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Publication numberUS3086650 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1963
Filing dateApr 9, 1959
Priority dateApr 9, 1959
Publication numberUS 3086650 A, US 3086650A, US-A-3086650, US3086650 A, US3086650A
InventorsFrancis Nagle Maurice, Richard Chapman James
Original AssigneeReynolds Metals Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package marking system
US 3086650 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1963 J. R. CHAPMAN- EIAL- 3,086,650

PACKAGE MAEKJQING SYSTEM Filed April 9, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS. JAMES RICHARD CY-MPMAN MAURICE FRANC/S NAGLE P 1963 J. R. CHAPMAN EIAL 3,086,650

PACKAGE MARKING SYSTEM Filed April 9, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS Y JAMES R/cmm CH4PM4N M4UR/CE FRAMc/s N4GLE United States Patent 3,086,650 PACKAGE MARKENG SYSTEM James Richard Chapman, Bon Air, and Maurice Francis Nagle, Henrico County, Va., assignors to Reynolds Metals Company, Richmond, Va., a corporation of Delaware Filed Apr. 9, 1959, Ser. No. 865,211

4 Claims. (iii. like-65) This invention relates to packages and packaging methods for articles such as cigarettes and the like and more particularly to a package and method for applying indicia such as a state cigarette tax emblem to individual packages contained within a larger package or carton. The invention will be illustrated and described in connection with a package and packaging method for use in connection with the application of cigarette tax emblems or indicia to individual cigarette packages, but it will be understood that the method and package of the invention are applicable to other uses.

In the tobacco industry, paper or paper-foil overwraps are widely used for wrapping cartons of cigarettes for export use, each carton containing a plurality of individual Packages of cigarettes. However the use of such paper or paper-foil overwraps for cigarette cartons intended for domestic use within the United States has been limited by the fact that in most of the States of the United States, it would be necessary for the individual cigarette distributors or jobbers to destroy the protective overwrap some time before distribution to retail dealers in order to aflix an ink tax stamp emblem by machine or hand to the individual cigarette packages contained within the overwrapped carton. This fact has tended to seriously curtail the use of paper or paperfoil overwraps on cigarette cartons within the United States.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a package and packaging method, particularly useful in connection with the packaging of cigarettes and the like, which permits the application of indicia, such as tax stamp emblems, to individual packages within a larger overwrapped package without removing the overwrap from the larger package.

It is another object of this invention to provide a package and packaging method, particularly useful for cigarettes and the like, which permits indicia to be applied at local distribution points to overwrapped articles contained in the package, without removing the articles from the package.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a method of packaging, particularly useful for cigarettes and the like, which makes practical the use of an overwrap on nationally distributed cartons requiring the application of different types of localized indicia to the contents of the carton.

In achievement of these objectives, there is provided in accordance with one embodiment of this invention a carton for cigarettes or the like adapted to receive a plurality of smaller P ckages, such as individual cigarette packages, including a cardboard carton shell which is open along the bottom side thereof and enclosed in a paper or paper-foil overwrap having a heat transfer ink positioned on the surface of the paper which covers the open bottom side of the carton. A heated roller or other suitable heated impression means is passed over the bottom of the overwrapped carton at a local distribution point such as the individual cigarette jobber, to cause an imprint of the desired indicia, such as a state cigarette tax emblem, to the bottoms of the individual cigarette packages contained within the overwrapped carton without removing the overwrapping.

3,68%,656 Patented Apr. 23, 1963 In a modified embodiment, the ink is carried by a heat transfer coating on a paper base which may be a separate strip member disposed between the inner surface of the overwrap and the bottom surface of the packages to be marked. Alternatively, the heat transfer coating may be carried by the paper surface of the overwrap. A heated roller or mandrel having the state tax emblem thereon is rolled over the outer surface of the overwrap to cause the heat transfer coating and the ink carried thereby to be transferred to the bottom surface of the individual cigarette or like packages.

For a better understanding of the invention, reference is now made to the accompanying drawing which show, for purposes of illustration only, certain present preferred embodiments of the invention. In the drawings:

PEG. 1 is a perspective view of a sheet of overwrap material bearing a layer of heat transfer ink, and a carton to be overwrapped, showing the relation of the location of the heat-transfer ink to the open bottom of the carton;

FIG. 2 is a view in transverse section along line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing the use of a heated roller in contact with the outer surface of the overwrapped carton to cause transfer of the desired indicia to the bottom surface of the individual packages within the carton;

FIG. 4 is a view in transverse section taken along line 44 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the carton of FIGS. l3 with the overwrap removed and showing the indicia applied to the bottom surface of the individual packages within the carton;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view illustrating a modified package and packaging method using a separate strip having a heat transferable coating which carries a layer of ink; and

FIG. 7 is a view in vertical section of the modified package of FIG. 6, showing the relative positions of the overwrap, the coated strip and the carton being overwrapped.

Referring now to the drawings, there is shown in FIG. 1 a cardboard carton shell generally indicated at 10 which is closed along each of its sides except the bottom side of the carton, the carton shell being shown in inverted position so that the open bottom of the carton can be seen. A plurality of cigarette packages 12 are positioned wtihin carton shell 16, ten such package arranged in two rows being shown with-in the carton shell. Each of the cigarette packages 12 usually includes an outer covering of cellophane, and is disposed with its bottom surface facing the open bottom of carton shell 10.

Carton shell 19 is entirely wrapped with a sheet of overwrap material generally indicated at 14. As best seen in FIG. 2, overwrap sheet 14 is a two-ply lamination including a ply 16' of metal foil material, such as aluminum foil, for example, on the outer surface of the overwrap, a ply of paper 18 on the inner surface of the overwrap, and an adhesive (usually glue or wax) between the plies. Alternatively, overwrap sheet 14 may consist only of a sheet of paper.

A marking material in the form of a layer 20 of heat transfer ink is positioned on the inner surface of paper layer 18 of paper-foil overwrap 14. Where the overwrap does not include a foil layer, but only a layer of paper, the heat transfer ink is on the surface of the paper layer facing the bottoms of the cigarette packages.

A working example of a heat transfer ink formulation which can be applied at an application rate of two pounds per ream, on the paper side of a laminated overwrap sheet 14 of aluminum foil, wax, glassine, and will transfer legibly to the cellophane (MD-31) cover of a cig- J arette pack, at 275 F. under 20 psi. pressure with a one-half second dwell time in the heat sealer, is as follows:

. Percent Ethyl cellulose, 7 cps. N-type 20.17 Paraffin WaX (MS-150 F. MP.) 0.63 Plasticizer (Dow 14.16 Toluol 50.83 Ethyl alcohol (95%) 12.71 Aviation oil blue (Calco pigments) 1.50

The width of layer 20* of heat transfer ink is made of a dimension substantially equal to the transverse width of carton shell so as to overlie both rows of cigarette packages 12 positioned within the carton. If desired, instead of using a single layer to overlie both rows of packages within the carton, two individual layers, each overlying one of the rows, may be used. Overwrap 14 is wrapped around the carton in any suitable manner, as, for example, in the manner shown in FIG. 3, as long as the portion of the overwrap containing the heat transfer ink 20 overlies the open bottom portion of the carton, with the heat transfer ink on the surface of the paper lamination facing the bottoms of the cigarette packages.

When carton '16, overwrapped as shown in FIG. 3, reaches a local distributor or jobber in any one of the States of the United States requiring the positioning of a tax emblem on the individual cigarette packages contained within carton 1G, a heated roller such as that indicated at 22 in FIG. 3 is rolled over the outer surface of the overwrap along the bottom side of the carton having the heat transfer ink positioned on the inner surface of the overwrap. The heated roller 22 is provided with raised surfaces, such as the number 21 which is assumed to be the desired tax emblem. Roller 22 may be connected to a tax meter. The raised numbers applied with the heat and pressure of the roller, cause the heat transfer ink from layer 20 to be transferred to the bottom surfaces of packages 12 within carton 10 without removing the overwrap from the carton. When the overwrap is finally removed from the carton by the retailer or ultimate purchaser, each cigarette package within carton 10 will have the desired indicia printed on the bottom surface of the package, as best seen in the view of FIG. 5.

In a modified embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, instead of using a heat transfer ink carried by the paper surface of the overwrap, the indicia .is transferred to the cigarette packages by a marking material in the form of a heat transfer coating which serves as a carrier for a conventional printing ink. The heat transfer coating may, for example, be similar to that sold by Dennison Manufacturing Co., of Framingham, Massachusetts, under the registered trademark Therimage.

There is shown in FIGS. 6 and 7 a cardboard carton shell 10 which is similar to carton shell 1% described in connection with the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5. Carton shell 10 is closed along each of its sides except the bottom side of the carton shell, the carton shell being shown in inverted position in the views of FIGS. 6 and 7. A plurality of cigarette packages 12' are positioned within carton shell 10, ten such packages arranged in two rows being shown within the carton. An overwrapping generally indicated at 14 is wrapped around the carton shell in any suitable manner, as, for example, the manner shown in FIG. 3 for the embodiment of FIGS. l5. Overwrap 14' may be made of a two-ply lamination of aluminum or other metal foil 16 and paper 18, as shown, or may consist of only a paper layer. Interposed between the inner surface of overwrap 14 and the bottom surfaces of cigarette packages 12 is a strip generally indicated at 24 having a width substantially equal to the transverse width of the two rows of cigarette packages shown in carton shell 10'. The strip 24 includes a paper base portion 26 which serves as a carrier for a heat transferable coating 28 which faces the bottoms of cigarette packages 12'. Coating 28 carries on its surface which faces the bottoms of the cigarette packages a layer 30 of a conventional printing ink.

When carton 10' reaches a local distributor or jobber, the tax indicia may be transferred onto the bottoms of cigarette packages 12 by rolling a heated roller provided with raised surfaces corresponding to the tax indicia, such as roller 22 shown in FIG. 3, over the outer surface of the overwrap along the bottom side of the carton. The heat and pressure from the roller will cause a clear separation of the heat transfer coating 25 from paper base 26 onto the bottoms of the cigarette packages, the coating 28 carrying the ink layer 30 along with it. The transfer of coating 28 and ink layer 30 conform to the shape of the raised portions of the heated roller used to effect the transfer, since the raised portions of the roller have the shape of the desired tax indicia.

Instead of having the heat transfer coating 28 and ink layer 30 carried by a separate paper base 26' as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, coating 28 carrying ink layer 39 may instead be directly positioned on the paper surface 18 of overwrap 14.

It can be seen from the foregoing that there are provided in accordance with this invention packages and packaging methods which have great utility in that they permit the application of local indicia or other types of information to individual packages contained within a nationally distributed overwrapped carton. The packages and packaging methods of the invention are particularly useful in connection with the application of tax emblems to individual cigarette packages contained within an overwrapped carton of cigarettes since the overwrapped cartons may be nationally distributed by the cigarette factory and the tax emblems required on the individual cigarette packages by 42 of the 48 States of the United States may be applied by the local jobbers or distributors without opening the overwrapped carton. This permits the overwrapped carton to arrive at the local retailer with the overwrapping intact and with the tax emblems stamped or printed on the bottom surface of the packages contained within the carton.

While present preferred embodiments of the invention and methods of practicing the same have been illustrated and described, it will be recognized that the invention is not limited thereto, and may be variously embodied and practiced within the scope of the following claims.

We claim:

1. In a package assembly, the combination comprising shell means having an opening on one side, package means for cigarettes or the like positioned within said shell means, said package means including surface means disposed in said opening on said one side, a heat transfer material being disposed in said opening and forming an overlay adjacent said surface means to facilitate transfer of indicia thereto, and overwrapping material enclosing said shell means and said heat transfer material to form a closed package assembly, said overwrapping material having a flexible portion'superimposed relative to said heat transfer material whereby said heat transfer material may be activated against said surface means while the package assembly remains closed.

2. In a package assembly, the combination comprising a carton having an opening on one side, a plurality of individual packages for cigarettes or the like positioned in said carton, each of said packages having a marking receivable surface exposed by said opening on said one side, heat transfer marking material disposed in said opening and forming an overlay adjacent said surfaces to facilitate transfer of markings thereto, and overwrapping material completely enclosing said carton and said heat transfer marking material to form a closed package assembly, said overwrapping material having a heat receivable portion superimposed on said heat transfer marking material whereby a transfer of markings from said heat transfer marking material to said surfaces is accomplished exteriorly of said overwrapping material with the closed package assembly intact.

3. The combination as recited in claim 2 wherein said heat transfer marking material comprises a heat transfer ink.

4. The combination as recited in claim 2 wherein said heat transier marking material comprises a heat transfer coating having an ink printed thereon.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Richards Nov. 15, Cohn Jan. 18, Nevenschwander Feb. 1, Mohr Nov. 15, Sevigne Jan. 12, Robbins Sept. 25, McChesney -2 Nov. 29, Schmitt Apr. 3, Maunder May 19,

Krukonis July 21,

Patent Citations
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US26127 *Nov 15, 1859 Letter-envelop
US1168787 *Feb 8, 1915Jan 18, 1916Jacob M CohnCombined pay-envelop, time-card, and receipt.
US1367077 *Mar 20, 1918Feb 1, 1921Electric Fruit Marking CoElectric fruit-marking machine
US1397444 *Feb 8, 1921Nov 15, 1921Mohr Arthur DCoin-wrapping device
US1569208 *Aug 5, 1925Jan 12, 1926Sevigne Frederick JFruit-marking machine
US1685645 *Oct 26, 1926Sep 25, 1928Robbins Elwin AFruit-branding machine
US2138350 *Mar 30, 1937Nov 29, 1938Dunlop Tire & Rubber CorpApparatus for printing tennis balls
US2547602 *Mar 25, 1949Apr 3, 1951Art Lines IncMetallic ribbon imprinting apparatus for book matches
US2887051 *Sep 4, 1956May 19, 1959Masson Seeley And Company LtdMarking of heat-stable objects
US2895272 *Jul 18, 1957Jul 21, 1959Crompton & Knowles CorpMethod of assembling and wrapping articles
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3872966 *Sep 9, 1974Mar 25, 1975Stanley WorksContainer assembly with individually priceable carded packages therein
US4738359 *Aug 3, 1987Apr 19, 1988R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette carton assembly
US5141106 *Oct 8, 1991Aug 25, 1992Philip Morris Inc.Two separate cartons combined as a single unit by adhesive/carrier means
US5158178 *Jul 3, 1991Oct 27, 1992R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanySeparable cigarette carton assembly
US5174443 *Feb 3, 1992Dec 29, 1992Philip Morris IncorporatedCigarette carton with modified tuck-in flap
US5174444 *Feb 5, 1992Dec 29, 1992Philip Morris IncorporatedTwo cartons joined as a dual carton separable into two individual cartons
US5178268 *Mar 10, 1992Jan 12, 1993Philip Morris IncorporatedTwo cartons releasably joined to form a dual carton
US5178270 *Jun 3, 1992Jan 12, 1993Philip Morris IncorporatedEasily sealable, openable, and reclosable carton
US5178271 *Dec 19, 1991Jan 12, 1993Philip Morris IncorporatedTwo cartons joined as a single unit separable into two single cartons
US5180056 *Feb 3, 1992Jan 19, 1993Philip Morris IncorporatedDual carton
US5193674 *Sep 23, 1991Mar 16, 1993R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette carton assembly
US5201413 *Nov 15, 1991Apr 13, 1993Philip Morris IncorporatedDual cigarette carton with separable or divisible label containing universal product code
US5205403 *Feb 19, 1992Apr 27, 1993Philip Morris IncorporatedMultiple unit carton
US5419431 *Aug 19, 1994May 30, 1995Gerhardt Schubert GmbhSeparable container for storage of plural articles
EP0219590A1 *Oct 17, 1985Apr 29, 1987BLACHON & CIEPackaging foil to prevent the sensing of bar code markings through the transparent packing
EP1283807A1 May 2, 2001Feb 19, 2003Focke & Co. (GmbH & Co.)Box packaging for cigarettes
WO1987002330A1 *Oct 14, 1986Apr 23, 1987Georges BlachonMethod and device for scrambling the reading of bar code data through a transparent package
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/273, 229/87.13, 53/411, 53/131.2, 53/449, 206/459.5, 206/245
International ClassificationB65D75/52
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/52
European ClassificationB65D75/52