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Publication numberUS3095943 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1963
Filing dateMay 29, 1961
Priority dateSep 19, 1960
Publication numberUS 3095943 A, US 3095943A, US-A-3095943, US3095943 A, US3095943A
InventorsKemp William G
Original AssigneeSoundlock Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Acoustical structure
US 3095943 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 2, 1963 w. G. KEMP ACOUSTICAL STRUCTURE Filed May 29, 1961 TE=E 5 IN VEN TOR. Wa /4m 9, KE'M/P ATTOAM d United States Patent Office 3,095,943 Patented July 2, 1963 3,095,943 ACOUSTICAL STRUCTURE William G. Kemp, Pontiac, Mich, assignor to The Soundlock Corporation, Hazlehurst, Ga., a corporation of Delaware Filed May 29, 1961, Ser. No. 113,451 Claims priority, application Canada Sept. 19, 1960 6 Claims. (Cl. 181-33) This invention relates generally to acoustical structure and refers more particularly to a strong, lightweight acoustical panel designed to present a pleasing appearance.

One object of the invention is to provide a lightweight acoustical panel having improved strength and rigidity.

Another object is to provide an improved acoustical panel constructed to facilitate the installation thereof, or removal from an installation, without interference with the supporting members.

Another object is to provide an acoustical panel composed of a lightweight semi-rigid core secured between a perforated bottom pan and an upper sound reflecting pan.

Another object is to provide an edge construction for the acoustical panel which will prevent delamination of the various parts of the panel.

These and other objects, advantages and novel details of construction of this invention will he made more apparent as this description proceeds, especially when considered with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of an acoustical panel embodying the invention, looking at the normally exposed surface thereof, with parts broken away and in section.

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line 2-2. of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of a corner portion of the acoustical panel shown in FIGURE '1, with parts broken away and in section.

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged fragmentary view of a ceiling installation composed of panels of the type shown in FIGURES 1-3, the section being taken across the panels substantially along the line 44 in FIGURE 1.

Referring now more particularly to the drawing, the acoustical panel shown in FIGURE 1 is generally indicated at 10. The panel includes a casing 11 having a perforated cover member or pan 12 for exposure to sound to he deadened, and a reflecting cover member or pan '14 positioned behind the perforated pan 12 for reflecting sound back toward the perforated pan. The panel also includes a lightweight, semi-rigid core 16, comprising a honeycomb structure 52 having sound deadening material 54 between the cells thereof, positioned between the perforated pan 12 and the reflecting pan 14 and secured to both for deadening the sound passing therethrough and for adding strength and rigidity to the complete acoustical panel.

The perforated plan 12 comprises a substantially flat rectangular sheet 13 having a plurality of orifices 18 therein. The orifices 18 may be in either a regular or irregular pattern and are provided to allow sound to pass into the interior of the panel 10 where it is deadened by the sound deadening material 54 of the core 16. The pan 12 may be molded, stamped or otherwise produced from metal, plastic or other suitable material. The material should present a smooth relatively rigid hard surface capable of being cleaned with case since the outer surface of the sheet 13 of pan 12 will be exposed to view in a finished acoustical installation.

The perforated pan 12 has at the ends of the flat sheet 13 ends 20 and 24 which are integral with sheet 13 and extend upwardly therefrom at an angle of less than 90 to the flat interior surface of sheet 13. Ends 20 and 24 extend for only a part of the depth of the completed panel 10. In a complete panel, and as best shown in FIGURES 2 and 3, the ends 20 and 24 of the perforated pan 12 abut ends 30 and 34 of the reflecting pan. Since the free edges 38 :and 42 of the ends 20 and 24 terminate short of the plane of the flat sheet 15 of reflecting pan 14, and since these free edges are disposed laterally inwardly of the end of sheet 13, the panels can be arranged end to end in an installation (not shown) and the actual installation and removal of the panels can be made without the edges 38 and 42 catching on the adjacent end surfaces of the abutting panel.

The reflecting pan 14 as shown comprises a substantially flat rectangular sheet 15. Reflecting pan 14 may also be molded, stamped or otherwise formed of metal, plastic or other suitable material. The pan 14 should have a relatively smooth hard dense inner surface in order to efficiently carry out its sound reflecting function. As best shown in FIGURE 4 wherein it may be assumed that the sound which it is desired to deaden is travelling upwardly, the reflecting pan 14 is positioned behind the perforated pan 12 with respect to the direction of travel of the sound so that the sound passing through the perforated pan and striking the reflecting pan 14 will be reflected back toward the perforated pan through the sound deadening material 54 of core 16.

It will also be noted that the reflecting pan 14 is provided at the ends of sheet 15 with ends 30 and 34 and sides 32 and 36. These ends and sides are integral with and extend downwardly from sheet 15 at a angle. The sides and ends 30, 32, 34 and 36 extend from the upper surface 49 of the reflecting pan 14 to the inner surface of sheet 13 of perforated pan 12. The free edges of the sides and ends 30, 32, 34 and 36 actually contact theinner surface of sheet 13 in a continuous line so that sound is prevented from escaping around the edges of the panel. This construction also allows the complete pan 12 including its ends and its hereinafter described sides to he perforated without affecting the acoustical properties of thepanel. The core 16 is provided between pans 1'2 and 14 to increase the strength and rigidity of the assembled panel 10 and to dea-den the sound passing therethrough. The core 16 comprises a honeycomb structure 52 of plastic, asbestos, paper, or other suitable core material, bonded to both the sheet '15 of reflecting pan 14 and the sheet '13 of perforated pan '12, the individual cells of which are filled with loose sound deadening material 54 such as plastic fiber, glass fiber, wool or the like. The bond is provided by films of adhesive 53. The core 16 may alternatively be foamed plastic, expanded metal or other lightweight semi-rigid material in combination with separate sound deadening material 54.

The perforated pan 12 has along the sides of the flat sheet 13 channel-shaped edge portions 22 and 26 which are of the same construction. As shown in FIG. 4, one side 22' or 26' of each channel-shaped edge portion extends laterally outwardly and in the plane of the sheet to form an extension thereof. These channel-shaped edge portions are laterally outwardly of and coextensive with sides 32 and 36 of the reflecting pan 14 and define laterally inwardly opening channels 37. The sides 32 and 36 of pan 14 have flanges 32' and 36' which extend laterally outwardly from the free edges thereof. These flanges are received within the channels 37 and tightly clamped by the channel-shaped edge portions to positively prevent separation of the pan at the edges so that delamination cannot begin. Since delamination is prevented at the edges, the opposed surfaces of the pans will not be stripped away from the surfaces of the core to which they are adhered. The flanges 32' and 36 are pressed tightly 3 against the sheet 13 of the perforated pan so that sound is prevented from escaping around the edges of the panel in and is reflected back into the sound deadening material.

The semi-rigid lightweight core 16 positioned between and bonded to the pans 12 and 14' provides a "stnucture which is extremely resistant to deformation under both bending and twisting stresses, Such structure besides having excellentacoustical properties may be cut around openings in anjacoustically treated surface or at the edge of "the surface Without providing special framing to prevent sagging or warping of the panels. Therefore panels constructed as "hereindescribed have the advantages of noto'nly being simply constructed in themselvesbut are also simple and economical to install. Further. economy in construction exists due to the high strength ratio of the panels constructed with core 16 which permits larger panels to be u es to cover an area to be acousticall'y treated thereby requiring less supporting structure and installation time. i

"The panels are arranged in rows end to end and supported along'their adjacent sidesby inverted T-bars 70. ReferringtoFIGURE 4,'theadjace'nt return-bent edges of'the lower pan are supported on the oppositely extending flanges *60'of the T- bar, and theiweb 61 ofthe T-bar extends upwardly therefrom between the panels and is foi med'withan aperture 71' through whichfa Wire suspension member 72 extends. The wire forms a loop through the aperture and about the web of the T-bar and is twisted'upon itself to support the T-bar.

The provision of the channel shaped edges of'the lower pans"providing'siipportingfhps for the,panels' in effect produces arecess 6 6 abiive the lips so that the sides of the'panels abov'eithe lips are fspaeed laterally from the web of the T-b-ar, With this construction, the sides and upper eornersjof the panels p'rovid e clearance and hence do not interfere with the wiresuspensionnierfnber, either during or after assembly obym ay; if the recessed co sanction were not provided, and the upper and lower coin'ersof the panels adjacentthe f web of the T-bar formed simpIePQ 'anglesfitiwould be necessary to form wider T-bar 'flan ges to supportjthepanels' in sufliciently spaced relation tothe web of the T' ba'r that no inter-fen eiice'would result. l

The supporting lips defined by the return-bent channelshaped'edge' portions 22am 26, together with the flanges SZf a'nd SU prbvide a triple layer or material which hasja rigidifying" and strengthening effect on the entire panel strncture." Hence'these "su'pport'ing lips tend to prevent any irregularity from developing in I the exposed surface of the lowerpan. l

The panels 10'have a multiplicity of sound isolation cells bounded by'the walls of thehoneycornb and'by the innef surfaces of the sheets 1'3 and 15 of perforated pan 12 and reflecting pan 151. Sound entering a cell through the perforations is"el fectively isolated,l since it cannot eseape tothe other cells through the walls ofthe' honeycomb, nor through the unperforated sheet 15, nor can any appreciable famoiint of sound pass from the cell through" the pa tomime." 'The isolated sound 'is eifectively attenuated by the deadening inaterial"54 within each and eglry n a Any suitable adhesive 53 may be employed to secure the edges ofcore 16 to the pans 12 and 14. The pans are pressed tight against opposite surfaces of the core and contact the edges of the core defining each cell. The adhesive layer '53 extends between all contacting surfaces to provide a r'igid'u'n'itary structure. 'I'he pans, while of light gage, will notsa'g becanse of the adhe'sive connection with the'cor. The distance across each cell is so" small that obviously no saggirig'of the'pan material between cells wflloc'c'ur. It isbf'course absolntely'necessary that the lower'pan present a perfectly flat appearance because it provides t-he exposed surface and any irregularity or unevenness 'would'be readily apparent.

As a further means of eliminating any appearance of irregularity or unevenness in the surface of the lower pan 12, is is preferably covered with a coating (not shown) of a hat or non-glossy paint.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. An acoustical panel comprising a casing and sound deadening means within said casing, said casing includ ing first and second cover membersssaid first cover meme ompr n a bst t lly s pe ate et adapt to be exposed to sound, said second cover member comprising a substantially. flat sound. reflecting sheet in spaced parallel relation to saidperforated sheet, said reflecting sheet being substantially coextensive with said perforated sheet and adapted to reflect sound passing through said perforated sheet back toward the latter, said second cover member having laterally spaced sides integrally joined to opposite margins of said reflecting sheet and extending from said reflecting sheet toward said perforated sheet, said-firstcover member having channelshaped edge portions integral with and extending along opposite margins of said perforated sheet, said channel-shaped'edge portions being laterally outwardly 'ofand substantially coextensive with said sides of said second cover member and defining channels opening laterally inwardly toward said sides of saidsecond cover. member, said sound -deadening means including a relatively ri-gidhoneycomb core forming a layer between and substantially coextensive with said sheets, the opposite surfaces of said honeycomb core being adhered directly to the opposedsurfaces'ofsaid sheets to prevent said sheets from'sagging or separating from said honeycomb core, sound deadening materialin the cells. of said honeycomb core, and flanges integral-with and extending laterally outwardly from the freeedges of said sidesfofssaid second cover member, said flanges being receivedwithin said channels. and tightly-grippedby saidchanneleshaped edge portions to preventseparation of said. cover members and to prevent delamination of i said sheets, and, said. core.

2. The acoustical panel defined in. claim 1, wherein saidsheetssare rectangular, one side of eachof saidchannel-shaped edgeportions extends laterally. outwardly. from and in the plane of said perforated sheet, as anintegral member aredisposed at righttangles .to said sheets.

3-. The structure. defined in claim 2, includingian in-. verted T-barsupportingalchanneleshaped edge portionion a flange of saidT-bar, the web QfSaidT-bar being.dis-. posedtoone side of said supportedchannel-shapededge portion andrin laterally spaced generally parallel relation to the side of said second cover member adjacent the asso ciated; channel-shaped; edge portion, and a. suspension m m.be v n a ng the eb, q rsaid ,T-bar. o pport the same,.the space between the web of ,the 'F-bar and the es -ment neds d fthe. co d v r emb Pr d n clearance to ayoid interference with the suspensionmem ber bothduring andafter installation ofthe panel;

4 An acoustical panel comprising a casing and sound deadening means within said casing, said casing including firstandsecond cover members, said-first cover member comprisinga substantially flat first sheet, said second cover member comprising a substantially fiat second sheet inspaced parallel relation to and coextensive with the first sheet, said second cover member having laterally spaced sideseatending from opposite rnargins of said second, sheet toward saidfirst sheet, said v first, cover member. having channel-shaped edge portions extending along opposite margins of said first sheet, said channel-shaped edge portions being laterally outwardly of and substantially co extensive with said sides of said secondcover member and, deflning channels opening laterally inwardly toward said sides of said secondcover member, said sound deaden-r ing .means including a relatively rigid. honeycomb corev forming a layer 'betweenand substantiallycoextensive with said.sheets,,the opposite surfaces of said honeycomb core beingvadher'eddirectly to the opposed surfaces of. said sheets to prevent said sheets from sagging or separating from said honeycomb core, sound deadening material in the cells of said honeycomb core, and flanges integral with and extending laterally outwardly from the free edges of said sides of said second cover member, said flanges being received Within said channels and tightly gripped by said channel-shaped edge portions to prevent separation of said cover members and to prevent delamination of said sheets and said core.

5. An acoustical panel comprising a casing and sound deadening means within said casing, said casing including first and second cover members, said first cover member comprising a substantially flat first sheet, said second cover member comprising a substantially fiat second sheet in spaced parallel relation to and coextensive with the first sheet, said sound deadening means including a relatively rigid honeycomb core forming a layer between and substantially coextensive with said sheets, the opposite surfaces of said honeycomb core being adhered directly to the opposed surfaces of said sheets to prevent said sheets from sagging or separating from said honeycomb core, sound deadening material in the cells of said honeycomb core, said second cover member having extensions projecting laterally outwardly beyond opposite sides of said second sheet, said first cover member having extensions projecting laterally outwardly beyond opposite sides of said first sheet alongside the extensions of said second cover member, the extensions of said cover members being rigidly secured together to prevent separation of said members and to prevent delamination of said members and said core.

6. The acoustical panel defined in claim 5, wherein the extensions of one of said members are channel-shaped portions defining laterally inwardly opening channels receiving and tightly gripping the extensions of the other of said members to prevent the aforesaid separation of the members and delarnination of the members and the core.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,957,822 Denning May 8, 1934 2,043,445 Oxhandler June 9, 1936 2,278,331 Meyercord Mar. 31, 1942 2,576,698 Russurn NOV. 27, 1951 2,825,800 Spott Mar. 4, 1958 2,998,337 Tillotson Aug. 29, 1961 3,021,916 Kemp Feb. 20, 1962 FOREIGN PATENTS 663,897 Great Britain Dec. 27, 1951 206,535 Australia Apr. 18, 1956

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3163961 *Jun 11, 1962Jan 5, 1965Soundiock CorpAcoustical structure
US3380206 *Sep 29, 1965Apr 30, 1968Soundlock CorpLay-in acoustical ceiling panel with flexible diaphragms
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Classifications
U.S. Classification181/292, 52/145, 428/73, 428/124, 428/117, 428/118, 392/485, 428/138
International ClassificationE04C2/34, E04C2/36, E04B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04B9/0442, E04B9/0485, E04B9/001, E04B9/045, E04C2/365
European ClassificationE04B9/04L1, E04B9/04G, E04B9/04F, E04B9/00A, E04C2/36B