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Publication numberUS3086768 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1963
Filing dateNov 16, 1960
Priority dateNov 16, 1960
Publication numberUS 3086768 A, US 3086768A, US-A-3086768, US3086768 A, US3086768A
InventorsJohn Lach
Original AssigneeUarco Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Folder for a collator
US 3086768 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 23, 1963 1, LACH 3,086,768

FOLDER FOR A COLLATOR Filed Nov. 16. 1960 '7 Sheets-Sheet 1 April 23, 1963 J. LACH FOLDER FOR A coLLAToR '7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 16, 1960 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 April 23, 1963 .1. LACH FOLDER Foa A coLLA'roR FledNov. 16, 1960 April 23, 1963 J. LACH 3,86,768

FOLDER FOR A COLLATOR Filed NOV. 16, 1960 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 FI E14 EQEQEEBGB fifa j/' w 'l d d u 0 Ala April 23, 1963 J. LACH FOLDER FOR A coLLA'roR '7VSheets-Sheet 5 Filed Nov. 16, 1960 J. LACH FOLDER FOR A COLLATOR pril 23, 1963 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Nov. 16, 1960 April 23, 1963 J. LACH FOLDER FOR A coLLAToR '7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed Nov. 16, 1960 United States Patent C) 3,086,768 FLDER FOR A COLLA'IOR .lohn Lach, Chicago, Ill., assignor to UARSG, Incorporated, a corporation of Iiinois Filed Nov. 16, 1966, Ser. No. 69,729 14 Claims. (Cl. 270-79) This invention relates to a device for folding continuous form stationery sometimes referred to Ias a zig-zag folder for a collator and more particularly to a folder having -a new and improved tucker for folding the continuous form stationery.

Continuous form stationery such as that used in business machines yand the like, normally contains numerous plies of record sheets interleaved by a number of carbon sheets. Individual record sheets are separated from adjacent record sheets by lines of weakening. These sheets are held together by glue, staples, thread or some other fastening means and after completion 'are folded into packs which can be packaged, shipped and later used.

Since there are a number of plies lof record sheets and interleaved carbon sheets, continuous form' stationery -is rather thick. Normally, it is intended that the stationery be folded along the lines of weakening to form the pack mentioned above.

in the past it has been possible to construct a folder, which is an expensive device which included a mechanism referred to as a tucker for folding the continuous form stationery -along the lines of weakening. However, the machine as constructed was adapted only to handle one size of record sheet, i.e., in lineal distance between continuous lines of weakening. For example, see U.S. Patent No. 2,643,878, assigned to a common assignee.

Obviously, it is desirable to provide -a folder having a tucker mechanism which is adjustable and may be adapted to fold continuous form stationery having record sheets of any size. Such a construction allows the production of stationery which will fulfill the normal requirements `of any business machine and will lessen the necessity for a larger number of folders.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a device adapted to produce continuous form stationery including a tucker mechanism capable of handling various record sheet sizes.

It is another object of this -invention to produce such a device wherein the tucker can be adjusted both to lineal distance in tucking and to time in tucking.

It is still another object of this invention to provide such a device having a pair of tuckers each of which are adapted to fold continuous form stationery along its line of weakening, one of the tuckers being adapted to fold the stationery in one direction and -another tucker being adapted to fold the stationery in another direction.

It is yet a further object of this invention to provide a folder having a tucker mechanism `such as that referred to also including a variable speed folding apparatus, an adjustable dapper mechanism and an adjustable speed conveyor mechanism for carrying away folded packs of continuous form stationery.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description taken together with the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIGURE l is a diagrammatic side elevational viewI showing the important elements of the device of this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a partial side elevational view of the device `of the invention partly in section and partly showing features in dotted lines;

FIGURE 3 is a partial side elevational View similar 3,086,738 Patented Apr. 23, 1963 to FIG. 2 taken from the opposite side of the machine also showing portions in dotted lines;

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken substantially -along the line 4-4 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 5-5 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a view taken substantially along the line 5 6 of FIGURE 7;

FIGURE 7 is a foreshortened partial side elevational view taken along the line 7-7 of FIGURE 1 .and showing in more retail the construct-ion of the tucking mechamsm;

FIGURE 8 is an enlarged partial side elevational view `showing the drive mechanism of the oscillating distributing device;

FIGURE 9 is a partial top plan View showing some of the detail of the liapper device; and

FIGURE 10 is a perspective view of .a section of con- ,tinuous form stationery.

Referring now to the drawings and particularly to FIG- URE 1, a diagrammatic or iiow sheet view of the operation of a portion of a folder is shown therein. It can be seen that a str-ip of continuous form stationary 10 is moving in the direction of the arrow A toward a pin wheel 11. The pin wheel 11 is journalled on the shaft 23 and grips the continuous form stationery 10 by means of the sprocket holes 12 so as to pull the stationery through the collator machine and downward toward the tucking device generally indicated by the arrows 13 and 14. The c'ontinuous form stationery 10 passes between the tucker devices. It can be seen that the upper tucker 14 is open thereby allowing the passage of the stationery whereas the lower tucker mechanism 15 is in a closed condition for creasing or folding the stationery.

As the stationery 10 leaves the lower tucking device 13 it passes through an oscillating distributing device 16 which oscillates in the direction of the arrow B so as to direct the stationery after folding first one way, yand then the other, as indicated generally by the diagrammatic pack indicated by the arrow 17. As the strip of stationery is directed by the oscillating device 16 it is urged into a stacked or packed form by means of a pair of apper devices 18. It will be noted that the stacked stationery after being urged into this condition by the flapper device is resting on a continuous conveyor indicated generally at 19, the surface of which is moving in the direction of the arrow C. This conveyor performs the function of moving the completed stationery out of the collator machine to a collecting yarea (not shown) from whence it can lbe loaded into the cartons for distribution.

Also shown in dotted lines in FIGURE 1 are a pair of tucker drive units 20 which are designed to time the tucker devices so that they will tuck on the lines of weakening previously mentioned.

In order to facilitate explanation of the construction `of the invention, various elements will be dealt with separately. However, each of the units will be located in the entire machine.

It -is desirable lirst to explain the gear drive or connection from the power source. This construction is perhaps best shown in FIGURES 2 and 3. Referring particularly to FIGURE 2, we nd therein a main power or drive chain 21 which is connected lto a power source (not shown). The chain Z1 passes over a sprocket gear 22. The sprocket gear is mounted on a shaft 23 which is journaled for rotation in the frame 24 near the top 24a. The sha-ft 23 extends axially across the machine and as seen in VFIGURE 3 emerges on the other side of the machine journaled in the top 25a of the frame portion 25.

Located adjacent the outer end of the shaft 23 and rigidly attached thereto is a sprocket gear 26. This gear is designed to mesh with an adjacently mounted gear 27 which is a movable or adjustable gear. It can be seen that a .protector cowl 28 overlies the gear 27 with the cowl having a slot 28a defined in its inward wall. Gear 27 is mounted on a stub shaft 29 which is slidably positioned in the slot 28a and which has an adjusting knob 3i) threadedly received on its outboard end. This construction allows the gear 27 to be moved a small distance through an 4arc equivalent to the length of the slot 28a. AThis motion allows the gear 27 to be disconnected from the adjacent change gear 31. When the gear 27 is in contact Wit-h the change gear 31, of course, the adjusting knob 30 will be tightened down to hold gear 27 in that position. Y

The primary function of the change gear 3'1 is to allow `adjustment of the drive speed going to the tuckers yet to be described. Thus ifa smaller gear is substituted for the gear 31 shown in FIGURE 3 for a larger gear, a variation in speed obviously will result, as is well known to rthose skilled in `the art. However, since the change gear is located in the gear drive ahead of the power source for other elements not yet described, it can be seen that it Aeffects the speed of these other elements also. The change gear 31 is mounted on a shaft 32 which is of similar length -to the shaft 23 and is also journaled for rotation .in the frame sides 24 and 25. Thus as can be seen in FIGURE 2, the shaft 32 emerges on the other side of the machine and has positioned on that end yet another .gear 33.

The gear 33 is mounted so as to be in driving contact with'several other gears. Thus it is in contact with the drive gear 34 on the lower Itucker assembly unit 35 which A-in turn is in contact with idler gear 36 which in turn is in contact with the idler gear 37 which finally imparts driving motion to the drive gear 38 on the upper tucker assembly -unit 39. The gears 34, 36,37 and 38 are conventional in construction and `are mounted either on drive shafts or on stub shafts as the case may be, all of which is known to those skilled in the art.

Y On the other side, the gear 33 is in mesh with a similar size gear 40 which is mounted on a shaft 41 journaled for rota-tion in the frame 24. The shaft 41 drives the oscillating device yet to be described. The gear 40 is also in mesh with a driveV gear 42 of yet another drive assembly 43 which is designed to control the timing of the dapper devices `18 previously referred to. Outboard of the gear 42 and mounted on the same shaft 44 is another gear `45 shown in dotted lines. Passing over this gear is a drive chain 46 which passes under a tightening gear element 47 and around another gear 48. The

sprocket gear V48 which is mounted for rotation on theV shaft 49 is held in the bracket 50. Internally of the bracket 50 and connected to the shaft 49 are bevel gears (not shown) which drive the shafts 51 and through the couplings SZ'the shafts 53. The ends of the shafts 53 are supported in the brackets 54 and have positioned adjacent the brackets -a bevel gear 55 which meshes with an adjacent bevel gear 56. vThe bevel gear 56 provides the drive for the apper device 18 as will be presently described. .The bevel gears 56 are mounted in slidable members 57 which are located in the channels 58 thus allowing the members 57 to slide in a longitudinal direction. The bevel gears 55 are held on the shafts 53 by means of a keyway 53a so that the position of the gears 55 and 56 may be varied t-hus accommodating movement of the dapper devices 118. Y

This movement of the dapper devices .-18 can be clearly seen in FIGURE 3 wherein it can be seen that the flapper device mounting 59 is threadably received on a shaft 60 Vhaving oppositely threaded portions l60a and 60b. The

shaft 60 is connected through a beveled gear linkage (not shown) to a crank nut 61. The crank nut is designed to received a conventional crank which on rotation will cause the apper assemblies 59 and thereby the apper units 18 to move Itoward or away from each other depending upon the size of the stationery to be handled. Further details of the apper device ,18 will be presented presently. Y

As a last element of the drive mechanism, a still larger gear 62 is located on the shaft 44 outward of the gear 45. A chain 63 passes over this gear under a tensioning gear 64 and around lanother drive sprocket gear e5 near the base of the unit. The drive sprocket gear 65 is mounted on a shaft 66 which enters `a variable speed unit 67. The variable speed unit 67 controls ythe speed of the conveyor 19 by a mechanism (not shown). However, it can be Seen that the gear `68 shown in dotted lines has a drive chain V69 passing thereover and also around a sprocket gear 7l? which is mounted on a shaft 71. The shaft 71 imparts rotation to ythe conveyor 19 through a drive roller over which the conveyor belt 73 passes.

There are a pair of flapper devices 1S as previously mentioned, each of which includes a drum 74 which is mounted for rotation on one of the shafts 75' of the bevel gears 56. IThis `allows rotating motion to be transmitted to the drums 74. -Pinned to the drums are a plurality of plates 76 which are designed to rotate about the pins '77. Adjacent Ithe bottom of the device is a bar 7S which is designed to urge the plates upwardly as the drum rotates so that they will pass clear of the pack stationery :located therebelow. A pair of guide plates 79 are provided on the flapper device mounting S9. As can be seen in FIGURE 1 Ithe rotating plates 76 flap over against the creased stationery thereby urging it into a stacked condirack 82 positioned along its top. The rack 82 mounts a gear 83 on the frame 84. The frame 84 is manually adjustable along the rack S2 to allow variation in the positioning of the gear S3. Inwardly of the gear S3 is another roller 86 which supports the belt 73. This mechanism allows the angle of `the belt to be varied as necessary depending upon the type of stationery being produced. 'Ihe crank is attached to the variable speed unit 67 through a linkage (not shown) to allow variation in the conveyor speed.

Referring once again to FIGURE 1 and to FIGURE 8 and the oscillating distributing device 16, it can be seen that it includes an auxiliary frame 87 which is pivotally mounted on the main frames 24 and 2S by means of the Shaft SS. Also mounted on the shaft 83 is a the gear 89 which has a chain drive 96 passing therearound and over the gear 91 and which drives the roller 92 through a gear chain (not shown). The gear 91 is mounted on the shaft 23 outwardly of the gear 26 and takes its drive therefrom. The shaft 23 at its other end mounts the sprocket 22 connected to thermain drive chain 21. Thus the speed of rotation of the gear 89 and its roller 92 is not variable. The construction of the oscillating distributing unit 16 is similar to that shown in the previously mentioned U.S. Patent No. 2,643,878.

However, there is an additional feature in the distributing unit of this invention in that the throwv and speed of the unit can be adjusted. It can be seen there is another gear 94 mounted on the shaft 93 which also mounts gear 89. The gear 94 has teeth 94a around its outer perimeter. The teeth 94a are designed to mesh with the rack 95 on Ithe bar 96.

The other end of the bar 96 is attached to a scotch yoke indicated generally at 97 which causes reciprocating motion of the bar 96. The scotch yoke includes a plate 98 which is pinned 99 to the bar 96. The lbar 96 itself is slidingly supported in the channels 1:11 and 102. The upper end 98a of the plate 98 is slidingly supported on the bar 103 which is gripped between the supports 104. The plate 98 is Slotted at 93h and designed to receive a threaded stud 19:3 which is slidingly attached to the circular plate 166. The plate 1136, the members 1112 and :the supports 164 are mounted on a portion of the frame 24. The plate 196 is mounted on the pins 197 which allow rotation of the plate 1% about the curved slots 1126:@ for timing purposes. The plate 1% is driven by the gear 46 through the shaft 41 on which it is mounted. This causes the plate to rotate. A four-pronged handle 1li?) is threadably mounted on the stud 135. On loosening of the handle, the stud 165 can be slid along the channel 93h and on tightening the handle permanently located there. Movement of the stud 105 or movement of the plate 166 on pins 197 or both will, of course, vary the reciprocal stroke of the rod le and thereby the stroke or amount of throw of the oscillating distributing unit 16. The speed of oscillation of the unit is, of course, determined by the change gear 31 and will be faster or slower depending on the size of the gear 31.

An inspection of FIGURE 2 discloses three similarly shaped units 35, 39 and 43. Units 35 and 39 are the lower tuclser drive unit and the upper tuclier drive unit, respectively. Each of these are constructed in the same fashion. The unit 43 is a drive assembly or speed reducer which has an external appearance similar to the units 35 and 3% but which is constructed differently and contains a conventional diiferential gear unit (not shown) mounted on the frame 24. The shaft 153 is connected to the direrential gear and has a wheel 164 at its other end with a handle 165 to allow adjusting of the timing of the speed reducer. Therefore, only one of the units 3S and 39 will be described.

The tuclter assembly shown in FIGURES 7 and 8 includes a housing 169 which has two halves lila and lfb. A pair of support legs 11d which are designed to attach the housing to the frame 24 by means of the bolts 111 extend outwardly from the half 16%. The halves 111% and 16911 are joined together by housing bolts 112. Gear 33 which has been described above is rigidly attached to the end of stub shaft 113 by means of a set screw 114 and keyway (not shown). Stub shaft 113 passes through the inner half of the housing lili/ib and is journaled for rotation in a bearing 11S. The other end of the stub shaft 113 is located in a ball bearing race 116. The positioning of the ball bearing race as well as several other ball bearing races in the assembly will be described later. Near the end of the shaft 113 adjacent the bali bearing race 116 is located a gem 117. This gear in turn meshes with a gear 11d which is mounted on the end of an adjacent stub shaft 119. Stub shaft 119 is held in a pair of ball bearing races 120 and 1.21. Near the end of the stub shaft 119 adjacent the ball bearing race 121 is another gear 122 which meshes with a larger gear 123. The gear 123 is mounted on a stub shaft 124. The end of the stub shaft 124 adjacent the gear 123 is held in the lball bearing race 125. The other end of the shaft 124 is journaled for rotation in a thrust bearing 126 which is positioned in the housing half Ecdl-la. Intermediate the thrust bearing 126 and the gear 123 is positioned a cam gear 127 which is also held on shaft 24. The gear 12.3 is rigidly attached to the cam bear 127 by means of a bolt 12S which passes through the cam gear 127 and is threadedly received in the gear 123. This gearing arrangement provides drive to the cam gear 127 which in turn imparts motion into the tuckers 13 as will presently be described. Thus, as the gear 33 rotates, it rotates gear 117 which being in mesh with gear 11S, rotates it and thereby rotates gear 122 which is in mesh with gear 123 rigidly connected by bolt 12S to cam gear '127.

A cam groove 12's is defined in the surface ofthe cam gear 127 adjacent the housing half 199:1. A cam follower 13o is positioned in the cam groove 129 in a sliding manner so that as the cam gear 127 rotates the follower 136 will slide in the groove. Attached to the cam follower by means of a bolt 131 is one end of a rocker arm 132. rThe other end of the rocher arrn 132 is rigidly attached to a shaft 133. Shaft 133 is journaled in bearing 134 whic-h is located in the housing half 10% and passes through and is journaled for rotation in a second bearing 135 in the housing half 16%. lt will be noted that the portion of the shaft 133 that extends between the two housings is enlarged. Such a construction provides in effect thrust shoulders at 133a to take up thrust of the shaft in the housing.

The groove 129 is substantially circular except for an embossment 136. Thus every revolution of cam gear 127' causes the cam follower 1311 to be moved which in turn imparts rocking movement to the rocker arm 132 thus rocking shaft v133 slightly. Since shaft 133 supports one of the tuckers which will presently be described this shaft provides a rocking movement to the tucker.

The timing of the rocking movement is important as the tuck must occur along the line of weakening 137 (FIG. l0) in this continuous stationary strip 1%. The timing can be adjusted through the use of a clutch 133 which is also located in the housing 169. The clutch includes a shaft y139 which is located in the housing half 1119er. A bearing 141 which supports an intermediate portion of the shaft 139 also is located in the housing half 111%. It will be noted that a stationary member 142 surrounds the bearing 141 and is held in place relative to the housing half by a bolt 143. A gear 144 is positioned on the shaft 139 by means of a set screw 145. 1t will be noted that this gear is of a slightly greater width than the remainder of the gears used in the gear drive construction. Outwardly of the gear 144 is a helical spring l146 which surrounds the shaft 139. Shaft 139 is connected with stub shaft 147 mounted in bearing 149. Shaft 1l47 is designed to move into bearing 141i so that the shaft 139 can be urged outwardly against spring pressure of the spring 146. The gear 144 in normal operating conditions will mesh through the notches 144e with embossments 142e on the member 142. This causes the gear 144 to be locked at a particular position against rotation. The gear may be unlocked simply by an inward force in the direction of the arrow E which pushes the shaft against the spring pressure and thus forces the gear 144 oi the embossment 142e.

The gear 144 is in mesh with a second larger gear This gear 14S is centered at the axis of rotation of the stub shafts 124 and 113. Each of the ball bearing races 116, 121 and 125 are held in the gear 148 by means of the retaining rings 149. Thus the retaining rings 149` grip in turn the ball bearing races and the outer portion of the gear 143 so that the races are held tirmly in the gear and thereby effect mounting of the gear for rotation in the axis mentioned above.

lt will be seen from the gear drive just described that rotation of shaft 124 by means of the drive connected to the gear 123 will result in the rotation of the cam gear 127 and thereby actuation through the embodiment 136 of the cam follower and the rocker arm 132. This then in turn will result in actuation of the tucker drive shaft '133. However, as previously mentioned, it is desirable on occasion to adjust the timing of this device. As will presently be explained, the number of tucks per linear dimension of a continuously moving station stationery sheet may be determined. However the time when the particular tucker tucks with regard to each linear section or sheet is also irnportant. In order to determine this, the clutch 13S has been provided. By disengaging the gear 144 from the member 142 and rotating the clutch 133 by means of the wheel 150 which is mounted on the outboard end of the shaft l139 through the coupling 15'1 on the frame 2S side, it is possible to rotate the gear 143 and thereby the entire gear drive mechanism, thus adjusting the time when the tuck will take place.

As previously mentioned, there is an upper tucker 14 and a lower tucker 15 (FlGS. l, 6 and 7) provided in the device of this invention. However since both tuckers are identical, only one of them will be described. The upper a tucker 14 includes shaft 152 which has collar 152e at one end. The collar 152a is designed to receive the shaft 133 coming from the tucker assembly 39. The collars are rigidly positioned on the shaft 133 by means of a pair of set screws 154 each of which pass through one of the collars 15201. At the other end f the shaft 152 is a threaded portion 152i?. A block 155 is positioned between the nuts .156.and its position may be determined by a movement of the nuts in either direction. Located in the block 155 is a tucker nger 157 and an elongated plate 158 which is designed to engage a pivotal drive portion 159 located adjacent the tucker. The pivotal portion 159 is L-shaped in configuration and is pinned at `159e near the bottom of the L on a pin 150 so that it may rotate slightly. The other end of the pin 160 is located in a stationary lY.-shaped member 161 which is rigidly mounted between the frames 24 and 25 by means of the bolt i162.

A shaft 152 will be actuated by the drive assembly pre- ViouslyV described which operates the shaft 133. When the shaft 133 is actuated, it will rotate the shaft 152 in the direction of the arrow F toward the stationary member 161 and the pivotal member 159. 'Ihe continuous form stationery l is moving in the direction of the arrow G and between the'rnembers :159, 161 and 155, At the time of actuation of the shaft 133, the shaft 152 will rotate toward the stationery 16 and the plate 155 will urge the movable member 159 upwardly to close the gap between the member 159 and the member 161. This closed gap or jaw performs the function of receiving the tucker iinger 157 as it is inserted into the gap with the paper therebetween so as to alfect the tuck. This is more clearly shown in the lower portion of FIGURE 6 wherein it can be seen that the tucker is in tucking position with the member 159 Vin an upward or closed position. Of course the tucker will move out of contact with the paper with actuation of the shaft i133 when the cam embossment 136 moves past its high point, thus releasing the stationery 10 allowing it to pass on to the oscillating distributing device 16.

The folder may include means for supporting numerous rolls of paper of both record and carbon sheets, numerous pin wheels and feed rolls, means for attaching the record sheets and carbon sheets and means for providing the transverse lines of weakening between record sheet forms, none of which are shown or it may be used as part of a press on single sheets or as a separate unit. However, one form of construction including the collator elements is shown in the copending application of Donald J. Steidinger, Serial No. 834,840, filed August 19, 1959 (now U.S. Patent No. 3,033,160) and assigned to a common assignee. The operation of the device of this invention, when used with a collator and the major elements of the device of the Steidinger application may be substantially the same insofar as production of the continuous form stationery is concerned.

After the stationery is formed, it is fed by the pin wheel 111 which moves at a constant speed, as can be seen in FIGURE 1, to the tucking devices 13 and 14. Prior to this, however, the desired speed and tuck distance of the tucking devices has been determined and has beenV set by means of the use of the proper size change gear 3-1. The timing of the flappers -18 and the speed of the conveyor 19 has also been determined by means of the drive unit 43 and the variable speed unit 67.V The machine is thus ready for operation and as 'the continuous form stationery 10 passes Ibetween the tuckers 13 and 14, the tuckers will tuck at a lineal distance equal to the distance between the lines of weakening 137 on the stationery. `However, the tucks may not be right on the lines of weakenings. Therefore, the machine is timed by means of the hand wheels which govern the clutch mechanism 138. This allows placing of the tuck or crease right on the line of weakening 137. On leaving the tuckers =13 and 14, the stationery now creased passes through the oscillating device 16 which throws the stationery first one way and then the other, in the direction of the crease so that the stationery will begin to fold. As the stationery begins to fold in the pack 17, each record sheet portion is struck by one of the plates 76 on `the Itlappers 13 to force ythe stationery into a compacted form. From this position, the stationery is removed from the device by means of the conveyor 19 -to a loading platform from whence it is packaged and shipped. Y

The foregoing detailed description has been given for clearness of understanding only, and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom for some modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. In an apparatus for producing continuous form stationery including a plurality of record sheet sets, a device forV folding said stationery, comprising: means for transversely creasing said stationery at intervals along the length thereof, said means being adapted to apply said creases alternately in opposite directions and said means being adjustable to allow variation in said intervals, and oscillating means adapted to direct successive creased portions of said stationery in substantially opposite directions, said oscillating means being adjustable as to amount of oscillation yand timing of oscillation; whereby various sizes of record sheet stationery may be folded into packs.

2. In an apparatus for producing continuous form stationery including a plurality of record sheet sets, a device for folding said stationery, comprising: means for transversely creasing said stationery at intervals along the length thereof, said means being adapted to apply said creases alternately in opposite directions and said means being adjustable to allow variation in Said intervals, oscillating means adapted to direct successive creased portions of said stationery in substantially opposite directions, saidV oscillating means being adjustable as to amount of oscillation and timing of oscillation; and means for urging said stationery into a folded condition, said urging means being adjustable to accommodate various crease intervals and lto vary the rate of urging; whereby various sizes of record sheet stationery may be folded into packs.

3. In an apparatus for producing continuous form stationery including a plurality of record sheet sets, a device for folding said stationery, comprising: means for transversely creasing said stationery at regular intervals along the length thereof including a pair of tucker elements, said tucker elements being adapted to apply said creases alternately in opposite `directions and said elements being adjustable to provide variation in said regular intervals, and oscillating means adapted to direct successive creased portions of said stationery in substantially opposite directions, said oscillating means being adjustable as to amount of oscillation and timing of oscillation; whereby various sizes of record sheet stationery Y may be folded into packs.

V4. In an apparatus for producing continuous form stationery including a plurality of record sheet sets, a device for folding said stationery, comprising: means for transversely creasing said stationery at regular intervals along the length thereof including a pair of tucker elements, said tucker elements being adapted to apply said creases alternately in opposite directions and said elements being adjustable to provide variation in said regular intervals, oscillating means adapted to direct successive creased portions of said stationery in substantially opposite directions, said oscillating means being adjustable as to amount of oscillation and timing of oscillation; and means for urging said stationery into a folded condition including a pair of transversely extending rotatable elements each having a plurality of plates, said elements being adjustable to vary the distance therebetween to accommodate various crease intervals and spoof/es f said elements being adjustable to vary the timing of rotation and thereby the rate of urging of said plates, whereby various sizes of record sheet stationery may be folded -into packs.

5. In an apparatus for producing continuous form stationery including a plurality of record sheet sets, a device for folding said stationery, comprising: means for transversely creasing said stationery at regular intervals along the length thereof including a pair of tucker elements, each of said elements including a tucker finger and a movable jaw, said jaw being adapted to close on actuation of said tucker element with said finger disposed therein and with said stationery disposed therebetween whereby said stationery is creased, each of said f elements being oppositely disposed so as to crease in opposite directions, and means for varying the tucking interval of said elements to provide variation in said regular intervals, whereby various sizes of record sheet stationery may be folded into packs.

6. In an apparatus for producing continuous form stationery including a plurality of record sheet sets, a device for folding said stationery, comprising: means for transversely creasing said stationery at regular intervals along the length thereof including a pair of tucker elements, each of said elements including a tucker finger and a movable jaw, each of said elements being oppositely disposed so as to crease in opposite directions, and means for varying the tucking interval of said elements to provide variation in said regular intervals, and oscillating means adapted to direct successive creased portions of said stationery in substantially opposite directions including an oscillatable element having a pair of rotatable rollers thereon and adapted to have said stationery pass therebetween, an oscillating drive connected to said element and means for varying the stroke of said oscillating drive to provide variation in said oscillatable element to accommodate various record sheet sizes, whereby various sizes of record sheet stationery may be folded into packs.

7. ln an apparatus for producing continuous form stationery including a plurality of record sheet sets, a device for folding said stationery, comprising: means for transversely creasing said stationery at regular intervals along the length thereof including a pair of tucker elements, each of said elements including a tucker linger and a movable jaw, each of said elements being oppositely disposed so as to crease in opposite directions, and means for varying the tucking interval of said elements to provide variation in said regular intervals, oscillating means adapted to direct successive creased portions of said stationery in substantially opposite directions including an oscillatable element having a pair of rotatable rollers thereon and adapted to have said stationery pass therebetween, an oscillating drive connected to said element and means for varying the stroke of said oscillating drive to provide variation in said oscillatable element to accommodate various record sheet sizes, and means for urging said stationery into folded condition including a pair of transversely extending rotatable elements each having a plurality of swingable plates, said elements being adjustable to vary the distance therebetween to accommodate various crease intervals and said elements being adjustable to vary the timing of rotation and thereby the timing of urging of said plates, whereby Various sizes of record sheet stationery may be folded into packs.

8. ln an apparatus for producing continuous form stationery including a plurality of record sheet sets separated by lines of weakening, a device for folding said stationery, comprising: a creasing mechanism adapted to transversely crease said stationery at regular intervals along the length thereof on the lines of weakening including a pair of movable tucker elements, each of said elements including a tucker finger, an elongated plate spaced from said tucker finger and parallel thereto, and a movable jaw including a stationery member and a movable member, said elongated plate being adapted to contact said movable member on actuation of said tucker element to partially close said movable jaw while said finger is disposed therein, each of said tucker elements being oppositely disposed so as to crease in opposite directions; driving means adapted to actuate said tucker elements and to vary the tucking interval of said elements to provide variation in said regular intervals including a changeable gear, and clutch means for varying the tucker timinU and adapted to adjust said tucker elements so that said stationery will be creased along the lines of weakening between said record sheets, whereby various sizes of record sheet stationery may be folded into packs.

9. ln an apparatus for producing continuous form stationery including a pluralityof record sheet sets separated by lines of weakening, a device for folding said stationery, comprising: a creasing mechanism adapted to transversely crease said stationery at regular intervals along the length thereof on the lines of weakening including a pair of movable tucker elements, each of said elements including a tucker finger, an elongated plate spaced from said tucker finger and parallel thereto, and a movable jaw including a stationery member and a movable member, said elongated plate being adapted to contact said movable member on actuation of said tucker element to partially close said movable jaw while said finger is disposed therein, each of said tucker elements being oppositely disposed so as to crease in opposite directions, driving means adapted to actuate said tucker and to vary the tucking interval of said elements to provide variation in said regular intervals including a changeable gear and clutch means for varying the tucker timing and adapted to adjust said tucker elements so that said stationery will be creased along the lines of weakening between said record sheets, and oscillating means adapted to direct successive creased portions of said stationery in substantially opposite directions including an oscillatable element having a pair of rotatable rollers thereon and adapted to have said stationery pass therebetween, an oscillating drive connected to said element and means for varying the stroke of said oscillating drive to provide variation in said oscillatable element to accommodate various record sheet sizes, whereby various sizes of record sheet stationery may be folded into packs.

10. In an apparatus for producing continuous form stationery including a plurality of record sheet sets separated by lines of weakening, a device for folding said stationery, comprising: a creasing mechanism adapted to transversely crease said stationery at regular intervals along the length thereof on the lines of wea-kening including a pair of movable tucker elements, each of said elements including a tucker finger, an elongated plate spaced from said tucker finger and parallel thereto, and a movable jaw including a stationery member and a movable member, said elongated plate being adapted to contact said movable member on actuation of said tucker element to partially close said movable jaw while said finger is disposed therein, each of said tucker elements being oppositely disposed so as to crease in opposite directions, driving means adapted to actuate said tucker and to vary the tucking interval of said elements to provide variation in said regular intervals including a changeable gear, and clutch means for varying the tucker timing and adapted to adjust said tucker elements so that said stationery will be creased along the lines of weakening between said record sheets, and oscillating means adapted to direct successive creased portions of said stationery in substantially opposite direct-ions including an oscillatable element having a pair of rotatable rollers thereon and adapted to have said stationery pass therebetween, an oscillating drive connected to said element and means for varying the stroke of said oscillating drive to provide variation in said oscillatable element to accommodate various record sheet sizes, and means for urging said stationery into folded condition including a pair of transversely extending rotatable elements each having a plurality of swingable plates, said elements being absence adjustable to vary the distance therebetween to accommodate various crease intervals and said elements being adjustable to vary the rate of rotation and thereby the rate of urging of said plates, whereby various sizes of record sheet stationery may be folded into pack-s.

l1. In an apparatus for producing continuous form st-ationary including a plurality of record sheet sets separated by lines of weakening, a device for folding said stationery, comprising: a creasing mechanism adapted to transversely crease said stationery at regular intervals along the length thereof and on the lines of weakening including a pair of movable tucker elements, each of said elements including a tucker finger, an elongated plate spaced from said .tucker finger, and parallel thereto, and a movable jaw including a stationery member and a movable member, said elongated plate being adapted to contact said movable member on actuation of said tucker element to partially close said movable jaw while said nger is disposed therein, each of said tucker elements being oppositely disposed so as to crease in oppositeY directions; a gear drive in said apparatus and adapted to actuate said tucker elements, said gear drive being adapted to accept a plurality of different sized change gears whereby the interval between tucks of said elements can be determined; a clutch in said gear drive adapted to adjust the point of actuation of said tucker elements whereby said creases canvbe made to register with the lines of weakening between adjacent record sheets; whereby various sizes of record sheet stationery may be folded into packs.

Y 12. In an apparatus for producing continuous form stationary including a plurality of record sheet sets separated by lines of weakening, a device for folding said stationery, comprising: a creasing mechanism adapted to transversely crease said stationery at regular intervals along the length thereof and on the lines of weakening including ya pair of movable tucker elements, each of said elements including a tucker finger, an elongated plate spaced from said tucker ngers and parallel thereto, and Ia movable jaw including a stationery member and a movable member, said elongated plate being adapted to contact said movable member on actuation of said tucker element to partially close said movable jaw while said finger is disposed therein, each of said tucker elements being oppositely disposed so as to crease in opposite directions, a gear drive in said apparatus and adapted to actuate said tucker elements, said gear drive being adapted to accepta plurality of different sized change gears whereby the interval between tucks of said elements can be determined, -a clutch in said gear drive adapted to adjust the point of actuation of said tucker elements whereby said creases can be made to register with the lines of weakening between adjacent record sheets; and oscillating means adapted to direct successive creased portions of said stationery in substantially opposite directions including an oscillatable element having ya pair ofl rotatable rollers thereon and adapted to have said stationery pass therebetween, an oscillating drive connected to said element and means for varying l2 the stroke of said oscillating drive to provide variation in said oscillatable element to accommodate Various record sheet sizes, whereby various sizes of record sheet stationery may be folded into packs. l

13. In an apparatus for producing continuous form stationary including a plurality of record sheet sets separated by lines of weakening, a device for folding said stationery, comprising: a creasing mechanism adapted to transversely crease said stationery at regular intervals along the length thereof on the lines of weakening including a pair of movable tucker elements, each of said elements including a tucker finger, an elongated plate spaced from said tucker finger and parallel thereto, and -a movable jaw including a stationery member and a movable member, said elongated plate being adapted to contact s-aid movable member on actuation of said tucker element to partially close said movable jaw while said nger is disposed therein, each of s-aid tucker elements being oppositely disposed so as to crease in opposite directions, a gear drive in said apparatus and adapted to actuate said tucker elements, said gear drive being adapted to accept -a plurality of diiferent sized change gears whereby the interval between tucks of said element can be determined, a clutch in said gear drive adapted to adjust the point of `actuation of said tucker elements whereby said creases can be made to register with the lines of weakening between adjacent record sheets; oscillating means adapted to direct successive creased portions of said stationery in substantially opposite directions including -an oscillatable element having a pair of rotatable rollers thereon and adapted to have said stationary pass therebetween, an oscillating drive connected -to said element and means for varying the stroke of said oscillating drive to provide variation in said oscillatable element to accommodate various record sheet sizes, and means for urging said stationery into folded Vcondition including a pair of transversely extending rotatable elements each havingY a plurality of swingable plates, said elements being adjustable to vary the distance therebetween to accommodate various crease intervals and said elements being adjustable to vary the timing of rotation and thereby the timing of urging of said plates, whereby various sizes of record sheet stationery may be folded into packs.

14. The device of claim 13 wherein a conveyor is provided and adapted to receive said folded stationery, said conveyor having an adjustable speed of lineal travel so that various sizes of folded packs may be carried away in said machine after folding.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification493/415, 270/39.5
International ClassificationB65H45/12, B65H45/20
Cooperative ClassificationB65H45/20
European ClassificationB65H45/20