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Publication numberUS3091459 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1963
Filing dateOct 5, 1959
Priority dateOct 5, 1959
Publication numberUS 3091459 A, US 3091459A, US-A-3091459, US3091459 A, US3091459A
InventorsGeorge E Lindman
Original AssigneeMag Powr Games Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Magnetic game
US 3091459 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. E. LINDMAN MAGNETIC GAME May 28, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 5, 1959 IN VEN TOR. GEORGE E. Ll/VDMAN ATTORNEYS May 28, 1963 G. E. LINDMAN MAGNETIC GAME 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 5, 1959 INVENTOR. GEORGE E, Ll/VDMAN BY 010M 7M M W A TTORNEYS May 28, 1963 G. E. LINDMAN MAGNETIC GAME 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Oct. 5, 1959 Fi g.23q

Fig.22

Fig.23b.

INVENTOR. George E. Lindman y 8, 1963 G. E. LINDMAN 3,091,459

MAGNETIC GAME} Filed 00%.. 5, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 224 Fig.28.

INVEN TOR. George E. Lindman BY AMm/Mm finite States.

ataet 3,091,459 MAGNETIC GAME George E. Lindrnan, San Francisco, Calif., assignor to Mag-=Powr Games, Inc., Mill Valley, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Oct. 5, 1959, Ser. No. 851,487 9 Claims. (Cl. 273--88) This invention relates to a new and improved amusement device, and more particularly relates to a new and improved game which is played with magnetized players adapted to be moved slid-ably over the surface of a game board under influence of operating magnets manipulated beneath said game board. This is a continuation in part of my co-pending application entitled Amusement Device, serial No. 393,880, filed November 26, 1953, now abandoned.

The invention defines a parlor game wherein a plurality of players are visually delineated into first and second football teams. The players are provided with bar mag nets, magnetscarried by members of the first team being oppositely disposed from magnets carried by members of the second team whereby like team players magnetically repell each other but are magnetically attracted to players of the opposite team. Oppositely magnetized control members are provided whereby each contestant can manipulate members of one team. A ball formed with a metal core is magnetically responsive to both teams.

Although the present invention has been found to have primary utility in providing a parlor game for simulating the action and play of American football and baseball, it is contemplated that many of the unique principles of the invention to be hereinafter described can also be employed to simulate other games of sport such as rugby, soccer, basketball, or the like. For purposes of brevity and clarity of understanding, the principles of construction and operation of the present amusement device will be described hereinafter with specific reference to the "games of football and baseball.

One object of the invention is to provide miniature figures for the games of American football and baseball which closely resemble human players of each of said games as such players function in actual football and baseball.

A principal object of the invention as adapted to football is to provide a miniature football game to be played by two human contestants, each controlling an eleven player team of miniature player units which are fashioned to simulate the backfield and line players of an American football team. The novel construction and arrangement of the various elements comprising the present invention are such as to provide a game in which the outcome between the contestants is made almost entirely dependent upon the skill and ability of the contestants to control and manipulate their respective teams according to sound principles of American football as it is actually played by human contestants. In this regard I am aware that there have been developed in the past, numerous types and kinds of amusement devices, including those which employ magnetized game pieces, which are supposed to provide a means for simulating various games involving human activity, such as football games. However, all of the prior art devices of which I have knowledge are subject to the general disadvantage and criticism that the outcome of game play depends largely on chance rather than upon the skill and dexterity of the human contestants. Hence, and as above mentioned, it is an important object of the present amusement device to provide a means for simulating the play and action of American football or other game involving opposing teams of players in which the outcome of game play is made substantially wholly dependent upon the two contestants individual knowledge of football play and upon their individual skill and physical dexterity in being able to control their respective teams of player units according to sound principles of play.

Another principal object of the invention is to provide a game comprising opposing teams of magnetized player units and in which the player units within a team are arranged to magnetically repel one another and wherein the magnetized players of opposing teams are magnetized to attract one another. As will more fully apear hereinafter, this unique arrangement of player units accounts in large measure for the ability of the players to be arranged and manipulated by operating magnets over a game board surface in life-like fashion.

A more specific object of the invention is to provide individual player units of unique construction. For example, one unique feature of construction in the football player units resides in the provision of an upwardly flared :arcuate recess or inward bevel formed in the body portion of a player unit which operates to literally magnetically pick up off the game board surface the miniature football in conjunction with which the game is played. Another unique structural feature resides in the provision of a spring catapult for certain of the player units which permits the human contestants to operate the players so as to catapult the toy football through the air in simulation of forward passing and kicking of a football which normally occurs in actual play of American football.

Another more specific object of the invention is to provide operating magnets of unique construction for controlling movements of the magnetized player units across the surface of a game board whereby scraping or rasping of the operating magnets on the undersurface of the board is minimized. In a modification the control magnet manipulators are sheathed in plastic sockets wherein the top level of the control magnet is slightly below the toplevel of the plastic sockets. By locating the top portion of the con-trol'magnet below the upper surface of the socket, the harsh scraping noise of the magnet against the undersurface of the table is eliminated. Another feature with respect to the manipulators resides in joining the sockets obliquely to the elongated handles of the manipulators such that the upper ends of the sockets are forward of the handle ends to which they are attached, the tops of the sockets being .disposed oblique to the handles. In use, when the top of the socket lies flat against the undersurface of the board, the handle is angularly, downwardly disposed thereto enabling the contestants hand gripping the handle to be freely moved under the board without interference by the latter. Additionally, the manipulator may be provided with a grip portion on the handle which properly positions the control magnet upwardly under the board and also provides uni-form position of grip assisting the contestant in properly positioning the control magnet to actuate a particular piece.

Another object resides in the fact that the bar magnets carried by certain of the miniature figures may be canted upwardly .and rearwardly. This places the lower end of the magnet, from which point the players are controlled, at a forward point of such figures and the opposite end of the magnet relatively rearwardly of such figures. By locating the magnet in this manner, the center of gravity of the figures is placed rearwardly creating a relatively rearward drag, while the magnetic forces of attraction controlling movement are positioned at a forward point of the figures. This efiects a much improved forward or frontward movement of the figures when magnetically activated in that the rearwardly concentrated weight causes the figure to align itself with the direction of movement. It also focuses the horizontal forces of attraction at the fronts of the players causing them to influence magnetically the ball and the other players with the front s,oe1,4.59

portions of their forms, thereby more closely approximating the competition of actual football and baseball players. Alternatively the magnets may be formed and incorporated in the figures with relatively less weight at the front of each figure, forming a rearward drag which aligns the figure with its direction of movement similar to the canted magnet. The latter arrangement provides certain economies of manufacture over the canted magnet.

Another object of the invention as applied to football resides in providing the playing surface with green flocking to simulate a baseball diamond or football gridiron. The flocking decreases the area of frictional contact between the bases of the figures and the surface of the board, thereby facilitating movement of the players over the playing surface. At the same time, the soft flocking impedes the football, causing it to roll dead and eliminating the unrealistic long rolls (or sliding) which occur on a smooth game surface.

Another feature with respect to football resides in the fact that running players are provided with their heads and shoulders projecting forwardly beyond the vertical plane of their base, permitting body contact at a point above the center of gravity and causing toppling of the players, thus approximating the fall of such players when blocked or tackled.

Another feature of the invention in an embodiment as adapted to football resides in the fact that the center is provided with a bar magnet as are the other player figures and thus may be maneuvered to guard against runs through center and guard positions. Additionally, means integral with the centers legs space the ball from the centers magnet so that the magnet does not interfere with snapping or hiking of the ball.

Another feature of an embodiment of the invention resides in the fact that the kicker and the passer are made from spring material, such as resilient vinyl plastic, so that the leg of the kicker and the arm of the passer can be urged rearwardly and then released causing a forward thrusting of the ball simulating an actual punt, a place kick or a pass.

Another feature of the invention resides in the fact that the players may be provided with a steel disc serving as a base in contact with the fielders magnet. This effects a fanning out of magnetic lines of force peripherally of the base to attract the ball or other players.

As adapted to baseball, one feature of the invention is that the fielding team has a plastic base portion which extends upwardly and slightly outwardly sufficient to prevent fast moving balls from climbing up the player and whereby the ball may subsequently be thrown by the player.

Another feature of the invention is that the baseball is provided with a shape slightly greater than a hemisphere, a flattened portion adjacent the playing board permitting the ball to slide rather than roll and yet retaining the appearances of an ordinary baseball. The ball is provided with a magnet terminating flush with the flattened face in a polarity opposite to that of a ball manipulator or control member. Thus, if the ball should become momentarily capsized with its flat surface not resting on the playing surface, the magnetic attraction of the ball control manipulator immediately corrects its position returning the flat surface into contact with the ground. Additionally, the ball consists of a coat of non-magnetic material over a magnet core. The non-magnetic covering causes a resounding crack similar to hitting an actual baseball by a wooden bat, and also spaces the balls magnet from a magnetically attracted fielder, permitting the ball to be easily detached from the fielder and thrown by the manipulator.

Another feature of the invention is that the base runners are provided with a base of non-magnetic material extending sufiiciently beyond the periphery of the lower end of the magnet, thus preventing the runners from becoming attached to the first, second and third basemen when running bases.

Other objects of the present invention will become apparent upon reading the following specification and referring to the accompanying drawings in which similar characters of reference represent corresponding parts in each of the several views.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a game board with the player units arranged in typical play formation and showing how the operating magnets may be positioned beneath the game board for controlling movements of the player units.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary view, partially in section, showing a game board with player units positioned thereon and with operating magnets positioned adjacent the underside of the game board.

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of a first type of player unit.

FIG. 4 is a front elevation view of same.

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of same.

FIG. 6 is a bottom plan view of same.

FIG. 7 is a side elevation view of a second type of player unit.

FIG. 8 is a front elevational view of same.

FIG. 9 is a top plan view of same.

FIG. 10 is a bottom plan view of same.

FIG. 11 is a side elevational view of a player unit simulating the center of each team of player units.

FIG. 12 is a front elevational view of same.

FIG. 13 is a top plan view of same.

FIG. 14 is an end elevational view of a preferred embodiment of toy football.

FIG. 15 is a side elevational view of same shown partly in section.

FIG. 16 is a side elevational view of same shown partly in section of one of the operating magnets.

FIG. 17 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a modified type of player unit construction with parts broken away in section.

FIG. 18 is a bottom plan view of same.

FIG. 19 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention as adapted to baseball, set up in preparation for the contestants.

FIG. 20 is a view taken on line 20-20 of FIG. 19 and showing the batter approximating actual size illustrating the underlying, actuating structure for the batter and showing a fragment of the playing table in cross section.

FIG. 21 is a fragmentary cross section of a portion of the table taken adjacent third base as in FIG. 19 and illustrating in side elevation a runner, a fielder, the ball, and fragmentarily showing control manipulators for each of the foreging movable parts of the game.

FIGS. 22, 22a and 22b illustrate a runner, showing respectively a top view, a front elevation and a bottom view.

FIGS. 23, 23a and 23b illustrate a fielder, showing respectively a front elevation, a top view and a bottom view.

FIGS. 24, 24a and 24b illustrate a kicker formed in accordance with the present invention as adapted to football and show respectively a side elevation, a front elevation and a top view.

FIGS. 25a and 25b illustrate the center, showing respectively a side elevation and a perspective view.

FIGS. 26:: and 26b illustrate a passer, showing respectively a side elevation and perspective view.

FIGS. 27 and 27a illustrate a football runner, showing respectively side and front elevations.

' FIG. 28 is a fragmentary cross section of a playing surface or simulated gridiron formed with a flocked upper surface.

FIG. 29 schematically illustrates a modified magnet incorporated in one of the players.

FIGS. 1-18 illustrate an embodiment of the invention as adapted to football. The game board on which the game is adapted to be played is indicated generally at A; the game pieces comprising the two opposing teams of player units are shown supported on the game board and are indicated generally at B; and the operating magnets which are employed to control movement of the player units from the under side of the game board are indicated generally at C.

The game board heretofore designated generally at A preferably comprises a relatively thin rectangular sheet of magnetically penetratable material 20, such as, for example, chip board or sheet plastic material which is preferably re-enforced around its marginal edges by a suitable frame 21. Preferably, the game board is provided with four depending legs 22 which may be about 30 inches in length so as to permit the two human contestants to sit facing one another at opposite ends of the game board and with sufiicient clearance between their knees and the under side of the game board to permit convenient manipulation of the operating magnets C slideably across the undersurface of the said game board.

The top surface of the game board sheet material 20 is preferably visually marked off with appropriate spaced lines to delineate and simulate a football playing field. More specifically, the game board is marked off to indicate the yard lines in multiples of ten as well as the opposite goal lines and end zones of a playing field. Miniature goal posts such as indicated at 24, provided with the usual cross bar 26 may also be provided for removable positioning at opposite ends of the field. An elongated strip 27 of cork or like material may be adhesively secured to the top surface of the game board adjacent the side lines of the playing field to permit selective positioning along the side lines of a miniature down marker 28 and yard markers 29. In this connection the down marker and yard markers may be formed with a relatively sharp point that can be penetrated into the cork strip 27 in any desired location along the strip. The yard markers 29 may be secured together by a miniature chain 31 of desired length torepresent the number of yards of playing field area each team must gain within four successive plays to make a first down in accordance with recognized rules of American football.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 1-18, the plurality of player units heretofore indicated generally at B, is preferably visually marked or delineated into two opposing eleven player teams. In more detail, each team of player units consists of eleven game pieces which are configured and colored to simulate the center, guards, tackles, ends and backfield players of an actual football team. FIG. 1 discloses how the two teams of player units may be positioned on the board indicating the typical formation prior to the commencement of play from scrimmage. In the arrangement shown the group or team of eleven players indicated generally at 3?. is arranged in typical offensive formation and with six linemen positioned along and parallel to a line of scrimmage '(which it may be assumed is the fifty yard line) and with four backfield players arranged in double wing formation behind the line of scrimmage. The group, or team of eleven player units, indicated generally at 33 in FIG. 1, is positioned on the game board in what may be considered as a typical defensive formation and with six line player-s disposed parallel facing the opposing line players of the offensive units arranged in defensive format-ion behind the defensive linemen.

FIGS. 3, 4, 5 and 6 may be considered as representative of one type of construction of each of the game pieces except for the team centers. More specifically, each player may comprise essentially a bar magnet 35 having north and south magnetic poles disposed in line with the vertical axis and south magnetic poles disposed in line with the vertical axis of the game piece. A figurine portion, indicated at 36, configured to visually simulate the upper body portion and head of a football player is, in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3, 4, 5 and 6, securely attached to the top surface of bar magnet 35. Preferably the player units of opposing teams are colored differently to simulate characteristic football team uniforms.

Each bar magnet, as heretofore indicated at 35, is preferably formed truncated conical-shape in cross section and is provided with a front vertically extending arcuate recess 37. Preferably the innermost wall 38 of the recess extends upwardly rearwardly at oblique angle with respect to the vertical axis of the player unit. The purpose of forming the bar magnet 35 and the arcuate recess 37 in the particular manner hereinabove described will be explained more fully hereinafter.

The undersurface of each of the ten magnetized player units of each team may also be provided with a friction pad such as indicated at 39. This pad may comprise simply a daub of rubber or plastic or similar tough material adhered to the fiat undersurface of the bar magnet adjacent the rearward edge thereof. The purpose of the friction pad 39 is to create a slight frictional drag at the rearward edge of each player unit so that when said unit is moved slideably across the game board under the influence of an operating magnet, the unit will always tend to move forwardly-i.e., each unit will, because of the frictional drag created by pad 39, move with its arcuate recess 37 leading in the direction of movement.

FIGS. 17 and 18 are illustrative of a modified and more preferred type of construction of the magnetized player units of each team. In this form each of the player units comprises an upright cylindrical bar magnet 60, the lower end of which is anchored within an apertured base plate 61 of soft iron. A figurine portion 62, preferably made of lighter weight and less expensive material, is supported on base plate 61 and encases magnet 60. The front side of figurine portion 62 is formed with an arcuate ball receiving recess 37a similar in shape and proportion to the previously described recess 37.

It is noted that the lower end of the bar magnet 60 is anchored to base plate 61 at a point located off-center and toward the rear edge of the plate. The off-center position of the iron magnet (which is much heavier than the lighter weight plastic material) plus the void in the plastic body defining the slot 37a results in the center of gravity of the player unit being located nearer the rear edge. By shifting the greater amount of weight toward the rear edge it has been found that when the player unit is moved across the surface of a game board by its respectively associated operating magnet, the player unit Will adjustably rotate itself in such a manner that the slotted front 37a of the unit will always move as the leading edge in the direction in which the operating magnet is manipulated.

As mentioned previously hereinabove, the ten magnetized players of opposing teams are magnetized so as to magnetically repel other player units of the same team and to magnetically attract the player units of the opposing team. Thus, in the preferred embodiment of the invention, each of the ten magnetized player units of one team comprises a bar magnet in which the south pole is located at the base of the magnet; whereas each player unit of the other team comprises a bar magnet in which the north pole is disposed at the base of the magnet. It is believed evident that when two such player units of the same team are moved in upright position into proximity with one another the like .magnetic forces of each will tend to repel one another. On the other hand, when player units of opposing teams are moved in upright position adjacent one another the magnetic forces of opposite polarity will tend to attrack one another.

I also prefer to provide at least one magnetized player unit of each team with a spring catapault to enable the contestants to imitate realistically the passing and kicking of a football that ordinarily occurs in actual game play.

FIGS. 7, 8, 9 and 10 illustrate a magnetized player unit which may be considered identical in all respects in construction to the player unit heretofore described with specific reference to FIGS. 3, 4, and 6. However, the unit shown in FIGS. 7 through 10 inclusive, is provided with an upwardly and rearwardly projecting spring catapult 40, which may comprise, more specifically, a flexible spring wire 41 and a cup-shaped pod 42 in which the miniature game football 45 may be loosely nested. The base end 43 of the spring Wire 41 may be imbedded within the material from which the figurine portion 36 of the player unit is made. As will more fully appear, the toy football may be catapulted into space across the area of the game board by manually retracting the pod against the force of spring 41 and then suddenly releasing the pod from retracted position.

FIGS. 14 and illustrate the preferred construction of the miniature football 45 with which the game is played. More particularly, the miniature ball may comprise an oval shaped core 46 of magnetized or magnetizable iron which is readily susceptible to the influence of surrounding magnetic forces of either north or south polarity, and which may be painted or coated with a non-magnetic material such as flock 4'7 to more realistically simulate a conventional leather covered football.

The construction of the player unit simulating each team center is shown in FIGS. 11, 12 and 13. The center of each team is preferably made of a non-magnetized and non-magnetic metal so as not to magnetically influence the miniature football or adjacent magnetized players. Moreover, each team center is preferably made of a relatively heavy metal, such as lead. The purpose of making this player out of relatively heavy material is that even though it remains immoble during actual game play it will establish an effective barrier to the attempted movement of any of the mobile magnetized players across the area of the game board, which the team center may occupy. The center preferably is configured to simulate a human figure in crouched position with its legs 48 and arms 49 supporting the body portion 5t) above the game board surface, and with the spaced arms and legs defining a longitudinally extended recess 51 so as to permit positioning and movement of the miniature football on the game board within the recess and under the body portion 50 of the player unit.

Each of the four operating magnets heretofore designated generally at C may be constructed substantially identically with one another, such as shown in more detail in FIG. 16. More specifically, each of the operating magnets comprises an elongated handle 52 formed of plastic, wood, or other light-weight nonmagnetic material, and to one end of which is secured a laterally projecting bar-magnet assembly, indicated generally at 53.

More specifically, the magnet assembly 53 preferably comprises an inner core bar magnet 54, having north and south magnetic poles located adjacent its opposite ends and encased within a sheath 56 of non-magnetic metal, such as aluminum alloy. A soft iron plug 57 of rounded contour is telescoped within and supported by the outer end of sheath 56. The sheath 56 and rounded plug 57 function in effect to focus the magnetic forces at the plug end of the magnet which is moved against the underside of the game board for causing movement of the magnetized players and game ball during game play. By focusing the magnetic forces to the more or less restricted area of the outer tip of the operating magnet an operator is enabled to more easily manipulate and control either the ball or one magnetized player unit at a time without magnetically influencing adjacent magnetized player units. The non-magnetic sheath has the additional function of preventing opponents operating magnets from magnetically adhering to one another should they come into contact under the table. Moreover, because the outer end of the iron plug 57 is rounded an operator need not pay any particular heed as to the angle which he holds and moves the operating magnets with respect to the undersurface of the game board.

Although it is considered unnecessary herein to explain in detail all of the rules and variations of preferred game play employing the combination of elements and devices above described, it is believed that the present invention can be more readily understood and appreciated by having brief reference to certain aspects of the game play itself.

In brief, play of the game is patterned closely after the rules and action of American football. Stated otherwise, the combination of elements above described affords a means whereby the player units may be arranged and manipulated to simulate the action and play of oftensive and defensive teams of football players and in which opposing player units can be manipulated to tackle and block one another, and in which the action of kicking, passing, centering and fumbling of the miniature football by the player units can be realistically simulated.

Play of the game may be instituted by lining up on the game board the two opposing teams of player units in formation simulating the offensive and defensive formation of American football teams at the kick-off. The miniature football may be kicked down field by operating the player unit on the kick-off team which is provided with the spring catapult 4-1. The contestant whose team is selected to kick off may hold the catapult game piece with one hand while manually withdrawing and releasing the cataput element with the magnetic ball positioned within the pod recess 4-4. Upon release of the spring catapult the ball will be impelled across the board toward the receiving team where it can be picked up by a player unit of this latter team and returned toward the opposite goal line through manipulation of the control magnets. In instituting play by kicking off in the manner above described the contestant controlling the receiving team is required to keep his hands on top of the game board until the football is actually kicked off. At the instant of kick-off, both contestants are then at liberty to grasp their respective operating magnets and to manipulate their respective team players. In this regard, the contestant controlling the receiving team will attempt to manipulate one of his magnetized players into contact with the miniature ball and to move this player unit with the ball held in magnetic attraction therewith down field toward his opponents goal line. The receiving contest, with his other operating magnet, may also attempt to manipulate one or more of his other magnetized players as a blocker moving ahead of the ball carrier. The contestant whose team kicked off will, upon the instant of kick-01f, also grasp his two operating magnets in both hands and attempt to manipulate one or more magnetized players of his team into physical contact with the ball-carrier of the receiving team to effect a tackle on the ball-carrier.

At this point it will be recalled that the mgnetized players of each team are magnetically repellent to one another and magnetically attractive to players of the opposing team. Accordingly, if the ball-carrier of one team is moved closely adjacent or into actual contact with any of the magnetized players of the opposing team the two players will adhere together and effectively prevent further progress or movement of either under influence of the operating magnets. Moreover, by making the bar magnet base 35 of each player unit truncated conical shaped, as above mentioned, it frequently happens that when two opposing magnetized players are brought into sharp physical contact with one another the forces of magnetism tending to draw the two units together will result in one of the player units tilting off its base toward the other player unit and overturning on the game board. This action again provides for a more realistic simulation of actual football play wherein 9 tackling and blocking between players generally results in one or both of them being thrown to the ground.

It may be further observed at this point that the armate recess 37, which is formed in each magnetized player and is configured to present an upwardly and rearwardly slanted rear wall surface 38, enables each of the magnetized players to virtually pick up the miniature football off the surface of the game board within its recessed pocket 37.

More specifically, when any of the magnetized players are moved into a position adjacent the toy football and with the said football embraced within the confines of arcuate recess 37, the forces of magnetism exerted by the vertically disposed magnetic poles of the bar magnet 35 upon the iron core of the football will tend to actually lift the ball upwardly along the slanted rear wall 38 of the recess a slight distance above the surface of the game board. This arrangement has the advantage of eliminating any frictional drag that the ball might exert across the top of the game board surface which would otherwise occur if no provision were made to magneti- 'cally lift the ball a slight distance above the said game board surface.

After completion of the initial kick-off play as above described, and assuming that the contestant controlling the receiving team obtained possession of the ball with "one of his magnetized players who was subsequently tackled before reaching his opponent's goal line, addi- 'tional plays from scrimmage may then be instituted. Each scrimmage play begins as in actual American football with the opposing teams lining up facing one another at the line of -scrimmage, and with the offensive "center passing the ball back to a ball-carrier of the same team.

FIG. t1 may be considered as illustrative of how the two teams of player units may be lined up on the line of scrimmage at the commencement of a scrimmage play. The player units 33 positioned to the right of the line of scrimmage are lined up in typical defensive formation, whereas the player units designated at 32 to the left of the line of scrimmage are lined up in a typical offensive formation. In commencing a scrimmage play the contestant controlling the offensive team will manually place the miniature ball beneath his own center and within the longitudinal recess 51, defined by the arms and legs of said center (see FIGS. 11 and 12). Play is instituted by the offensive contestant moving the miniature ball rearwardly across the table surface under influence of one of his operating magnets and into the possession of one of the offensive magnetized players simulating a backfield ball-carrier. At the moment that the ball is centered in this fashion, play begins. The offensive contestant will attempt to manipulate the ball-carrier player through the opposed team players toward the defensive teams goal line. Generally speaking the offensive contestant will employ one operating magnet under the game board to move the balLcarrier while at the same time he will attempt to manipulate one or more of his magnetized players into position as blockers for the ballcarrier. The defensive team contestant will, of course, try to manipulate with his two operating magnets defensive magnetized players into contact with the offensive ball-carrier to effect a tackle on the offensive ball-carrier.

As soon as the ball-carrier is contacted and effectively tackled by defensive player, the play is stopped. Thereupon a new scrimmage play at the new scrimmage line --i.e., the ,point where the previous tackle of the ballcarrier occurredmay be instituted. Under recognized rules of American football an offensive team is allowed four plays from scrimmage to gain a first down by moving the ball toward the defensive teams goal line a distance of ten yards from the initial line of scrimmage. Similarly, in play of the present game the offensive team contestant is given four downs in which to move the ball a prescribed distance over the game board, as determined by the miniature yard markers 28. If the offensive team succeeds in moving this prescribed distance down-field within four scrimmage plays, it may be considered as having made a first down. This process is repeated until such time as the offensive team succeeds in scoring or loses control of the ball to the defensive team.

Scoring by either team may be accomplished in substantially the same Ways as scoring may occur in actual football play. Thus, for example, a touchdown, worth six points, results whenever an eligible team player crosses the goal line of the opposing team with the ball. Scoring can also be accomplished by the offensive team kicking a field goal or making a conversion after touchdown. In this connection the offensive team may attempt a field goal at any time in the following manner: the offensive team contestant, upon centering the ball in the manner above described to the back-field player provided with the spring catapult, will declare aloud to his opposing contestant his intention to try for a field goal. At this instant both contestants are required to instantly stop play, and place their operating magnets and hands on top of the game board surface. Thereupon the offensive team contestant may attempt to catapult the game ball through the uprights and over the cross bar of his opponents goal post in the same fashion as described above with regard to the manner in which the catapult player may be employed to impel the miniature ball down-field in the pick-off play. If the offensive team contestant succeeds in catapnlting the miniature ball through the uprights of the goal post, his team is presumed to have made a field goal for a three point score in its favor.

The game also provides a means for an offensive team to attempt to gain yardage or make a touchdown by forward passing. In brief, an offensive team contestant may attempt a forward pass much in the same manner as the offensive team may attempt a field goal. In more detail, upon centering the miniature ball to the magnetized offensive back-field player provided with the spring catapult, and contingent upon the ability of the offensive contestant to maneuver another one of his magnetized players into a suitable pass receiving position on the game board before his ball-carrier is tackled by the defensive team, the offensive contestant can declare aloud his intention to pass. Thereupon both contestants are required to immediately stop play and to place their hands and operating magnets above the game board. With all of the players remaining in the positions they occupied at the instant the offensive contestant de-, clared pass the latter will attempt to catapult the miniature football to the eligible pass receiver player which he has previously maneuvered into receiving position. Instantly upon release of the catapult both contestants are at liberty to grasp their respective operating magnets and to resume maneuvering the players of their respective teams. In this regard the offensive contestant will attempt to maneuver his pass receiver player into magnetic possession of the ball and thence toward his opponents goal line. The defensive contestant, on the other hand, will attempt to manipulate one or more players to intercept the ball or to tackle the offensive pass receiver, assuming the latter has completed the pass and is in magnetic possession of the ball.

FIGS. 19-2312 illustrate the invention as adapted to baseball.

FIG. 19 illustrates a polygonal game table 112 which is formed of marginal members 114 mated together at their ends. As appears in FIG. 21 each member 114 is cut out to define substantially an L in cross section, to receive and support the game board 116 in the L-shaped cutouts. Game board 116 is secured in spaced relation from the defined upstanding leg 118 of each L defined by the cross section of marginal members 114, the spaced relation defining a trough 120 marginally surrounding the game board. Game board 116 should have a smooth surface and be formed of non-magnetic ma 1 1 terial. Game board 116 is visually delineated, as by paint lines to simulate a baseball diamond 122, home plate 124 being nearest the apex of playing table 112 appearing at the bottom as viewed in FIG. 19, and first, second and third bases and the outfield being located in an orthodox, well-known manner.

The batter indicated at 126 is located immediately to the left of home plate. As appears in FIG. 20, the batter is a figurine simulating a batter in action and carrying a downwardly extending bat 128 which preferably is formed of wood. The figurine is mounted on a pedestal 130 which forms the top of an axle 132 journaled through playing board 116. The lower end of axle 132 is provided with a trigger mechanism 134 operable to rota-t-e hatter 126. Resilient means such as an elastic band 136 is suitably attached to trigger mechanism 134 and to a peg 138 which is located outwardly from home plate 124 in the direction of third base. Band 136 is operable to swing bat 128 from the cocked position, shown in dotted line in FIG. 19, and over home plate 124. The cocked position is obtained by manually actuating trigger mechanism 134. In FIG. 20 trigger 134 has been released swinging bat 128 over home plate 124 for a strike, ball, foul, or other play.

FIGS. 2122b illustrate the construction of one of the runners 141 Each runner comprises a figurine formed to simulate a man running, his feet being formed integral with a thin plastic base 142. A bar magnet 144 is canted angularly from base 142 and has been illustrated with its north pole flush with the lower surface of base 142 and its south pole disposed angularly upwardly and rearwardly therefrom. Canting of magnet 144 focuses the forces of magnetic attraction relatively forward of the center of the gravity of the player, which center of gravity is moved rearwardly by the position and weight distribution of magnet 144. This arrangement focusing the magnetic forces forward of the runners center of gravity while moving the center of gravity relatively rearward causes the runner to align itself with its path of movement.

FIGS. 21 and 23-2312 illustrate one of the fielders 146. As used in this application, the term fielders includes all members of the fielding team.

Each fielder 146 includes a figurine simulating a baseball player intent upon catching a ball. The figurine is formed integral with a pedestal 148 which the figure appears to straddle. As appears in FIG. 21, pedestal 148 is mounted on a magnetic metal disc 150.

A vertically mounted magnet 154 is carried within player 146, the magnet having been illustrated with its south pole downward and contacting metal disk 150. Disk 150 causes a fanning out of magnetic lines of force peripherally of the base of the player and serves to attract the baseball and simulate catches. In the illustrated fielder, it will be observed pedestal 148 extends forwardly of magnet 154 disposing the latter relatively rearwardly of the figure. Disk 150 being in contact with magnet 154 is magnetized and, in effect, becomes an integral part of the magnet forming a magnet which is substantially heavier at the rear of the fielder. In use, the disk in combination with the magnet assists in giving forward direction to the fielder when it is moved.

Ball 152 is formed of non-magnetic material such as plastic and has a flattened bottom 156 upon which the ball slides across game board 116. A magnet 158 vertically disposed Within ball 152 has been illustrated with its north pole down and flush with flat surface 156. Thus, unlike football 35, previously described, the baseball is attracted only to members of the fielding team. The plastic surface of ball 152 may be impressed with head lines, not illustrated, to simulate the seams of a baseball. As appears in FIG. 20, the center of ball 152, when fiat surface 156 is down, should be approximately the same height as the lowermost swing of bat 128. Thus, when batter 126 is actuated with proper timing as ball 152 passes over home plate, the ball will be squarely hit by the bat. Due to the downwardly extending bat 123, an inside ball may be pitched which, if the batter swings, Will be missed, for a strike. This increases the variety of pitches that can be made to strike out a batter. this connection the plastic coating of ball 152 being hit by bat 128 effects a resounding crack similar to the familiar cracking sound of a bat hitting a ball in an actual baseball game.

The control manipulators for use with the game as adapted to baseball have been illustrated in FIG. 21. Four magnetic manipulators are provided to move the various elements or pieces of the game over the surface of the board. The manipulators operate from underneath the board. The manipulators comprise a baserunner manipulator 164, a ball manipulator 166, and a fielder manipulator 168. Two runner manipulators 164 are provided the contestant at bat in order that two runners may be actuated at the same time. The two runner manipulators are identical, and accordingly only one has been illustrated.

With the exception of differences in polarity adapted to contact the undersurface of playing field 116, the manipulators are identical. Thus each manipulator comprises an elongate pole on handle 170 having secured at one end thereof a forwardly and obliquely disposed plastic sheath 172 which in use is turned upward whereby when the obliquely disposed, upper terminal end 174 of the sheath is flush with the undersurface of board 116, handle 170 extends angularly downward from the table, spacing the gripped end so the contestants hand may be moved under the table. Disposed within each plastic sheath is a magnet 175, having an upper terminal end spaced somewhat short of terminal end 174 of the sheath. As illustrated in FIG. 21, each manipulator has the magnet disposed within the sheath whereby the polar end of the magnet nearest the undersurface of playing board 116 has a polarity opposite to the adjacent polarity of the associated overlying piece of the game it is adapted to actuate. The outer or gripped end of each handle 170 is also provided with a detent 176 which is engaged by the thumb of the player. Detent 176 when engaged positions sheath 172 vertically upwardly for proper contact with the undersurface of table 116. It also provides uniform spacing from the grip to the terminal end 174 of the manipulator whereby the player soon learns to maneuver for proper movement of a particular piece.

The game consists of nine players for the fielding team and at least four runners for the team at bat. The fielders 146 are arranged on game board 116 to simulate the various actual positions assumed by members of the fielding team in actual baseball, and one of the runners is positioned adjacent home plate 124 by the contestant at bat.

The fielding contestant uses in one hand ball manipulator 166 and in the other hand fielder manipulator 168 to simulate pitches or throws. The fielding contestant positions the fielder manipulator 168 under the fielder having the ball and with the other hand brings ball manipulator 166 under the ball, moving the latter to cause the ball to slide away from the fielder to a desired position. Speed and direction of the pitch or throw is controlled by movement of the control magnet, ball 152 following its movement. iIhus, in pitching, the contestant can pitch a variety of outside and inside curves, fast balls, slow balls, screw balls, etc.

The contestant at bat hits the ball 152 by releasing trigger mechanism 134 to swing bat 128 over the home plate.

If the contestant at bat hits the ball and it flies into the magnetic field of a fielder 146 attaching itself thereto, it is regarded as a caught fly ball and the batter is out.

If the ball is hit and slides to a stop without attaching itself to a fielder, it is regarded as a grounder. The fielding contestant then may catch the grounder by maneuvering a fielder 146 toward the ball, thus attaching the ball to the maneuvered fielder. In this type of play it helps to lower the field manipulator from the undersurface of the game board and away from the fielder as the latter reaches the ball, allowing the fielder to slide-into the ball of its own momentum. If this is not done the magnetic field of fielder manipulator 168 may repel the like pole of the ball away from the fielder.

When causing one fielder to throw the ball to another, it similarly helps to lower the ball manipulator 166 momentarily before the ball reaches the receiving player, allowing the ball to slide .into the player under its own momentum. With practice participants will become 'quite proficient at simply aiming the ball and then with a sharp movement of the ball manipulator, causing it to slide freely almost the entire distance between the throwing and receiving fielders.

If the ball is hit so that it slides into trough 120, the fielders cannot recover it and it is considered a home run.

The contestant at bat is not permitted to pick up his runner manipulator 164 until the ball is hit. This gives the fielding contestant a fair chance to field the ball and throw it to first base, or perhaps another base in the event the bases are loaded, and also prevents the contes'tant at bat from interfering with the pitch.

Size, weight and magnetic power of fielders 146, ball 152 and runners 40 and respective manipulators should be such that the runners and fielders move easily and swiftly, even when carrying or running with the ball. The ball should be strongly attracted to the fielders so that catches can be accomplished easily and players can carry the ball in situations where the contestant wants to make a player run with it as, for example, when a baseman wants to tag out a runner; notwithstanding, the ball is readily detachable from fielders and easily thrown by the ball manipulator 166.

FIGS. 24-28 illustrate another embodiment of the invention as adapted to the game of football.

Kicker 180 illustrated in FIGS. 24-24b comprises a figurine with arms extended simulating a football player actually kicking a football. The left leg of the figurine is formed integral with a base or pedestal 182 which carries an angularly disposed magnet 184 positioned with the lower end of the magnet at a point relatively to the front of the kicker and the top end of the magnets disposed rear-wardly. As in the case of runner 140 in the description of the invention as adapted to baseball the angular disposition of magnet 184 positions the center of gravity of kicker 1'80 relatively rearwardly providing a rearwardly disposed drag area with the magnetic forces :fiocused relatively to the front of the kicker, directionalizing the kicker for forward movement. As appears in FIG. 24a, pedestal 182 is largely restricted laterally to the left leg of the player leaving right leg 186 free for relatively forward and rearward movement, though the pedestal does extend under leg 186 as at 187 forming a base or tee on which a toy football 45 (FIGS. 14 and 15) may be set for place kicking. Magnet 184 is flush with the bottom of pedestal 182 and in contact with a magnetic metal disk 188 which underlies base 182F187. The metal forms a smooth undersurface facilitating gliding of the figure or a run over the field. All disks of the players should be rounded 'on their edges, which provides a smoother sliding action and also lifts the ball clear of the board for easier movement of the player. If the edge of the disk were not rounded, the football would tend to drag with the player along the surface of the playing board and impede the players movement.

The projecting disks also provide metal to metal, or magnet to magnet, contact of opposing players whereby a runner is effectively stopped by a member of the opposing team. The metal to metal contact is sufficiently strong that the players cannot be detached from each other with magnetic controls as they could be it" the disks did not protect for metal to metal contact. In this re 14 spect, the magnetically attracted opposing players tend to neutralize each others polarity, diminishing the ability of the underlying control manipulator to attract the ball carrier. Thus, a ball carrier who has been tackled is realistically stopped. Disk 188 also directs magnetic forces peripherally of the kicker to attract the ball and opposing players. The disk projects slightly forward of the ,player as at 189. This provides metallic, magnetic, positive contact with players of the opposing team Who are similarly provided with projecting disks. Leg 186 is formed of spring material such as resilient plastic, terminates in a concave portion 190 formed with a laterally projecting finger tab 192, and is of sufficient length to just miss tee or base 187 when retracted rearwardly to kick a football. The base is forwardly beveled at which permits the ball to climb up the player simulating an actual catch.

Center 194' comprises a figurine formed in a relatively crouched position simulating a center on an actual football field. A pedestal 196 supports the center. The center 194, unlike the center of FIGS. "ll-12, carries a magnet 198 permitting the center to be manipulated by a suitable manipulator (not illustrated). The legs of the center are spread :and joined by band 199 which 'space's the toy football from the centers magnet so it may be put in play with 'a manipulator. Magnet 198 is angularly disposed as in kicker 180, permitting the same directionalizing feature, and whereby center 194 of the present invention may be manipulated'to block runs 'of the opposing team through the center of the line. Similar to kicker 180, magnet 198 of center 194 is secured to a magnetic metal disk 200 providing the same features as in the kicker.

Passer 202 comprises a figurine simulating an actual football passer with one arm raised, appearing as though about to throw a forward pass. The right arm 204 terrninates in a concave portion or hand 2'0'6 carrying a small tab 208 permitting manual retraction of the arm when a football is placed in concave portion 206. Ann 204 is formed of spring material whereby the ball may be placed in hand 206; the hand is then retracted by tab 208 and upon being released the ball is passed. The outwardly extending left arm 210 provides a contacting means with other players causing the passer to topple more readily when rushed by defensive players. Passer 202 is formed integral with and "carried by a base 212 which carries an angularly disposed magnet 214. The base of pedestal 212 is fonwardly beveled as at 21 5 permitting the ball to climb up the passer.

FIGS. 2727a illustrate a running or charging player 216 comp-rising a figurine simulating a player in such a position. The figurine is carried by a pedestal 218 which in turn carries an angplarly disposed magnet 220. Pedestal 218 is forwardly beveled at 221 similar to the kicker and passer.

The game board 222 fragmentarily illustrated in cross section in FIG. 10 is provided on its top surface with fine flocking such as rayon 224 which serves to more closely simulate a gridiron, reduces the friction facilitating movement of players thereover, and at the same time inhibits long, unrealistic rolls or sliding of the simulated football.

It will be appreciated that the full complement of the game includes two teams, each of which includes a kicker, a center, a passer and su'ificient chargers or runners to form a full complement of eleven men for each team. It will also be understood that themagnets carried by each player are disposed such that the polarity of members of the same team is identical, and opposite to members of the other team. The two teams are arranged on a game board simulating a football gridiron to represent ofiensive and defensive teams.

Toy football 45 (FIGS. 14-15) formed with a core o f metal responsive to both north and south pole manipulat'ors is employed in this embodiment.

In commencing the game the contestant controlling the offensive team will manually place the ball between the legs of his own center, band 199 spacing the ball from attracting magnet 198. The offensive contestant then moves the ball rearwardly across the table surface under the influence of a manipulator such as described with reference to the invention as adapted to baseball and into the possession of one of the offensive magnetized players simulating a backfield ball player. The offensive contestant will attempt to manipulate the ball carrier player through the opposing team players toward the defensive teams goal line. At the same time the defensive player maneuvers his members to block progress of the ball toward the goal. A kick or punt is effected by positioning the ball upon tee 187 of kicker 180, having first retracted leg 186 and then released the leg. Alternatively the ball may be placed in pocket 190 and kicked directly therefrom. Upon being kicked, the ball travels down the field. Similarly, a pass is effected by inserting the ball within concave handle 206 of arm 204, retracting and then releasing the arm.

FIG. 29 illustrates a modified magnet carried by a player which lends forward direction to the players movement. The figurine 226 shown in dotted line is carried by a pedestal 228 which carries a short, vertical magnet 230. The magnet has been beveled forwardly as at 232 diminishing weight at the front of the player and effecting rearward drag. This arrangement provides the forward directional feature of the canted magnet but is more easily manufactured and incorporated in the pedestal. The disk 232 has been illustrated to project slightly forward of pedestal 228 for positive contact with another player.

From the foregoing it is believed evident that the hereinabove described arrangement and combination of elements provides a means whereby much of the play and action of American football and baseball can be realistically duplicated and simulated in miniature. The present game has been found to have particular appeal to both juvenile and adult contestants alike because the outcome of the game is almost entirely dependent upon the individual skill and dexterity of the contestants, to move the players, and to effect the various plays according to their own discretion and desires.

Although I have described the present invention in some detail for purposes of illustration and example, it is understood that various changes and modifications may be practiced within the spirit of the invention and scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a game played with magnetized players adapted to be slideably moved over a game board under influence of operating magnets moved beneath said game board, the combination comprising: a plurality of magnetized player units visually delineated into first and second opposing teams of players; said player units each comprising a bar magnet provided with a flat base portion for supporting said bar magnet in upright position for slideable movement along the surface of a game board; the north and south poles of the bar magnets comprising the players of said first team arranged similarly and with the north pole of each situated adjacent the base portion of the player, whereby the players within said first team are magnetically repellent to each other in upright position; the north and south poles of the bar magnets comprising the players of said second team arranged similarly and with the south pole of each situated adjacent the base portion of the player, whereby the players within said second team are magnetically repellent to each other and magnetically attractive to the players of said first team in upright position; and at least one operating magnet provided to manipulate each team from the underside of the game board, said operating magnets for opposite teams disposed with their north and south poles in vertically opposite polarity so that each said operating 13 magnet is magnetically attractive to only the players of the team it is respectively adapted to manipulate.

2. A game according to claim 1 and wherein the upper end of each operating magnet is curvatured to slideably move in contact against the under side of the game board; the south pole of the operating magnet provided for manipulating the players of said first team being situated adjacent the curvatured end of said magnet; the north pole of the operating magnet provided for manipulating the players of said second team being situated adjacent the curvatured end of the said magnet.

3. In a toy football game in which each player is simulated by a player unit adapted to be supported in upright position on, and moved slideably over a game board surface, the combination comprising: two visually delineated teams of opposing player units; each team consisting of eleven player units simulating back-field and line players, including a center; the player unit simulating the center of each team being formed of non-magnetic material; the remaining ten player units of each team each comprising a bar magnet provided with a fiat base portion for supporting said bar magnet in upright position for slideable movement across the surface of a game board; the north and south poles of the bar magnets comprising the ten magnetized players of said first team arranged similarly and with the north pole of each situated adjacent the base portion of the player, whereby the players within said first team are magnetically repellent to each other in upright position; the north and south poles of the bar magnets comprising the players of said second team arranged similarly and with the south pole of each situated adjacent the base portion of the player, whereby the players within said second team are magnetically repellent to each other and magnetically attractive to the players of said first team in upright position; and at least one operating magnet provided to manipulate each team from the underside of the game board, said operating magnets for opposite teams disposed with their north and south poles in vertically opposite polarity so that each said operating magnet is magnetically attractive to only the players of the team it is respectively adapted to manipulate.

4. A football game according to claim 3 and wherein the upper end of each operating magnet is curvatured to slidably move in contact against the under side of the game board; the south pole of the operating magnet provided for manipulating the players of said first team being situated adjacent the curvatured end of said magnet; the north pole of the operating magnet provided for manipulating the players of said second team being situated adjacent the curvatured end of the said magnet.

5. A football game according to claim 3 and wherein each of the ten magnetized players of each team comprises a truncated conical shaped base portion defining upwardly inwardly slanted sides; the front face of the base portion of each player unit formed with a vertical recess arcuate in cross section and inverted truncated conical shaped in vertical elevation.

6. A football game according to claim 3 and wherein one of the magnetized players of each team is provided with an upwardly projecting spring catapult proportionately recessed to receive a toy football.

7. -A football game according to claim 3 and wherein the player simulating the center of each team comprises a figure formed with a body, head, arms and legs, and in crouched position with the hands and feet supporting the body and head above the player surface defining a longitudinally extended recess between the game board surface and the body and arms and legs of the figure.

8. A game apparatus comprising in combination a nonmagnetic game board, two sets of players movable on the upper surface of said board and carrying magnetic material therein, a set of elongated manipulators movable on the lower surface of said board and carrying magnetic material therein, and a playing piece movable on the upper surface of said board upon being propelled by one of said players, and the magnetic material in said sets of players comprising substantially vertically disposed bar magnets, wherein .the south pole of the magnets of one of said sets extends downwardly and the north pole of the magnets of the other of said sets extends downwardly, and the magnetic material in the said set of manipulators comprising substantially vertically disposed bar magnets, wherein the south pole of the magnet of one of said manipulators extends upwardly and the north pole of the magnet of the other of said manipulators extends upwardly, thereby achieving positive attraction only between a given set of said players and its associated manipulator having an oppositely polarized portion of its magnet in adjacent relationship to said board.

9. In a parlor game simulating the game of baseball and including a plurality of magnetized player units slideably movable over a game board, the improvement comprising a game board; a figurine simulating a batter journaled in said game board for rotation about a substantially vertical axis; a toy bat joined to said figurine and extending laterally and downwardly therefrom; a substantially spherical member simulating a baseball and formed with a flat surface parallel and spaced from an equator of said member and including a bar magnet having a polar end terminating flush with said fiat surface,

said member adapted to move slideably over a game board surface on said flat surface; said figurine and connected bat and said member being relatively dimensioned whereby the lowermost end of said bat is spaced from the game board a distance substantially equal to the distance from the flat surface of said member to its equator measured through its polar axis; the juncture of said figurine and bat being vertically spaced from the game board a distance greater than the height of said member when the latter rests on its flat surface.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,044,506 Lundquist June 16, 1936 2,101,764 Swart Dec. 7, 1937 2,385,859 Jacobson Oct. 2, 1945 2,414,165 Paschal Jan. 14, 1947 2,485,143 Duncan Oct. 18, 1949 2,492,238 Roof Dec. 27, 1949 2,528,938 Wolf Nov. 7, 1950 2,716,028 Yaeger Aug. 23, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS 455,958 Canada Apr. 19, 1949 761,345 Great Britain Nov. 14, 1956

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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/108.4, 335/302, 446/135, 273/443, 124/7, 273/259, 335/285, 273/239
International ClassificationA63F7/00, A63F7/06, A63F7/26
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/068, A63F2003/0093
European ClassificationA63F7/06M