Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3092284 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1963
Filing dateMar 9, 1961
Priority dateMar 9, 1961
Publication numberUS 3092284 A, US 3092284A, US-A-3092284, US3092284 A, US3092284A
InventorsRodney W Stout
Original AssigneeRodney W Stout
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Beverage bottle cases
US 3092284 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 4, 1963 R. w. STOUT 3,092,284

BEVERAGE BOTTLE CASES Filed March 9, 1961 5 Skeets-Sheet 1 June 4, 1963 w, s'rou'r 3,092,284

BEVERAGE BOTTLE CASES Filed March 9, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR. RODNEY W. STOU T June 4, 1963 R. w. STOUT 3,092,284

BEVERAGE BOTTLE CASES Filed March 9, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 l IIIIIII I {II(IIIA lIIIlll/II IN VEN TOR. RODNEY W. STOUT United Stats atnt 3,092,28 BEVERAGE BOTTLE CASES Rodney W. Stout, 211 Cheney Lane, Webster Groves, M0. Filed Mar. 9, 1961, Ser. No. 94,616 Claims. (Ci. 22- 21) This invention relates in general to certain new and useful improvements in beverage bottle cases.

The present invention has for its primary object the provision of a unitary or so-called one-piece beverage bottle case molded from a suitable synthetic resin.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a beverage bottle case which, by reason of its unitary structure, has extremely high impact, thereby eliminating the very costly repair and maintenance operations encountered with conventional wooden boxes.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a beverage bottle case which is not only light in weight, but is also provided with a uniquely vented bottom so that dirt, moisture, liquid and other undesirable materials will not collect or be retained therein.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide a beverage bottle case of the type stated which is so designed as to achieve maximum strength with minimum weight and minimum material-requirements.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide a molded plastic beverage bottle case which will stack securely and can readily be adapted to modern palletized handling operations.

With the above and other objects in view, my invention resides in the novel features of form, construction, arrangement, and combination of parts presently described and pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a molded plastic beverage bottle case constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the beverage bottle case;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view taken along line 3-6 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view taken along line 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the interior of a bottle compartment in the beverage bottle case;

FIG. 6 is a bottom plan view of a. corner of the beverage bottle case;

FIG. 7 is a vertical sectional view of a beverage bottle case filled with bottles and a second beverage bottle case resting thereon in order to illustrate the manner in which a plurality of beverage bottle cases may be stacked;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a modified form of beverage bottle case constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention;

FIG. 9 is a longitudinal sectional view taken along line 9- 9 of FIG. 8;

FIGS. 10 and 11 are fragmentary sectional views taken along lines Ill-10 and 1111, respectively, of FIG. 9;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary sectional view of a modified form of beverage bottle case constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 13-13 of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a. fragmentary top plan view of a further modified form of beverage bottle case constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention; and

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 1515 of FIG. 14.

Referring now in more detail and by reference characters to the drawings, which illustrate practical embodiments of the present invention, A designates a beverage bottle case constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention and comprises a unitary or onepiece structure molded of a synthetic resin such as linear polyethylene of the rigid type, for example. The case A unitarily comprises four rectangularly arranged side walls 1, 2, and end walls 3, 4, endwise integrally connected by round corner sections. The side walls 1, 2, are integrally provided adjacent the corners with four somewhat semi-circular corrugations or bumper-columns b, which are flush along their outermost surface portions with the outwardly presented peripheral margins of a continuous horizontal flange 5 formed integrally with and extending continuously around the upper marginal portions of the side walls 1, 2, and end walls 3, 4. Formed integrally with and extending vertically between the side walls 1, 2, and end walls 3, 4, is a plurality of longitudinal and transverse partitions 6, 7, all integrally connected to each other at their several points of intersection, as at C. The entire structure is integrally connected as a onepiece unit by a bottom wall 8 which is integrally joined on its upper face to the lower marginal edges of the two partitions 6, 7, and around its perimeter to the lower marginal edges of the side walls 1, 2, and end walls 3, 4, so that the beverage bottle case A is subdivided into a plurality of upwardly opening bottle receiving compartments or pockets P.

Midway between each of the lines of intersection C, the partitions 6, 7, are provided with elongated slots s, which open downwardly through circular drainage holes h which extend through the bottom wall, each of the drainage holes h within the interior of the beverage bottle case A being common, so to speak, with two adjacent pockets P, as best seen in FIG. 5. However, around the perimeter of the beverage bottle case A, the pockets P are centrally provided with semi-circular openings h which join the solid or non-slotted side walls 1, 2, and end walls 3, 4. As may also be seen from FIG. 5, the bottom wall 8 is preferably contoured rather than flat, that is to say, within the area of each pocket P, the bottom wall is inclined upwardly toward the center and downwardly toward each of the four apertures h, h in a series of marginally abutting triangular planes, so that the surface drains downwardly toward the apertures h, h in all directions from the center. Similarly, the bottom wall is preferably provided with a somewhat wafllelike pattern of short diagonal ribs 9, which extend inwardly and merge radially into a circular or ring-shaped flange 19, each such flange 10 being substantially concentric with a compartment P. The ribs 9 and ring-shaped flanges 10 are all flush with the lowermost peripheral margins of the side walls 1, 2, and end walls 3, 4, so as to bear the weight of the beverage bottle case A and the bottles therein contained, as shown in FIG. 7. :It will be evident that the ribs 9 and flanges 10 constitute structurally strong elements within the botom wall 8 and are integral therewith so that the flat portions of the bottom wall may be made relatively thin, thereby saving a great deal of weight and material without sacrificing strength or utility.

In addition to this, the ring-shaped circular flanges 10 are of such size and shape as to loosely encircle the crowns of the bottles which the case A is adapted to re- :ceive and, therefore, when one case A is filled with bottles it can be conveniently stacked upon another case A similarly filled with bottles.

The side walls 3, 4, are centrally provided with two rectangular handle-forming apertures 11, 12, which are symmetrically located with the center partition 6 and, in effect, open into the pockets P on either side thereof. On their outer faces, the end walls 3, 4, are integrally provided with a heavily ribbed U-shaped handle-forming frame-element 13 which somewhat resembles an inverted U and integrally merges along its top or bight portion into the central portion of the flange 5 with its vertical leg portions, in effect, framing the ends of the openings 1, 12, respectively, as best seen in FIG. 1. The frame element 13 is substantially equal in thickness to the horizontal Width of the flange, so that the outermost axial portions of its surface will be flush with the peripheral margin of the flange and, therefore, act as buffer elements to prevent one of the beverage bottle cases A from unauthorizedly slipping under the flange of .an adjacent beverage bottle case when several of the beverage bottle cases are stacked side-by-side either on a warehouse floor or on a pallet. The bumper-column b also serves the same function. In addition to this, the leg portions of the frame-element '13 and the bumper-column b give very substantial vertical column-strength to the beverage bottle case, making it possible to save Weight and material by the use of somewhat thinner sections for the intervening portions of the side Walls 1, 2, and end walls 3, 4.

It is also possible to provide a modified form of beverage bottle case B, which is substantially similar in all respects to the previously described beverage bottle case A, being a one-piece molded unit, and comprising end walls 14, 15, side walls 116, '17, and a plurality of intersecting longitudinal and transverse partitions '18-, 19, which form bottle-holding pockets P. Formed integrally around the upper margins of the end walls 14, 15, and side walls 16, 17, is a continuous horizontal flange 5' and similarly formed integrally across the bottom is a bottom wall 8, the flange 5', and bottom wall 8' being substantially similar to the previously described flange and bottom wall of the beverage bottle case A.

In the beverage bottle case B, however, the handleforming frame-element 13 and bumper-column b are eliminated and in lieu thereof the end walls 14, 15, and side walls 16, 17, are integrally provided on their outwardly presented vertical faces with a series of uniformly spaced triangular gussets 20, the apices of which are substantially flush with the bottom peripheral margin of the beverage bottle case B and slant outwardly and upwardly into flush alignment with the outer peripheral margin of the flange 5'. Along the central area of the end walls 14, 15, three such gussets 20 are interconnected at their tops by heavy horizontal L-shaped handle-forming ribs 21, which extend across and form the upper margin of two apertures =11, 12', which are similar in purpose and function to the apertures 11, 12, of the previously described beverage bottle case A.

It has also been found possible, in connection with the present invention, to provide either of the previously described beverage bottle cases A, B, with modified forms of pocket-wall slots S as shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, said slots S having parallel vertical side margins and a semi-circular top margin. Moreover the slots S open downwardly through circular drainage holes 11 all as best seen in FIG. 12.

It has also been found possible, in connection with the present invention, to provide either of the previously described beverage bottle cases A, B, with modified forms of pocket-wall slots S as shown in FIGS. 14 and 15, which resemble an inverted parabola and open downwardly through elliptical drainage holes 12 all as best seen in FIG. 15.

The beverage bottle cases of the present invention may be molded as a'unitary one-piece structure in a single molding operation from a high impact-strength synthetic resin, such as linear polyethylene and will have extremely high strength notwithstanding the fact that the various ribs, flanges, and other structural components make it possible to eliminate much Weight and material. By reason of the fact that both weight and material are eliminated while maintaining maximum structural strength, it is possible to provide a beverage bottle case which Will withstand the rigorous type of usage encountered in the bevenage industry and at the same time be relatively inexpensive. It will also be apparent that beverage bottle cases constructed in accordance with the present invention are comparatively light-weight and, therefore, can be handled easily by delivery men and other persons connected with the handling, sale and distribution of bottled beverages with a minimum of physical effort. This factor also contributes to long life endurability inasmuch as a beverage bottle case which can be more easily handled will not be as readily abused or mishandled. Finally, the beverage bottle cases of the present invention will drain freely both when subjected to rainwater and other adverse conditions on delivery trucks and also when subjected to washing and accidental spillage within the beverage-bottling plant.

It should be understood that changes and modifications in the form, construction, arnangement, and combination of the several parts of the beverage bottle cases may be made and substituted for those herein shown and described without departing from the nature and principle of my invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is- V 1. A beverage bottle case molded as an integral one piece unit from a synthetic resin and comprising side walls, a bottom wall and a plurality of pocket-forming intersecting interior walls having upwardly presented top margins and being integrally joined to the bottom wall thereby defining bottle retaining pockets, the portion of the bottom wall Within each pocket being inclined upwardly toward the center of the pocket in a series of marginally abutting triangular planes, said marginally abutting planes forming four upstanding ridges which lie in the same horizontal plane and radiate outwardly from the center to the corners of the pockets, said marginally abutting planes extending downwardly from the center of each pocket, so that the bottom wall within each pocket drains downwardly in all directions from the center, each interior wall being provided with a plurality of elongated parallel-sided square-topped slots extending upwardly from the bottom and terminating below said top margins, the undersurface of the bottom wall being integrally provided with a circular flange beneath each pocket and being substantially concentric with said pocket, said flange being sized to snugly engage the top of a beverage bottle, said bottom wall further having a plurality of ribs that radiate diagonally outwardly from the circular flan-get 2. A beverage bottle case molded as an integral onepiece unit from a synthetic resin and comprising side walls, a bottom wall and a plurality of pocket-forming intersecting interior walls having upwardly presented top margins and being integrally joined to the bottom wall thereby defining bot-1e retaining pockets, the portion of the bottom wall within each pocket being inclined upwardly toward the center of the pocket in a series of marginally abutting triangular planes, said marginally abutting planes forming four upstanding ridges which lie in the same horizontal plane and radiate outwardly from the center -to the corners of the pockets, said marginally abutting planes extending downwardly from the center of each pocket, so that the bottom wall within each pocket drains downwardly in all directions from the center, each interior wall being provided with a plurality of elongated slots having upwardly converging side margins and extending upwardly from the bottom and terminating below said top margins, the undersurface of the bottom Well being integrally provided with a circular flange beneath each pocket and being substantially concentric with said pocket, said flange being sized to snugly engage the top of a beverage bottle, said bottom'wa'll further having a plurality of ribs that radiate diagonally outwandly from the circular flange. i

3. A beverage bottle case molded of an integral onepiece unit from a synthetic resin and comprising side walls, a bottom wall and a plurality of pocket-forming intersecting interior walls having upwardly presented top margins and being integrally joined to the bottom wfll thereby defining bottle retaining pockets, the portion of the bottom wall within each pocket being inclined upwardly toward the center or" the pocket in a series of marginally abutting triangular planes, said marginally abutting planes forming four upstanding ridges which lie in the same horizontal plane and radiate outwardly from the center to the corners of the pockets, said marginally abutting planes extending downwardly from the center of each pocket, so that the bottom wall within each pocket drains downwardly from the center, each interior wall being provided with a plurality of elongated slots extending upwardly from the bottom and terminating below said top margins, said slots each being between two interior walls which intersect the wall in which such slot is located, the undersurface of the bottom wall being integrally provided with a circular flange beneath each pocket and being substantially concentric with said pocket, said flange being sized to snugly engage the top of a beverage bottle, said bottom wall further having a plurality of ribs that radiate diagonally outwardly from the circular flange.

4. A beverage bottle case molded of an integral onepiece unit from a synthetic resin and comprising side walls, a bottom wall and a plurality of pocket-forming intersecting interior walls having upwardly presented top margins and being integrally joined to the bottom wall thereby defining bottle retaining pockets, the portion of the bottom wall within each pocket being inclined upwardly toward the center of the pocket in a series of marginally abutting triangular planes, said marginally abutting planes forming four upstanding ridges which lie in the same horizontal plane and radiate outwardly from the center to the corners of the pockets, said marginally abutting planes extending downwardly from the center of each pocket, so that the bottom wall within each pocket drains downwardly in all directions from the center, each interior wall being provided with a plurality of elongated slots extending upwardly from the bottom and terminating below said top margins, said slots each being approximately midway between two interior walls which intersect the wall in which such slot is located, the undersurface of the bottom wall being integrally provided with a circular flange beneath each pocket and being substantially con- 6 centric with said pocket, said flange being sized to snugly engage the top of a beverage bottle, said bottom wall further having a plurality of ribs that radiate diagonally outwardly from the circular flange.

5. A beverage bottle case molded as an integral onepiece unit from a synthetic resin and comprising side walls, a bottom wall and a plurality of pocket-forming intersecting interior walls having upwardly presented top margins and being integrally joined to the bottom wall thereby defining bottle retaining pockets, the portion of the bottom wall within each pocket being inclined upwardly toward the center of the pocket in a series of marginally abutting triangular planes, said marginally abutting planes forming four upstanding ridges which lie in the same horizontal plane and radiate outwardly from the center to the corners of the pockets, said marginally abutting planes extending downwardly from the center of each pocket, so that the bottom wall within each pocket drains downwardly from the center, each interior wall being provided with a plurality of elongated slots extending upwandly from the bottom and terminating below said top margins, each of said slots opening downwardly through the bottom, the nndersu-rface of the bottom wall being integrally provided with a circular flange beneath each pocket and being substantially concentric with said pocket, said flange being sized to snugly engage the top of a beverage bottle, said bottom wall further having a plurality of ribs that radiate diagonally outwardly from the circular flange.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,554,413 Coppage Sept. 22, 1925 1,805,287 Krantz May 12, 1931 2,411,673 Vechey Nov. 26, 1946 2,414,171 Scharff Ian. 14, 1947 2,773,624 Knieriem Dec. 11, 1956 2,935,221 Mitchell May 3, 1960 2,979,222 Levine Apr. 11, 1961 3,002,650 Covell Oct. 3, 1961 FOREIGN PATENTS 25,977 Switzerland Feb. 2, 1903

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1554413 *Apr 25, 1924Sep 22, 1925William S ChapmanSkid-chain holder
US1805287 *May 21, 1929May 12, 1931Reeves Mfg CompanyFruit picking pail
US2411673 *Jan 27, 1944Nov 26, 1946Jr Theodore VecheyBeverage bottle case
US2414171 *Oct 9, 1944Jan 14, 1947Gerber Plastic CompanyBeverage bottle case
US2773624 *Sep 20, 1954Dec 11, 1956Calresin Ind IncPlastic case for transporting packaged fresh milk
US2935221 *Aug 11, 1958May 3, 1960Nat Brewing CompanyBottle case
US2979222 *Jun 24, 1959Apr 11, 1961Commw Plastics CorpCase for cartons
US3002650 *May 27, 1959Oct 3, 1961Baker Plastic Containers IncStacking case and tote box of plastic material
CH25977A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3155268 *Feb 9, 1962Nov 3, 1964Grace W R & CoBottle case
US3178052 *Sep 13, 1962Apr 13, 1965Gen Am TransportCarrying cases for bottles
US3261495 *Jan 6, 1964Jul 19, 1966Dow Chemical CoCase for beverage bottles and the like
US3286876 *Jun 15, 1964Nov 22, 1966Goodyear Aerospace CorpContainers
US3334767 *Dec 28, 1964Aug 8, 1967Cornelius CoBottle carrier for 6-packs
US3349943 *Mar 22, 1965Oct 31, 1967Theodor BoxBottle carrying and stacking case
US3383027 *Jan 3, 1966May 14, 1968Owens Illinois IncUnitary collapsible partition
US3390801 *Feb 14, 1967Jul 2, 1968Lenox Plastik G M B H & Co KgBottle container
US3391814 *Jun 20, 1967Jul 9, 1968Theodor M. BoxBeverage bottle case
US3391815 *Aug 24, 1967Jul 9, 1968Theodor BoxBottle case
US3392869 *Jul 26, 1966Jul 16, 1968Wiva NvContainer for soft drink bottles
US3638824 *Dec 24, 1969Feb 1, 1972Dainippon Ink & ChemicalsPlastic container
US3639027 *Dec 4, 1969Feb 1, 1972Joseph W Higdon JrDrawer frame
US3856148 *Apr 30, 1973Dec 24, 1974Jentzen Miller CoConvertible gondola display for stores
US4118892 *Feb 4, 1977Oct 10, 1978Sekisui Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaConnectable nursery box structures having compartmentalizing grids
US4161259 *Oct 17, 1977Jul 17, 1979Procesos Plasticos, S.A.Stackable container for bottles and the like
US4448344 *Sep 1, 1982May 15, 1984Diamond International CorporationEgg cell construction
US4597503 *Dec 18, 1984Jul 1, 1986Scepter Manufacturing Co. Ltd.Unitary molded citrus crate
US5009316 *May 12, 1989Apr 23, 1991Klein David CTest tube cassette system and cassettes for use therein
US5230601 *Oct 11, 1991Jul 27, 1993Rehrig-Pacific Company, Inc.Method for stacking trays
US5277316 *May 29, 1991Jan 11, 1994Rehrig-Pacific Company, Inc.Low-depth stackable can tray
US5285899 *Jul 1, 1991Feb 15, 1994Rehrig-Pacific Company, Inc.Stackable can tray systems
US5351814 *Aug 28, 1992Oct 4, 1994Rehrig-Pacific Company, Inc.Stackable case for bottles
US5419080 *Feb 1, 1991May 30, 1995Gardener's SupplyMulti-celled tray for growing plants
US5651461 *Apr 13, 1995Jul 29, 1997Rehrig-Pacific Company, Inc.Stackable low depth bottle case
US5660279 *Feb 1, 1995Aug 26, 1997Rehrig Pacific Company, Inc.Stackable low depth bottle case
US5785170 *Jul 8, 1997Jul 28, 1998International Container Systems, Inc.Beverage can tray with improved handling features
US5842572 *Jul 25, 1997Dec 1, 1998Rehrig-Pacific Company, Inc.Stackable low depth bottle case
US6021913 *Dec 17, 1996Feb 8, 2000Mcgrath; Patrick JamesTray system for beverage cans and a beverage can tray
US6079554 *Jul 7, 1998Jun 27, 2000International Container Systems, Inc.Beverage can tray with improved handling features
US7017746Apr 16, 2001Mar 28, 2006Rehrig Pacific CompanyStackable low depth tray
US7086531Apr 26, 2001Aug 8, 2006Rehrig Pacific CompanyStackable low depth bottle case
US7207458Jun 30, 2000Apr 24, 2007Rehrig Pacific CompanyLow-depth nestable tray for fluid containers
US7281641Jun 25, 2001Oct 16, 2007Rehrig Pacific CompanyStackable low depth tray
US7549539Mar 27, 2006Jun 23, 2009Rehrig Pacific CompanyStackable low depth tray
US8109408Nov 16, 2009Feb 7, 2012Rehrig Pacific CompanyLow depth crate
US8328009Sep 29, 2008Dec 11, 2012Orbis Canada LimitedBottle crate
US8353402Oct 5, 2009Jan 15, 2013Rehrig Pacific CompanyStackable low depth tray
US8448806Jan 10, 2012May 28, 2013Rehrig Pacific CompanyLow depth crate
US8607971Dec 10, 2012Dec 17, 2013Orbis Canada LimitedBottle crate
US8636142Sep 10, 2009Jan 28, 2014Rehrig Pacific CompanyStackable low depth tray
US8757420Aug 13, 2010Jun 24, 2014Orbis Canada LimitedBeverage crate with constant-diameter pockets
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/516, 47/87, 220/DIG.140, 220/519, 217/19
International ClassificationB65D1/24
Cooperative ClassificationY10S220/14, B65D1/243
European ClassificationB65D1/24B