathode-ray type devices.

4Beam scansion in such devices is usually accomplished by a magnetic yoke assembly having two pairs of deflection coils in quadrature geometrical relationship so that the scanning field contributed by one pair is in space quadrature relationship to the field contributed by the other. Generally, one such tield is horizontally disposed and the other is vertical.

The position of the deflection yoke upon th'e tube struc- `ture determines what is referred to as the center of deflection and it is desirable that this center be `located forwardly of the neck portion of the tube toward the conical portion thereof. This is especially true where the angular excursion of the beam in traversing ythe Itube screen in the horizontal or vertical `direction is 90 or more. For such wide-angle deflection, the location of the center of deflection -down in the neck of the tube causes undesirable electron shading and other distortion effects. Consequently, it is the practice to adopt a coil configuration which permits the yoke assembly to be mounted partially encompassing the conical section and partially encompassing the neck section of the tube. This usually results in a coil that has a lforward lobe of large dimension and a rearward lobe of smaller dimension, viewed in the direction of the screen of the tube. This unsymmetrical coil configuration has created difficult fabricating problems in the art.

In accordance with one prior method the deflection coils have been formed by Winding a flat or uniplanar coil which is then heated and introduced to forming dies and deformed to the -desired configuration. This has the distinct ldisadvantage of imposing undue stresses on the Winding turns and presents a definite possibility of interturn shorts.

Another approach to this problem contemplates the use `of a winding mandrel which has a recess conforming to the desired conliguration of the coil, and a family of cams carefully -disposed with respect to the recess cooperate with a winding head to lay the wire into the recess to form successive coil turns. It is necessary to effect relative rotation of the winding head and the cams so that the laying down of the wire may be accomplished by the camming action. This winding process causes the tension of the winding conductor to vary undesirably in the formation of each winding turn and also requires a family of precisely shaped cams in addition to the mandrel. It is desirable to avoid the use of such a family of cams in directing the coursing of the Winding conductor.

Still another process employs a complex mechanical movement having both reciprocatory and oscillatory motions. A linear section of the wire may be laid down on a linear traverse of a winding head and a following arcuate displacement of the Winding matrix may form one lobe of the coil turn but the winding head is usually held stationary during this oscillatory movement of the matrix. Such a complex mechanical motion precludes the highspeed operation Which is highly ldesirable and which is attainable if the machine employs continuous rotary movements. Hence, apparatus of this type is not capable of achieving the production rate and uniformity of coils that may be realized by the apparatus presently to be described.

It is an object of the present invention, therefore, to provide acoil-winding machine which avoids one or more ofthe aforementioned deficiencies and limitations of prior apparatus. g

It is a principal object of the invention to provide an improved machine for lWinding coils of nsymmetrical configuration Ifeaturing continuous rotary motions and substantially constant tension of the winding conductor.

It is a specific object of the invention to provide an improved coil-winding machine for forming coils to be employed in deflection yoke assemblies of magnetically deected cathode-ray tubes.

A coil-winding machine constructed in accor-dance with the invention comprises a mandrel supported for rotation about a iirst axis and having' a recess defining a predetermined coil pattern for receiving a continuous wire and for forming that wire into consecutive coil turns having a shape corresponding to the pattern of .the recess. There is a winding' head rotatable about a second axis which intersects the mandrel and this Winding head has -a Wirefeeding station which revolves about the recess of the mandrel as the winding head rotates. 4The machine includes means for feeding a winding conductor from a supply station to the feeding station of the winding head, as well as means for concurrently rotating the mandrel and the winding head at preselected relative speeds;

In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the axis of the winding head intersects the geometrical center Of the winding recess of the mandrel and the winding head rotates at twice the speed o'f rotation of the mandrel.

The foregoing and other objects of the invention, together withmfurther advantages and benefits thereof, will l,be more clearly understood from the following descriptin of a particular embodiment thereof taken in conjunction with the `annexed drawings in the Iseveral figures of which like components are designated by similar reference characters Iandin which: Y

FIGURE l is a perspective View of a deflection coil to be Iformed -by the coilJwinding machine; y

FIGURE 2 is an elevation View, partly in section, of a coil-winding machine embodying the present invention;

FIGURE 3 is a det-ail ofthe mechanism enabling adjustment of the angular relation of the winding head to the mandrel in the machine of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a view taken as indicated by section line 4-4 of FIGURE 2, showing details of the Winding mandrel;

FIGUR-E 5 is a further View of the winding mandrel, taken along `section line S-K'S of, FIGURE 4 but representing theyforming die advanced into its operated position;

FIGURE 6 is a further sectional view of the winding mandrel taken on section line y6 6 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 7 shows still another yie-W of the winding mandrel taken Ialong section line 7--7 of 'FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 8 is a' schematic representation of the control circuitry incorporated in the winding machine of FIGURE 2; and

FIGURE 9 comprises a series of functional drawings used in explaining the cooperation of the mandrel and winding head in' forming a' coil turn.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION Referring now more particularly to FIGURE l, the coil there represented isA the product of the machine to be described in detail hereinafter. It is one of agpair of identical coils which are assembled in a deflection yoke, arranged in mirroir-image relation and electrically connected in series and energized to establish one of the deecton fields, for example, the horizontal iield within a cathode-ray tube. Each coil terminates in ser'nicircular lobes 10 and 1=1 interconnected by a two part linear section 12. Lobe 16` is the larger and is shaped to fit the conical section of the tube enevelope adjoining its neck section while the remaining lobe is shaped closely to embrace the neck section. This permits the yoke assembly to be positioned forwardly of the neck section of the tube properly -to locate the center of deflection. The coil is one continuous winding wound to constitute a succession of coils turns of generally similar configuration.

The machine for forming such a coil has certain major components including a winding mandrel, a winding head, a common drive for eecting concurrent relative rotation of the mandrel and Winding head, and a timing and control system to assure that the several Winding steps take place in a desired prescribed sequence. These several components will be considered seriatim.

WINDING MANDREL The winding mandrel is supported for rotation about a first axis, specifically a vertical axis, and has a recess defining a predetermined coil pattern for receiving a continuous wire and for forming the wire into consecutive coil turns having a shape corresponding tto the pattern of the recess. Details of this mandrel are revealed in FIG- URES 4 to 7, inclusive.

The mandrel includes a first portion 16 having the general configuration of a saddle with a linear central section 16a terminating in enlarged flanges 16b and 16e` at its opposite ends. The mandrel further includes a U-shaped second portion 17 which is removably secured to the first portion intermediate its flanges 116b, 116e by means of a mounting bolt 18. The confirmation of these two portions of the mandrel, their specific dimensions and shapes, define a winding recess the pattern of which imposes a definite shape to a coil constructed by forming continuous winding turns in that recess. The section represented in FIGURE 6 shows the coil constructed by the laying of successive coil turns into the recess defined by mandrel portions 16 and 17. Lobe 10 which is specilically larger indiameter than lobe `11 results from the shaping of the saddle 16. The linear portion 1-2 of the coil appears in broken construction line in `this figure.

A pair of channels 19a, 19b are formed in mandrel portion 17, entering into the recess of the mandrel to facilitate the introduction of certain fluids into the recess in particular parts of the coil-forming process. More specifically, it is contemplated that the coil will be formed of a Winding conductor having an insulating coating, and a thermo-plastic cement coating, and a solvent introduced into the recess through one of these channels tends to soften and dissolve the cement so that the application of heat, subsequent thereto, cause the cement to coalesce and integrate the coil turns to one selfsustaining structure. Alcohol is a suitable solvent for the cement coatings and may be admitted into one of these channels through a tube 20, extending from a supply tank. Moreover, after the coil has thus been constructed into one integrated whole, it is proposed to introducing a coolant, such as wa-ter, through one of the channels as well as on lobes 10 and 11 to cause the coil structure to solidifyor congeal preparatory to its removal from the coil recess. Tube 21 may extend from a water supply to one of fthese channels. The piping and 21 is shown schematically in FIGURE 2 because the details of the connection from an alcohol and a water supply to the mandrel is of no great moment. Structures for connecting such supplies to lthe mandrel will be well understood by those versed in the art. In order to distribute the fluids through the winding recess, it is convenient to form a rectangular trough 14 in the upper surface of mandrel portion V1'7 and to have channels 19a, 419b lead therefrom.

While the recess of the mandrel imparts to `the coil the general confirmation it is to have, it is desirable that the mandrel include a forming die movable into juxaposition with the winding recess accurately to form the coil turns therein to the desired pattern. A forming die 22 is movable axially of the mandrel between a normal or rest position represented in FIGURE 2 and an operated or actuated position represented in FIGURE 5. In plan view, the cross sectional configuration of the die matches or is complementary to the pattern of the winding recess as viewed looking upwardly of the mandrel into the cavity defined by its parts .16, 17. This is clearly represented in the sectional plan view of FIGURE 7 where the die portions 22a and 22b may be observed closing the spacing between mandrel portions 16, 17. The forming die is mechanically atiixed to a yoke 23 which is slidable upon a collar 24 clamped and keyed to a shaft 25 supporting the mandrel to the end that the angular orientation of the die and mandrel portions 16, 17 is maintained fixed. The displacement of the forming die between its actuated and rest positions is accomplished by a bifurcated lever 26. While lever i26 is movable in a vertical plane, it does not accommodate rotation and therefore yoke 23 is provided with a race for receiving rollers 27 secured to the tines of lever 26. This lever is carried by a vertical shaft 27 supported by the framing ofthe coilwinding machine for reciprocal motion in a vertical plane. Its motion is under the control of an air cylinder 28 mechanically coupled to shaft 27 and comprising means for advancing the die into operating relation with respect to the winding recess of the mandrel.

Passing reference has been made above to the fact that a heating current is supplied to the coil as one step of the coil-winding process. This is achieved by means of circuitry which includes portions of the mandrel assembly. In particular, a clamp 31 is supported by mandrel portion 16, being afiixed to the flange 16C thereof by means of mounting screws. The clamp is of wellknown construction having two portions 31a and 3'1b provided with serrations or teeth on the surfaces which face one another. Clamp portion 31a is stationary but the other part 31h is rotatable and is axially movable although it is normally urged into clamping engagement with clamp 31a by means of a spring `32. This clamp may be manually opened by lifting part 31b against the force of its spring to admit the leading end of the Winding conductor in order to anchor that end as required for the winding operation.

It is desirable that clamp 31 be one terminal of the heating circuit so that While it anchors the winding c011- ductor it, at the same time, continues an electrical circuit to that conductor. An adequate electrical connection may be assured by turning clamp portion 31b in order to scrape the insulation off the section of the winding conduction that is secured within the clamp. Stationary clamp portion 31a is insulated from mandrel portion 16C by means of an insulating spacer 33 which appears in FIGURE 6. A channel way 34 cut into mandrel portion `16 accommodates a lead or connector 35 which connects clamp 31 to the terminal post of the male pontion 36a of a banana plug having a mating portion 361; secured at the top of mandrel shaft 25 which has a central bore. The circuit in question is continued from plug connector 36 by means of a lead 37 to a contact ring 38 supported in the bearing block of mandrel shaft 25. A brush 39 engages contact ring 38 and receives a lead 40 for continuing the heater circuit to a power supply to be considered hereinafter.

WINDING HEAD A winding head d5' cooperates with mandrel 15 in forming the coil turns. The winding head is rotatable about a second axis intersecting mandrel 15 along its axis and preferably at the geometrical center of the winding recess formed in the mandrel. Obviously, the specilic physical dimensions and shape of the coil turns to be wound are Vdetermined by the winding recess of the mandrel as indicated above and, therefore, it is contemplated that portions 16, 17 of the mandrel be removable so that different pairs of mandrel sections may be selectively put into effect in accordance with the requirements of any particular winding operation. Therefore, it is desirable that winding head 45 be adjustable as to its angular orientation with respect to the mandrel axis to facilitate establishing the axis of the winding head to intersect at the geometrical center of the winding recess. Thus the winding-head assembly, as represented in FIGURE 3, is secured to a stationary portion 46 of the machine frame in a manner which lpermits angular adjustment of the winding head. (The machine frame in this region is provided with an arcuate slot 47 to which the winding-head assembly is adjustably locked by machine screws '48 at a desired angle with respect to the axis of mandrel 15.

The winding head comprises a circular plate 50 secured at the end of a hollow shaft 51 which Shaft is rotatably supported in bearing blocks 52 of conventional construction. TIhe shaft bearing blocks and its driven gear 53 are enclosed within a housing 54. Plate 50 carries a guide 55 through which a winding conductor may be leid t0 a Wire-feeding station located on the |winding head but displaced from the axis thereof to revolve about the winding recess of the mandrel as the winding head rotates. The wire-feeding station may -be a needle type structure comprising a threaded shaft 56 carrying a wire-guide roller 57 at one end and engaging plate 50 at the other. This permits adjusting the axial spacing of guide 57 with respect to plate 50 and also with respect to mandrel 15. Since the machine is to operate upon a wire conductor, the guides must be made of a material having a suitable hardness; they may conveniently be formed of carbide. In addition to guides 55 and 57, it may be convenient to locate guides at the terminal portions of shaft 51 and, if desired, there may be a sleeve 58 included within shaft S1 as a covering and further guide for the wire.

The winding conductor is led into the shaft by means of a flanged roller 59 and a guide 60. Obviously, needle 56 and guide 55, unless counter-balanced, constitute an eccentric load on the winding head and establish an undesirable mechanical unbalance in the structure. This is avoided by using a counter weight 61 positioned on plate 50 at the appropriate `distance but in 4the opposite direction from needle 56.

A spool 65 represents the supply of winding conductor and the conductor feeds from that spool or other suitable container (buckets and drums) through a clamp 68 which applies a drag and some ltension to the conductor 70. From this clamp the wire leads over a pulley 71 through guides of another fixture 72 to pulley 59 leading to the winding head. All of this comprises means for feeding the wire conductor from a supply station to the feeding station of the winding head. The supply rcel 65 may have radially extending bristles 73 which add further restraint on the wire and prevent overrunning of the reel. A thumb release mechanism 74 permits clamp 68 to be opened in order to `facilitate leading the winding conductor from spool 65 to guide roller 71.

One portion of the heating circuit vfor the coil formed within the mandrel has been outlined in discussing the mandrel and another -part of that circuit may be convcniently considered at this juncture particularly with respect to the feed from supply reel 65 to the winding head. Intermediate guide pulleys 59 and 71, there is a fixture 72 having guides in diametrically opposed portions of a cylindrical casing through which Winding conductor 70 is threaded. One end of the -xture accommodates a terminal 75 to which a lead from the power supply for energizing the heater circuit may connect. Terminal 75 carries at the end which enters into the bore of fixture 72 a serrated plate 78 forming the endv wall of an air cylinder and insulated therefrom. A piston 6 76, having an insulated head and shaft, is included in that cylinder and may be displaced, upon the admittance of air via a supp-ly tube 77, to `drive winding conductor 70 by an insulated member of cylinder against serrated plate 78 to extend an electrical connection from terminal 75 to the winding conductor.

DRIVE MECHANISM The mandrel 15 and winding head 45 share a common -drive system which constitutes means for concurrently rotating the mandrel and the winding head at preselected relative speeds. For the case under consideration, the winding head rotates at twice the speed of the mandrel.

The drive includes a motor S0 coupled through V-belts 81 to pulleys 82 which -rnay be mechanically coupled through a conventional magnetic clutch 83 to a principal drive shaft 84. This shaft is also provided at one end with a magnetic brake mechanism 85 of any conventional type.

Drive shaft 84 is supported by suitable journals and bearings from the frame of the machine and is gear coupled to shaft 25 of the mandrel. This coupling is afforded by a gear 86 on shaft 84 and a meshing gear 87 carried on the mandrel shaft. Suitable bearings for the mandrel shaft are represented in FIGURE 2.

The mechanical coupling from shaft 84 to shaft 51 of the winding head includes a gear 8S carried by shaft 84 and meshing with a gear 89 of a vertical intermediate drive shaft 9i) likewise supported by suitable bearings for rotation about a vertical axis. Near the uppermost bearing this intermediate shaft carries a gear 92 meshing with a gear 93 carried on a horizontal intermediate shaft 94 and in turn coupled with driven gear 53 of winding head shaft 51. Shaft 94 lies in the planes of gears 92 and 53 to permit the previously discussed angular positioning of the winding head. As indicated, the gear drives are proportioned to achieve a rotational `speed of the winding head which is twice that of the mandrel.

TEMING AND CONTROL SYSTEM The correlation of the several functions carried out 4by the mechanism is under the control of a timing and control system shown symbolically in FIGURE 2 by the block 100 and outlined lfurther in FIGURE 8. Actually, the timer is made up of controlled circuits operated in timed relation with respect to one another through the agency of suitably shaped cams driven from a timing motor. The circuits are opened and closed by these cams in conventional fashion and cause the energization and de-energi'zation of a plurality of controlled relays required to time the several functions of the winding machine.

The principal driving motor 80 connects through a starter mechanism 101 to a three-phase 230 volt supply system and it is contemplated that this motor will be 'connected to that supply to remain in operation for extended periods, reliance being placed on the operation of magnetic clutch 83 and brake 85 to eifect winding operations at desired intervals. The timing and control system, per se, comprises a timing motor 102 for driving a cam shaft on which is mounted a cam `assembly 103. The several cams of this assembly have such cam sectors 'and such relative angular orientation on their shaft as to impose a desired programming or time sequence upon the controlled circuits. Timing motor 102 is normally de-energized because contacts 104a of relay 104 are normally open. Closure of these contacts connects the motor across a pair of busses 105, 106 which are fed from the primary winding of one isolation transformer 107 energized from t-he three-phase supply.

Relay 1-04 may be energized by la contour 110 which counts the rotations of mandrel 15, Referring to FIG- URE 2, it is seen that this counter is mechanically coupled rto the common driving -system by means' of gears 111 rand 112 carried by a shaft of the counter and by intermediate shaft of the drivin-g system, respectively. No

novelty is predicated upon the structural details of this counter which may be of any well known form. For purposes of convenience, certain segment elements of the counter are illustrated schematically in FIGURE 8. It is represented as having an orienting device in the form of a ring 113 which is conductive except for a segment 114. A group of three brushes 115 associated with ring 113 permit :a circuit to be closed through the ring for all operating intervals, except when it assumes the an'gular aspect in FIGURE 8 presenting insulating segment 114 to the brush connected with bus 106.

As is customary, the counter may be set to exert a control effect upon attaining a preselected count register. Accordingly, a lever 116 indicates the control device actuated by the counter at the time ta `desired count has been achieved. Actuation of this lever displaces movable contact 117b, opening a circuit at stationary 'contact 117:1 and completing a different circuit at contact 117c. The counter will further be considered as including a re-set motor 118 driving a cam 119 to control a pair of contacts 120 such that re-set, when achieved, presents the several cornponents of the counter in a desired reference angular orientation so that the counter always commences the counting function from a fixed reference. Contacts 120 close a circuit to maintain motor 118 energized for a period of time required to accomplish re-set.

Magnetic clutch S3 and magnetic brake 85 of the coilwinding machine are D.C. operated from a rectifier bridge 124 having diagonal points a, b, c and d. Diagonals a and b connect to supply mains 105, 105 and a D.C. output is attained at the opposing diagonals c and d with the polarity indicated on the drawing.

It is convenient to outline the circuitry of the control system of FIGURE 8 in conjunction with a recitation of the operation of the apparatus.

OPERATION In describing the operation of the coil-winding machine, first consideration will be given to the many operating steps occasioned by the control system without regard to the details of laying consecutive turns of winding conductor 70 within the winding recess of mandrel 15. The details of that aspect of the operation will be given hereinafter in a discussion of the functional views of FIG- URE 9.

Machine Set-Up It will be assumed initially that the machine has been set up with the conductor 70 threaded to the mandrel. This, of course, assumes that the mandrel and winding head are in their desired starting positions indicated in FIGURE 2. The winding conductor is led through clamp 68 by the operation of finger release 74 which parts the clamp for that purpose. Thereafter, it may be readily fed over guide roller 71 through the successive guides of clamp fixture 72, and of the winding head to the needle of feeding station 57 thereon. Finally, it passes under portion 16 of the mandrel and is introduced between jaws 31a, 3117 of clamp 31. As these jaws are returned to normal position, the insulation of the anchored conductor is scraped away by turning jaw 31 or penetrated by the jaws to establish an electrical connection to the conductor as well as to anchor it securely against movement. Starting switch 125 is now momentarily depressed.

Start of Winding Process, Loading of Solvent Pump A circuit is complete from bus 105 through the closed starting switch 125, through a relay 126, closed stop switch 127 to the alternate bus 106. Energization of relay 126 closes its movable elements 126a, 126b to engage associated stationary contacts. Closure of contact 126:1 completes a hold circuit for relay 126. At the same time, closure of contact 126b releases magnetic brake and applies operating potential from rectifier terminal c to magnetic clutch 83 and rectifier terminal d. It is apparent that diagonals a, b of the rectifier bridge are across bus 105 and a tap of a winding 129 which connects to bus 106.

As relay 126 attracts its armature, it displaces a pivoted actuator 130 to retract the piston of a pump 131 downwardly to unblock an intake valve. A conduit 132 leads from a supply of solvent, such as alcohol, to this intake valve and the pump is thus charged or loaded so that when its piston is subsequently thrust vertically upwardly, it discharges a measured quantity of alcohol through a discharge duct 20 leading to trough 14 and channels 19a, 19b in .the mandrel. Of course, the pump will be equipped with a check valve of known type (not shown), assuring that displacement of the piston forces the charge of solvent out conduit 20 rather than back into the supply through conduit 132.

Gperation of the clutch permits driving motor to set the machine into operation, causing mandrel 15 to rotate at one speed and causing winding head 45 to rotate concurrently but at twice the speed of the mandrel. It also initiates operation of counter 110 through mating gears 111, 112.

The concurrent rotation of mandrel 15 and winding head 45 results in needle 57 coursing or gyrating about the winding recess formed within the mandrel. In this fashion, the winding conductor is, in effect, laid into the several parts of the winding recess as required to form a succession of coil turns. The details of this winding operation will be considered more particularly hereinafter in connection with a discussion of FIGURE 9. When the required number of coil turns has been formed, counter 110 will have attained a corresponding register and, in so doing, will have advanced its control lever 116 counter clockwise. This displaces movable contact 117b from engagement with contact 117a into engagement with contact 117C.

Completion of Winding Process, Actaation of Solvent Pump Breaking the engagement of contacts 117a and 117b tdeen'ergizes relay 126 and its movable elements 126:1, 126b fall yfrom their upper to their lowermost positions, the latter being represented in FIGURE 8. As a consequence, the energizing circuit of clutch 83 is broken and the driven components of the winding machine are brought to rest. This is accomplished by means of magnetic brake which is energized through a circuit from bridge terminal c through contacts 126b, contacts `135a, brake 85 to bridge terminal d.

At the same time, the release of its armature by relay 126 deflects control lever 130 in a clockwise direction and advances the piston of solvent pump 131 vertically upwardly. A measured quantity of solvent is thus discharged through duct 20 into mandrel 15. The solvent enters the winding recess of the mandrel and spreads over the formed coil turns. The solvent chosen partially dissolves the thermo-plastic cement coating of the winding conductor, preparatory to the integration of the coil turns into a unitary whole under the influence of heat supplied through a circuit presently to be described.

Reset of Mandrel and Winding Head Displacement of movable element 117b within timer closes a circuit to effect energization of timing motor 1012 `which controls a cam assembly 103 for programming or establishing a sequence of other functions. In particular, a circuit is completed from bus 105 through relay 104, contact pair 117b, 117C to bus 106. Relay 104, in attracting its armature, retracts a blocking lever 135 normally seated within a recess in cam a of cam assembly 103. A contact pair 104:1 is closed at the same time, completing an obvious energization circuit for timing motor 102. Thus, the timer is conditioned to execute one revolution of its cam assembly.

Cam b of assembly 103 is the first to operate movable contacts 'associated therewith. These contacts 136 are normally open but close as cam b rotates in a counterclockwise direction. The closing of this contact pair extend a circuit from bus 106 through brushes 115 if conductive segment 113 of a ring included within and rotated concurrently with counter 110 permits. The circuit is completed through contact pair 136, relay 135 to the other bus 105. Relay 135 elevates its movable elements 135a, A135b. The nrst of these re=energizes clutch 83- from bridge terminal c', through a potentiometer 138, contacts closed by element 135a, clutch 83 to the other side of the bridge at terminal d, The potentiometer `138 reduces the potential applied to the clutch to establish a slipping condition rather than a fully actuated condition so that motor 80 drives the apparatus slowly. At the same time, the voltage applied across the bridge is increased since switch element 135d connects bridge terminal d directly to bus 106 rather than through a tap of coil 129. 'Full rectiiier voltage is now applied from terminal c through contact 126b to a condenser 140 and terminal d, charging the condenser for a purpose to be considered presently.

For lthe described conditions, motor 80 effects slow rotation of themandrel and winding head as Well as counter 110. This is accomplished in order to return the mandrel and winding head to a desired reference position established under the control of commutator 113, 114 carried by the counter. When .the commutator assumes the position represented in FIGURE 8, presenting insulating segment 114 to brush 115, the circuit otherwise completed through contact pair 136 is interrupted.

Interruption of that circuit de-energizes relay 135 and restores movable elements 135a, 135b into engagement with the lower pair of associated fixed contacts as illustrated. This displacement of contact element 135a reinstates the energizing circuit of magnetic bralie 85. In this instance, however, the charge on condenser 140 energizes the brake with the higher voltage and arrests the machine immediately to retain the parts in the angular orientation corresponding to the positioning of insulating segment 114 of the counter commutator against brush 115. Of course, condenser 140' effects sudden and complete braking action and the potential supplied to the brake from bridge terminals c, d retains the brake in its operated condition. With relay 135 de-energized and switch element 135b returned to the position represented, the bridge is again excited from the tap of coil 130 which is the low voltage condition nrst described.

Actuaton of Clamp Fixture and Loading Coolant Pumpl The portion of cam c of cam assembly 103`| serving normally to open contact pair 141 has such arcuate length as to retain this contact pair open until the described mechanism is able to restore the rotatable components of the coil-winding machine to their reference position following the fabrication of the desired number of Aconductor turns within the winding recess of mandrel 15. Thereafter, cam c closes these contacts completing an obvious circuit from bus 106, through contact pair 141, a r-st valve operating relay 142 and a further valve operating relay 143 to bus 105.

Oper-ation of relay 142 cau`ses a valve y144 in an air l-ine 77 coupled to clamp iixtu're 72 toppen-admitting air under pressure thereto. The piston 76 is thrust forward, clamping winding conductor 70 between the end of the piston and the serrated portion 78 of terminal 75. Of course, the leading end of the piston may likewise have serrations and the impact causes the serrations to penetrate the insulation of the winding conductor. Electrical connections are now complete at two points along the winding conductor; the first is made Iat clamp 31 of mandrel 15 and the second is made at xture 72. These contact points are at opposite sides of and in series relation with the several coil turns formed in the mandrel.

Relay 143 energized at the same time as relay 142 operates a lever 145 to lift the piston of' a coolant pump 146. This admits a measured amount of a coolant, such as Water, from an intake conduit 147 to the pump chamber for sub-sequent discharge through tube 21 into trough 14 and channelways 19a, 19h of mandrel 15. Pump 146 may be the same as pump 131, and both are of any conventional design. t

H eating of Coil Structure Directly thereafter, cam d of assembly 103 permits movement of the middle or intermediate element 150b from engagement with a contact 150a into engagement with an lalternate contact 150e` completing an obvious circuit through .a relay 151. Operation of relay 151 closes a switch 152 and completes a heater circuit from one side of another isolation transformer 153, through switch 152, a relay 154, through clamping fixture 72 to 'winding conductor 70, through the formed coil within the contines of the winding recess of the mandrel, to clamp 31, conductor 35, plug 36a, 36h, conductor 37, collector ring 38 and brush 39, lead 40, switch 152 and the other side of isolation transformer `153. Energization of relay 154 lifts movable elements 155a, 155b. It also elevates a locking plunger 156 in a position in which its projection 157 rests on top of a bell crank 158, locking contacts 155a, 15511 in their closed positions. This, in effect, short-circuits relay 154 and locks the heating circuit to maintain a how of heating current through the formed coil. Heating current is maintained for a suiiicient period of time that its thermo-plastic insulating coating, which had previously been partially dissolved under lthe influence of alcohol admitted into the winding recess, Welds itself into a unitary Whole capable of retaining its own shape when removed from the mandrel. As a practical matter, the winding conductor is of the type having a double coating of insulation. The outer coat is a thermo-plastic cement which softens under the influence of the heating current. The inner insulating coating is not a'ected by the heating.

Although contact element 155b Ihas been closed against its stationary contacts, the circuit in which it is located is open at contact pair 150a, 1501) so that for the time being, closure of switch element 155b does not complete any circuit although it conditions one presently to be discussed.

Actuaton of Conforming Die After the desired heating period has transpired, cam d of assembly 103 displaces movable element 150b of switch bank 150 into engagement with its alternate contact 150a. The energizing circuit of relay 151 opens and interrupts the heating circuit. At the same time an obvious circuit is closed through contact pair 150a, 1501:, contacts 1551) and a valve operating relay 160. The valve 161 controlled thereby is located in an air line 162 leading to air cylinder 28. The piston contained within that cylinder is advanced vertically upwardly .to elevate .shaft 27, lever 26 and conforming die 22. rlhus, the die is inserted or introduced into the recess of the mandrel, fitting in 4the space between portions 16 and 17 of the mandrel as indicated in FIGURE 7. The conforming die urges the coil turns within winding recess of the mandrel against the confining surfaces thereof to assure the desired confirma-tion of the coil.

Clamp Release and Cooling of Coil Presently, cam c of assembly 103i opens its associated contact pair 141. This de-energizes bot-h valve -actuating relays 142 and 143i. The first of these releases clamping fixture 72 and frees winding conductor 70 therefrom. De-enertgization of relay 143 restores the piston of water pump 146 to the position shown, discharging a measured quantity of Water through conduit 21 into trough 14 and channels 19a, 19b of the mandrel. The -admitted coolant quenches the coil form and, lin effect, freezes it into the 1'1 shape imposed by the conjoint operation of the mandrel and the conforming die 22.

Reset of Conforming Die and Counter Finally, cam e of assembly 103 closes contact pair 165, energizing lan obvious circuit including relay 166. When this relay attracts its armature 167, belt crank 158 is per mitted to be rotated counter-clockwise under the influence of a spring 16S. Lever 156 is released and restores elements 155a, 15517 to the position shown in the drawing in which they are out of engagement with the stationary contacts that they are brought to bear a-gainst when relay 154 operates. The circuit broken due 4to the displacement of contact 15511 includes valve operating relay 160'. As that valve is dc-energized, 'the air supply to cylinder 28- is interrupted, permitting mechanism 26, 27 to descend and withdraw forming die 22 from the bottom area of the winding recess formed in mandrel 15.

It is also `apparent that closure of contact pair 165 completes a circuit through a re-set motor 11S within counter 110. This motor drives a re-set cam 1.19 which closes the contact pair 120. Closure of contact pair 120 completes a circuit from bus 105, through motor 118, Contact pair 1Z0 to the other bus 106 and maintains the re-set motor in operation for one complete revolution. At the end yof that time, cam 119 opens contact pair 120 and de-energizes the re-se't motor. In the interim, control lever 116 within the counter will have been re-set to the position represented schematically in FIGURE 8. This, of course, re-sets the counters as well as the switch assemblies within mechanism 110 and prepares the control system for another cycle of operations. Thereafter, the recess of cam a in cam assembly 103 is presented to locking lever 1315. As this lever enters the recess, oontact pair 104a open, timing motor -102 is de-energized and the cam assembly is locked against further rotation.

With the machine thus stopped, after the formation of a coil assembly, U-shaped portion 17 of mandrel 15 may be removed and the completed coil may be withdrawn. It is only necessary to return mandrel portion 17 'into position and rethread winding conductor 70 through the mandrel as afore-described in order to prepare for the winding of the next coil.

WINDING DETAILS The coil-winding machine described above, featuring cooperating and continuously rotating mandrel 15 and winding head 45, permits rapid fabrication of multi-turn deiiection coils in a process wherein there is substantially constant winding tension on the winding conductor throughout the formation of each winding convolution. This has the distinct advantage of uniformity in the winding, and minimized load on the machine and, in general, an improved structure. It results in large measure from the relative speeds of the mandrel and winding head and from the gyrations of the winding mandrel with respect to the winding recess of the mandrel. This is depicted functionally in the Iseries of sketches of FIGURE 9.

The first position, shown in lFIGURE 9a, is a convenient starting point to consider the formation of one winding turn assuming the mandrel and winding head to be rotating in the directions indicated by the arrows. The winding conductor at this juncture has completed the minor or smaller lobe 11 represented by the part of the winding recess adjacent flange 16C. In the next 45 degrees of rotation of the mandrel and the concurrent 90 rotational degrees of the winding head, the winding conductor is laid along the linear traverse of the mandrel recess in the direction from flange 16C to flange 16b. This will be considered a unit angular displacement because in the several remaining sketches of FIGURE 9, it is assumed that the rotatable parts have been advanced by the same amount compared with the immediately preceding showing.

' As shown in FIGURE 9c, during the next unit of rota- 12 tion, the winding conductor makes a vertical pass form ing the start of the major lobe 10 of the coil. The next two rotational units represented in FIGURES 9d, 9e cornplete .the formation of this major lobe. In the ensuing unit displacement, represented in FIGURE 9i, the conductor is laid in the alternate linear run of the winding recess in the direction from flange 16h to 16e. The formation of the minor lobe 11 is commenced with the vertical rise occasioned in the next unit of angular displacement, represented in FIGURE 9g, and is continued during the next unit of angular displacement, represented in FIGURE 9h, being completed as the cycle finishes with the mandrel and winding head assuming the initial relative positions of FIGURE 9a.

A principal advantage of the described machine is the avoidance of vibrations or pulsations Iin the winding conductor as the coil turns are formed. This enables and assures uniformity of results and faster winding operations without any material danger of breakage of ythe wire or damage to its insulation because of discontinuities in the winding tension. The desirable results attained iiow directly from the fact 'that the winding conductor is essentially laid directly into the several portions of the winding recess as the mandrel and winding head are driven. This is in sharp contrast to prior practices wherein cam elements are employed to deflect a winding conductor from a normal feed path into a position from which it may enter the winding recess.

While particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it Will be -obvious to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made without departing from the invention in its broader aspects, and, therefore, the aim in the appended claims is to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A coil-winding machine comprising: a mandrel supported for rotation about a first axis and having a saddleshaped recess defining a predetermined coil pattern, having a window through which said first axis extends, for receiving a continuous wire and for forming said wire into consecutive coil turns having va shape corresponding to said pattern; a winding head rotatable about a second axis, intersecting said first vaxis at an angle of less than and at the approximate geometrical center of said recess and having a wire-feeding station which revolves about said recess of said mandrel as said winding head rotates with said feeding station spaced radially of said second axis and located in its motion path at a point from which said wire extends directly in a substantially straight line into said recess; means for feeding said wire from a supply station through said feeding station of said winding head; and means for concurrently effecting continuous rotation of said mandrel and said winding head at a speed ratio of 1:2, respectively.

2. A coil-winding machine comprising: a mandrel supported for rotation about a iirst laxis including a first portion having a linear central section terminating in enlarged flanges at its opposite ends and further including a U-shaped second portion secured to said rst portion between said flanges thereof and constituting therewith a recess defining a saddle-shaped coil pattern, having a window through which said first axis extends, for receiving a continuous wire and for forming said wire into consecutive coil turns having a shape corresponding to said pattern; a winding head rotatable about a second axis, intersecting said yfirst axis at an angle therewith of less than 90 and at the approximate geometric center of said recess, and having a wire-feeding station which revolves about said recess of said mandrel as said winding head rotates with said feeding station spaced radially of said second axis and Ilocated in its motion path at a point from which said wire extends directly in a substantially straight line into said recess; means for feeding said wire from a supply station through said feeding station of said winding 13 head; and means for concurrently effecting continuous rotation of said mandrel and -said winding head at a speed ratio of .1:2, respectively.

3. A coilwinding machine comprising: a mandrel sup'- ported `for rotation about a first axis including a first portion having a linear central section terminating in enlarged flanges at its opposite ends and further including a U-shaped second portion secured to said first portion between said flanges thereof and constituting therewith a recess defining a saddle-shaped coil pattern, having a window through which said first axis extends for receiving a continuous wire and for forming said wire into consecutive coil turns having a shape corresponding to said pattern; said second portion having at least one channel entering into said recess to facilitate the introduction of a fluid thereto; means for introducing a fluid into said channel; a winding head rotatable about a second axis, intersecting said first axis at an angle therewith of less than 90 and at the approximate geometric center of said recess, and having va wire-feeding station which revolves about said recess of said mandrel as said winding head rotates with said feeding station spaced radially of said second axis and 'located in its motion path at a point from which said Wire extends 'directly in 'a substantially straight line into said recess; means for feeding said wire from a supply station through said feeding station of said winding head; and means for concurrently effecting continuous rotation of said mandrel and said winding head at a speed ratio of 1:2, respectively.

4. A coil-winding machine comprising: a mandrel supported for rotation about a first axis including a nrst portion having a linear centr-al section terminating in enlarged flanges at its opposite ends and further including a U-s'haped second portion secured to said first portion lbetween said flanges thereof and constituting therewith a recess defining a saddle-shaped coil pattern, having a window through which said first axis extends, for receiving a continuous wire and for forming said wire into consecutive coil turns having a shape corresponding to said pattern; a winding head rotatable about a second axis, intersecting said first axis at an angle therewith of :liess than 90 and at the approximate geometric center of said recess, and having a wire-feeding station which revolves about said recess of said mandrel as said winding head rotates with said feeding station spaced radially of said second axis and located in its motion path at a point from which said wire extends directly in a substantially straight line into said recess; means for feeding said wire from a supply station through said feeding station of said winding head; means for concurrently effecting continuous rotation of sai-d mandrel and said winding head at a speed r-atio of 1:2, respectively; a forming die movable into said recess to conform coil turns therein to the pattern of said recess; and means for advancing said die into said recess.

5. A coil-winding machine comprising: a m-andrel supported for rotation about a first axis including a first portion having a linear central section Iterminating in enlarged flanges at its opposite ends and further including a U-shaped second portion secured to said first portion between said flanges thereof and constituting therewith a recess defining a predetermined coil pattern for receiving a continuous wire and for forming said wire into consecutive coil turns having a shape corresponding to said pattern; said second portion having at least one channel entering into said recess to facilitate the introduction of a fluid thereto; a winding head rotatable about a second axis intersecting said mandrel and having a wire-feeding station which revolves about said recess of said mandrel as said Winding head rotates; means for feeding a winding conductor having an insulating coating from a supply station to said feeding station of said winding head; means for concurrently effecting continuous rotation 4of said m-andrel and said winding head at preselected relative speeds; and means admitting -a solvent for said coating into said 14 channel after a predetermined number of coil turns have been formed in said recess.

6. A coil-winding machine comprising: a mandrel supported forrotation about a first axis including a first por tion having a linear central section terminating in enlarged flanges at its opposite ends and further including a U-shaped second portion secured to said first porti-on between said fianges thereof and constituting therewith a recess defining a predetermined coil pattern for receiving a continuous wire and for forming said wire into consecutive coil turns having a shape corresponding to said pattern; said second portion having at least one channel entering into said recess .to facilitate the introduction of a fluid thereto; a winding head rotatable about a second axis intersecting said mandrel and having a wire-feeding station which revolves about said recess of said mandrel as said winding head rotates; means for feeding a winding conductor having an insulating coating from a supply station to said feeding station of said winding head; a clamp affixed to said first portion of said mandrel for anchoring one end of said winding conductor and for making an electrical connection thereto; means for concurrently effecting continuous rotation of said mandrel and said winding head at preselected relative speeds; means admitting a solvent for said coating into said channel after a predetermined number of coil turns have been formed in said recess; and means for completing a heater circuit through said winding conductor at a given time interval following the admission of solvent to said channel.

7. A coil-winding machine comprising: a mandrel supported for rotation about a first axis including a first portion having a linear central section terminating in enlarged flanges at its opposite ends and fur-ther including a U-shaped second portion secured to said first portion between said flanges thereof and constituting therewith a recess defining a predetermined coil pattern for receiving a continuous Wire and for forming said wire into consecutive coil turns having a shape corresponding to said pattern; said vsecond por-tion having at least one channel entering into said recess to facilitate introducing a fluid thereto; a winding head rotatable about a second axis intersecting said mandrel and having a wire-feeding station which revolves about said recess of said mandrel as said winding head rotates; means for feeding a winding conductor having an insulating coating from a supply station to said feeding station of said Winding head; a clamp aflixed to said first portion of said mandrel for anchoring one end of said conductor and for making an electrical connection thereto; a conforming die movable into said recess; means for concurrently effec-ting continuous rotation of said mandrel and said winding head at preselected relative speeds; means admitting a solvent for said coating into said channel after a predetermined number of coil turns have been formed in said recess; means for maintaining a flow of heater current through said winding conductor for a preselected interval following the admission of -solvent to said channel; and means for advancing said die to said recess at the end of said interval.

8. A coil-winding machine comprising: a mandrel supported for rotation about a first axis and having a saddleshaped recess defining a predetermined coil pattern, having a window through which said first axis extends, for receiving a continuous wire and for forming said wire into consecutive coil turns having a shape corresponding to said pattern; a winding head rotatable about a second axis, intersecting said first axis at an angle of less than and at the approximate geometrical center of said recess, and having a wire-feeding station displaced from said second axis to revolve in a circular path about said recess of said mandrel as said winding head rotates with said feeding station spaced radially of said second axis and located in its motion path at a point from which said wire extends directly in a substantially straight line into said recess; means for feeding said wire from a supply station through said feeding station of said Winding 15 head; and means for concurrently effecting continuous rotation of said mandrel and said winding head at constant speeds and at a speed ratio of 1:2, respectively.

9. A coil-winding machine comprising: a mandrel supported for rotation about a first axis and having a saddleshaped recess defining a predetermined coil pattern, having a window through which said rst axis extends, for receiving a continuous wire and for forming said wire into consecutive coil turns having a shape corresponding to said pattern; a winding head rotatable about a second axis, intersecting said first axis at an agle therewith of less than 90 and at the approximate geometrie center of said recess, and having a wire-feeding station which revolves about said recess of said mandrel as said winding head rotates with said feeding station spaced radially of said second axis and located in its motion path at a point f from which said wire extends directly in a substantially straight line into said recess; means for feeding said wire from a supply station -through said feeding station of said winding head; means for concurrently effecting continuous rotation of said mandrel and said winding head at a speed ratio of 1:2, respectively; and means for automatically arresting said mandrel and winding head in predetermined relative angular positionsl after the formation of a preselected number of coil turns in said recess.

10. A coil-winding machine comprising: a mandrel supported for rotation about a first axis and having a saddle-shaped recess defining a predetermined coil pattern, having a Window through which said first axis extends, for receiving a continuous Wire and for forming said wire into consecutive coil turns having a shape corresponding to said patern; a Winding head rotatable about a second axis, intersecting said first axis at an angle therewith of less than 90 and at the approximate geometric center of said recess, and having a wire-feeding station which revolves about said recess of said mandrel as said winding head rotates with said feeding station spaced radially of said second axis and located in its motion path at a point from which said Wire extends directly in a substantially straight line into said recess; means for feeding said wire from a supply station through said feeding station of said Winding head; means for concurrently effecting continuous rotation of said mandrel and said Winding head at a speed ratio of 1:2, respectively; means for automatically arresting said mandrel and winding head after the formation of a preselected number of coil turns in said recess; and means for automatically establishing a predetermined relative orientation of said mandrel and said winding head preparatory to the formation of a preselected number of coil turns in said recess.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,391,969 Herzog Jan. l, 1946 2,565,331 Torsch Aug. 2l, 1951 2,638,943 Bugg May 19, 1953 2,848,794 Roth Aug. 26, 1958 2,877,807 Robertson Mar. 17, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 155,433 Australia Feb. 25, 1954

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Classifications
U.S. Classification140/92.2
International ClassificationH01J9/236, H01F41/06, H01J9/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01J9/236, H01F41/065, H01J2209/2366, H01F2041/0662
European ClassificationH01F41/06D, H01J9/236