Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3095568 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1963
Filing dateApr 10, 1958
Priority dateApr 10, 1958
Publication numberUS 3095568 A, US 3095568A, US-A-3095568, US3095568 A, US3095568A
InventorsAine Harry E, Arthur Leinwohl
Original AssigneeAine Harry E, Arthur Leinwohl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Life preserver with integral pneumatic antenna erecting apparatus
US 3095568 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 25, 1963 H E. AINE ETAL 3,095,568

LIFE PRESERV ER WITH INTEGRAL PNEUMATIC ANTENNA ERECTING APPARATUS Filed April 10, 1958 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN V EN TOR.

Harry E. Aine BY Arthur Leinwohl Attorney E. AlNE ETAL 3, LIFE PRESERVER WITH INTEGRAL PNEUMATIC ANTENNA ERECTING APPARATUS Filed April 10, 1958 June 25, 1963 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

m A Em r m Hm MET/$1.:

Attorney June 25, 1963 H. E. AINE ETAL LIFE PRESERVER WITH INTEGRAL PNEUMATIC ANTENNA ERECTING APPARATUS Filed April 10, 1958 a Sheets-Sheet a IN VEN TOR.

mww E5 m rm mm June 25, 1963 H. E. AINE ETAL LIFE PRESERVER WITH INTEGRAL PNEUMATIC ANTENNA ERECTING APPARATUS Filed April 10, 1958 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. Harry E. Aine Arthur Lemwohl June 25, 1963 H. E. AINE ETAL 3,095,568

LIFE PRESERVER WITH INTEGRAL PNEUMATIC ANTENNA ERECTING APPARATUS Filed April 10, 1958 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Fig. /7

Attorney June 25, 1963 H. E. AINE ETAL 3,095,568

LIFE PRESERVER WITH INTEGRAL PNEUMATIC ANTENNA ERECTING APPARATUS Filed April 10, 1958 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTORS HARRY E. AINE ARTHUR LEINWOHL ATTORNEY 3,095,558 Patented June 25, 1963 hire 3,ll5,568 LIFE PRESERVER WITH INTEGRAL PNEUMATIC ANTENNA ERECTING APPARATUS I-Iar y E. Aine, 3422 .Ianice Way, Falo Alto, Calif., and

Arthur Leinwohl, Los Altos, Calif. (979 Arnstntz Drive, San Jose, Calif.)

Filed Apr. ltl, 1*)58, Ser. No. 727,696 12 Claims. (Cl. 343-309) The present invention relates in general to a pneumatic life preserver with integral antenna erecting apparatus and more specifically to a novel hollow inflatable antenna erecting apparatus which may be stored in a relatively small volume and when calledupon may be readily erected into a relatively rigid antenna structure by inflation thereof. Such an antenna erecting apparatus is extremely useful where it is desired to employ a comparatively lightweight, compact, antenna mechanism as, for example, on radio equipped life preservers, other survival garments, life rafts, retrievable drones and missiles and the like.

Heretofiore it has been proposed that a mechanical collapsible antenna apparatus be included as an appendage to a life preserver having a radio transmitter aflixed thereto. The prior art mechanical antenna apparatus included a collapsible segmented flexible metallic tape which was manually extended and held together in the extended position by a plurality of clips spaced apart longitudinally of the antenna. These antennas were difficult to secure to the life preserver and moreover were susceptable to a considerable amount of bending and buckling in winds of moderate velocities as, for example, in excess of 20 knots. In addition, the antenna when collapsed formed a rigid noncompressible package which precluded its placement in many desirable locations because it was uncomfortable to wear when carried underneath, for example, a tight fitting parachute harness.

The present invention provides an inflatable antenna erecting apparatus which when stored forms a relatively fiat, compact,compressible package, and which when inflated is self erecting into a rigid member capable of withstanding wind velocities in excess of 60 knots and is impervious to moisture which would otherwise tend to electrically short the antenna elements.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a novel pneumatic life preserver with integral antenna erecting apparatus which may be stored in a relatively small volume, is light weight, self-erecting, and has sufficient rigidity and resilience to operate satisfactorily in winds of high velocities.

One feature of the present invention is the provision of a novel life preserver with hollow inflatable member supporting therefrom a wave radiating element, forming an antenna, whereby the antenna may be erected by inflation of said hollow inflatable member.

Another feature of the present invention is the provision of a novel life preserver including a hollow inflatable member carrying therefrom and externally there- 7 Other features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent upon a perusal of the specification taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of a life preserver incorporating the novel inflatable antenna erecting apparatus of the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged plan view of the structure of FIGURE 1,

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged cross sectional view of a portion of the structure of FIGURE 2 taken along line 3-3 in the direction of the arrows,

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged cross sectional view of a portion of the structure of FIGURE 2 taken along line 44 in the direction of the arrows,

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged partially cut away view of a portion of the structure of FIGURE 2 taken along line 5-5 in the direction of the arrows,

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged cross sectional view of a portion of the structure of FIGURE 2 taken along line 6-6 in the direction of the arrows,

FIGURE 7 is a top view partially cut away of the structure of FIGURE 6 taken along line 77 in the direction of the arrows,

FIGURE 8 is a side view of an appendage to a life preserver, said appendage incorporating the novel inflatable antenna erecting apparatus of the present invention,

FIGURE 9 is an enlarged top view of the apparatus of FIGURE 8,

FIGURE 10 is a side elevational view partially cut away of a novel antenna erecting apparatus useful on recoverable drone aircraft and missiles,

FIGURE 11 is an enlarged cross sectional view of a portion of the structure of FIGURE 10 taken along line 11II in the direction of the arrows,

FIGURE 12 is an enlarged cross sectional view of a portion of the structure of FIGURE 9 taken along line I2l2 in the direction of the arrows,

FIGURE 13 is an enlarged partially cut away view of a portion of the structure of FIGURE 12, taken along line 13-43 in the direction of the arrows,

7 FIGURE 14 is an enlarged cross sectional view of a portion of the structure of FIGURE 9 taken along line 14-14 in the direction of hte arrows, v

FIGURE 15 is a side elevational view of a buoyant exposure suit adapted to include the novel inflatable an- FIGURE lfl is a cross sectional view of a portion of the structure of FIGURE 17 taken along line 18-18 in the direction of the arrows,

FIGURE 19 is a side elevational view of an alternative More specifically, a hollow inflatable antenna erecting.

member l as of, for example, rubberized nylon fabric or l I 3 polyethylene plastic is sealed in a gas tight manner to the outer envelope 2 of a life preserver 3. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention the hollow inflatable member 1 has a physical configuration which is substantially conical or frusto conical to lend stability and rigidity to the inflatable member :1 in strong winds.

The life preserver 3 is divided into three separate inflatable chambers (see FIGURES 3 and 6). The hollow inflatable member 1 is shown communicating with the uppermost inflatable life preserver chamber. If desired there could be provided a plurality of said hollow inflatable antenna erecting members 1, concentrically disposed of each other, and said members 1 each communicating with its separate life preserver chamber by being sealed in a gas tight manner to the uppermost side- 'wall thereof. In this manner with a small additional amount of antenna package volume the antenna is automatically erected no matter which one or more of the three chambers of the life preserver 3 were inflated.

An electromagnetic wave radiating element 8 (FIG- URES 6 and 7) which may be, for example, a thin flexible braided metallic conductor or a thin sheet of conducting foil is fixedly secured to the hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 1 as by, for example, rubber cement or a dielectric adhesive tape. The wave radiating element 8 is coupled to one wire of a two wire transmission line 9 which may be, for example, a subminiature RF. coaxial transmission line. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention the outer conductor 11 of the radio frequency transmission line 9 is segmented at its end and secured as by soldering to a suitable ground plane.

The ground plane includes, in a preferred embodiment, a thin pliable apertured conducting disk 12 as of, for example, copper having a plurality of thin flexible conductors 13 extending radially outwardly thereof and being secured to the conducting disk 12 as by, for example, soldering. The radially extending ground plane elements 13 are held in position against the inside surface of the envelope 2 as by a thin flexible sheet of rubberized nylon fabric 14, vulcanized or cemented to the envelope 2. The aperture in the conductive disk 12 serves to allow the inflating gas within the first life preserver chamber to flow into the hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 1 for erection thereof. Flanged Webs 15 extend transversely of and within the outermost inflatable life preservers chambers and are fixedly secured at their flanged portions to the side walls of the respective chambers for maintaining the desired relatively flat oval shape to the cross section of the chambers.

The antenna erecting member 1 is stored by folding the deflated member 1 back and forth transversely of (see FIGURE 3) and externally to the rear loop portion of life preserver 3. The folded hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 1 is held firmly and campactly against the rear portion of the life preserver 3 by two elastic bands 17 and 18 (see FIGURE 2) which form an elastic pocket for the antenna. The elastic bands 17 and 18 as of, for example, elastic webbing are fixed at their ends to the outer envelope 2 of the life preserver 3 as by, for example, rubber cement. The two elastic bands 17 and 18 have an adjoining or overlapping edge portion which will yieldably separate when the hollow inflatable antenna erecting member .1 is inflated thereby allowing said memher to push outwardly of the elastic pocket into the erect position.

The R.F. coaxial transmission line 9 is carried within the outmost inflatable chamber around the neck portion thereof and down the front leg portion to a hollow flared resilient tube '19 as of, for example, rubber (see FIG- URE 4). The tube 19 is sealed in a gas tight manner to the inside surface of the outside envelope 2 of the life preserver 3 as by, for example, vulcanizing or cementing. A flange 221 is provided at the free end portion of the tube -19. The coaxial line 9 is carried within the hollow tube 19 and through the apertured side wall of a trans- 'm tter'b ox 22. A suitable coaxial fitting 23 is provided 4 in the RF. transmisison line 9 between the transmitter box 22 and the outer envelope 2 of the life preserver 3.

A hollow cylindrical adapter 24 is fixedly secured to the outside wall of the transmitter box 22 as by, for example, brazing. The internal bore of the cylindrical adapter 24 is threaded to mate With the external threads of a centrally apertured end closing member 25. The end closing member 25 is threaded within the interior of the cylindrical adapter 24 and bears at its innermost end upon the flange 21 of the hollow tube 19 thereby forming a Water tight, gas tight seal for preventing the escape of gas, utilized for inflation of the life preserver 3, and for preventing the entry of water into the trans mitter box 22.

The bottom and top inflatable chambers of the life preserver 3 are inflated via compressed gas cartridges 26 (see FIGUR$ Q. and 5) which are contained within gas tight housings 27. A threaded cap 28 covers over the open end of the housing 27 and is removable for replacement of the cartridge 26, as desired. A slightly larger cartridge 26 is desirable for proper inflation of the upper chamber because of the additional volume of the hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 1. A threaded housing extension 29 has been provided to accommodate the larger cartridge. It mates with the external threads of the cartridge housing 27 at one end and is threaded for mating with the internal threads of the end cap 23 at the other end.

The compressed gas cartridge 26 is discharged, in use, by driving an axially slidable pin, contained in the end of the cartridge housing 27, into the sealed end of the cartridge 2 5. The slidable pin is sealed to the housing 27 by a suitable gland, not shown. The slidable pin is actuated by manually pulling a string 32 attached to one end of a pivoted arm 31 coupled to the pin. The compressed gas which escapes f-rom the cartridge 26 passes through an aperture 33 in the side wall of the cartridge housing 27 and thence through a communicating passage to the interior of the life jacket 3.

The novel separately attachable inflatable antenna erecting garment is depicted in FIGURES 8, 9, 12, 13 and 14. A hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 35 (see FIGURE 12) is flanged at its open end and fixedly secured to the inside surface of an apertured hollow inflatable chamber 36. The hollow inflatable chamber 36 includes an enlarged end portion and an elongated narrow leg portion. The enlarged end portion contains therewithin and disposed transversely thereof a flanged web 37 serving to retain the relatively flat physical configuration of the rear portion of the chamber 36 when inflated.

A wave radiating element 33 is carried within the hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 35 as by, for example, dielectric adhesive tape or a vulcanized tape, said tape being secured to the inside surface of the member 35 and sandwiching therebetween the radiating element 33. The radiating element 38 is connected to the center conductor of an RF. subminiature coaxial line 39. The outer conductor 41 of the coaxial transmission line 39 is segmented at its end and secured as by soldering to a thin pliable conducting metallic sheet 42.

A conducting metallic foil 43 as, for example, aluminum and the conducting sheet 42 are sandwiched between two thicknesses of fabric and the sandwiched ground plane is secured to the upper inside surface of the hollow inflatable envelope 36 as by, for example, vulcanizing or cementing. At the centrally disposed overlapping portion of the conducting sheet 42 and the conducting foil 43 the two conductors may be secured together as by for example soldering. The conducting sheet 42 and conducting foil 43 are suitably apertured in the vicinity of the intersection of the hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 35 and the inflatable chamber 36 to allow the inflating gas to enter the hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 35 from the inflatable chamber 36.

5 The hollow elongated leg portion (see FIGURE 9) of the chamber 36 contains therewithin the subminiature R.F. coaxial line 39 which emerges therefrom through a sealed gas tight hollow tube 44. The tube 44- is flanged at its free end for facilitating a gas tight seal between the hollow tube 44 and a suitable connector provided on a transmitter box 45. The transmitter box 45 may be contained within a pocket provided on the garment to which the hollow inflatable chamber 36 is secured.

The chamber 36 and communicating antenna erecting member 35 are inflated via rupture of a compressed gas cylinder which is suitablydisposed within an air tight housing communicating with the interior of the inflatable chamber 36, as previously described with regard to FIG- URE 5. The hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 35 when deflated is foldably stored and held in position under two resilient bands and 47 forming an elastic pocket, as previously described with regard to FIGURES 2 and 3.

Snap assemblies 49 secure the hollow inflatable chamber 36 to the garment. In this manner the antenna erecting apparatus may be secured to and carried upon ordinary wearing apparel suitably modified to receive snaps 49. In particular, the standard life preserver 3 may be made to easily accommodate the novel inflatable antenna erecting apparatus of the present invention without the necessity of cutting into or otherwise destroying the gas tight integrity of the standard life preserver 3.

A novel missile and drone antenna configuration which is particularly useful for radio aided retrieving purposes is shown in FIGURES 10 and 11. More specifically, a hollow inflatable antenna erecting envelope 59 as of, for exarnple, rubberized nylon fabric is secured at its base in an airtight manner to a hollow cylindrical antenna container 51. The inflatable antenna erecting envelope 50 contains therewithin a sub-miniature RF. coaxial trans mission line 52 which when erected extends longitudinally thereof. The center conductor 53 of the coaxial line 52 extends substantially to the free end of the erected envelope 50. Substantially a quarter wave length from the free end portion of the center conductor 53 the outside conductor 54 of the transmission line 53 is segmented and coupled as by, for example, soldering to a ground plane 55. The ground plane 55 may comprise, for example, a plurality of longitudinally extending flexible conducting wires or a thin conducting flexible foil fixedly secured to the inside surface of the hollow inflatable envelope 50 and extending down the inside surface thereof to the antenna container 51.

The center conductor 53 of the RF. transmission line 52 forms the wave radiating element and extends longitudinally of the inflatable envelope 50 substantially to the free end portion thereof and is secured to the inside surface thereof as by, for example, dielectric adhesive tape or secured at its free end to the inside of the end closing wall of the erecting envelope 50.

For storage (see FIGURE 11) the hollow inflatable antenna erecting envelope 50 may be folded back and forth within a hollow upper compartment 56 f the an tenna container 51. A lower hollow compartment 57 of the antenna container 51 contains therewithin an electrically ignited squib 58 which when ignited, evolves suflicient gas to inflate the antenna erecting envelope St). The gas that evolves from the squib S fills the lower compartment 57 and under pressure flows int-o the hollow inflatable antenna erecting envelope 50 via a communicating channel 59 therebetween. An end closing cap 61 having a plurality of resilient gripping fingers closes olf the open end of the upper compartment 56 of the antenna container 51. When sufficient gas pressure builds up in the folded inflatable envelope 50 suflicient pressure will be exerted against the end closing cap 61 to force the cap 61 off and allow the folded antenna erecting envelope 5%? to emerge from the housing 51 into the erect position.

The lower chamber 57 of the antenna container 51 is closed off at its open end via a gasketed disk 62 which is tightly held in a gas tight manner against the open end of the chamber 57 via a flanged collar 63. The collar 63 threadably mates with external threads on the end portion of the antenna container 51.

The squib 58 is fixedly secured to the end closing disk 62 and makes suitable electrical connection with a coaxial line 64 via the intermediary of a hermetically sealed coaxial connector 65. Likewise the RF. coaxial transmission line 52 passes through the end closing disk 62 via the intermediary of a hermetically sealed coaxial connector 66 and thence through the lower chamber 57 and into the hollow inflatable envelope 50 via a suitable channel 67 communicating between the interior of the antenna erecting envelope 50 and the lower chamber 57.

The novel exposure suit antenna erecting apparatus of the present invention is shown in FIGURES 15 and 16. More specifically, a hollow inflatable supporting chamber 71, communicating with the pressurized interior of the exposure suit 72 and disposed behind the wearers head, has a hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 73' communioating with the interior thereof. The hollow inflatable supporting chamber 71 has affixed thereto on the inside surface thereof an antenna ground plane as previously described with regard to FIGURES 6, '7, l2, and 13. The wave energy radiating element is carried within and afllxed to the hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 73 such that when the rearwardly disposed supporting chamber 71 is inflated the radiating element is erected. The antenna is connected via an R.F. coaxial transmission line communicating through the interior of the pressurized exposure suit 72 to a transmitter box 74. The tnansmitter box 74 is contained within a pocket affixed to the exterior of the pressurized exposure suit 72. The antenna erecting member 73 is foldably stored within an elastic pocket formed by two elastic 'webs 75 secured to the outside surface of the inflatable supporting chamber 71.

The novel life raft antenna erecting embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIGURES 17 and 18. More specifically, a hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 77 is secured at its base in a gas tight manner to the inflatable chamber 78 of the life raft. A gas communicating passage is provided between the inflatable chamber '78 and the hollow inflatable antenna erecting member 77. An RF. ground plane 79 is carried from the life raft inflatable chamber 78 on the inside surface thereof. The ground plane 79 may comprise, for example, a plurality of radially extending conducting elements as previously described with regard to FIGURES 6 and 7 or it may comprise a conducting foil as previously described with regard to FIGURES l2 and 13. The antenna erecting member 77 contains therewithin and affixed thereto an RF. radiating element which is connected to a subminiature R.-F. coaxial line 80. The subminiature coaxial line 8-0 emerges from the life raft inflatable chamber '78 via a suitable tight fitting 81 and is electrically connected within the RF. transmitter box 82 contained within a pocket 83 suitably provided on the inside perimeter of the inflatable chamber 78. The antenna erecting member 77 when deflated may be foldably stored, if desired, within an elastic pocket formed by two elastic bands 84 and 85 secured to the outside surface of the raft inflatable chamber 78-.

Although the hollow antenna erecting member 77 has been shown directly communicating with the main life raft inflatable chamber 78 it could equally well have utilized a separate inflating mechanism or have been disposed on the top of an overhead raft covering canopy and share the main or have a separate inflation system.

All the foregoing embodiments of the present invention have been described and depicted having the RF. wave radiating element, subminiature coaxial feed line, and ground plane carried within the hollow inflatable antenna erecting member and supporting inflatable chamber. This is not a requirement of the present invention and the aforementioned elements may be carried externally of the inflatable members as shown in FIGURES 19 and 20. More specifically, the wave radiating element 8 may comprise the center insulated conductor of a subminiature R.F. coaxial line 9. The outer conductor 11 may be stripped from the center conductor and center conductor insulation for substantially a quarter wavelength from the free end thereof. The outer conductor 11 may be segmented at its ends and connected to a suitable ground plane as of, for example, conducting foil or a plurality of radially extending conducting elements 13 as previously described. The ground plane is centrally apertured to allow the hollow antenna erecting member to pass therethrough. The ground plane is carried from the outer surface of the supporting chamber or antenna erecting member as the case may be.

The subminiature coaxial feed line 9 is carried along the outside surface of the inflatable chamber 2 to the transmitter box. The coaxial line and ground plane may be covered over and held to the inflatable chamber with a sheet of material 91 cemented or vulcanized to the inflatable chamber. The insulation left on the wave radiating element prevents it from being electrically shorted to the ground plane. This embodiment has the advantage of not requiring a gas tight fitting for passing the coaxial feed line outwardly of the inflatable chamber and into the transmitter box. From reciprocity it follows that the transmitter box may well include a receiver utilizing the same antenna for transmitting and receiving wave energy.

The appendage antenna erecting apparatus described with regard to FIGS. 8 and 9, the drone or missile recovery antenna apparatus of FIGS. and 11, the exposure suit antenna apparatus of FIGS. 15 and 16, and the lift raft antenna embodiment of FIGS. 17 and 18 are described and claimed in applicants co-pending divisional application, U.S. Serial No. 278,375, filed May 6, 1963, and entitled Pneumatic Antenna Erecting Apparatus.

Since many changes could be made in the above construction and many apparently widely different embodiments of this invention could be made without departing from the scope thereof, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description and shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

1. An inflatable life saving apparatus including, an elongated tubular inflatable envelope structure, said envelope structure when inflated having a pair of spaced apart elongated portions directed generally in the horiz-ontal plane for flotation on the surface of the Water, said elongated envelope portions being disposed adjacent the water and being formed and arranged to straddle and to attach to a body portion of a person with the body portion being disposed inbetween said inflated envelope portions for supporting when inflated the body of an unconscious person with at least his head and neck out of the water, said inflatable envelope including an inflatable antenna erecting portion of a flexible material in gas communication with said first envelope structure for erection when inflated, a collapsible pliable radio frequency wave radiating element carried from said antenna erecting portion of said inflatable envelope for radiating distress radio signals therefrom in use, and means common to said antenna erecting and said body supporting envelope portions for inflating said inflatable envelope for supporting the person in the water and for erecting and supporting by means of the inflating gas pressure in said wave radiating element in the erected state with a substantial vertical component of height, whereby an integral life preserver and antenna is obtained.

2. The apparatus according to claim 1 including, a transmitter coupled to said wave radiating element, and a pocket affixed to said inflatable envelope for carrying said transmitter therewithin whereby an integral compact life saving device and radio transmitting apparatus is obtained.

3. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said antenna erecting portion of said inflatable envelope includes an elongated tubular member, and said radiating element includes an elongated electrical conducting member carried approximately longitudinally of said tubular erecting member, and said elongated radiating element being disposed with respect to said tubular erecting member to erect said elongated radiating element with its lon gitudinal axis directed approximately vertically when said tubular erecting member is inflated in the upright state upon the water.

4. The apparatus according to claim 3 wherein said elongated tubular antenna erecting portion has a terminating free end and is tapered with a decreasing characteristic transverse dimension toward the terminating free end thereof whereby rigidity of said tubular envelope portion is facilitated in heavy wave action and winds.

5. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said wave radiating element is elongated and is affixed to the outside of said antenna erecting envelope portion and when erected by inflation of said envelope has a substantial vertical component of height.

6. The apparatus according to claim 5 wherein said wave radiating element comprises the unshielded insulated extension of the center conductor of a coaxial transmission line.

7. The apparatus according to claim 1 including a ground plane element carried by said envelope and outwardly extending from the base of said vertically directed wave radiating element when said wave radiating element is erected by inflation of said envelope.

8. The apparatus according to claim 7 wherein said ground plane element comprises a plurality of radially extending wires angularly spaced apart and outwardly directed from the base of said antenna erecting portion.

9. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said inflatable envelope is a garment worn on the torso portion of the body of a person and is formed and arranged for supporting the person with at least his head and neck out of the water when inflated.

10. The apparatus according to claim 9 wherein said torso worn garment envelope portion includes two leg portions adapted to extend over the persons shoulders and in front of the person, said envelope further including a rear loop portion extending behind the persons head, and said antenna erecting envelope portion being in gas communication directly with said rear loop portion of said envelope.

11. The apparatus according to claim 10 including means for holding said inflatable antenna erecting envelope portion when deflated in a substantially fully collapsed state against the outside surface of said envelope body supporting envelope portion.

12. The apparatus according to claim 1 including a pocket for stowing said antenna erecting envelope in the deflated state and having yieldable flap members adapted for separation and release of said antenna envelope due to expansible forces exerted on said flap members by inflation of said antenna erecting envelope portion whereby said envelope frees itself from the confines of said pocket and becomes erected for use.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 590,421 Manley Sept. 21, 1897 1,285,940 Chodakowski Nov. 26, 1918 1,557,049 Hammond Oct. 12, 1925 2,212,128 Richter Aug. 20, 1940 2,359,844 Harris Oct. 10, 1944 (Other references on following page) 9 UNITED STATES PATENTS Hurt et a1. Apr. 24, 1951 Russell et a1. Aug. 28, 1951 Lense Nov. 27, 1951 Harris Aug. 7, 1956 Radnofsky Feb. 26, 1957 Bayze Apr. 22, 1958 Tcrench et a1. Sept. 23, 1958 Seyfang Oct. 6, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 411,312 Great Britain July 7, 1934 636,776 Great Bn'tain May 3, 1950 1,048,186 France July 29, 1953 734,139 Great Britain July 27, 1955 OTHER REFERENCES The ARRL Antenna Book, 1956, pages 63 and 64,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US590421 *Apr 6, 1896Sep 21, 1897The OvermanInflatable ball
US1285940 *Dec 22, 1917Nov 26, 1918Leon ChodakowskiWireless-telegraph pole.
US1557049 *May 10, 1918Oct 13, 1925Hammond Jr John HaysElectrical antenna
US2212128 *May 6, 1939Aug 20, 1940Telefunken GmbhAntenna
US2359844 *Apr 20, 1942Oct 10, 1944Mamie GarrettLifesaving garment
US2550562 *Feb 5, 1948Apr 24, 1951Us Rubber CoLife preserver
US2565523 *Apr 17, 1945Aug 28, 1951Harold RosenbergSea rescue transmitter
US2576128 *Apr 3, 1948Nov 27, 1951Motorola IncMan-pack antenna
US2758203 *Jun 28, 1952Aug 7, 1956Harris Transducer CorpSonobuoy
US2782430 *Feb 17, 1953Feb 26, 1957Radnofsky Matthew IFlotation and thermal protecting apparel
US2831967 *Dec 27, 1955Apr 22, 1958Bayze Thomas FAir crash signal device
US2853706 *Feb 19, 1954Sep 23, 1958Giese Arthur CInflatable antenna
US2907875 *Sep 26, 1957Oct 6, 1959Seyfang Frank GEmergency radio transmitter
FR1048186A * Title not available
GB411312A * Title not available
GB636776A * Title not available
GB734139A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3234503 *Mar 27, 1963Feb 8, 1966Hoffman Electronics CorpDrag chute and flotation device
US3278938 *Jan 29, 1963Oct 11, 1966Loral Electronics CorpInflatable antenna
US3309649 *Mar 26, 1964Mar 14, 1967Sanders Associates IncSonobuoy with depth selection capabilities
US3312902 *Jun 29, 1964Apr 4, 1967Mcdonnell Aircraft CorpSelf-erecting floating structure
US3788255 *Apr 26, 1960Jan 29, 1974Us NavyExpendable submarine receiving antenna
US3946391 *Aug 1, 1974Mar 23, 1976Motorola, Inc.Buoy antenna system
US4353071 *Apr 28, 1981Oct 5, 1982Fairchild Industries, Inc.Self-erecting floatable structure
US4523914 *Jan 26, 1983Jun 18, 1985U.S.D. CorpConformable buoyancy compensator
US4694931 *Oct 10, 1986Sep 22, 1987Ecole Nationale Superieure De Creation IndustrielleAutomatic tripping rescue system
US4725252 *Mar 16, 1987Feb 16, 1988Mcneil Wallace RFlotation device having spotting streamer
US5800227 *Mar 26, 1997Sep 1, 1998Brown, Jr.; Robert EdwardSelf erecting personal water safety device
US5971243 *Aug 27, 1998Oct 26, 1999Sportsstuff, Inc.Storage pocket for inflatable towable vehicle
US6368174 *Jun 15, 2000Apr 9, 2002Terence MageeVisible floatation device
US6688253 *Jun 6, 2001Feb 10, 2004Stephen B. FrinkMethods of using hands free signal devices
US7023338Jul 29, 2003Apr 4, 2006Foth Robert AApparatus, systems and methods for aquatic sports communications
US7095377 *Oct 30, 2003Aug 22, 2006Lucent Technologies Inc.Light-weight signal transmission lines and radio frequency antenna system
US7927162May 1, 2009Apr 19, 2011Doubleday Marc DMulti-functional, personal flotation device
US20050093754 *Oct 30, 2003May 5, 2005Lyons Alan M.Light-weight signal transmission lines and radio frequency antenna system
US20120178319 *Apr 8, 2010Jul 12, 2012Ross SpencerMarine Safety Device
DE4137125C2 *Nov 12, 1991Apr 18, 2002Daimlerchrysler Aerospace AgAutomatisch aufrichtbare Antenne für ein elektronisches Gerät, insbesondere Funkgerät
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/709, 455/100, 441/94, 455/128, 343/881, 441/40, 441/89
International ClassificationH01Q1/08
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q1/081
European ClassificationH01Q1/08B