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Publication numberUS3087145 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1963
Filing dateJul 29, 1955
Priority dateJul 29, 1955
Publication numberUS 3087145 A, US 3087145A, US-A-3087145, US3087145 A, US3087145A
InventorsFruh Arthur W
Original AssigneeFruh Arthur W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Burglar alarm system and switch therefor
US 3087145 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

INVENTOR.

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BURGLAR ALARM SYSTEM AND.SWITCH THEREFOR Filed July 29, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 79 PROTECT/N jj BATTERY MASTER 8W! TCH SIGNAL BA TTERY 92 7'0 CENTRAL STA 7/0 8 UP! R V/SED GROUND PROTEC no 1 a g mm) RELAY 116 00/1. 6 J17 J77 INVENTOR.

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BURGLAR ALARM SYSTEM AND SWITCH THEREFOR Filed July 29, 1955 United States Patent U 3,087,145 BURGLAR ALARM SYSTEM AND SWITCH THEREFOR Arthur W. Fruh, Chicago, Ill. Filed July 29, 1955, Ser. No. 525,154 2 Claims. (Cl. 340-274) The present invention relates to a burglar alarm system, and more particularly to certain improvements in the equipment therein, and also relates to window switches which may be used in circuits and with a burglar alarm control box of the type as disclosed and claimed in my U.S. Patent 2,353,452, granted July 11, 1944, for Burglar Alarm Control Box.

A principal object of the invention is to provide a window switch construction for burglar alarms for use with tiltable or pivoted windows wherein the switch may be operated on windows which tilt either in or out, and for use also in conjunction with the foil circuit of an alarm circuit wherein the breakage of the window causes the foil to break and an alarm to be sounded.

Another object of the invention is to provide a burglar alarm switch which may be used in conjunction with tilting stairways, such as fire escapes and the like, wherein movement beyond a predetermined angle will sound an alarm.

Another object of the invention is to provide a burglar alarm switch construction wherein the adjustment for the amount of tilt may be made externally of the switch without necessitating disassembly of the burglar alarm switch.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a burglar alarm switch construction incorporating a mercury switch construction wherein the movement of the mercury within the switch in a predetermined tilted position of the switch upon tilting of the window or stair to which the switch is attached either opens or closes a circuit to sound an alarm.

Another object of the invention is to provide a burglar alarm switch construction in which the angular position of a mercury switch incorporated therein is adjusted exteriorly of the housing for the switch.

Another object of the invention is to provide a burglar alarm switch in which the contact may be set for overhead doors or windows opening or tilting in and also for windows and doors opening out.

A further object of the invention is to provide a mercury window contact switch for use with local alarm circuits which may include a positive battery return, a negative ground feed, a positive battery feed, or a negative ground return, and also for use with a central station connection circuit having either a negative battery feed, a ground feed, negative battery return, or ground return.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fire escape switch which is on the on position when the fire escape is raised, and upon lowering of the fire escape the fire escape switch opens the circuit sounding the alarm.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a mercury fire escape switch with a tamper switch so that when the cover is removed from the housing of the switch an alarm will be sounded upon opening of the circuits.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a window switch construction for burglar alarm circuits which may be used solely with tiltable or pivoted windows or with a foil circuit for the window, or in conjunction with both, and also which may be used in circuits in which more than one window is operatively connected to the alarm system.

Another feature of the invention is to provide adjustable mercury contact switches for alarm systems which permit the switches to be installed on modern store fronts, and which may be readily adjusted through the angle of Patented Apr. 23, 1963 operation whether used on doors or windows which tilt in or out, and the switch circuits are available for use with either two or four wire circuits.

In order to accomplish the various objects of my invention, the window switch for burglar alarms preferably comprises a simple housing for mounting the mercury switch construction of this invention in which the housing is adapted to be readily mounted upon a tiltable window, and in which the mercury switch is adjustably mounted upon the cover plate of the housing. There is provided an adjustable pivot construction for the switch so that the mercury switch may be adjusted to break at 5 or when the window is opened substantially two inches. The adjustment of the switch is such that the mercury tube may be adjusted for windows which tilt either in or out. A simple acorn nut is provided for shielding the end of the adjusting screw to which the mercury tube is mounted to prevent unauthorized tampering with the adjustment once it has been set. In the fire alarm switch construction, the angular adjustment of the mercury tube is made within the housing and there is also included in the circuit a tamper switch which causes an alarm to sound upon unauthorized opening of the cover. In conjunction with the various alarm switches illustrated, there is also provided a pigtail construction including the wires leading from the connections within the housing to a terminal box which is connected to the alarm system. In the case of the window switch constructions, connections are provided for directly connecting the window foils to the window switch.

Many other objects and advantages of the construction herein shown and described will be obvious to those skilled in the art from the disclosure herein given.

To this end, my invention consists in the novel construction, arrangement, and combination of parts herein shown and described and more particularly pointed out in the claims.

In the drawings, wherein like reference characters indicate like or corresponding parts:

FIG. 1 is a view in elevation of a tiltable or pivoted wndow having applied thereto for each half of the window a window switch of this invention adapted upon the tilting of the window to operate an alarm, and also upon breaking of a pane of glass to actuate an alarm circuit;

FIG. 2 is a view in perspective similar to FIG. 1, illustrating the window in open position with the upper and lower panes connected to their respective alarm switches;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of the alarm switch of FIGS. 1 and 2 with the cover removed, illustrating the adjustable mercury switch and the pigtail connections thereto and the box for connecting the wiring to an alarm circuit;

FIG. 4 is a view in elevation of the cover plate for the alarm switch of FIG. 3 illustrating the mercury tube mounted on the inside of the switch cover plate;

FIG. 5 is a view in elevation of the cover plate of FIGS. 3 and 4, illustrating the exterior thereof, showing the means for adjusting the mercury tube and the connections for the window foil;

FIG. 6 is an exploded perspective view, illustrating the adjustable mounting for the mercury tube of the alarm switch of FIGS. 3 and 4 for adjusting the degree or angle of tilt;

FIG. 7 illustrates an alarm circuit for a local alarm using the alarm switch of FIG. 3 and operatively connected to a circuit including the foil circuit of FIG. 1, and particularly adapted for a local alarm circuit;

FIG. 8 is a view in elevation of the back face of the cover plate of another embodiment of a local alarm mercury window contact;

FIG. 9 is an alarm circuit for the local alarm mercury window contact of FIG. 8;

FIG. illustrates the cover plate of an alarm switch for a four post mercury window contact;

FIG. 11 illustrates a schematic wiring diagram for a local alarm circuit for use with the mercury window contact of FIG. 3, four post mercury window contact of FIG. 10, or a mercury window contact or fire escape switch;

FIG. 12 is a view in elevation with the cover removed, illustrating a fire escape switch, tamper switch, and contacts therefor;

FIG. 13 is a view in elevation, partly in section, taken along the line 1313 looking in the direction of the arrows of FIG. 12 of the fire escape switch;

FIG. 14 is a schematic wiring diagram for a central station circuit with a supervised ground and incorporating the fire escape switch of FIGS. 12 and 13.

Referring to the drawings, particularly FiGS. 1 through 7, there will be described one embodiment of my improved switch for alarm systems utilizing a mercury switch in which the switch is for use on hinged or pivoted steel sash windows, either opening in or out, coal holes, steel sidewalk trap doors, large overhead doors, transoms, roof scuttle holes or any closure that tilts. Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, there is illustrated a hinged or pivoted steel sash window construction 15 in its closed position as shown in FIG. 1, and opening inwardly at its upper end as shown in FIG. 2, and outwardly at the bottom thereof, the tiltable or pivoted closure 15 being pivotally mounted on trunnions 16 mounted on the window frame 17. The steel sash window 15 preferably comprises an upper glazed sash 18 and a lower glazed sash 19, being separated by the divider 20, and to which is assembled the small compact mercury contact assembly or switch 21 to the upper left-hand corner of the window sash 15, and a similar switch 21 is mounted and secured on the window sash 15 below the trunnion 16 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. A pigtail 23 connects each switch 21 and 21 to its respective junction box 24 mounted on the frame 17 by securing means 24 extending through holes 24 of the junction box. A foil circuit 25 and 25' is operatively atfixed to each of the respective glazed sashes 18 and 19, and is shaped as shown so that any unauthorized entrance brought about by breaking the window will also break the foil circuit whether the break occurs in the upper sash or the lower sash. Each foil circuit 25 and 25 has terminal end connections 26 and 27 operatively connected to the terminals 28 and 29 of the respective switches 21 and 21'. The flexible pigtails 23 for each of the switches 21 and 21 permit the opening of the window a predetermined distance for ventilation within the range of opening of substantially 5 or two inches beyond which range the mercury switch will actuate the alarm system. Suit able stops (not shown) may be used to limit the normal opening of the window, and any opening greater than that normally preset will cause the alarm system to operate and would therefore be considered an unauthorized opening.

Referring to FIGS. 3 through 6, the particular mercury contact assembly or switch construction 21 and 21 as illustrated for use with a pivoted or tiltable closure or window construction 15 will be described along with the junction box 24- connected to the pigtail 23. The switch or mercury contact assembly 21 comprises a dustproof aluminum housing 30 substantially two and one-fourth by two and one-fourth by one inch in depth and a mounting flange 31 approximately one by three and three-fourth inches providing a recessed opening 32 over which an insulated cover 33 is affixed by securing means such as machine screws 34 having countersunk heads for mounting through the countersunk openings 35 in the cover 33, the machine screws 34 being affixed in complementally threaded openings 36 in the bosses 37 integrally cast with the housing 39. Each of the switches 21 and 21 are affixed to the sash 15 by securing means 31 extending through the openings 31" in the fiange 31.

The foil terminals 2? and 29, FIGS. 3 and 5, preferably comprise a brass washer 38, a terminal screw 39, a brass nut 40, and a lock washer 41. Each brass washer 38 may be formed with a burred opening 38 to penetrate the foil to improve the contact therebetween. Between the brass washers 38 and panel 33, the foil terminals 26 and 27 are respectively connected to the terminal contacts 28 and 29 and secured by the nuts 40, FIGS. 1, 2, and 5. The inner terminal contacts 23' and 29' are formed on the back or inner face of the insulated housing cover 33 as shown in FIG. 3, and provide connections for the wiring of the foil circuit 25 operatively mounted within the housing and operatively connected to the circuit of a mercury contact tube 42, and the wiring operatively connected by the pigtail 23 to the junction box 24.

For angularly adjusting the mercury contact tube 42 to provide for the angle at which the mercury contact switch breaks contact to actuate the alarm circuit, an adjustable mounting 43, FIGS. 3 and 6, is provided. This adjustable mounting 43 comprises a U-shaped member 44 for detachably mounting the mercury contact tube 42. The U-shaped member 44 comprises similarly arranged resilient leg portions 45 and 45, each provided with an elongated slot 46 and a substantially circular opening 47. The opening 4-7 receives the vacuum pump connection 48 of the mercury tube 42. The oppositely arranged openings 47 permit the mercury tube to be turned end for end, if desired, in adjusting the mercury switch for use with windows which tilt either in or out. The resilient legs 45 and 45 permit ease in detaching and attaching of the mercury tube contact in the assembly thereof to the adjustable mounting 43. The U-shaped member 44 has an elongated base 49 which is soldered to an adjusting screw 50 by solder 51. The adjusting screw 50 passes through an opening in the insulated cover 33 and a washer 51' which abuts the outer face of the cover 33. A locking nut 52, FIGS. 5 and 6, affixes the adjusting screw 50 in its final adjusted position, the adjustment being made by a suitable tool or wrench applied to the flattened end 53 of the adjusting screw 50. To prevent tampering with the final adjustment of the mercury tube, an acorn nut 54 is afiixed to the threaded portion 53 of the flattened end 53 of the adjusting screw 50.

As illustrated in FIG. 3, the mercury window contact switch 21 is now set for overhead doors or windows opening or tilting in, shown as mounted on the upper end of the window construction 15 in the closed position of FIG. 1 and in the open in position of FIG. 2. The switch 21 is set for windows which open out as shown in FIG. 2. To set for Windows or doors opening out from the assembled position as shown in FIG. 1, the panel mounting screws 34 are removed and the switch assembly opened to the position as shown in FIG. 3. The mercury tube 42 is then reversed in the U-shaped member or clip 44. The panel or cover 33 is replaced and secured in position by the screws 34. To adjust in either position of the mercury tube 42, the acorn cap nut 54 is removed and the lock nut 40 is loosened. The adjusting screw 50 is turned sufiiciently to break the contact of the mercury upon tilting not to exceed 5 horizontal, or when the window or door to which the switch '21 is attached is opened two inches.

Referring to FIG. 3, the mercury switch 42 comprises spaced contacts 55 and 55' at the right end and spaced contacts 56 and 56 at the left end which extend through the glass tube forming the mercury switch, the contacts on the inside of the tube being contacted by a globule of mercury 57, in the position of the switch, as shown, completing the circuit Within the tube between the respective prongs 55, 55' and 56, 56' as the switch is tilted in one direction or the other as the window is closed or opened.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, the connections to the mercury tube of the switch 21 and the connections to the junction box 24 will be described with reference to the alarm circuit to which it is comiected. A lead 58 connects a terminal 55, FIG. 3, to a green wire 59 and a white wire 60 of the pigtail which are respectively connected to the terminals 61 and 62 of the junction box 24. Terminal 56 of the mercury tube 42 is connected by a red wire 63 to terminal 64 of the junction box 24. A black wire 65 connects the lower terminal A to the terminal 66 on the junction box. The upper terminal B is connected to the terminal 56 by a lead wire 67. Terminals 56 and 55' are connected by the connection 68.

FIG. 4 is a view similar to the insulated cover 33 of FIG. 3 but with certain of the wires removed to illustrate the angle of substantially 5 as indicated at 69 showing the mercury 76 in the closed position of the window to which the switch is mounted. By moving the window beyond 5 in an unauthorized entrance, FIG. 2, the mercury of the switch 21 will then flow to the other side to the dotted position 78.

Referring to FIG. 8, there is illustrated another embodiment of my invention wherein a similar housing is used as that described with reference to FIG. 3 but showing a two post local alarm mercury window contact or switch 71 in contrast to the mercury switch construction of FIGS. 3, 4, and 5. The contact as shown is set for overhead doors or windows opening or tilting in, and the mercury tube 72 is shown in the closed position of the window. The mercury switch 72 has a simple U-shaped adjustable mounting 73 with spring-biased legs 74 and 75 similarly formed with a slot 76. An adjusting screw 77 extends through a hole in the insulated cover 33 and this hole for the adjusting screw 77 is centrally located with respect to the cover 33 as compared to the adjusting screw 5% for the embodiment of FIGS. 3 and 4. The holes 35 for mounting the switch on the housing 36 are identically placed in each embodiment of FIGS. 3, 4, and 8. The adjusting screw 77 is similarly formed as the adjusting screw 5% with the flattened end 53 to receive the lock nut 52 and acorn cap nut 54 as described with reference to FIG. 6. The foil connections A and B are identical to the foil connections of FIGS. 3, 4, and 5. The rear prong 73 (not shown in FIG. 8) is connected to the contact B by a lead wire 79. The front prong 78' is connected to a white wire 88 of a pigtail (not shown), which in turn is connected to a two terminal junction box, the terminal thereof corresponding to the terminal 62 of FIG. 3. A black wire 81 is connected to the other terminal of the two terminal junction box and would correspond to the terminal 66 of the junction box 24. However, in this modified form of junction box (not shown), the junction box is identical to that of FIG. 3 with the exception that terminals 64 and 66 are omitted. Actually, as used the white wire 80 is connected to a terminal corresponding to terminal 61, and the black wire 81 is connected to a terminal corresponding to terminal 61.

T set for windows or doors opening out which would compare to the switch 21 of FIGS. 1 and 2, the adjustment is the same as that described with reference to the switch of FIGS. 3 and 4 in that the screws .34 are removed to detach the insulated cover 33', FIG. 8. The acorn cap nut 54 is removed and the lock nut 52 is loosened and the adjusting screw 7'7 is turned counterclockwise one-half turn or 180. The cover or panel 33' is replaced and the mounting screws 34 are assembled to the housing. The mercury tube 72 is adjusted to break at tilt or when the window is opened two inches, and the lock nut 52 is then tightened and the acorn nut 54 replaced. The local or central station alarm contact or switch 21 of FIG. 3, 4, and 5 is made for break and ground and is particularly adapted for use Where contact and foil with ground is desired. The two terminals A and B for connecting to a foil are provided. The window switch of FIG. 8 is primarily used for local alarms only, and where contact only or contact and foil is desired. This switch 71 has the two terminals A and B for connecting the foil. In either switch construction of FIGS. 3 and 8, if no foil circuit 23 is used to have an alarm sound if the window is broken, the terminals A and B may be connected by a wire 82 as shown in dotted lines of FIG. 5.

The pigtail connections for the pigtail 23 of FIG. 3 and that of the switch 71 (not shown) are connected by a strain reliever 83 so that any pull on the pigtail will not disturb the connections to the terminals or to the mercury tube of the switches. This is likewise the same with regard to the mercury switch of FIG. 10 in which the pigtail connections are shown.

Referring to FIG. 10, there is illustrated another embodiment of the invention which is for use with local or central station alarms, and the embodiment of FIG. 10 is identical to that of the switch of FIGS. 3, 4, and 5 except that it has four terminals and is known as a four post mercury window contact. This switch 85, in addition to the terminais A and B as described with reference to the construction of FIGS. 3 and 8, includes two additional treminals C and D. The four terminals A, B, C, and D are used for bringing both circuits over the opening to be protected according to Underwriters Laboratories Standard Practice. The construction of FIG. 10 will give both break and ground and the switch may be used for both cenrtal station or local alarms.

Since the construction of the switch of FIG. 10 is identical with that of FIG. 3 with the exception of the additional contacts C and D, like reference characters will indicate the same or similar parts as described with refer ence to FIGS. 3, 4, and 5. Referring to FIGS. 3, 4, and 5 as the embodiment of FIG. 10 is described, the wiring and mercury contact tube of the embodiment of FIG. '10 is substantially identical. The additional contacts C and D are similarly formed as the contacts A and B using terminal screws 39, lock washers 41 as identified in the construction of the terminals A and B, along with the brass washer 38 and brass nut 40 forming the foil terminals as particularly illustrated in FIG. 5. Instead of the green wire 59 being connected to the lead 58 of the mercury tube 42 as in the embodiment of FIG. 3, in the embodiment of FIG. 10 the green wire 59 is connected driectly to the terminal C. Instead of the white wire 60 of the embodiment of FIG. 3 being connected to the lead connection 58, the white wire 60 is directly connected to the terminal D; and instead of the lead wire 58 of the embodiment of FIG. 3 which was directly connected to the green wire 59 and white wire 60 of the embodiment of FIG. 3, the lead 58' of the embodiment of FIG. 10 directly connects the contact 55 of the mercury tube to the terminal D.

The embodiment of FIG. 10 similarly as the embodiment of FIG. 3 employs the same junction box 24, and the red, white, black, and green wires are similarly connested to their respective terminals as illustrated in FIG. 3.

The 4-post mercury window contact 85 of the embodiment of FIG. 10 is shown with the window in the closed position. The contact is now set for overhead doors or windows opening or tilting in. To set for windows or doors opening out, the panel 33a is removed by removing the mounting screws 34. The mercury tube 42 is reversed in the clip 43. The panel 33a is then replaced and the screws 34 afiixed. To adjust, the acorn cap nut 54 (FIG. 6) is removed and the lock nut 52 is loosened. The adjusting screw 50 is turned to set the mercury tube to break contact upon tilting not to exceed 5 horizontal or when the window or door is opened two inches. The contacts A and B are used for a positive circuit and the contacts C and D are used for a negative circuit. If no foil circuit 25 is used as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, the terminal posts A and B may be connected by a wire 82 as illustrated in FIG. 5.

Referring to FIGS. 7, 9, and 11, there will be described simple circuits for use with the burglar alarm switches of FIG. 3, FIG. 8, and FIG. 10. FIG. 7 illustrates a circuit for a local alarm and may utilize the switch of FIG. 3, FIG. 10, or FIG. 12. The structure of the switch of FIGS. 12 and 13 has not been described as yet but will be more particularly described later. schematically, however, the same circuit may be used. The circuit of FIG. 9 is also used for local alarm and is adapted solely for use of the switch described with reference to FIG. 8. The wiring diagram of FIG. 11 is for a local alarm circuit and is similarly adapted for use with the switch of FIG. 3, FIG. 10, or FIG. 12.

Referring to FIG. 7, the alarm circuit comprises the foil circuit 25 which is illustrative of the foil and its connections to a local or central station alarm contact switch 21 including the mercury tube 42. In the description of the alarm circuit of FIG. 7, the like or similar reference characters used to describe the construction of the switch 21 of FIG. 3 will be used. The alarm circuit for the foil is illustrated at the left-hand side of FIG. 7, whereas the alarm circuit used with the switch 21 upon the unauthorized opening of the window is illustrated on the righthand side of FIG. 7. The alarm circuit 86 for the foil 25, which is used when the window is broken in an unauthorized entry, comprises a signal device or bell 07 which is connected in series with a signal battery 88. The battery lead wire 89' is in series with the closed contacts 90 and 91 of a master switch 92. The master switch may be any conventional switch, for example, a master switch as disclosed and claimed in my U.S. Patent No. 2,353,452, for Burglar Alarm Control Box, granted July 11, 1944, or a master switch of the type which may be closed as one leaves the building and being time operated to open after a sufficient period of time to permit the guard or other authorized person to lock the building.

The alarm circuit of FIG. 7 is shown in the energized position of the various contacts so that the breaking of the foil 25 or the unauthorized tilting of the switch 21 in the opening of a window beyond its predetermined range will actuate the alarm for the foil or the alarm for the opened window, or simultaneously actuate both signals if both the foil is broken and the window is tilted beyond its unauthorized open position. The terminal A, a wire 93 is connected to the black wire 65 of the junction box at the terminal 66. The wire 93 is connected through a coil 94 of a relay 95 including the contacts 96, 97, 98, and 99. The relay 95 is similar to that disclosed and claimed in the above-mentioned patent. In the energized position of the relay 95, contacts 96 and 97 are biased to their closed position and contacts 98 and 99 are biased to their open position. The contact 96 is connected to the contact 92 of the master switch 92 through a lead 100. The contacts 97 and 98 are connected to the contact 91 of the master switch 92 through a lead 101. The contact 99 is connected to the signal device 87 through a lead 102. The signal battery 88 is connected to the signal device through a lead 103.

The alarm circuit 106 for indicating the unauthorized tilting of a window by the actuation of the switch 21 includes a light, siren, or horn 107 directly connected to the terminals of a commercial power line 108 by a lead 109 connected to one side of the line 108, and a lead 110 connected to the other side through the terminals 111 and 112 of a relay 113. The terminals 111 and 112 are held in their open position by a deenergized relay coil 114 of the relay 113. The relay coil 114 is operatively connected in a circuit 115 including a protection battery 116, shut-oiT switch 122, and the window switch 21.

As shown in FIG. 7 with the window switch 21 in the position shown, the mercury 57 completes the circuit through the prongs 56 and 56' upon the window being closed, through the battery 116 which is connected to the lead 56 through the red wire 63. The negative side of the battery is connected to a lead 117 by a lead 118. The lead 117 is connected to the terminal 90 of the master switch 92. The foil circuit continues from the protection battery 116 through the leads 118 and 117 which, in turn, is connected to a lead 101 through the closed contacts 90 and 91 in series with the contacts 97 and 96, a lead 119, a lead 120, the relay coil 94, the lead 93, the lead wire 65 through the foil 25, and the lead 67 to the other terminal 56'. With the foil circuit completed in this manner, the relay coil 94 is energized to open the contacts 98 and 99 as shown with the contacts 96 and 97 being closed. Upon an unauthorized breakage of the window which will break the foil circuit 25, the relay coil 94 is deenergized, closing the contacts 98 and 99 and opening the contacts 96 and 97. The signal device 37 will then sound since the contacts 98 and 99 connect the signal device to the signal battery 88. The circuit 86 including the lead wire 102 in series with the bell or signal 87 is completed through the lead 103, the signal battery 88, the lead 89, the contacts and 91, and the lead 101.

The tilting of the switch 21 to move the mercury globule 57 connects the terminals 55 and 55'. Because of an unauthorized opening, the relay coil 114 is energized through the circuit including the lead 58, the lead 121, the closed switch 122, the relay coil 114, lead 123*, battery lead 118, protection battery 11o, lead 63, and lead 6?; connecting the terminal 55 with the terminal 56. This energization of the relay coil 114 closes the contacts 111 and 112 of the circuit 106 which were previously held open with the mercury connecting the contacts 56 and 56, as shown. Since the siren 107 is in the line circuit 108, the siren will sound because of the unauthorized opening of the window. It is thus evident that by an unauthorized breaking of the Window which has a foil circuit 25 attached, the alarm 87 will sound, and likewise, upon the unauthorized opening of the window beyond a predetermined amount actuating the switch 21, the siren 107 will also sound. The shut-off switch 122 can be opened to silence the signal 107 when the unauthorized opening has been detected and located. The above operation of the circuit of FIG. 7 has been described with the master switch 92 in the position shown, so that the relay coil 94 is energized and the relay coil 114 is in its deenergized position since there is no flow of current through the relay coil 114 with the window switch 21 in the closed position of the window. The switch 21 only operates upon the unauthorized opening of the window. The master switch 92, actuated to open the contacts 90 and 91 during the day or when the alarm circuit is 011, prevents the energization of the relay coil 94, and as the window switch in the closed position prevents the energization of the relay 114, the signal 107 is also prevented from actuation. The shut-off switch 122 also permits the opening of the windows beyond their unauthorized position during the working period.

Referring to FIG. 9, the circuit includes the modified local alarm mercury window contact or switch 71 including the mercury tube 72 as described with reference to FIG. 8. The circuit for the foil including that of the master switch, the relay coil 94, signal battery 88, and signal device 87 is identical to that described with the circuit of FIG. 7, and therefore like reference characters will indicate the same or similar parts. The circuit of the window switch 71 is shown with the window closed and the mercury globule 72' connecting the contacts 78 and 78'. The rear prong 78 of the mercury tube 72 is connected to the terminal B by the lead Wire 79. The terminal 73' is connected to the battery 116 through the pigtail connection 80. The terminal A is connected to the lead 93 through the black wire 81 of the pigtail connection. With the contacts in the operative position for a local alarm system with the window closed, the relay coil 94 is energized from the protective battery 116 through the lead 80, the terminal 73, the globule 72, the terminal 78, the lead 79, the foil circuit 25, the leads 81 and 93, the relay coil 94, the lead 120, the lead 119, the contacts 96 and 97, the lead 101, the contacts 91 and 90, the lead 117, and back to the battery 116. Upon unauthorized breaking of the window which causes the foil 25 to break, the relay coil is decnergized which opens the contacts 96 and 97 in the protective battery circuit and closes the contacts 98 and 99 of the alarm circuit 86, so that the circuit for the alarm is through the contact 99, the lead 162, the bell 87, the lead 103, the signal battery 88, the contacts 91 and 91, the lead 101, and the contact 98 which causes the signal device to ring, denoting an unauthorized entry or a broken window. The tilting of the window, causing the mercury globule to move to the left, disconnecting the terminals 73 and 78 of the mercury tube 72 also causes the deenergization of the relay coil 94, and the signal 8'7 is caused to ring in the same manner as described above. The circuit of FIG. 9 is simpler than that of FIG. 7 and only one signal device is used, but when this signal device rings one does not know whether it is caused by a breaking of the foil or the opening of the window beyond its unauthorized range. With the circuit of FIG. 7, the signal $7 denotes a breakage of the foil circuit 25 and the sounding of the signal 107 denotes the unauthorized opening of the window. With the master switch 92 in position to open the contacts t} and 91, the signal 87 cannot be actuated and also the protective battery is not in circuit so that the batteries are not run down when the alarm system is not set for actuation. This is also true of the circuit of FIG. 7.

Referring to the circuit of FIG. 11, this circuit is used in connection with the 4-post mercury window contact or switch 85 of FIG. 10. Since the signal circuit 86 for the foil circuit 25 is identical to that of FIGS. 7 and 9, like reference characters will indicate the same or similar elements. The circuit of FIG. 11 is illustrated in which the terminals A and B are connected to the foil circuit. Since the foil circuit 25 is identical with that described in FIG. 7 and FIG. 9, like reference characters will indicate the same or similar elements. When used in this manner, the foil circuit is connected to the terminals A and B for a local alarm circuit with the switch of FIG. 3, 10, or 12. In a negative circuit, the terminals of the foil circuit are connected to terminals C and D, FIG. 10. As the signal device circuit 86 has been previously described, further description is unnecessary. The foil circuit with the switch 85 in the position shown, FIG. 11, is energized through the protective battery 116, through the lead 124 and red wire 63, prong 56, mercury globule 42, and prong 56', lead wire 67 to the terminal B of the switch, through the foil circuit 25 to the terminal A, and through the lead wire 65, then through the lead 93 to the relay coil 94 which is shown energized open, through the lead 129 to the lead 119, through the closed contacts 96 and S 7, through the lead wire 1111, the lead 117, and connection 113 to the battery. Upon the breaking of the foil, the relay coil 94 is deenergized, opening the contacts 96 and 97, and closing the contacts 93 and 99 of the relay, placing the signal battery 88 in the circuit, sounding the alarm. The circuit of the signal device is through the closed contact 98, through the lead 1111, the contacts 91 and 9t) of the master switch 92, through the connection 89 to the signal battery 88, through the lead 103 to the signal device 87, returning through the connection 1112 and completing the circuit through the closed contacts 93 and 99. The signal circuit for the tilted window actuated by the switch 85 is also similar to the circuit 1% of FIG. 7, and therefore like or similar reference characters will be used in describing the operation of the signal circuit upon the tilting of the window. Since the switch 85 is shown in the closed position of the window, the relay 114 is deenergized, leaving the contacts 112 and 111 open. Upon the window being tilted past the unauthorized position so that the mercury globule 42' contacts the terminals 55' and 55 of the switch 85, the coil 114 is energized through the closed circuit from the protection battery 116 through the lead 124, the red wire 63, through the lead 68 to the terminal 55' of the switch, through the mercury globule 42 which is in contact with the terminals 55' and 55, to

terminal D, white wire 60, through the lead 121', through the relay 114, through the connection 123, returning through the connection 118 to the protection battery 116. Since the contacts 111 and 112 are closed on the energization of the relay 114, the signal 107 sounds the alarm upon the unauthorized opening of the window, the circuit being connected to commercial power or like line 108. The circuit is completed through the closed contacts 111 and 112 of the relay 113, the circuit going through the lead wire to the siren 107, and returning to the other side of the line 108 through the lead wire 10?. If no foil is used, the terminals A and B are connected by a wire 82 as shown by the dotted lines of FIG. 5. However, if the foil is connected to the terminals C and D as described with references to FIGS. 10 and 11 for a negative circuit, the terminals A and B of the switch of FIG. 10 may be connected by a wire.

Referring to FIGS. 12, 13, and 14, there will be described the mercury fire escape contact switch for local and central station alarms. This switch is primarily for outdoor or indoor use on fire escapes, overhead doors, or any tilted or pivoted opening or device where break, or break and ground is desired. The switch construction 131 comprises a cast iron housing 131 substantially three by four and oner"ourtl1 inches by two and three-eighth inches fabricated from cast iron and which is weatherproof and sealed against moisture and dust. The switch comes furnished with a ten foot, four wire cord 132 corresponding to the pigtail construction 23 of the switch of FIG. 3, and, in turn, is connected to a junction box similar to the junction box 24 of FIG. 3, and therefore this construction has not been illustrated. The length of the cord 132 is suificient to run from a fire escape into a building in most installations. Wherever a longer cord is desired, additional length may be used.

Referring to FIGS. 12 and 13, the particular switch construction will be described. An insulated terminal block 133 is mounted on spaced insulating posts 134 positioned between the base 135 and the bottom of the terminal block 133, FIG. 13, and secured in place by securing means or machine screws 136 and washers 137. The terminal block 133 is divided into four similar sections for receiving respectively terminal contacts 138, 139, 141 and 141 together with the respective terminal screw 138' to which is attached the red wire 142 of the cable. The terminal screw 139' attaches the white wire 1 13, the terminal screw 14G attaches the black wire 14 and the terminal screw 141' attaches the green wire 145. The red, white, black, and green wires of this embodiment are comparable to the red, white, black, and green wires of the switch of FIG. 3 and may be considered as suitably connected to the junction box described with reference to FIG. 3 to which the remainder of the alarm circuit is attached as will be described with regard to the schematic wiring diagram of FIG. 14.

The mercury tube 146 is similar to the mercury tube 42 of the switch of FIG. 3 and the mercury tube of the embodiment of FIG. 10, and is detachably mounted in a U-shaped bracket 147 similar to the bracket 43 described with reference to FIG. 6. This bracket 147 has similarly arranged legs 45 which are formed with slots 46 and circular openings 47 for reversibly mounting the mercury tube 146 by detachably mounting the vacuum pump connection 48 thereof in one of the openings 47. The U-shaped bracket 147 is spot-welded to a pivotal supporting member or tube assembly bracket 148 for adjusting the tube at a maximum of 5 from the horizontal or other predetermined range. The pivotal support member 1 18 is held in its adjusted position by a machine screw 14? and a lock washer 150 with the machine screw threadably mounted in the base 135. In the position as shown, the mercury tube is set for the tire escape in its raised position whereas unauthorized lowering causes an alarm to be sounded.

A tamper switch 151, similar to that disclosed and claimed in my aforementioned US. Patent No. 2,353,452,

with its push button connection 152 is supported on a bracket member 153 affixed to an end wall 154 by securing means 155 comprising countersunk machine screws and nuts as illustrated in FIGS. 1 2 and 13. The tamper switch is a single pole switch and is provided to deener gize the circuit upon unauthorized opening of the switch box cover plate 156, FIG. 13. In the secured position of the cover, a depending lug 157 in the form of a machine screw is secured to the cover 156 by a lock nut 15%. With the cover in place, as shown in FIG. 13, the tamper switch 151 is held in its closed position completing the circuit. Unauthorized or authorized opening of the cover will open the tamper switch, causing deenergization of the circuit in which it is attached; and if the removal of the cover plate is unauthorized, the alarm will sound. The cover plate 156 is secured in place by round head machine screws 159 which extend through the cover and clamp the cover plate together with its rubber gasket 160 detachably mounted on the .cover to the corresponding peripheral flange 161 of the housing providing a watertight seal, the screws being afiixed at the upper end in threaded holes 159' complementally formed to the screws and positioned in an upper flange 162 and a lower flange 163, FIG. 12 and FIG. 13. This seal between the cover and the housing provides a housing receptacle for the switch contsruction which is weatherproof and sealed against moisture and dust.

Referring to FIGS. 12, 13 and 14, the circuit for the tamper switch 151 and mercury tube 146 will be particularly described. A lower terminal 164 of the tamper switch is connected to the red wire 142 by a lead 165 connected to the terminal screw 138". The upper terminal 166 of the tamper switch 151 is connected to the left-hand back terminal 167 of the mercury tube 146 at one end and, in turn, a lead 163 connects the terminal 167 to the right-hand back terminal 169. The left-hand front terminal 167 is connected to the black wire 144 by a lead 171 connected to the terminal screw 1411". A lead 171 connects the right-hand front terminal 169' with the green Wire 1 15 through the terminal screw 141. A shunt connection 172, FIG. 12, connects the white wire 143 and the green wire 145 together. The wiring of this switch is somewhat similar to that described with regard to the embodiment of FIG. 3.

The switch 130 is suitably mounted on the fire escape stairway (not shown) which is lowered during a fire or for inspection, by securing means 173 to its proper ad justed position, and the lead 132 is then brought into the building and the lead opening is made watertight by a connection 174 which also provides a strain relief for the cable or cord 132.

After the switch has been suitably assembled on the movable portion or stair of the fire escape, the tube 146 may be adjusted by loosening the set screw 149 and the tube assembly 1-47 may be turned to the desired position, after which the set screw 149 is locked in its adjusted position by the lock nut 15%. The mercury tube 146 is adjusted or set at a maximum of 5 from the horizontal so that an unauthorized lowering of the fire escape to which the switch is mounted will break the alarm circuit, sounding an alarm.

Referring to FIGS. 12, 13, and 14, the circuit which incorporates the mercury fire escape contact or switch of this invention will be particularly described for use in which the circuit is connected to a central station with a supervised ground. As the circuit of FIG. 4 includes an alarm circuit 86 similar to that described with the circuits of FIGS. 7, 9, and 11, like reference characters will indicate the same or similar parts. The circuit of FIG. 14 is shown in the energized position of the fire escape switch, whereupon a lowering of the fire escape will sound an alarm. With the tamper switch 151 in its closed position, that is, with the cover on the box, the relay coil 94 is energized by the protection battery 116 which is connected to the terminal 169 of the mercury switch 146 by a lead 176, then through the mercury globule 146', the terminal 169, a lead wire 14S, and a connection 177 to one terminal 166 of the tamper switch 151, through the connection of the closed switch to the other terminal 164, and through a lead 178 to the relay coil 94, and then through a connection 121? to a lead wire 119 to the closed contacts 96 and 97 of the relay switch 94, through the connection 161 to the closed contacts 91 and 90 of the master switch 92, through the connection 117, through the connection 118 to the protection battery 116, thus completing the closed circuit. Deenergization of the relay coil 94 either by the opening of the tamper switch 151 or by the tilting of the fire escape switch 130 to break the circuit between the terminals 169 and 169 causes the closed contacts 96 and 97 of the protective battery circuit to open and close the contacts 98 and 99 of the signal circuit 86, causing the signal device 87 to sound an alarm. The signal circuit 86 is completed from the closed contacts 98 and 99 through the connection 102, through the signal device $7 and the lead 103 to the signal battery 88, and then through the connection 89 to the closed contacts 91] and 91 of the master switch 92 and being completed through the closed contacts 98 and 99 of the relay switch 95. The deenergization of the protective battery circuit by the movement to an unauthorized position of the fire escape causes the signal device 87 to sound. Also, as the mercury 146 moves to the left in the unauthorized position of the switch 1130, connecting the terminals 167 and 167, the central station circuit 186 is closed and this circuit has a supervised ground connection as is common with central station circuits of this type, and an alarm will then be sounded at a central station, indicating the unauthorized opening, whereupon personnel may be dispatched to the building at which the unauthorized entrance is being made.

In each of the circuits of FIGS. 7, 9, 11 and 14, there has been described a master switch 92 illustrated schematically. This master switch is the same as is disclosed and claimed in my previously mentioned Patent No. 2,353,452. With this type of master switch it is possible to test the alarm circuit 86 and the signal device 557 as the key is rotated, and in this testing position the relay coil 94 is energized and then the contacts of the signal circuit are operatively positioned to sound the signal device to test the circuit. This testing position may be maintained for a few seconds and then the switch may be rotated further, whereupon the wiping contacts 181 and 182 are momentarily engaged. These contacts are connected with the spring contacts 91 and 92' of FIGS. 7, 9, and 11 and act to momentarily complete the circuit from the protective system to energize the relay coil 94 of the relay for drawing up the armature therefor, which places the relay switch in the position illustrated in FIGS. 7, 9, 11 and 14, whereupon the system will then again be restored to its normal active position. Further description of this master switch is believed unnecessary in view of the full description in the aforementioned patent.

In addition to the particular circuits which have been described with reference to FIGS. 7, 9, 11, and 14, there are also set forth the connections which may be made either for central station connection or for local alarm as identified with the red, white, black, and green wires common to the cable connection to the switches. The following circuit connections are given for the switch of FIG. 3:

For the connections of the switch illustrated in FIG. 10

13 for central station connection or for local alarm, the following connections may be made:

For central station connection or for local alarm connections of the mercury fire escape contact switch of FIG. 12, the following connections may be made:

For Central Station Connection Note For Local Alarm Minus:

Battery Feed Red Plus Battery Return. Ground Feed White Minus Ground Feed. Minus:

Battery Return Black-. Plus Battery Feed. Ground Return Green. Mtinus Ground Reurn.

It is therefore evident that there has been disclosed an improved mercury switch construction for alarm systems which are available for 2-wire and 4-wire circuits, and which are readily adjustable exteriorly of the switch for certain of the embodiments and of FIGS. 3, 8, and 10, and are readily adapted for adjustment from within the switch housing in the fire escape contact switch of FIG. 12.

It is also evident that there have been particularly disclosed improved forms of mercury contact switches which may be used on hinged or pivoted steel shaft windows opening in or out, coal holes, steel sidewalk trap doors, large overhead doors, transoms, roof scuttle holes, or any opening that tilts.

There has also been disclosed in connection with these improved mercury contact switches the use thereof with foil circuits in combination with a circuit which operates upon the unauthorized tilting of a device to which the switch is connected.

Various embodiments of the mercury contact switches have been described with reference to local or central station alarm contact.

Having thus described my invention, it is obvious that various immaterial modifications may be made in the same without departing from the spirit of my invention; hence I do not wish to be understood as limiting myself to the exact form, construction, arrangement and combination of parts herein shown and described, or uses mentioned.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. The combination of a burglar alarm circuit including a foil circuit, an alarm circuit for the foil circuit and a window switch in the foil circuit comprising, mounting means for mounting said window switch upon a horizontally pivoted closure member; said window switch including a housing and a mercury tube switch operatively mounted therein; means for adjusting the position of the mercury tube switch comprising mounting means for detachably mounting the mercury tube switch and for reversing the position of said mercury tube switch for adjustment thereof to tilting of said closure member in either direction, whereby tilting of the closure member breaks the foil circuit and closes the alarm circuit.

2.. The combination of a burglar alarm circuit as claimed in claim 1, wherein said mercury tube switch mounted in the housing for movementtherewithcomprises at least two contacts in operative relationship to a mercury globule for opening or closing at least one circuit, said adjustable mounting means for said mercury switch including mounting means for relea-sably mounting the mercury tube and providing for reversal thereof, and said adjusting means including means for predetermined angular adjustment of the mercury contact switch relative to the housing to limit angular movement of the housing permissible without effecting movement of said mercury globule.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 849,651 Ashfor-d Apr. 9, 1907 1,614,275 Bruhn Jan. 11, 1927 1,738,508 Bonnell Dec. 3, 1929 2,070,683 Price Feb. 16, 1937 2,086,405 Darden July 6, 1937 2,353,452 Fruh July 11, 1944 2,601,142 Hubbard June 17, 1952 2,606,218 Wickman Aug. 5, 1952 2,713,624 K-agan July 19, 1955 2,724,823 Toepfer Nov. 22, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS 365,267 Great Britain Jan. 21, 1932

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3200393 *Jun 18, 1962Aug 10, 1965Worley Emmett JElectric burglar alarm system with exit and entry delay
US3569645 *Oct 29, 1968Mar 9, 1971Lea Lawrence NTamperproof switch devices for burglar alarm systems, affording cordless connections across protected station separations
US3634845 *Mar 27, 1968Jan 11, 1972Gen Alarm CorpWindow security system
US3775575 *Jun 30, 1972Nov 27, 1973Alarm Products Int IncSwitch for connecting window foil with a burglar alarm circuit
US3835461 *Jun 18, 1963Sep 10, 1974Nelson JTamperproof alarm switch
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US5712621 *Jun 6, 1996Jan 27, 1998Andersen; James D.Security system with variable inductance sensor
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EP2226777A1 *Mar 2, 2010Sep 8, 2010Siemens AktiengesellschaftIntrusion or break-in detector
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/545.5, 340/550, 340/689, 200/61.93
International ClassificationG08B13/02, G08B13/08
Cooperative ClassificationG08B13/08
European ClassificationG08B13/08