Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3089493 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 14, 1963
Filing dateAug 12, 1960
Priority dateAug 12, 1960
Publication numberUS 3089493 A, US 3089493A, US-A-3089493, US3089493 A, US3089493A
InventorsGalindo Eugene R
Original AssigneeGalindo Eugene R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Colostomy bag with disposable liner
US 3089493 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 14, 1963 E. R. GALINDO COLOSTOMY BAG WITH DISPOSABLE LINER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 12. 1960 FIG. 5.

INVENTOR [WM M A. 6341 M00 n In W .59122 A TTOR/VEY May '14, 1963 E. R. GALINDO COLOSTOMY BAG WITH DISPOSABLE LINER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 12, 1960 FIG. 8.

6 O 1 1 9 l a I n t w Q m FIG. I].

M/VE/VTOR ATTORNEY United States Patent O 3,089,493 COLOSTOMY BAG WITH DISPOSABLE LINER Eugene R. Galindo, 4735 Ocean View, La Canada, Calif. Filed Aug. 12, 1960, Ser. No. 49,279 Claims. (Cl. 128-283) This invention relates to a colostomy bag with disposable liner and has for one of its principal objects the provision of a device of the class described, which can be conveniently worn at all times by the user and the con tents of which can be readily removed from time to time and disposed of in a toilet or similar device in a very simple manner.

One of the important objects of this invention relates to the provision of a colostomy device which can be held in place on the body in a very comfortable manner with no likelihood of becoming loose or leaking, which is inconspicuous when worn and further affords a high degree of protection.

Another important object of the invention relates to an abdominal appliance which need not be removed from the users body each time it is emptied or cleaned, but which is cap-able of being emptied in a very short space of time and with a minimum of expenditure or effort, and furthermore, wherein the contents are always in a disposable bag which presents no problem as far as ordinary toilet facilities are concerned.

Still another important object of the invention relates to a colostomy or similar device which, when worn, provides an air-tight seal so for as the contents are concerned, but which can be readily opened or valved to permit escape of gases which otherwise might accumulate to an objectionable degree.

Yet another object of the invention relates to a colostomy bag with a disposable inner liner which is simple of construction, easy of installation and operation, and the inner liner of which can, whenever desired or necessary, be flushed down an ordinary toilet without danger of blocking the same.

Other and further important objects of the invention will be apparent from the disclosures in the accompanying drawings and following specification.

The invention, in a preferred form, is illustrated in the drawings and hereinafter more fully described.

In the drawings: Y

FIGURE 1 is an elevationalv'ie'w of the improved colostomy appliance of this invention illustrating the outer face thereof when the same is worn, and with parts broken away to show certain interior construction.

FIGURE 2 is a side elevation of the apparatus of FIG- URE 1, showing additional essential details.

FIGURE 3 is a partial sectional view taken on the plane of the line 3-3 of FIGURE 2, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows.

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged exploded detailed section, parts being broken away, taken on the line 4-4 of FIG- URE 1, looking in the direction indicated.

FIGURE 5 is another enlarged view on the line 55 of FIGURE 1, illustrating a simple means for gaining access to the interior of the device and showing the disposable inner lining bag of the colostomy appliance of this invention removed therefrom.

FIGURE 6 is a plan view of the disposable inner bag or liner of the colostomy appliance of this invention.

FIGURE 7 is a sectional view on the line 77 of FIG- URE 6, looking toward the left.

FIGURE 8 is a view similar to FIGURE 6 illustratmg another type of disposable inner bag used in connection with the colostomy appliance of this invention.

FIGURE '9 is an enlarged and fore-shortened section on the line 99 of FIGURE 8 illustrating certain details. FIGURE 10 is a greatly enlarged sectional view of a portion of the wall of a disposable bag or inner liner of the colostomy appliance of this invention illustrating essential details.

FIGURE 11 is also an enlarged section similar to FIG- URE 10, but illustrating a slightly modified form of the invention.

As shown in the drawings:

The reference numeral 10 indicates generally a waterproof container, preferably of rubber or some suitable plastic, which comprises the main element of the improved colostomy bag of this invention. As shown in FIGURES 4 and 5, the bag consists essentially of two wall portions sealed together completely around their peripheral edges.

Referring now to FIGURE 5, a special easily opened and operated closure element is provided for the bag 10 adjacent its upper outer face. This consists of an insert of some special plastic or similar material and comprises two portions v12 and 14. The portion 12 forms part of the front wall or outer face of the bag 10, being attached thereto in a resilient manner for opening purposes along the line 16 (FIGURE 5 The element 12 has linear protuberances 18 which are integral therewith and which are adapted to fit into juxtaposed or similarly parallel channels 20 formed in the companion portion 14. This is a well-known type of such an easily operable closure means and forms no part of the present invention, except that it enables ready access to the interior of the bag 10, and also furnishes a completely air and liquid type seal when closed,

The bag 10 is provided with a circular inlet opening 22 in its rear wall or inner face and this is equipped with a flexible outer skirt or flange 24 (FIGURE 4), usually of the same material as the bag, and actually sealed thereto in fluid-tight relationship. A resilient plastic ring or the like 26 is adapted to be fitted about this flange 24 when the bag is to be placed in position on the body 28 of a patient or user. In this event, a receiving ring 30 adapted to cooperate with the ring 26 is preliminarily fixed on the patients body 28 about the exit opening or or tube 32, all as best shown in FIGURE 4. This is fastened into position by means of a plurality of arcuate strips 34 (FIGURE 3) and when the ring 26 is seated or fitted on to the protruding flange 36 of the ring 30 with the plastic flange '24 therebetween, a fluid-tight seal results with a very firm connection, whereby there is no possibility of the bag '10 with its contents becoming loose or falling away from its support on the users body.

The exit tube 32 is adapted to protrude through the opening 22 and extend into the bag 10. In order to pro test the end of the exit tube 32 and also to prevent it from becoming blocked by any of the walls of the bag, a hood or shield 31 is provided, as best shown in FIGURES 3 and 4. This is preferably of the same material as the rings 26 and 3t and is usually either integral with the ring 30 or can be fitted thereinto in any suitable manner as by an adhesive. This hood 31 is shaped as shown in FIGURE 4 and is slightly more than semi-circular, as shown in FIGURE 3, in order to provide a maximum of eflicient protective spacing at this critical point.

A disposable inner bag 40 (FIGURES 1 and 6), is adapted to be placed inside the outer main bag or container '10, and this disposable receptacle is provided with an opening 42, which, when properly inserted in the bag 10, will be in alignment with the opening 22 of the bag 10. At this point, and annularly disposed about and fastened to the peripheral opening 22, is an inner skirt or flange 44 of the same material as the bag 10 and the flange 24. When the disposable bag 40 is fitted into the bag '10 through the opening 12- 14, the openings 22 and 42 are first aligned and then the flange 44 is pulled in, so as to be inside the opening 42 in the inner receptacle 40, thereby providing a liquid-proof connection at that point and about the aligned openings 22 and 42.

As best shown in FIGURES 6 and 7, one type of a disposable bag 40 is sealed at its lower end 50, but is open at its upper end 52. However, this inner bag 40 is slightly longer than the main container 10, so that after it has been properly fitted into the outer bag 10, its upper edge can be bent over and folded as best shown at 54 in FIGURE 4. In the event that undesirable gas accumulates in the inner disposable bag 40, this seal at the top can be easily unfolded by gaining access thereto through the lock-joint 12-14- and simply unfolding the same to allow the escape of such gases.

A slightly different type of disposable inner bag is illus trated in FIGURES 8 and 9. This is usually of the same material as the bag of FIGURES 6 and 7, but is constructed of a single sheet of paper, or the like 58, doubled over with an accordion fold, as shown in FIGURE 9, and then sealed along one edge 60. The dimensions are such that it can be easily placed inside the outer main container 10 and this bag is also provided with a circular opening 62 similar in size and location to the opening 42 in the bag 40. As best shown in FIGURE 8, this bag 58 is originally longer than the outer container 10 and the lower end is preliminarily folded at least twice, as shown on the dotted lines 64 in FIGURE 8, and this folded over portion is then sealed by a strip of adhesive tape or similar material 66.

A similar fold is made at the top as shown on the dotted lines 68, this being the same as the fold at the top of the bag 40 (FIGURE 6). The accordion fold in the bag 58, as shown in FIGURE 9, provides for additional expansion which often becomes necessary.

Referring now to FIGURE 10, the nature of the walls of one of the disposable bags 40 is therein disclosed. An outer layer or wall of paper 70 forms the main portion of this disposable bag and this is of a fairly loose construction and comprises a rather readily soluble material, which, when exposed to water, will disintegrate in a fairly short space of time. The inner face of this paper sheet 70 is coated with a rather insoluble material, such as a layer of lacquer or the like 72. The proportions of the layers of material in FIGURE 10 are not in' any way accurate because the relative thickness may be varied considerably, depending upon the actual material and the proposed end use.

A slightly different type of disposable inner bag material is shown in enlarged section in FIGURE ll where an outer sheet of paper 74 is first coated with a lining of some water soluble material, such as glue or gelatin 76, and then an inner face or coating of substantially insoluble lacquer 78 similar to the lacquer 72 of FIGURE 10 is then applied over the water-soluble intermediatei liner or coating.

In operation, the plastic bag '10 is more or less permanently affixed to the body 28 of the user, as best shown in FIGURES 2, 3 and 4, and ordinarily need not be removed except at rather infrequent intervals, and even the replacement of the bag is simple because this is accomplished by merely separating the two rings 26 and 30, whereupon the bag 10, with all its contents and appurtenances, readily comes away from the more or less permanently positioned ring 30 with its flange 36 and the fastening means 34. These are used with a special inner lining 80 which further protects the wearers skin from blistering, peeling and rawness.

In any event, the inner bag 40 can very readily be removed from the outer container 10 by simply reaching in through the sealable and resealable opening 1214, and pulling out the bag 40. When this, with its contents, is flushed down a toilet, the outer layer of paper 70, being readily soluble in water, will practically immediately dissolve, whereupon, the insoluble coating 72, which ordinarily is relatively thin, and left with no foundation, will simply go to pieces. This completely eliminates any possibility of clogging the toilet or other drain.

With regard to the inner bag construction shown in FIGURE ll, substantially the same action results because a bag composed of this material when placed in a toilet bowl will have its outer layer of paper immediately softened and practically dissolved in a few minutes. Then the inner water-soluble layer 76 will also go into solution in the water and the innermost lining 78 of lacquer, having no foundation and being thin in any event, will disintegrate.

It will be seen that herein is provided a really necessary and extremely convenient colostomy bag which enables the user to more readily dispose of the contents at almost any time with practically no difficulty. Furthermore, the main bag is safe and foolproof, need not be replaced except at long intervals, is very comfortable when worn, will not irritate the skin, and any accumulated gas in-the inner container can be readily disposed of in a minimum of time and by very simple operation. The replaceable, disposable and soluble inner bag is relatively cheap, therefore imposing no exorbitant expense or cost so far as the user is concerned.

I am aware that many changes may be made and numerous details of construction varied throughout a wide range without departing from the principles of this invention; and I, therefore, do not propose limiting the patent granted hereon otherwise than as necessitated by the prior art.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a colostomy bag, the combination of: a first sealing ring; means adapted to secure said first sealing ring onto the body of the user of said bag; an outer bag having an opening in its rear wall and including an inner skirt and an outer skirt, each of said skirts extending radially outwardly from said opening; a second sealing ring located about said outer skirt and adjacent said opening and closely, removably fitted about said first sealing ring, thereby removably securing said outer skirt therebetween in unitary and fluid tight relationship and holding said outer bag in predetermined position; and a disposable inner bag located within said outer bag and having an inner bag opening, said inner skirt being disposed through said inner bag opening and extending radially from said inner bag opening, said outer bag including a second opening for quickly inserting and removing said inner bag without removing said outer bag from said predetermined position, said outer bag also including means adjacent said second opening to effect fluid tight sealing of said second opening.

2. In a colostomy bag, he combination of: a first sealing ring; means adapted to secure said first sealing ring onto the body of the user of said bag; an outer bag having an opening in its rear wall and including a flexible inner skirt and a flexible outer skirt, each of said skirts extending radially outwardly from said opening; a resilient second sealing ring located about said outer skirt and adjacent said opening and closely, removably fited about said first sealing ring, thereby removably securing said outer skirt therebetween in unitary and fluid tight relationship and holding said outer bag in predetermined position; and a disposable inner bag located within said outer bag and having an inner bag opening in its rear wall, said inner skirt extending through said inner bag opening into said inner bag and mounting said inner bag, said outer bag including a bag opening for quickly inserting and removing said inner bag without removing said outer bag from said predetermined position, said outer bag also including means adjacent said second opening to effect fluid tight sealing of said second opening.

3. In a colostomy bag, the combination of: a first scaling ring; means adapted to secure said first sealing ring onto the body of the user of said bag; an outer bag having an opening in its rear wall and including a flexible inner skirt and a flexible outer skirt, each of said skirts extending radially outwardly from said opening; a resilient second sealing ring located about said outer skirt and adjacent said opening and closely, removably fited about said first sealing ring, thereby removably securing said outer skirt therebetween in unitary and fluid tight relationship and holding said outer bag in predetermined position; and a disposable inner bag located within said outer bag and having an inner bag opening in its rear wall, said inner skirt extending through said inner bag opening into said inner bag and mounting said inner bag, said inner bag having Walls constituted by a relatively thin inner layer of water insoluble material and an outer layer of readily water soluble material whereby said inner layer resists leakage of liquid material from said inner bag to said outer bag and said outer layer disintegrates when said inner bag is removed from said outer bag and immersed in water, said outer bag including a second opening for quickly inserting and removing said inner bag without removing said outer bag from said predetermined position, said outer bag also including means adjacent said second opening to eflect fluid tight sealing of said second opening. 4

4. In a colostomy bag, the combination of: a first sealing ring; means adapted to secure said first sealing ring onto the body of the user of said bag; an outer bag having an opening in its rear wall and including a flexible inner skirt and a flexible outer skirt, each of said skirts extending radially outwardly from said opening; a resilient second sealing ring located about said outer skirt and adjacent said opening and closely, removably fitted about said first sealing ring, thereby securing said outer skirt therebetween in unitary and fluid tight relationship and holding said outer bag in predetermined position; and a disposable inner bag located Within said outer bag and having an inner bag opening in its rear wall, said inner skirt extending through said inner bag opening, into said inner bag and mounting said inner bag, said inner bag having walls made of a readily water soluble material and including a relatively thin inner coating of Water insoluble material whereby said inner coating resists leakage of liquid material from said inner bag to said outer bag and the remaining portion of said inner bag walls disintegrate when said inner bag is removed from said outer bag and immersed in water, said outer bag including a second opening for quickly inserting and removing said inner bag without removing said outer bag from said predetermined position, said outer bag also including means adjacent said second opening to effect fluid tight sealing of said second opening.

5. In a colostomy bag, the combination of: a first sealing element for securement to the body of the user of said bag; an outer bag having an inlet opening in its rear wall and including an integral, flexible skirt extending rear- Wardly of said inlet opening and radially outwardly therefrom; a resilient second sealing element encompassing said skirt adjacent said inlet opening, and resiliently, removably fitted about said first sealing element and against said skirt, thereby removably securing said skirt therebetween in unitary and fluid tight relationship and holding said outer bag in predetermined position, said outer bag including in its front wall a second opening; and a disposable inner bag Within said outer bag and secured thereto adjacent said inlet opening, said inner bag being removable through said second opening without removing said outer bag from said predetermined position, said outer :bag also including means adjacent said second opening to effect fluid tight sealing of said second opening.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,205,27-0 Perry June 18, 1940 2,423,060 Zaro June 24, 1947 2,540,777 Deahl Feb. 6, 1951 2,557,998 Phillips June 26, 1951 2,557,998 Phillips June 26, 1951 2,634,727 Nelson Apr 14, 1953 2,808,830 Maxim Oct. 8, 1957 2,874,697 Johnson Feb. 24, 1959 2,973,759 Plyrnale Mar. 7, 1961

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2205270 *Mar 20, 1939Jun 18, 1940Murle PerryColostomy cup
US2423060 *Dec 17, 1943Jun 24, 1947Zaro Henry CColostomy appliance
US2540777 *May 27, 1949Feb 6, 1951Deahl Robert BColostomy device
US2557998 *Mar 8, 1949Jun 26, 1951Phillips John MColostomy device
US2634727 *Apr 11, 1949Apr 14, 1953Medical Specialty Company IncColostomy appliance
US2808830 *Aug 8, 1955Oct 8, 1957Perry Teeple JColostomy bag
US2874697 *Jun 22, 1954Feb 24, 1959William T SevaldColostomy device
US2973759 *Nov 16, 1956Mar 7, 1961Plymale Jr Mis William SColostomy unit
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3283757 *Jun 3, 1965Nov 8, 1966Nelson Elhart FSurgical appliance for use in ostomy cases
US3398744 *Jun 17, 1965Aug 27, 1968Melvin J ClawsonColostomy appliance
US3439679 *Jun 16, 1966Apr 22, 1969Doolittle Alton OColostomy or ileostomy device
US3457920 *Jan 5, 1967Jul 29, 1969Norbert D ThompsonMethod of reducing cross contamination in administering anesthesia and apparatus therefor
US3507282 *Jan 10, 1968Apr 21, 1970Burding Judy SColostomy bag
US3570490 *Nov 15, 1968Mar 16, 1971Atlantic Surgical Co IncEnterostomy pouch
US3618606 *Feb 14, 1969Nov 9, 1971Osteolite AppliancesStoma bag
US3626943 *Mar 11, 1970Dec 14, 1971Gurdon S WorcesterSanitary clothing article
US3680560 *Nov 26, 1968Aug 1, 1972Voys Inc LeVacuum drainage collecting apparatus with disposable liner
US3704709 *Sep 9, 1970Dec 5, 1972Levoy Inc SDisposable body drainage receiver
US3762454 *Nov 15, 1971Oct 2, 1973R WilkinsDisposable garbage container
US3837342 *Aug 23, 1972Sep 24, 1974K MitsuoExcrement receiving bag for artificial anus
US3934587 *Jun 17, 1974Jan 27, 1976Roy Gerald GordonDisposable articles having a water-permeable and water-repellent surface
US4107426 *Jul 6, 1976Aug 15, 1978Roy Gerald GordonImparting water-repellency by exposure to aliphatic acid chloride vapors
US4268286 *Jul 24, 1980May 19, 1981Kingsdown Medical Consultants LimitedAttachable filter and ostomy bag including same
US4372308 *Jul 10, 1978Feb 8, 1983Kingsdown Medical Consultants Ltd.Ostomy bag including filter means
US4387713 *Jul 17, 1981Jun 14, 1983Calanni John RDisposable discharge collector for a drainable stoma pouch with wiper
US4403991 *Dec 27, 1977Sep 13, 1983E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc.Closures for open ended ostomy pouch
US4439191 *Jul 14, 1982Mar 27, 1984Hogan Elizabeth ROstomy bag cover
US4460363 *Jul 2, 1982Jul 17, 1984Kingsdown Medical Consultants, Ltd.Ostomy bag
US4465486 *Sep 30, 1982Aug 14, 1984E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc.Closures for open ended ostomy pouch
US4553969 *Mar 14, 1983Nov 19, 1985Taylor Frances HDisposable relief container with secural liner
US4755177 *Sep 30, 1982Jul 5, 1988E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc.Closures for open ended ostomy pouch
US4762738 *Dec 22, 1986Aug 9, 1988E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc.Polyvinyl alcohol, wrapping in sheet of material which becomes slimy
US4784656 *Apr 23, 1987Nov 15, 1988Christian Delores JFecal incontinence receptacle and methods of use
US4816027 *Sep 3, 1987Mar 28, 1989Gilchrist Richard JDisposable ostomy bag liner
US4830187 *Feb 26, 1988May 16, 1989E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc.Polyvinyl alcohol sheet or tissue enclosure becoming slimy after contacting with water; flushing
US4930942 *Oct 11, 1988Jun 5, 1990E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc.Method of disposal of articles by flushing
US4941869 *Oct 17, 1988Jul 17, 1990Amico Ben A DOstomy plug-pouch
US5009647 *Feb 6, 1990Apr 23, 1991Smiths Industries Public Limited CompanyWater closet disposable ostomy bags and materials
US5074839 *Aug 24, 1989Dec 24, 1991Hemotrans, Inc.Blood transfer apparatus
US5108382 *Aug 27, 1991Apr 28, 1992Timbale Corporation NvWater closet disposable ostomy bag
US5268222 *Jan 26, 1993Dec 7, 1993Isolyser Co., Inc.Thermoplastic polymer of polyvinyl alcohol
US5423782 *Jun 17, 1994Jun 13, 1995Wolrich; Douglas H.Disposable ostomy bag liner
US5470653 *Aug 5, 1994Nov 28, 1995Isolyser Company, Inc.Disposable mop heads
US5620786 *Aug 5, 1994Apr 15, 1997Isolyser Co. Inc.Hot water soluble towels, sponges and gauzes
US5650219 *May 19, 1995Jul 22, 1997Isolyser Co. Inc.Method of disposal of hot water soluble garments and like fabrics
US5661217 *Aug 5, 1994Aug 26, 1997Isolyser Company, Inc.Method of manufacturing monolithic structures from polyvinyl alcohol
US5707731 *May 9, 1996Jan 13, 1998Isolyser Company, Inc.Disposable cleaning articles
US5785695 *Nov 8, 1996Jul 28, 1998Alcare Co., Ltd.Body wastes receiving appliance
US5865819 *Jun 27, 1997Feb 2, 1999Hollister IncorporatedTwo-pouch ostomy appliance with separate inner and outer adhesive flanges
US5871679 *Nov 14, 1997Feb 16, 1999Isolyser Company, Inc.Disposing of garments after use, thermoplastic polyvinyl alcohol fiber
US5885907 *Nov 4, 1997Mar 23, 1999Isolyser Company, Inc.Method of disposal of hot water soluble garments and like fabrics
US5891812 *Jun 5, 1997Apr 6, 1999Isolyser Company, Inc.Medical equipment; disposable products
US5985443 *Nov 13, 1997Nov 16, 1999Isolyser Company, Inc.Dissolving polyvinyl alcohol fibers in water; preventing infection from medical waste
US6048410 *Sep 1, 1994Apr 11, 2000Isolyser Company, Inc.Method of disposal of hot water soluble garments and like fabrics
US7416543 *Aug 30, 2002Aug 26, 2008Bioprogress Technology International, Inc.Drainage bag
US7517339 *Oct 20, 2004Apr 14, 2009Hollister IncorporatedPeelable and flushable ostomy pouch and method of use
US7556707Dec 6, 2006Jul 7, 2009Hollister IncorporatedFlushable body waste collection pouch, pouch-in-pouch appliance using the same, and method relating thereto
US8105298 *Mar 1, 2005Jan 31, 2012Coloplast A/SOstomy appliance
US8118797Nov 21, 2006Feb 21, 2012Hollister IncorporatedFlushable body waste collection pouches, pouch-in pouch appliances using the same, and methods pertaining thereto
US20130144236 *Apr 1, 2011Jun 6, 2013Joergen-Ulrik BrandtOstomy bag with a compacted sheath
DE19646211A1 *Nov 8, 1996May 15, 1997Alcare Co LtdVorrichtung zur Aufnahme von Körperexkreten
DE19646211C2 *Nov 8, 1996Jun 24, 1999Alcare Co LtdVorrichtung zur Aufnahme von Körperexkreten
WO2012019271A1 *Aug 12, 2010Feb 16, 2012Colo-Majic Enterprises Ltd.Ostomy pouch apparatus with closable opening
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/342, 604/344
International ClassificationA61F5/445
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/445
European ClassificationA61F5/445