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Publication numberUS3092235 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1963
Filing dateApr 8, 1959
Priority dateApr 8, 1959
Publication numberUS 3092235 A, US 3092235A, US-A-3092235, US3092235 A, US3092235A
InventorsRobert S Kemp
Original AssigneeRobert S Kemp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin controlled commodity vending apparatus
US 3092235 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 4, 1963 R. s. KEMP 3,092,235

COIN CONTROLLED COMMODITY VENDING APPARATUS Filed April 8, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 03 wrom/Ey June 4, 1963 R. s. KEMP 3,092,235

COIN CONTROLLED COMMODITY VENDING APPARATUS Filed April 8, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 I N V EN TOR. @0.5m 5 Aff/vp BY www ATTO/@Alfy June 4, 1963 R. s. KEMP COIN CONTROLLED COMMODITY VENDING APPARATUS Filed April 8, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 ATTORNEY June 4, 1963 R. S. KEMP COIN CONTROLLED COMMODITY VENDING APPARATUS Filed April 8, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. P05597 ,5 #5MP ,4 TTOIENE)l United States Patent O 3,692,235 COIN CGNTRGLLED CGMMEHY VENBENG APPARATUS Robert S. Kemp, 1408 Dancy St., Jacksonville 5, Fla. Filed Apr. 8, 1959, Ser. No. 805,037 8 Ciaims. (Cl. 19d-10) The present invention relates to an improved coin controllecl vending apparatus and more particularly to an improved coin controlled vending apparatus in which an electrical train arrangement dispenses selected commodities.

One of the most expensive -factors in the sale of commodities is the money expended for wages of sales personnel. In order to eliminate or to diminish this cost, eiorts have been directed towards developing automatic vending apparatuses that are operated by the customers. The customers, in elect, Wait upon themselves.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide an improved automatic commodity vending apparatus.

Most of the present automatic vending apparatuses are of the lstationary type in which there is usually only one vending station dispensing any one particular commodity. Thus, if a customer wants several different commodities he must go to several stations and perhaps be delayed in line at some of the stations, which moving and waiting is generally unpleasant. It is much preferred that instead of the customers moving to the commodities that the commodities move to the customers.

Thus, a further object of the present invention is to provide an improved automatic vending apparatus in which a plurality of different commodities are moved to a dispensing station in a cyclic fashion.

The prior movable commodity type vending apparatuses have many undesirable features. There may be undesirably lengthy delays ybetween the time an order is placed and the time the order is delivered, or much eX- pensive labor or equipment may be involved, or in those types of systems wherein the food or other commodities pass within reach of the customers who help themselves, there is no ready way of determining the amount taken by each customer, and there is the danger that the customers may injure themselves on the moving commodity carrier or that they may damage the commodity carrier.

Therefore, a further object of the present invention is to provide an improved moving commodity type vending apparatus requiring no manual operation other than that of the customer.

Still another object is to provide an improved moving commodity type vending apparatus in which there is only `a very short time delay between the time when the apparatus is operated by the customer to select a desired commodity item and the time when the selected item is delivered to the customer.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an improved moving commodity type Vending apparatus in which none or" the moving parts are in reach of the customers.

-Another object of the present invention is to provide an automatic vending apparatus that yattracts customers by interest in its oper-ation.

These and other objects are achieved in a preferred embodiment of my invention in which the vending apparatus includes an electrical train that pulls commodity carrying cars. Arranged around the train track are one or more dispensing stations `at each of which there is a coin operated dispensing control circuit. This control circuit, when operated, causes the train to stop and to unload the selected commodity at the dispensing station at which the selection was made. An arrangement is also provided for automatically loading the cars.

ICC

The novel features believed characteristic of the invention are set forth in the appended claims. rIhe invention itself, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of the electric train track;

FIG. 2 is a circuit diagram of a preferred vending control circuit for one of the dispensing stations;

FlG. 3 is a perspective view of a portion of an electrical train and of a dispensing station;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of one of the contact arrangements `at a dispensing station;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of one of the commodity carrying cars;

FIG. 6 is a side View of the car illustrated in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 isa cross-sectional view of the car illustrated in FIG. 6 taken along the line 7 7 looking in the direction of the arrows;

PIG. S is a cross-sectional View of the car illustrated in FIG. 6 taken yalong the line S--S looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 9 is a circuit `diagram of a preferred unloading device embodiment for the cars;

FIG. 10 is a circuit diagram of a preferred embodiment of a plurality of loading stations for loading the commodities on the emptied cars; and

FIG. ll is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of a loading station with a car at the station.

Referring now to FIG. l, there is illustrated a single track layout one or more of which can -be used in the practice of this invention. The track comprises an inner rail 1l, and an outer rail 12, one or both of which may be grounded. The center rail comprises a plurality of insulated segments 14a, 14E-b, 14C, 14d, 14e, and 141, each segment of which forms with the adjacent rails 11 and 12 `a block Thus, there are as many blocks as there are segmented center rails. As i-s explained later, through the use of these blocks a plurality of trains can be accommodated on this single track. Also, a different block is required for each dispensing station. if there is only one dispensing station and only one train, the center rail need not be segmented.

The circuit of FIG. 2 is a preferred embodiment for the coin controlled commodity vending apparatus. In this circuit `a coin receiving and value sensing device 16, which may be conventional, controls the energization of a lead 17 from a voltage source (not shown) connected to a terminal 19. This voltage source may for example, supply -a voltage of the order of 30 volts to terminal 19. Each time a coin of the lowest denomination that device 16 will `accept is deposited, device 16 momentarily cornpletes the circuit between terminal )t9 and lead i7, thus causing a voltage pulse to be appiied to lead i7. Also, if device i6 will receive coins of different denominations, and it is preferred that it does, it completes and then interrupts the cirrcuit between terminal 19 and lead 17 as many times as the coin deposited is greater than the lowest coin denomination that is accepted. For example, if device 16 will accept a nickel, then when a nickel is deposited a single voltage pulse is applied to lead i7. if a dim-e is deposited, two voltage pulses are applied to lead 17. And if a quarter is deposited, tive voltage pulses are applied.

The voltage pulses on lead 17 are conducted to a solenoid 2t) around a pawl 21. Each time the solenoid 2li is energized the solenoid action predominates over the force of a biasing spring 22 thereby causing the pawl 21 to engage a ratchet wheel 23. Then when the voltage pulse subsides, the spring force causes the pawl to return, and in so doing `to rotate ratchet wheel 23 in a counter-clockwise direction. This ratchet wheel 23 is 3 maintained in this new position by another pawl 24 that is spring-loaded and also solenoid operated, as is explained later. Thus, it is seen that the depositing of coins in device 16 results in the rotation of the ratchet wheel 23 through an angle the magnitude of which depends upon the total amount deposited in the device 16.

Ratchet wheel 23 is connected by a shaft 24', shown in `dotted-lineform, to two wiping-type switch arms 26' and 27 in two multi-terminal value accumulating switches 28 and 29, respectively.v As wheel 23 rotates, it drives arms 26 and 27, causing'arm -26 to vengage terminals 31--35 and arm 2,7 to engage terminals 37-'41. Each switch 28 and 29 should have approximately as many terminals as there are diiferent priced commodities that can be selected from the trains of this one track. If wheel 23 is rotated only one notch by pawl 21, then arm 26 engages only terminal 31 and arm 27 engages only terminal 37. 'lf wheel r23 is rotated two notchesthen arm 26 engages terminals 31 and 32 and arm 27 engages terminals 37 and 38, and so on.

Shaft 24 isrspring-loaded by a spring 43 that urges shaft 24' to rotate in the clockwise direction. Thus, when pawl 24 `disengages wheel 23, as will be explained later, spring 43 causes wheel 23 and switch arms 26 and 27 to return to their starting positions. l

'I'he voltage pulses on lead 17, inA addition to causing the movement of pawl 21, also energize a solenoid 45 4that is around an armature '46 of the two position type,

ile., having two stable positions. When solenoid 45 is energized the resulting solenoid action moves armature 46 into locking engagement with a sprocket or toothed wheel 48 that is connected by `a shaft 49 to two switch arms 50 and 51 of two commodity selector switches 52 and 53, respectively. vIn turn, switch arm 50 is connected by a shaft 54 to a commodity selector dial or knob 55 that can be rotated manually to a plurality of positions each corresponding, preferably, to a different commodity. Since shaft -49 and thus shaft 54 are locked against rotation after the coins have been deposited in device 16, the selection of the commodities should be made prior to the. depositing of the coins. However, as will be shown later, in some Aapplications it may be desirable to dispense with this locking arrangement in which case the selection can be made after Ithe coins have been deposited.

Switch arm 50 connects individual terminals 57, 58, 59, and'60 t-o corresponding terminals 57', 58', 59'., and 60'. Similarly, switch arm 51 connects individual terf minals 62, 63, 64 and 465 to corresponding terminals 62', 63', y64,fand V65. The number of terminals in either switch 52 or switch `53 should be at least twice as many as the number of commodities that can be selected from the trains on this track. This is necessary, of course,

from the dispensing station. Likewise, terminals 62, 63,

64 and 65 of switch l53 are connected, respectively, by leads 76, 77,'78, and 79 to a second set of contact fingers l 82, 83, 84, and 85 positioned along the track at the station.

There are branch connections between the terminals of value accumulating switch 28 and commodity selector switch 52. Terminal l57' of switch 52 is connected by a lead 87 to terminal 31 of switch 28. Also, terminals 58. and 59 are connected by a lead 88 to terminal 52. And terminal 60 is connected by a lead 89 to terminal 34. Similarly, terminal 62' of switch 53 is connected by a lead 91 to terminal 37 of switch 29. Terminals y63 and 64 are joined by a lead 92 to terminal 38 and terminal 65' by a lead 93 to terminal 40.

The switch arm 26 is joined by a lead 94 to relay solenoid 97,5 on a relay armature 97. lSolenoid 95 is alsov joined to a terminal 99 to which a source of voltage (not illustrated) is connected. The voltage supplied may be, e.g., 30 volts. When the circuit through switches 28 and 52 is completed to ground by a train, as will be explained, solenoid 95 is energizedand the resulting lsolenoid action lowers relay armature 97 against the force of a spring 101. Armature 97 is maintained in this lowered position a predetermined length of time by the action of a dashpot 103.

When armature 97 is in this lowered position a switch arm 104 mounted on it closes against two switch terminals 106 and 106' thereby completing a connection through a lead 108 from switch arm 27 to a `relay solenoid 110 mounted on a relay armature 111. One side of solenoid 110 is connected to a terminal 113 to which a source of voltage (not illustrated) is connected and which may, e.g., supply 30 volts. When this circuit is completed to yground by a train, as will be explained,

' the resulting solenoid action moves armature 111 down against the force vof a spring 115. A dashpot 116 maintains armature 111 in this position for a predetermined length of time Ythat is preferably equal to the delay time of dashpot 103.

Referring back to relay armature 97, before it moves down, a switch arm 117 on it is across two terminals 118 and 118 of a normally closed switch. Thisswitch is in a series circuit including a terminal 119, to which a source of voltage (not shown) is connected, a lead 12.1, a switch arm 122 on armature 111 and terminals 124 and 12.4' of another normally closed switch, and a pressure switch 126-mounted beneath the adjacent block-and center rail 14a. Thus, `if there is no train on the adjacent Y block, which train would operate the pressure switch 126 and thus open this circuit to center rail 14a, the center rail is energized by .the voltage applied to terminal 119. This voltage, which may be of the order of 18. volts, is sufiicient to energize the train to full speed.

Pressure switch 126, with other pressure switches, functions to prevent trains from colliding. When there is a ytrain on one block, its weight operates a pressure -Y switch beneath this block, which switch then opens the energizing circuit to the preceding block. Thus, any train on this preceding block is stopped and in this manner collisions between trains are prevented. If there is only one train, there is, of course, no need for pressure switches.

As mentioned, armature 97 moves down as the result of the closing of a circuit to relay solenoid by a train. When armature 97 moves down, the circuit to the center rail 14a is opened by switch arm 117 separating from terminals 118 and 118. At the same time another circuit is completed by a switch arm 130 which then makes connection between two terminals 131 and 131 of a normally open switch. This completes a circuit to the center rail 14a from a terminal 133, to which a source of voltage (not shown) is connected.Y The voltage supplied to terminal 133 is approximately half that supplied to terminal 119, and is only enough to slowly move th train that is on the block.

Any time before a train completes the circuit to relay solenoid 95, the deposited coins may be returned if a coin return button 136 is pushed. Then a circuit is completed from a terminal 138 to which .a source of voltage (not shown) supplies a voltage of e.g. 30 volts, through a lead 139, through two terminals 140 and 140 and a switch arm 142 on armature 97, and through three leads 14,4, 145, and 146, that form three parallel paths to ground.

I'he voltage on lead 144 operates the coin return mechanism in device 16, thus causing the deposited coins to be returned. At the same time, the voltage on lead 145 energizes a solenoid 147 the resulting solenoid action of which pulls pawl 24 down against the force of a spring 148, thereby permitting the spring 43 on shaft 26 to return the ratchet wheel 23 and switch arms 26 and 27 to the start position. The voltage on lead 146 energizes a solenoid 150 on armature 46, the solenoid action of which pulls armature 46 out of locking engagement with wheel 48 thereby permitting new commodity selections to be made. Thus, it is seen that the pressing of the coin return button 136 not only returns the deposited coins but also resets the commodity selection circuit such that a new commodity may be selected.

As implied above, once a selection has been made and a train has completed a circuit to solenoid 95 and armature 97 has moved down, the coin return mechanism is inoperative. This results from the opening of the coin return circuit by the separation of Switch arm 142 from terminals 140 and 140. Thus, it is not possible for a commodity to be obtained and also the coins returned.

t was mentioned that when armature 97 moves down, the switch arm 104 on it makes a connection between relay solenoid 110 and switch arm 27. However, a circuit is not completed by this action since there is no path to ground from switch arm 27 until a train makes contact with one of the iingers 82-85 and providing there is a connection between the finger contacted and switch arm 51 and switch arm 27. When this circuit is completed by a train, relay solenoid 11G is energized and armature 111 moves down against the force of a spring 115 thereby causing switch arm 122 to separate from terminals 124 and 124' and thus the center rail 14a to be deenergized and the train stopped. At the same time, a switch arm 152 on armature 111 is moved against two terminals 153 and 153 of a normally open switch to complete a circuit trom a terminal 155, to which a source of voltage (not shown) is connected, through a lead 157 to one auxiliary rail 159 of a pair of auxiliary rails 159 and 159. Rail 159' is grounded through a lead 161. As will be explained later, this energization of rail 159 energizes a dump mechanism on the train, the circuit of which is completed through rail 159', which then dumps the selected commodity into a chute (shown in FIG. 3).

The dumped commodity in traveling through the chute to the customer, strikes and closes a switch 162, which then completes a circuit from a source of Voltage (not shown) connected to a terminal 163, through a lead 164 to ve dilerent leads 165, 166, 167, 168, and 169, all of which provide parallel paths to ground. The voltage on lead 165 energizes a solenoid 170 the resulting solenoid action of which moves armature 46 out of locking engagement with wheel 48 so that a new commodity selection can be made. Simultaneously, the voltage on lead 166 energizes a solenoid 171 on pawl 24. The resulting solenoid action moves pawl 24 away from ratchet wheel 23, thereby permitting the ratchet wheel 23 and switch arms 26 and 27 to move to the start position under the force of spring 43. Also, at the same time, the voltage on lead 167 energizes a solenoid 173 on armature 111, the solenoid action of which acts with spring 115 to move armature 111 to its start position against the restraining force of dashpot 116. The energizing circuit to center rail 14a is then completed and the train is again placed in motion. Also, simultaneously, the voltage on lead 168 energizes a solenoid 177 on armature 97 to produce a solenoid force that acts with spring 101 to bring armature 97 into the start position. As a consequence, the relatively large voltage on terminal 119 is applied to the center rail 14a, causing the train to move at its full speed. Finally, the voltage on lead 169 energizes the coin release mechanism in device 16, and the deposited coins are dropped into a receptacle.

If the train stops but does not dump a commodity into the chute, switch 162 is not activated. This may occur, for example, if the car on the train usually carrying the desired commodity has previously been dumped and if the commodity sensitive switch mechanism, described later, is not utilized. However, it is desired that the train move on so that another train may dump the selected commodity. This moving on is accomplished by the springs 101 and 115 which, acting against dashpots 103 and 116, respectively, return armatures 97 and 111, respectively, to their start positions after a predetermined time. Thus, the rail 14a is energized so that the train can move on but the selector circuit is still responsive to the next train having the selected commodity. Also, the pushing of the coin return button 136 will cause the deposited coins to be returned.

Before continuing with the `discussion of the FIG. 1 circuit, reference will be made to some of the other gures that show structure of the train and of the contact fingers. In FIG. 3 there is illustrated a train that can be used on this track. This train moves in the direction indicated by the arrow. It has an electrical engine 180, which may be conventional, that pulls a plurality of dat cars 181, 181', etc., each of which preferably carries a different commodity E182. But if desired, several cars may carry the same commodities. 'I'hese at cars will be described in more detail in the discussion of FIGS. 5-9.

Attached to each flat car is a contact finger engageable bolt 183, 183', etc., the height of which from the track depends upon the commodity 182 carried by the respective flat car 181. Also, the heights are the same as the heights of respective contact lingers 7-1-74 (not illustrated in FIG. 3) and of the contact fingers 82-35. Thus, if fingers 71 and 32 vcorrespond to a. ham sandwich, the car 181 carrying the ham sandwich will have a bolt 193 at the height of contact lingers 71 and 62 so that the bolt 183 engages these ngers when the car 181 moves by them. Similarly, fingers 72 and S3 may correspond to a piece of apple pie. Thus, the bolt 183 on the car 181 carrying applie pie will have been placed at the height of lingers 72 and 83, and so on.

It is to be realized that the contact fingers could be arranged on both sides of the track in which case the contact finger engageable bolts would be on both sides of the flat cars, but still only one bolt to a car. Also, the displacement of the bolts and -ngers may be diterent from vertical. For example, it may be horizontal. Further, the number of ngers is for the most part a matter of choice, and there may be many more than four. Of course there are some obvious practical limitations to the number of lingers that can be used.

A chute 186 is provided into which the commodities are dumped. It may be extended to serve a plurality of tracks arranged at dierent heights in a pyramid fashion. However, in this case not all of the switches 162 can be placed in the main chute 136, as shown, for then a commodity from an upper track would activate a switch 162 for a lower track. Thus, some of the switches 162 would have to be placed in a non-parallel section of the chute 186. However, alternatively, in the circuits of the switches 162 there may Ibe normally-closed relays around the armature of each of which are placed solenoids connected in the series circuits of all the switches 162 but `the switch 162 for the respective circuit. Then the iirst switch 162 that is closed by a commodity energizes the relays in all of the circuits 'of the other switches 162 causing them to open until after the commodity has passed by these switches.

A transparent barrier 18S that may, for example, be formed of glass or plastic, is positioned adjacent the track between the customers and the track. It prevents customers from reaching up and removing commodities from the at cars 181 and from taking the trains from the track. However, it permits a full view of the actions of the trains.

The commodity selector dial 55 and the coin receiving and value sensing device 16 are positioned within easy reach of the customers and preferably adjacent the chute 186 from which the selected commodities `are ejected.

Preferably, a plurality of these dispensing stations are positioned around the track. Theremay be as many sta: tions as there are blocks. 1 In FIG. 4 there is a view of a contact Vengageable bolt 183 engaging one of the ngers 84.` This clearly illus trates vthe correspondence between Yheights of the finger 84 and of the bolt 183.V Preferably the fingers are flexible so that the bolts can brush by them. The resulting circuit closure is only for a short time.

In-FIGS. 5 .through 8 various views are illustrated of a preferred at car embodiment. In the top view of FIG. 5 a car bed 190 is hinged at one side by pins 192 to the car body 193. In the center of bed 190 is an aperture 195 in which switch armor plate 196 is mounted. When there is a commodity on the bed 190, its weight closes switch 196 which then completes a connection from a grounded wheel of the car 181 or from a grounded portion of the car body 193, through a lead'198 and throughanother lead 199 to contact finger engageable bolt 183 (these connections are Abest seen in FIG. 9). Therefore, when the car is not loaded, bolt 183 is at ground potential and when it engages a contact linger it completes a connection to ground forthat contact finger.

When Vthe car bed 190 is empty, swicth 196 raises by its own spring action to complete a connection between bolt |183, through lead 199, and a lead 201 to a rail shoe 203. The bolt 183 is no longer grounded .and has no effecton the selector circuit of FIG. 1. Actually, as is mentioned in the following paragraph, there is a ground connection to bolt 183 through a dump solenoid. But the impedance of this solenoid is sutlicient to prevent a significant current ow to ground when switch 196 is in a raised position.

When a car 181 Iwith the selected commodity arrives 4at the dispensing station, bed 190 is raised to dump the commodity into the chute 186. This dumping is produced upon the energization of a `dump solenoid 205 (illustrated in FIGS. 549) that is electrically connected by a lead 207 to rail'shoe 203 and to another rail shoe 209. Rail shoe 203'is positioned to-ride upon the ,auxiliary track 159 and shoe 209 vupon track 159'. Thus, when track 159 is energized, as previously described, current flows through solenoid 205 thereby producing a solenoid action that pulls in an armature'211 connected through a bracket 213 to car bed 190. Bed 190 then pivots about pins 192 to dump the commodity.

FIG. 6 is a side view of car 181 showing the position of bolt 1,83. It is seen that bolt 183 can be placed at different vertical positions by placement indifferent holes v2,14, 215, and 216 in a bolt holder 217.

In the cross-sectional view of FIG. 7 the switch 196 is shown in its raised position. Also shown is rail shoe 203. In the cross-sectional View of FIG. 8 both rail shoes 203 and 209 are illustrated. Y The following discussion is directed tothe complete commodityfdispensing operation. lIn this discussion it will be assumed that device 16 accepts nickels and that the'highest priced commodity is twenty cents. The first actiony of the customer should be operation of the commodityvselector dial 55. Assuming the customer wants to spend a dime, he has two choices: he can turn dial 55 to either position 2 or 3 (FIG. y3). If he turns it to position 2, switch arm 50 is moved through shaft 54 to make a connection between terminals 59 and 59' whileswitch arm 5=1 is moved by shaft 49` to make connection between terminals 64 and 64'. The customer Vthen deposits his dime or two nickels and the resulting two Vvoltage pulses from device 16 cause ratchet wheel 23 to beV moved two notches by pawl 20. As a conthrough `switch 5-3, lead 92, switch 29, andslead 108 to terminal 106. It is to be noted that if the customer had selected `a twenty cent commodity but had deposited only a dime, the connections made by switches 52 and 53 as a result of the selection would not have been completed by switches 28 and 29 for the switch arms 26 and 27 would have been moved only to terminals 32 and 39, respectively, and not to the terminals 34 and 40 as required for obtaining a twenty cent commodity.

If a train has a car y181 on which the selected commodity normally would'be on, but which has previously been dumped, the bolt 183 on this car 181 that strikes finger 73 is not grounded and thus the energizing circuit to solenoid is not completed.' The train maintains full speed. However, if the car has the commodity on it, bolt 183 is grounded. Then when it engages finger 73, the energizing circuit to solenoid 95 is completed. The resulting solenoid action causes armature 97 to lower to open the relatively high voltage circuit from terminal 119 to center rail 14a and to close the low voltage circuit from terminal 133 to railY 114:1. The much less energized train theny considerably reduces speed.

When armature 97 moves down, the'switch arm 104 closes against terminals -106 and 106 thereby completing a current path from solenoid 110 on armature 111, through lead 1018, switch 28, lead 92, switch 53, lead 78, to lfinger 84 vof the second set. Therefore, when this grounded bolt 183 engages iinger 84 the circuit through solenoid `110 is completed and theV resulting solenoid action lowers armature 1-11 to thereby cause thecircuit to the center rail 14a to be opened by the separation of the switch arm 123 from terminals 124 and 124'. The deenergized train stops with the car with the selected commodity directly in front of the chute 186. Also, when armature 111 lowers, a switch arm 152 closes against terminals A153 and 153' to complete va circuit to auxiliary rails 159 and 159' which are positioned in front of the chute 186. T'he rail shoes 203 and 209 are then in engagement with these rails 159 and 159?. the dump solenoid isV energized tandraises the platform 190. The selected commodity is then dumped into chute 186.

When'the commodity in traveling along chute vv186 strikes and closes the switch 162, the solenoids 173 and 177 on armatures 97 and 1,11, respectively, are energized tand these armatures are moved to their original positions. As a consequence, the high voltage circuit from terminal is completed to center rail 14a, 'and the train moves on. Also, solenoid on armature 46 and solenoid 171 on pawl 24 are energized resulting in the unlocking of the selector mechanism and the returning of the value accumulating switches 28 and 29 to their no-value positions. And, as previously mentioned, the coin release mechanism in device 16 is operated to drop the deposited coins ,into a receptacle. pared for another operation.

' The foregoing discussion although directed to an operation in which a dirne commodity was selected, applies as well to the selection of Ia nickel or twenty cent commodity. Then, ofcourse, the circuits are connected to different Contact fingers in both sets. But the general operation is the same.

As previously mentioned, the locking operationi.e., the engagement of lwheel'48 by armature i6-need not be utilized. But if it is, then switch 28 or switch 29 preferably switch 29-can be eliminatedand either the leads 87, 88, and 89 connected to lead 94 or leads 91,l 92, and 93 connectedto leadr108. Only one value accumulating switch is'then required. If leads 91, 92, and

V93 are connected to lead 108 yand switch 29 .is eliminated, the circuit will function exactly as previously described.

However, if the locking arrangement is also eliminated, a customer may select a nickel commodity and then after the bolt 183 on the car 181 engages the first set of lingers and Ithe train decelerates, the customer may quickly Thus,

Therefore, the circuitV is pre-V vehicles carrying Va respective commodity indexed element, a plurality of stationary electrically conducting elements each corresponding to a diiierentV commodity and respectively arranged at said station to engage the respective ones to said commodity indexed elements when said vehicles move past said station, unloading means upon energization for unloading the commodities from said vehicles at said station, a power supply having two terminals, a coin controlled and manually operated selective switch circuit in response to the depositing of certain value coins and manual operation -for connecting one of said terminals of said power supply to a respective one of said stationary elements corresponding to a preselected commodity, conducting means connecting the other 4terminal of said power supply in circuit relationship with said unloading means and said commodity indexed elements whereby upon the arrival at said station of a vehicle carrying the preselected commodity and the engagement of the commodity indexed element thereon to said respective one of said stationary elements, said unloading means is energized to unload said preselected commodity from said vehicle.

3. In a coin controlled commodity vending apparatus, a track, a dispensing station adjacent said track, a selfpropelled electric train on said track including an engine and commodity carrying cars, unloading means upon energization for unloading a commodity from a car that is at said dispensing station, a stationary coin receiving and value sensing device, a value accumulating switch responsively connected to and operated by said sensing device, a manually -operated circuit selector switch, a plurality of branch circuits each corresponding to a different commodity, means for connecting said unloading means to one side of an energizing circuit and to one branch circuit selected by operation of said value accumulating switch and said selector switch, and means responsive to the loaded condition of a car with the commodity corresponding to said one branch circuit for completing said branch circuit to the other side of said energizing circuit whereby said unloading means is energized to unload said corresponding commodity from said car at said dispensing station. Y

4. The apparatus as defined in claim 3 further comprising means responsive to the presence at Isaid station of a oar with said preselected commodity for momentarilydeenergizing said engine whereby said train is stopped for the unloading operation.

5. In a coin controlled commodity Vending apparatus, a track, a dispensing station adjacent said track, a selfpropelled electric train on said track and includingy an engine and commodity carrying cars, a stationary coin receiving and value sensing device for producing an electiical signal as a function of the value of coins deposited therein, a manually operated commodity selector, means responsive to the electrical signal from said device and the operation of said commodity selector for slowing down a train approaching said station having a car with a commodity thereon corresponding to the operation of said commodity selector and the coin value deposited in said device, means responsive to the loaded condition of said car at said station and also responsive to said device and said selector for stopping said train and unloading said commodity at said station, and means responsive to the unloading of said commodity for starting said train.

l6. In a coin controlled commodity vending apparatus, a track, a dispensing station adjacent said track, a selfpropelledelectric train on said track and including an electrical engine and commodity carrying cars, a stationary coin receiving and value sensing deviceY for producing an electrical signal as a function of the value of coins deposited therein, a manually operated commodity selector, and means responsive to the electrical signal from said device and the operation of said commodity selector for conditioning said apparatus for stopping of the engine with Va selected car at said station and for thereafter stopping the engine with the car at said station, for unloading at said station a commodity from said car and for restarting said engine, the unloaded commodity corresponding to the operation of said commodity selector.

7. In a coin operated commodity vending apparatus, a track, a dispensing station adjacent said track, a selfpropelled electrical train on said track and including an engine and commodity carrying cars, each of said cars carrying a contact iinger engageable member the position of which corresponds to the respective commodity carried by the respective car, each of said cars having an electrically controlled commodity dumping device with electr-ical contact elements, stationary electrically conductive elements atsaid station and respectively arranged to engage the respective contact elements of said dumping devices, a iirst set of contact ngers adjacent said track and at a short distance away from said station in a direction therefrom opposite from the direction of movement of said train, each of said contact fingers corresponding to a different commodity and having the same position relative to said track as the corresponding contact finger engageable members carried by said cars, a second set of contact lingers at said station, each of said contact fingers of said second set corresponding to a different commodity and having the same positions relative to said track as the corresponding contact tinger engageable members carried by said cars, a iirst relay having an actuating coil and including a normally open switch and a normally closed switch, a high voltage energizing circuit connected through said normally closed switch to said track for energizing said engine, a low voltage energizing circuit connected through said normally open switch to said track for energizing said engine when said normally open switch is closed, a stationary coin receiving and value sensing device for producing an electrical signal as a function of the value of coins deposited therein, a manually operated commodity selector switch, a first value accumulating switch responsive to produce circuit connections in response to the electrical signals from said coin receiving and value sensing device, circuit means including said manual selector switch and said irst value accumulating switch for making a connection to said first relay coil lfrom the contact nger of'said irstV set of contact fingers corresponding to the commodity corresponding to the selector switch position and the coin value which has been deposited in said device, said circuit means being operative in response to contacting of said contact linger by a contact iinger engageable member to said iirst relay coil whereupon said first relay opens said normally closed switch and closes said normally open switch thereby resulting in decreased energization of said train and a decrease in speed of said train, a second relay having an actuating coil and including a first normally closed switch in series in the circuit between said track and said switches'of said rst relay, said second relay fur-ther including a normally open switch, a third energizing circuit in series with said normally open switch of said second relay and said stationary electrically conductive elements, a second selector-switch for operation in parallel with said manual selector switch and a second value accumulating switch for operating in parallel with said rst value accumulating switch, circuit means including said second selector switch and said second value accumulating switch for making a connection to said second relay coil from the contact finger of said second set corresponding to the commodity corresponding-to the manual selector switch position operative when said contact finger of said second set is contacted by a contactV References Cited iu the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Smith Mar. 2, 1943 Burdick Apr. 20, 1943 Frankle June 2, 1953 Wells June 23, 1953 Chaln Oct. 13, 1953

Patent Citations
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US2312450 *Apr 20, 1940Mar 2, 1943Lionel CorpDevice for storing toy logs and loading toy cars therewith
US2317175 *Aug 2, 1940Apr 20, 1943Semet Solvay Eng CorpGate operating control
US2640574 *Apr 4, 1952Jun 2, 1953Frankle Harry RControl for revolving drum vending machines
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6540100Mar 6, 2001Apr 1, 2003The Coca-Cola CompanyMethod and apparatus for remote sales of vended products
US6742673Jan 16, 2003Jun 1, 2004The Coca-Cola CompanyMethod and apparatus for remote sales of vended products
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/222, 221/24, 221/81, 221/9, 221/129, 221/225
International ClassificationG07F17/32
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/32
European ClassificationG07F17/32