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Publication numberUS3088680 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1963
Filing dateJul 19, 1960
Priority dateJul 19, 1960
Publication numberUS 3088680 A, US 3088680A, US-A-3088680, US3088680 A, US3088680A
InventorsFulton Robert A, Yeomans Alfred H
Original AssigneeFulton Robert A, Yeomans Alfred H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispenser for pressurized products
US 3088680 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 7, 1963 R. A. FULTON ETAL DISPENSER FOR PRESSURIZED PRODUCTS Filed July 19, 1960 FIG. I 2

II J J 9, h *l j;

FIG. 3

INVENTORS ROBERT A. FULTON ALFRED H. YEOMANS ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,088,680 DISPENSER FOR PRESSURIZED PRODUCTS Robert A. Fulton, Silver Spring, Md., and Alfred H. Yeomans, Washington, D.C., assignors to the United States ofltAmerica as represented by the Secretary of Agricu nre Filed July 19, E60, Ser. No. 43,963 4 Claims. (Cl. 239-337) (Granted under Title 35, US. Code (1952), see. 266) A non-exclusive, irrevocable, royalty-free license in the invention herein described, throughout the world for all purposes of the United States Government, with the power to grant sublicenses for such purposes, is hereby granted to the Government of the United States of America.

This application is a continuation-impart of application bearing Serial No. 769,516, filed October 24, 1958, now abandoned.

This invention relates to a dispenser comprising a contamer and an internal dispensing device adapted to selectively discharge a desired phase of its contents by a propellent gas under pressure, also contained therein, regardless of the position of the container.

The invention has as among its objects the provision of such a dispenser for dispensing contents such as decontammants for clothing, plastic gear, mobile equipment, aircraft, or any type of decontaminan-t where the use of steam under pressure is impractical, insecticides to horizontal or low vertical surfaces, and other materials such as shaving creams, liquid hair nets, paints, and lubricating oils.

A further object of the invention is to provide a dis penser of the above character which will not discharge the propellent gas alone when the dispenser is improperly positioned, as for example, inverted.

A further object is the provision of a dispenser of the above character which obviates the need of a nozzle havmg expansion chambers.

Other objects will be apparent from the description of the invention.

To discharge contents of a conventional pressurized container by internal pressure, a propellent gas, such as air, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, a low-boiling hydrocarbon, a chlorofluorohydrocarbon, or CH Cl, or any mixture of these is used. The gas may be soluble or insoluble in the other contents and may be lighter or heavier than the other contents. The contents are conventionally forced through a dispensing device, such as a rigid tube, a dispensing valve, and a dispensing nozzle having expansion chambers, in that order to produce the desired type of product, such as an aerosol of fine particles, a medium or fine mist, a coarse spray, a foam type product like shaving lather, whipped cream or hand lotion, a dust, or a gas. With such ordinary dispensers, if the container is held in the wrong position, as, for example, in an inverted position, so that the dispensing nozzle points downwardly, the wrong phase of the contents will escape with resultant waste of product. In some instances, the propellent gas will escape and since the pressure is no longer present, the remaining contents will become useless since they will not be expelled. The dispenser provided by the instant invention obviates these deficiencies in that it dispenses the proper phase of the contents of the container regardless of the position of the container. The dispenser of the invention, furthermore, obviates the need of using a dispensing nozzle having expansion chambers.

According to the invention, there is provided a dispenser comprising a pressure-resistant container, having a dispensing nozzle provided with an orifice adapted to be opened to the atmosphere, for dispensing fluid contents,

3,088,680 Patented May 7, 1963 e.g., a liquid under pressure, as for example, under pressure of a propellent gas as described above. These is also provided a flexible, non-kinking capillary tube which functions as an eduction tube and has one end communicating with the nozzle orifice and its other end communicating with the fluid contents to be dispensed, preferably under the surface thereof if the contents to be dispensed is a liquid.

An essential feature of the invention relates to the eduction tube whose internal diameter and corresponding length are so selected as to be capable of producing a capillary effect in the tube whereby boiling of the contents in the tube occurs when the nozzle orifice is opened to the atmosphere. In effect, under these circumstances, the pressurized solution, as it flow-s through the tube, boils or forms a consecutive series of bubbles of gas. These bubbles are essentially a series of expansion chambers that eliminate the need for expansion chambers in the nozzle which otherwise are necessary to atomize and control the size of the particles as they emerge from the discharge outlet.

For this reason, the nozzle and valve structure can now be made exceedingly simple since all that is necessary is for the eduction tube to be connected to the nozzle orifice and the need for an expansion chamber is eliminated. Any size orifice can be used in the nozzle as long as its diameter is not smaller than the internal diameter of the eduction tube.

Means are also provided for continuously maintaining communication between the said other end of the eduction tube and the fluid contents to be dispensed regardless of the position of the container. Such means are exemplified by a weight of the proper specific gravity secured to the end of said other end of the eduction tube, and which, when the fluid contents to be dispersed is a liquid, is submerged below the surface of the liquid.

To produce an aerosol of the proper particle size with liquefied gas formulations of the type described above, a suitable boiling of the formulation must occur as it is being released. This is effected in prior art devices by orifices and expansion chambers in the nozzle.

In the present invention, there has been incorporated a capillary'tube effect in the eduction tube so that no constricting orifices or expansion chambers are needed in the nozzle to produce the proper boiling of the formulation. As explained above, the pressurized solution, as it flows through the eduction tube, boils or forms a series of bubbles of gas which are essentially a series of expansion chambers. In addition, this action in the eduction tube has been coupled with flexibility in the tube to enable the said weight at the end to seek the lowest point in the container as the position of the container changes thereby permitting the proper contents of the container to be dispensed at all times regardless of the position of the container.

The capillary eifect causes boiling of the formulation in the eduction tube and is a result of pressure drop due to friction. This effect is a function of the internal diameter size, the roughness of the inner surface, and the length of the tube, as well as the ingredients in the formulation. These factors must be balanced to obtain the desired par ticle size and output of the formulation as it is emitted. For proper operation, it is necessary that the outlet orifice of the nozzle be not smaller, that is, equal to or larger than, the internal diameter of the eduction tube. The inside diameter of the eduction tube may vary from 0.010 to 0.100 inch and the length may vary from /2 inch to several feet depending on the size of the container and other factors involved.

The following internal diameters and corresponding lengths of the eduction tube have been found to be effective in producing a particle size in the aerosol range with standard formulations of 85 percent propellant and 15 percent active ingredient:

Internal diameter of Length of eduction tube eduction tube (inches): (inches) 0.0135 0.5 to 1.0 0.017 0.75 to 2.0 0.024 1.0 to 4.0

0.029 4.0 to 6.0 0.040 4.0 to 8.0

The tube lengths listed above may be increased depending on the size can that is used.

In the accompanying drawing FIG. 1 is a view of a dispenser of the invention in a normal upright position and partly in cross-section;

FIG. 2 is a view of the dispenser of FIG. 1 in an inverted position and also partially in cross-section;

FIG. 3 is a cross section of a weight hung from the eduction tube, exemplifying a means for continuously maintaining communication between the said other end of the eduction tube and the fluid to be dispensed; and

FIG. 4 is a detail showing the bubbling efiect in the capillary tube.

Referring to the drawing, the dispenser comprises a conventional container 11 adapted to hold contents under pressure of a propellent gas and to release said contents to the atmosphere through a conventional dispensing valve, such as breakofl? valve 12, and a communicating dispensing nozzle 13. Means for permitting the release of the contents to the atmosphere through the orifice of the nozzle regardless of the position of the container is provided in the form of a dispensing device comprising a flexible, non-kinking eduction tube 14, preferably made of polyethylene and of an internal diameter of capillary dimensions and a corresponding length sufficient to produce the boiling efie'ctdescribed above when the orifice of the nozzle is opened to the atmosphere. The diameter of the orifice of the nozzle is not smaller than the internal diameter of the eduction tube. One end of the ed-ucationtube is fixed to, and communicates with, the said dispensing valve 12 while its other end passesthrough a longitudinal hole 15 in the center of a weight 16. The hole 15 comprises a narrow entrance end and a wider exit end coaxial therewith. 'An expansion tube 19, coaxial with said entrance and exit ends of hole 15, tightly fitted within the said wider exit end, firmly wedges the said other'end of said eduction tube and compresses it against the walls of said exit end. As a result of this structure, the weight '16 is firmly hung to the said other end of the eduction tube, which, in thus extending through the'full length of hole 15, communicates direct l with the contents of the'container.

As "an example of a satisfactory dispenser, the container 11, having an internal diameter of about 2 inches and having a conventional dispensing valve and a nozzle provided with an orifice of a diameter not less than 0.040 inch, as, for example, a Can type III, is preferred. The'eduction tube 14 is preferably constructed of polyethylene, has an outer diameter of 0.075 inch, an internal diameter of 0.040 inch, and is 11 /2 inches long. Its dimensions must be such as to preventkiuking. The length of hole 15 corresponds to the diameter of the weight 16 and is 0.625 inch long. The entrance end of hole 15 is 0.35 inch longand 'has a diameter of 0.078 inch while the exit end is .275 inch long and has a diameter of 0.094 inch. Expansion tube 19 is 0.15 inch long, has an outer diameter of 0.60 inch, and an inner diameter of 0.030 inch. 7

If the contents of the container comprise a liquid phase and a lighter gas phase, and if it is desired to .empty the liquid phase, the weight is made heavy so that it always at the lower point no matter what position the container is in, that it, being submerged below the surface ofthe liquid." If the gas phase is to be released, the weight can be made light so that it will float on the liquid. If there are several phases in the container, the weight can be made to float in the phase desired to be released by using a weight of the proper specific gravity.

In operating the dispenser, the dispensing nozzle is opened to the atmosphere as for example, by breaking off breakotf valve 12., as a result of which the phase to be released is propelled by the propellent gas into the exit end of hole 15, then passes through the narrower entrance end of hole 15, and then up through the eduction tube and out to the atmosphere through the orifice of the dispensing nozzle.

As an illustration of the use of the dispenser of the invention to decontaminate clothing, contained, for example, in a large bag, the charged dispenser may be dropped into the bag, the bag closed, and the breakoif valve then broken ofi whereup the contents of the contaiuerare released to decontaminate the clothing and will do so regardless of the position of the container in the bag.

We claim:

1. A dispenser comprising a closed, pressure-resistant container, having a dispensing nozzle provided with an orifice adapted to be opened to the atmosphere, for dispensing fluid contents under pressure, a flexible, nonkinking eduction tube having one end communicating with said nozzle orifice and having its other end in communication with said fluid contents to be dispensed, said nozzle orifice having a diameter not smaller than the internal diameter of said eduction tube, said eduction tube having an internal diameter of capillary dimensions ranging about from 0.010 to 0.100 inch and a corresponding length suflicient to produce boiling in said tube when the orifice of the nozzle is opened to the atmosphere, and means for continuously maintaining communication between said other end of the eduction tube and said fluid contents to be dispensed regardless of the position of the container.

2. A dispenser comprising a closed, pressure-resistant container, having a dispensing nozzle provided with an orifice adapted to be opened to the atmosphere, for dispensing fluid contents under pressure, a flexible, nonkinking eduction tube having one end communicate with said nozzle orifice and having its other end in communication with said fiuid contents to be dispensed, said nozzle orifice having a diameter not smaller than the internal diameter of said eduction tube, said eduction tube having an internal diameter of capillary dimensions ranging about from 0.010 to 0.100 inch and a corresponding length suflicient to produce boiling in said tube when the orifice of the nozzle is opened to the atmosphere, and means, secured to said other end of the eduction tube, adapted to continuously maintain the said other end of the eduction tube in communication with the fluid contents to be dispensed regardless of the position of the container.

3; A dispenser comprising a closed, pressure-resistant container, having a dispensing nozzle provided with an orifice adapted to be opened to the atmosphere, for dispensing one phase of multi-phase fluid contents under pressure, a flexible, non-kinking eduction tube having one end communicating with said nozzle orifice and having its other end in communication with the phase to be dispensed, said nozzle orifice having a diameter not smaller than the internal diameter of said eduction tube, said eduction tube having an internal diameter of capillary dimensions ranging about from 0.010 to 0.100 inch and a corresponding length sufiicent to produce boiling in said tube when the orifice of the nozzle is opened to the atmosphere, and-means of such specific gravity secured to said other end of the eduction tube as to continuously maintain said other end in communication with said phase to be dispensed regardless of the position of the container.

4. A dispenser comprising a closed, pressure-resistant container, having a dispensing nozzle provided with an orifice adapted to be opened to the atmosphere, for dispensing a liquid under pressure, a flexible, non-kinking eduction tube having one end communicating with said nozzle orifice and having its other end in communication with the liquid to be dispensed, said nozzle orifice having a diameter not smaller than the internal diameter of said eduction tube, said eduction tube having an internal diameter of capillary dimensions ranging about from 0.010 to 0.100 inch and a corresponding length sufiicient to produce boiling in said tube When the orifice of the nozzle is opened to the atmosphere, and a weight of such specific gravity secured to said other end of the eduction tube as to continuously maintain said other end below the surface of the said liquid regardless of the position of the container.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 69,882 Williams Oct. 15, 1867 1,503,125 Iddings July 29, 1924 2,046,300 Benner June 30, 1936 2,530,583 Nurkiewicz Nov. 21, 1950 2,811,390 Kiraly Oct. 29, 1957

Patent Citations
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US1503125 *Apr 10, 1919Jul 29, 1924Fyr Fyter CoFire extinguisher with a single delivery tube
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US2811390 *Mar 16, 1956Oct 29, 1957Kiraly Joseph LAerosol valve assembly
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3214860 *Mar 18, 1963Nov 2, 1965Controlled Dev Of Florida IncThermal aerosol dispenser
US3490656 *May 21, 1968Jan 20, 1970Taschner Kenneth ACompressed gas-type liquid dispenser
US3532257 *Apr 10, 1968Oct 6, 1970Kidde & Co WalterSyphon tube
US3638840 *Jul 9, 1969Feb 1, 1972Ishida MitsuoSafety valve for aerosol containers
US4319464 *Jul 25, 1980Mar 16, 1982Dodd N RayRefrigerated container
US4445630 *Feb 25, 1982May 1, 1984Gartman Rayburn LEmergency recovery system
US4843215 *Nov 19, 1987Jun 27, 1989Black & Decker Inc.Wallpaper steamer
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US5558518 *Aug 10, 1993Sep 24, 1996Novadent Ltd.Oral hygiene irrigator syringe bulb
US5611467 *May 7, 1996Mar 18, 1997Peng; Karl K.Invertible pressurized fluid dispenser with guided fluid inlet member
US5636770 *Apr 26, 1995Jun 10, 1997Toyo Aerosol Industry Co. Ltd.Aerosol dip tube
US5655714 *Dec 8, 1994Aug 12, 1997Wagner Spray Tech CorporationPivotable syphon tube
US5657909 *Jan 4, 1996Aug 19, 1997Calmar Inc.Manual sprayer having multi-directional liquid pickup and container venting
US5755572 *Aug 30, 1996May 26, 1998Novadent Ltd.Oral hygiene irrigator syringe bulb
US5934519 *Nov 17, 1997Aug 10, 1999Kim; Hee SooWeighted dip tube
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US6676032Jun 12, 2002Jan 13, 2004Wallace Franklin BanachWeight integrated drinking apparatus
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US6955305Mar 7, 2002Oct 18, 2005Wallace Franklin BanachWeight for drinking apparatus
US7240810Sep 4, 2003Jul 10, 2007S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Flexible supply tube with weighting mechanism for use in spray bottles
US20120183926 *Jul 12, 2011Jul 19, 2012Pinchas ShalevDental treatment apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/337, 222/464.4, 239/344, 222/376, 222/541.6
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/32
European ClassificationB65D83/32