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Publication numberUS3086779 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1963
Filing dateJul 20, 1961
Priority dateJul 20, 1961
Publication numberUS 3086779 A, US 3086779A, US-A-3086779, US3086779 A, US3086779A
InventorsTaylor Howard N
Original AssigneeTaylor Howard N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Simulated golf cup
US 3086779 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 23, 1963 H. N. TAYLOR 3,086,779

SIMULATED GOLF CUP Filed July 20, 1961 INV EN TOR.

Haward )7. Tag/ 0r Unite grates 3,686,779 Patented Apr. 23, 1963 3,986,779 SIMULATED GQLF CUP Howard N. Tayior, 1558 Schilling, Chicago Heights, ill. Filed July 20, 1361, Ser. No. 125,399 2 filairns. (61. 273-477) This invention relates to a new and improved device for producing a simulated golf cup for practicing golf on any lawn or grassy area.

One object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved device which will produce a simulated golf cup on ordinary grassy turf, without any necesslty for cutting the turf and without any damage to the turf.

A further object is to provide a new and improved simulated golf cup of the foregoing character which may be installed very quickly and easily and which may he moved from one point to another as desired.

It is a further object to provide a new and improved golf cup simulator of the foregoing character which 1s extremely easy to manufacture and low in cost.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will appear from the following description, taken Wlth the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a simulated golf cup to be described as an illustrative embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view of the simulated golf cup, the turf in which the cup installed being shown in section; and

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a disc forming one part of the simulated golf cup.

As already indicated, the drawings illustrate a golf cup simulating device which may be installed upon ordinary grassy turf 12 on any lawn or the like, so as to produce an opening or depression 14 which will serve as a golf cup for use in practicing the game of golf. One or more of the golf cup simulators 10 may be placed upon a lawn so that the user may practice putting, approach shots and the like.

It will be seen that the device 10 comprises a disc 16 adapted to be pressed downwardly into the turf 12. The disc 16 depresses the grass and the underlying turf so as to produce a definite depression which closely simulates a golf cup. The depression is sufliciently pronounced to retain the golf ball 18, as illustrated in FIG. 2, when the ball rolls into the depression at normal speed.

The disc 16 is retained and pressed downwardly into the turf by a stake 20 which is adapted to be inserted through an opening 22 in the center of the disc 16. A circular flange or shoulder 24 is provided on the stake 20 so as to engage the upper side of the disc 16 around the opening 22. When the stake 26 is pushed into the ground, the flange 24 presses the disc 16 downwardly into the turf. The flange 24 may take the form of a small circular disc which may be press fitted, welded or otherwise secured to the stake.

In this case, the stake 20 'has an upwardly projecting portion 26 which extends upwardly from the flange 24 and is fitted with a marker or flag 28 which is large enough so that it may be seen at some distance. The marker 28 makes it easy for the golfer to locate the simulated golf cup. In this case, the marker 28 is circular in shape. A number or the like may be painted on the marker to identify the cup. When a series of cups are employed, the markers will normally be numbered sequentially. Although the illustrated marker displays a number 2, it will be understood that any desired number or the like may be displayed on the marker. When the golf hole simulator is to be removed from the turf, the marker 28 provides a convenient handle for withdrawing the stake 20 from the ground. The marker may also be 2 used to hold the stake when it is inserted into the ground.

Although the disc 16 might be in the form of a solid plate, it is illustrated as being skeletal in form. Thus, the illustrated disc 16 is generally in the form of a spider comprising a circular ring 30 made of wire or the like. The opening 22 is formed in a crossbar 32 which extends diametrically across the ring 30 and forms the arms of the spider. The illustrated crossbar 32 comprises two pieces of wire 34 or the like extending side by side. The ends of the wires 34- are welded or otherwise secured to the ring 30. The central portions of the wires 34 are bent outwardly to form half loops 36 which constitute the central opening 22 in the disc 16.

It will be recognized that the golf hole simulating device may be manufactured very economically and thus may be sold at lost cost. The device is used by placing the disc 16 at the desired point upon any grassy spot. The stake 20 is then inserted through the central opening 22 in the disc 16 and is forced downwardly into the ground until the flange 24 presses the disc downwardly into the turf. The disc 16 depresses the grass and the turf so as to form the simulated golf cup =14. When the golf ball 18 rolls into the cup, it is retained by the upstanding grass and turf surrounding the cup. The ring 36 and the upwardly projecting portion of the stake 20 also assist in retaining the golf ball. Even if the golf ball pops out of the cup, it will be evident to the golfter that it has enter the cup.

When the golfer has finished with his practice session, the device may be removed simply by withdrawing the stake 26 and picking up the disc 16. The depressed portion of the turf soon springs back to normal so that no damage is done to the turf. The stake 20 makes such a small hole that the turf is not damaged.

Various modifications, alternative constructions and equivalents may be employed without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention, as exemplified in the foregoing description and defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A golf hole simulator for use on ground with grass thereon, said simulator comprising a flat spider made of wire and having a central portion with a central opening therein; said spider comprising a circular outer ring portion and radial arm portions extending between said central protion and said outer ring portion; said outer ring portion, said arm portions and said central portion being aligned in a single flat plane; a stake receivable through said central opening and adapted to be inserted into the ground; and a flange on said stake and engageable with said central portion of said spider for pressing said spider downwardly to form a circular depression in the grass simulating a golf hole.

2. A golf hole simulator for use on ground with grass thereon, said simulator comprising a flat skeletal spider and having a central portion with a central opening therein; said spider comprising a circular outer ring portion and radial arm portions extending between said central portion and said outer ring portion; said outer ring portion, said arm portions and said central portion being aligned in a single flat plane; a stake receivable through said central opening and adapted to be inserted into the ground; and a flange on said stake and engageable with said central portion of said spider for pressing said spider downwardly to form a circular depression in the grass simulating a golf hole.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,l2'1,270 Streich June 21, 1938

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2121270 *Apr 6, 1936Jun 21, 1938Streich Philip APutting game
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4260157 *Jul 30, 1979Apr 7, 1981Jones Elby WGolf game equipment
US4359225 *Nov 27, 1978Nov 16, 1982Baldorossi Blanche NGame ball entrapment device
US4691922 *Mar 10, 1986Sep 8, 1987Peel Robert MGolf practice device
US5636844 *Jul 22, 1994Jun 10, 1997De Buys; James W.Simulated golf game
US6506123 *Aug 24, 1997Jan 14, 2003Robert D. WeidlichGolf putting target
US6884178 *Aug 15, 2003Apr 26, 2005Ken C. FrostKit and method for playing a golf-like game
US7278924Nov 12, 2002Oct 9, 2007Weidlich Robert DGolf putting training aid
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/180
International ClassificationA63B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B57/0056
European ClassificationA63B57/00D