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Publication numberUS3091046 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1963
Filing dateJul 5, 1960
Priority dateJul 5, 1960
Publication numberUS 3091046 A, US 3091046A, US-A-3091046, US3091046 A, US3091046A
InventorsEngelstein Harold, Engelstein Stanley
Original AssigneeEngelstein Harold, Engelstein Stanley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flip file cards
US 3091046 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 28, 1963 H. ENGELSTEIN ETAL 3,091,046

FLIP FILE CARDS Filed July 5, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN V EN TORS L- f/Apoaa 6/YGEL s 76/ 3 BY ANLEY Even srev/y May 28, 1963 H. ENGELSTEIN ETAL 3,091,046

FLIP FILE CARDS Filed July 5, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 United States Patent 3,01,tl46 Fill? FILE CARDS Harold Engelstein, 7 33 (Iaiirey Ava, Far Roclraway, lhY, and Stanley Engelstein, 45 Salem Road, Rosiyn Heigats,

Filed July 5, 196%, Ser. No. 49,852 7 Clairns. ((Il. 4tl102) This invention relates generally to transparent filing envelopes and protective display jackets, and more particularly to flip-file cards constituted by a series or transparent envelopes each of which is provided with a acket display section and an oversize index chamber.

It is known to make use of so-called flip files for the purpose of protectively filing photographs, records and other forms of data. conventionally, such cards are made up of a series of transparent envelopes mounted in staggered relation on a base card, the card being adapted for mounting in a loose-leaf folder, a file cabinet or on a filing board. Each envelope is ordinarily in the form of a transparent jacket into which the picture or record may be inserted, the jacket being hinged to the card so that it may .be raised or fiipped upward to expose the next envelope thereunder.

Attempts have been made to add index tabs or index chambers to such envelopes, but these have not proven to be commercially successful either because the index tab adds excessively to production costs or, in the case of the index chamber, because it is difiicult to insert an indexing strip therein. Where the chamber for receiving the index strip is no wider than the strip itself, insertion is almost impossible especially when the strip is of fairly soft paper.

Accordingly, it is the primary purpose of the present invention to provide a flip file having a jacket section for accommodating photographs or the like and an indexing chamber integral with the jacket section into which an index tab may readily be inserted. It is a feature of the invention that the pocket or chamber for receiving the index tab is larger than the tab itself.

More particularly, it is an object of the invention to provide a flip file of the above'described type in which the transparent envelope is compartmentalized into a main section and an indexing chamber by means of a ledge which serves to hold an inserted item in place and yet makes available the entire cross-sectional area of the envelope for the insertion of the index strip.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a flip file of the above-described type which may be produced efficiently and economically in large scale production and which may be sold at relatively low cost.

Briefly stated, in one embodiment of the invention these objects are attained in a flip fil card having envelopes in staggered relation, each being formed by two superposed transparent panels joined at their ends. A strip is interposed between the two panels in parallel relation to one end thereof and is joined by a spacer rib to the underside of the upper panel to provide a ledge for supporting the lower margins of a picture insert, an index strip being insertable therebelow in the envelope.

In another embodiment, each envelope is composed of two superposed panels, the first of which is longer than the second to provide an extension, 21 third and shorter panel being connected between the end of the extension and an intermediate point on the second panel to provide an oversized pocket for receiving the index tab.

For a better understanding of the invention as well as other objects and further features thereof, reference is had to the following detailed description to be read in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, wherein like components in the various views are identified by like reference numerals.

"ice

In the drawings:

PEG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a flip file card in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 2 is an elevational view, partially in section, of a single envelope taken from the card.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken in the plane of lines 3-3 in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of another embodiment of an envelope in accordance with the invention, and

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along the plane of lines 5-5 in FIG. 4.

Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to FIG. 1, a dip file card in accordance with the invention is constituted by a base card 10 and a series of envelopes 11, 11a, 1112, etc., hingedly secured thereon in staggered relation. The card is provided with eyeletted holes 12 by which the cards may be held in a loose-leaf binder or otherwise filed. Each of the envelopes 11 is constituted by a jacket section 13 into which a picture 14 or other record to be displayed may be inserted, and an indexing chamber 15 into which may be inserted an index strip 16 for identifying the display record. Since the various envelopes overlap, ordinarily only the picture in the top envelope may be seen, as well as the index strips of all of the envelopes. To observe a given envelope, one has merely to lift the envelopes lying thereover.

The envelopes 11, as best seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, are made by folding a sheet in half along fold line 17 to form a top panel 11 and back panel 11". The sheet is made of acetate, cellophane, mylar or any other suitable flexible transparent plastic. The lower edges of panels 11' and 11 are joined together by a rib 18 of the same material, out colored, which also acts as a spacer to maintain the panels in spaced relation. The interconnection of the two panels forms a chamber 15 which occupies the entire area therebetween.

It is to be understood that the envelope may also be made by the use of two separate superposed panels joined together at either end by spacer ribs. The envelope 11 is hinged to the card it by means of a fabric strip 19, onehalf of which is cemented or otherwise secured to the upper margin of the envelope and the other half to the card.

To form a picture supporting jacket within the chamber 15, a ledge is provided in the form of a strip 29 of flexible transparent material whose lower margin is secured by a spacer element in the form of a rib 21, preferably colored, to the underside of the top panel 11. Thus the ledge is spaced from and is parallel with the underside of the top panel to form a channel for accommodating the lower end of a picture insert.

Thus the picture 14 is confined within the jacket area defined between the fold 17 and the ledge rib 21. The index tab or strip 16, which is positioned below the jacket area within the envelope, is substantially of the same width as the distance between ribs 18 and 21. The narrow space between these ribs constitutes the window area for the index tab. Nevertheless, the tab may be inserted and removed without ditficulty. The reason for this is that the ledge is attached only to the top panel of the envelope and the entire cross-sectional internal area of the envelope is available when inserting or withdrawing the index tab.

This greatly facilitates handling of the insert strips which otherwise would be diflicult to manipulate in a confined space. On the other hand, there is sufficient gripping action between the top and bottom panels at the point they are joined togetther by rib 18 to hold the index strip in place.

In manufacturing, the envelopes, the various components thereof (i.e., upper and lower panels, ribs and ledge strip) may be fed in acontinuous web 'form into a combining mechanism wherein they are adhesively united in the manner described above, and thereafter sectioned to size. A relatively broad paper web may also be fed into the combiner to form a backing in the jacket section for a picture insert and a narrower web in the index chamber to provide indexing strips. Thus the manufactured article will contain an indexing strip on which filing information may be typed.

In the embodiment shown in FIGS.'4 and 5, three transparent panels 22, 23 and 24 are provided. Panels 22 and '23 are formed by folding a sheet ofi center so as to form on the first panel an extension 2211. A rib 25 connects the free end of the second panel 23 to the first panel thereby defining a jacket section 26 to receive the picture. Extension 22a constitutes the window through which the index tab may be seen.

The third and shorter panel 24 is connected at one end by a rib 27 to the margin of extension 22a and at the other end by a line of adhesive 28 to an intermediate point on the second panel 23. Thus a pocket is formed havinga width w substantially equal to the width of the panel 24 for inserting an index tab to be positioned between the ribs 25 and 27. This makes it possible to insert the index tab so as to occupy a relatively narrow space. The flip file card is otherwise like that shown in FIG. 1.

While there have been shown what are to be considered to be preferred embodiments of the invention, it will be manifest that many changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the essential spirit of the invention. It is intended, therefore, in the annexed claims to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true scope of the invention.

-What is claimed is:

1. A fiip file card provided with transparent envelopes in a staggered relation hinged to a backing, each envelope including means dividing said envelope into a jacket section for receiving a record to be displaced and an index chamber having a'window Whose dimension is substantally the same as an index tab to be inserted, and a chamber extension communicating with said index chamber and overlapping said jacket section to facilitate insertion of the tab into said index chamber.

2. A flip file card provided with transparent envelopes in staggered relation hinged to a backing, each envelope being constituted by two superposed panels joined at their ends and a strip interposed between the two panels in parallel with and adjacent one end thereof, said strip being joined by a spacer element to the underside of the top panel to provide a ledge for supporting the lower margin 'of an item inserted between said panels, the space between said spacer element and said one end of said panels providing a window for an indexing strip which may be readily inserted in the larger chamber between the two panels.

3. An envelope comprising two panels of transparent i I a ",m-

r t Y .4

material joined at either end to define a chamber, a ledge secured to the underside of the top panel and unsecured to the bottom panel to provide a support for a record inserted between the ledge and one end of the panels, an index strip being insertable therebelow.

4. An envelope comprising a sheet of transparent material folded in half to provide an upper and lower panel, a rib interconnecting the free ends of the panels to provide a chamber, and a ledge secured to the underside of the upper panel and unsecured to the lower panel to provide a support for a record inserted between said ledge and one end of the panels, an index strip being insertable therebelow.

5. A flip file card provided with transparent envelopes in staggered relation hinged to a backing, each envelope being constituted by two identical superposedpanels of flexible material formed by folding a sheet in half and joining the ends thereof by a rib, and a strip interposed between the two panels in parallel with and adjacent said rib, said strip being joined by a spacer element to the underside of the top panel to provide a ledge for supporting the lower margin of an item inserted between said panels, the space between said spacer element and said rib of said panels providing a window for an indexing strip which may be readily inserted in the larger chamber between the two panels.

6. A flip file card provided with transparent envelopes in staggered relation hinged to a backing, each envelope being constituted by two superposed panels joined at their ends, the first panel extending beyond the second to provide an extension, and a third and shorter panel secured at one end to the margin of said extension and at the other end to an intermediate point on said second panel to provide an oversize pocket for receiving an index strip which is to lie against said extension.

7. An envelope comprising first and second panels in superposed relation, the first panel extending beyond the second to provide an extension, the second panel being joined at its ends to said first panel, and a third and shorter panel connected at one end to the margin of said extension and at the other end to an intermediate point along said second panel to provide an oversize pocket for receiving an index tab dimensioned to lie against said extension. 7 l 5 References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1466255 *Jan 9, 1922Aug 28, 1923Spitzer Benjamin LCombination mount and container for transparent films
US1580127 *Feb 28, 1925Apr 13, 1926Rand Company IncIndex system
US1987377 *Mar 15, 1934Jan 8, 1935Us Envelope CoDevice for philatelists' use
US2096559 *Nov 2, 1935Oct 19, 1937Lester S RileyMounting hinge for cards, photographs, and the like
US2576272 *Mar 11, 1946Nov 27, 1951Adelman WilliamAdvertising device
US2610421 *Jun 18, 1947Sep 16, 1952W C Horn Bro & CoTransparent mounting sheath for snapshots
US2775050 *Sep 12, 1955Dec 25, 1956Miehle Printing Press & MfgFile card structure
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3285249 *Jul 9, 1965Nov 15, 1966Sol RaelDisplay manifold
US3353281 *Jun 17, 1965Nov 21, 1967Addressograph MultigraphTransport carrier and picture composite
US3363349 *Oct 21, 1965Jan 16, 1968Dale L. NelsonOpen-face card holder and mounting assembly therefor
US3371322 *Dec 29, 1965Feb 27, 1968Interior UsaShingle filing and retrieval system
US3422557 *Jan 16, 1967Jan 21, 1969James G PetersAlbums for photographs or the like
US4041616 *Jul 13, 1976Aug 16, 1977B & G Hydraulics LimitedCircuit design apparatus
US4055909 *May 21, 1976Nov 1, 1977Loren Dale PerryDisplay and scheduling panels with document holding envelope
US4136471 *Aug 19, 1976Jan 30, 1979Alf Cooke Bag Co. Ltd.Document carrier
US4203239 *Jul 25, 1977May 20, 1980Gregory Martha DPicture holder
US4259799 *May 16, 1979Apr 7, 1981Fulton Jr Robert ECombination package comprising a loose leaf book, a plurality of transparent plastic frames, and means for hanging the same
US5850705 *Nov 7, 1996Dec 22, 1998Groh; David S.Circuit directory for electric panels
US6796426Oct 9, 2002Sep 28, 2004Ultra Pro LpSleeves and album pages for flat items
US8104612Jul 22, 2004Jan 31, 2012Ultra Pro CorporationSleeves and album pages for flat items
US20050072692 *Jul 22, 2004Apr 7, 2005Ultra Pro L.P., A California Limited PartnershipSleeves and album pages for flat items
US20050180811 *Feb 18, 2004Aug 18, 2005Robert WorkmanAlbum pages
US20050235533 *Mar 21, 2005Oct 27, 2005Gary LembergerCombination keychan and informational fandeck
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/391, 40/651, 434/428, 40/401, D19/33, D19/76, 40/776
International ClassificationB42F19/00
Cooperative ClassificationB42F19/00
European ClassificationB42F19/00