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Publication numberUS3091396 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1963
Filing dateSep 20, 1961
Priority dateSep 20, 1961
Publication numberUS 3091396 A, US 3091396A, US-A-3091396, US3091396 A, US3091396A
InventorsKenneth M Curtin
Original AssigneeVanderburgh County Soc For Cri
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wick assembly
US 3091396 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 8, 1963 K. M. cuRTlN- 3,091,396

WICK ASSEMBLY Filed Sept. 20, 1961 INVENTOR. KEN/VET M fwemv United States atet 3,091,396 Patented May 28, 1963 Fice 3,091,396 WICK ASSEMBLY Kenneth M. Curtin, Evansville, Ind, assignor to The Vanderburgh County Society for Crippled Children and Adults, Inc., Evansville, Ind., a corporation of Indiana Filed Sept. 20, 1%1, Ser. No. 139,505 3 Claims. (Cl. 23947) The present invention relates to a new and novel wick assembly which has particular adaptability for use with an evaporative type of deodorant.

As is known, various arrangements have been employed for positioning a wick in containers for evaporative type deodorants. The aforesaid prior arrangements included the use of, for example, metallic frames, but all presented a problem as to the positioning of the wick thereon. In this latter regard, a typical approach necessitated the use of staples for securing together the free ends of the wick, as well as the latter onto the frame of the structure, which staples required additional manufacturing ope-rations and, hence, increased cost to the user.

By virtue of the instant invention, the applicant has provided a new and novel wick assembly for a container for an evaporative type of deodorant, which, among other features, permits the positioning of the wick without the use of additional fastening members. Briefly, the applicants invention comprises a framework preferably made from a plastic or other material having high anti-corrosive characteristics, which framework has a new and novel configuration for receiving the wick thereon, as well as for positioning the assembly at various heights with reference to the bottom of the deodorant container. The instant invention is not only simple in structure but provides convenience in assembly for use and sale.

Accordingly, the principal object of the present invention is to provide a new and novel wick assembly.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and novel wick assembly onto which the wick may be readily received and retained.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a new and novel assembly for a wick, where the wick is readily positioned without the necessity of additional fastening members.

A still further and more general object of the present invention is to provide a new and novel wick assembly having typical use in connection with an evaporative type of deodorant, which wick assembly represents not only economies in manufacturing, but effectiveness in use.

Other objects and a better understanding of the invention should be more apparent from the following description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, wherein FIG. 1 is a view in front elevation, partly fragmentary, showing a wick assembly, with the wick disposed thereon, in accordance with the instant invention;

FIG. 2 is another view in front elevation showing the applicants new and novel wick structure positioned in a typical container for an evaporative type deodorant; and,

FIG. 3 is a view in side elevation showing details of the wrapping arrangement for the wick.

For the purposes of promoting an understanding of the principles of the invention, reference will now be made to the embodiment illustrated in the drawing and specific language will be used to describe the same. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the invention is thereby intended, such alterations and further modifications in the illustrated device, and such further applications of the principles of the invention as illustrated therein being contemplated as would normally occur to one skilled in the art to which the invention relates.

Referring now to the drawing, the applicants new and novel wick assembly 10 typically comprises a framework 5 12 defined by side members 12a and 12b having cross members 12c, 12d, 112a and 12f extending therebetween. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the framework 12 is made from a plastic or like material which is not affected by the solution in which the wick assembly is utilized.

As should be evident from the figures, portions of the side members 12a and 12b, along with cross members 120 and 12d, define a neck-like carrying portion 14 at the top thereof, where such neck-like carrying portion 14 is, of course, narrower than the neck of the deodorant container in which the wick assembly is positioned (see FIG. 2).

The framework 12 further defines an enlarged body portion, below the aforesaid neck-like carrying portion 14, where the side members 12a and 12b along the enlarged body portion are serrated at 12g and 12h. Additionally, indicia are typically provided on the surfaces on the side members 12a and 12b, in the region of the aforesaid serrations, for purposes to be described herebelow.

A wick 18, used in conjunction with the instant invention, is typically a rectangular strip of cotton felt, or Webril, the latter being the trade name of a commercially available type of wick. As mentioned hereabove, a new and novel feature provided by the applicant is the wrapping arrangement for positioning or securing the wick 18 onto the framework 12 defining the wick assembly 10. In this regard, and reference to FIG. 3, the wick 18 is typically assembled by inserting one free end 18a thereof around the cross member 12s, and then drawing the body thereof upwardly and around the cross member 12d in the neck-like carrying portion 14 of the wick assembly 10.

Thereafter, the wick 18 is drawn downwardly so that a portion thereof is caused to engage the free end 18a surrounding the cross member 12c. The wick 18 is then caused to pass through an opening, or locking portion, defined by portions of the side members 12a and 12b and the cross members 12e and 12) of the wick assembly 10, the remaining length being positioned on the bottom of the container for the deodorant (not shown). It should be noted that an opening 12]} may be provided in cross member 12) to permit further ease of assembly.

In use, and after the wick 18 is wrapped on the framework 12 of the wick assembly 10, as described hereabove, the framework is positioned within the container for the deodorant. The aforesaid positioning is readily effected to any desired depth by the position of the serrations 12g and 12h on the side members 12a and 12b with reference to the inside of the neck of the bottle. In other words, the unit is designed so that the aforesaid serrations 12g and 12h engage the inside of the neck of the container, and, thereby, position the wick assembly 10 to the desired depth in the deodorant. The indicia 15 provided on the surfaces of the side members 12a and 12b assure accurate repeating of any deodorant requirements by the user, i.e. permit the same amount of wick 18 to be exposed for evaporation, if desired.

From the preceding, it should be apparent that the applicant :has provided a new and novel wick assembly which is readily positioned for use within a container for a deodorant or like material. The instant invention provides not only a new and novel configuration for the framework defining the wick assembly, including the serrations thereon, but also an arrangement for wrapping the wick 18 in position for use without the need of supplementary fastening means.

It should be apparent that the above-described wick assembly is susceptible to various changes Within the spirit of the invention. For example, changes in proportion" may be made, depending, of course, on the type of container with which the wick assembly is employed, and the wick itself would also be subject to such dimensional variations. Thus, the above description should be considered as illustrative, and not aslimiting the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A wrapping arrangement for a wick disposed on a framework having side members and afirst and a second cross member extending laterally from said side mem- :bers, where said wick has a free end Wrappedaround said first cross member of said framework, where said wick thereafter extends to and around said second cross member of said framework, and where said wick thereafter extends to engage its said free end in the region of said first member.

2. A wrapping arrangement for a wick disposed on a framework having side members and a first, a second and a third cross member extending laterally from said side members, where said wick has afree end Wrapped around said first cross member of said framework, where said wick thereafter extends to and around said second cross member of said framework, and where said wick thereafter extends to engage said free end thereof and to extend through an opening defined by said first and said third cross members and said side members.

3. A wick assembly comprising, in combination, a framework having side members, and a first, a second and a third cross member, at least one of which interconnects said side members, and a wick having a first portion thereof extending around said first cross member and extending along a first side of said framework to said second cross member of the latter, thereafter extending around said second cross member of said framework and along a side of said framework oppositely disposed to said first side thereof, and thereafter engaging its first portion in the region of said first cross member and extending through an opening defined by said first and said third cross members and said side members of said framework.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,452,424 Bell Oct. 26, 1948 2,474,605 Wheeler et a1. .Tune 28, 1949 2,474,606 Nicolet June 28, 1949 2,474,607 Wheeler et al. June 28, 1949 2,802,695 Johnson Aug. 13, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 82,909 Norway Dec. 21, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2452424 *Aug 3, 1945Oct 26, 1948Seeman Bros IncWick holder for evaporators
US2474605 *Oct 26, 1948Jun 28, 1949Airkem IncLiquid diffuser
US2474606 *Jun 26, 1945Jun 28, 1949 Wick-supporting device
US2474607 *Jun 13, 1946Jun 28, 1949Airkem IncLiquid diffuser
US2802695 *Jul 12, 1955Aug 13, 1957Pride Washroom ServiceOdorant dispenser
NO82909A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3793989 *Jan 15, 1973Feb 26, 1974Clark TDeodorized pet relief station
US4742960 *May 1, 1986May 10, 1988O'connor Products Company, Inc.Wick dispenser
US6619560 *Jul 19, 2002Sep 16, 2003Blyth, Inc.Bottle assembly with wick holder assembly
US7628338Sep 18, 2006Dec 8, 2009S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Refill for a volatile material
US7981367Nov 16, 2007Jul 19, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyContinuous emission by heating and dispensing through a wick of two or more volatiles (particularly scents) that automatically alternates between the different volatile compositions in sequence; the volatile liquids are contained in bottles
US8016207May 9, 2005Sep 13, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanySystems and devices for emitting volatile compositions
US8061628Jul 29, 2011Nov 22, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanySystems and devices for emitting volatile compositions
US8119064Nov 12, 2008Feb 21, 2012The Proctor & Gamble CompanyMethods, devices, compositions, and systems for improved scent delivery
US8210448Oct 25, 2011Jul 3, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanySystems and devices for emitting volatile compositions
US8349251Feb 1, 2012Jan 8, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethods, devices, compositions, and systems for improved scent delivery
US8651395May 18, 2012Feb 18, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanySystems and devices for emitting volatile compositions
US8721962Dec 13, 2012May 13, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethods, devices, compositions and systems for improved scent delivery
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/47, 239/55, 239/49, D23/366
International ClassificationA61L9/12, F24F3/16
Cooperative ClassificationF24F3/16, A61L9/12
European ClassificationA61L9/12, F24F3/16