Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3097047 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 9, 1963
Filing dateApr 27, 1961
Priority dateApr 27, 1961
Publication numberUS 3097047 A, US 3097047A, US-A-3097047, US3097047 A, US3097047A
InventorsSidney M Weinstein, Peter J Scott
Original AssigneeTanatex Chemical Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dyeing synthetic fibers with alkyl naphthalene composition
US 3097047 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unite States Free I a y No Drawing. Filed Apr. 27, 1961, Ser. No. 105,906 12 Claims. (Cl. 8--94) This invention relates to novel compositions which are useful for dyeing synthetic fibers. More specifically this nvention relates to novel carrier compositions for use in dyeing synthetic fibers which until the present time required the use of dyes which are known in the art as disperse dyes.

The use of carriers, sometimes called swelling agents, to aid in the dyeing of synthetic fibers is well known. The novel carrier compositions of the present invention are particularly adapted to be used with any dyestuif, dispersed or otherwise, and are particularly suitable for use in the dyeing of polyester fibers such as condensation polymers of ethylene glycol and terephthalic acid known in the trade as Dacron, Terylene or Fortrell, modified acrylic fibers of which a trade example is Verel, polymers comprising vinylidine dinitrile as their basic constituent, such as Darlan, cellulose triacetate, of which a trade example is Arnel, and various thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers. Moreover, the carrier compositions of this invention also are adapted for use in dyeing modified polyester fibers such as Dacron type 62 or 64 with cationic dyestuffs which contain a positively charged nitrogen group within the molecule and which may be dispersed or dissolved in water with the aid of acids, such as acetic or formic acids.

The disperse dyes have proved to be the most successful type of dye for the coloration of cellulose acetate fiber. They are widely manufactured in the form of powders containing the so-called crude disperse dye together with requisite quantities of dispersing agent. The advent of the newer fibers such as polyesters and cellulose triacetate presented the dyer with the task of finding some means of coloring them. These fibers are easily dyed with disperse dyes provided that dyeing temperatures are 250 F. or higher. Such temperatures require pressurized equipment which is not generally available. By the use or" chemicals known as carriers, the amount of dye absorbed at 205-208 F. is increased to nearly that absorbed at 250 F. Temperatures of 205-208 F. are attained in non-pressurized equipment. Carrier dyeing of polyester fibers and other synthetic fibers has therefore become generally acceptable. In such operations, the disperse dye, available in a mixture consisting of the actual or crude disperse dyestufl? in finely divided, usually pulverized form admixed with dispersing agents and/or solid diluents is added to a dyebath to which is separately added the carrier. Among the carriers which have heretofore been employed are aromatic compounds such as xylene, toluene, naphthalene, methyl salicylate, orthophenylphenol, etc. In this way satisfactory dyed fabrics of the new synthetic fibers have been obtained, but the uniformity and color value are not optimum.

Accordingly, an object of this invention is to provide a novel carrier composition which is suitable for use in dyeing the above described hydrophobic synthetic fibers.

A further object of this invention is to reduce appreciably the cost of dyeing such synthetic fibers by increasing the utilization of the dyestuff.

Still another object of this invention is to reduce the amount of time necessary in dyeing such synthetic fibers by the heck, jug, paddle, padder, package machine, and other dyeing methods.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following detailed description and explanation thereof.

In accordance with the present invention, dyeing of synthetic fibers is facilitated by carrier compositions consisting essentially of methylnaphthalenes having less than 7 methyl groups on the naphthalene nucleus and at least one emulsifying agent.

The carriers of this invention consist essentially of methylnaphthalenes and usually comprise mixtures of mono, di, tri or tetramethylnaphthalenes. One specific formulation which we have found to be particularly effective is a composition sold under the trademark Panasol AN3 by Amoco Chemicals Corp. which comprises about 63% by weight of mono, di and tri methylnaphthalenes, the balance comprising other aromatic hydrocarbons.

It has been found unexpectedly that in using methylnaphthalenes as the carrier in the compositions of this invention, excellent dyeings have been obtained using disperse-type and cationic-type dyestuffs. Furthermore, surprisingly enough, the dyeings obtained using methylnaphthalenes are vastly superior to the dyeings obtained using homologous carriers of the prior art such as naphthalene.

The term fiber is used herein to include filaments, fibers, bristles, films, flakes, fabrics and the like which have been produced from the above described polymers. The term dyestuff as used herein includes dyestuffs of both the disperse and cationic types.

The disperse type dyestuffs which may be used for the purpose of this invention include the azo, nitroarylamine or anthraquinone compounds. Specific examples of such type dyestuffs are:

1,4-diamino-2,3-anthraquinone dicarboximide (blue crude disperse dyestuif); l,4,5,8-tetramino anthraquinone (blue crude disperse dyestutf); 1,4-dialkylamino anthraquinone (blue crude disperse dyestuff); 2,6-dichloro-4- nitro-4 -(N,N-hydroxyethylmethyl) amino azobenzene (brown crude disperse dyestufi); 4-nitro-4 -(N, N bydroxyethyl-ethyl) amino-azobenzene (scarlet crude disperse dyestuif); 4,4 -diarnino-azobenzene (orange crude disperse dyestuff); 1-hydroxy-4-aminoanthraquinone (red crude disperse dyestuff); etc.

These disperse dyestuffs when used according to the teachings of the prior art are generally employed in compositions which contain from about 10 to 40% of the crude dyestuffs, from about 20 to 50% of the dispersing or emulsifying agents such as sodium butyl naphthalene sulfonates and the balance are generally inert salts or other inert materials. These disperse type dyestuffs when employed with the compositions of the subject invention may be added directly to the dyeing bath to which will be added the compositions of the subject invention.

Examples of the cationic dyes which may be employed with the compositions of this invention to dye Dacron 62 or 64 are Sevron Yellow GL, Sevron Brown YL, Sevron Blue NV, Sevron Red GL, Sevron Bordeaux G, and Sevron Blue 56, all of which are manufactured under the above trademarks by E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co.

The compositions of this invention are particularly advantageous since they permit fine dispersion of the compositions throughout the dyebath so that all portions of the material to be dyed will receive a fair distribution of the dyes-tuff. In addition the emulsifying or dispersing agent places the methylnaphthalene carrier into a condition which permits quicker and more uniform distribution of the carrier in the dyebath. Generally we have found that good results are obtained when the carrier is employed in about /2 to 25% by weight based on the weight of the synthetic fiber to be dyed. 'We prefer to use from about 4 to 18% of the carrier, based on the weight of the amount of synthetic material to be dyed.

However, the exact amount of carrier to be used will to a great extent depend on whether or not the goods are to be dyed to a light, medium or heavy shade. When it is desired to dye the goods to a light shade, we prefer to use from about 4 to about 9% of carrier, and when the goods are to be dyed for medium shades, we prefer to use from about 9 to about 14% of carrier, and for heavy shades, we prefer to use from about 14 to 18% of carrier. The emulsifying agents employed are generally surface active agents of the anionic, cationic or nonionic type, and the emulsifying agent is generally mixed with the carrier to the extent of about 2 to 30% by weight based on the weight of the carrier employed. Preferably we prefer to use about to 20% by weight based on the weight of the carrier employed.

The type of emulsifying agents specified above are well known to those skilled in the art and any of them can be used for the compositions of this invention. For example, various classes are included'such as sulfonated Castor oil, sulfated alcohols, alkyl sulfonates, alkylaryl sulfonates, sulfated ethoxylated alkyl phenols, ethoxylated alcohols, sulfated ethoxylated alcohols, ethoxylated fatty acids, etc. The emulsifying agents may be represented by the following formulae; in which R designates an alkyl group and M is a metal salt such as sodium, potassium, ammonium, or a derivative of ammonia, etc.

wherein R is an alkyl group containing 8 to 24 carbon atoms.

wherein R is an alkyl group containing 8 to 24 carbon atoms.

wherein R is an alkyl group'containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms.

wherein R is an alkyl group containing 3 to 18 carbon atoms and Ar is an aromatic nucleus selected'from benzene, naphthalene, lanthracene,-etc.

R-COOM ROSO OM RSOSM wherein R is an alkyl group containing 1 to 18 carbon atoms, Ar is a benzene nucleus and n is a number from 4 to 40.

wherein R is an alkyl gnoup containing 8 to 24 carbon atoms and n is a number from 4 to 40.

o OM ll/ R-(OCHzCHzhr-O-P wherein R is an alkyl group containing 8 to 24 carbon atoms and 11" is a number equaling 1 to 4.

wherein R is a fatty radical containing 8 to 24 carbon atoms and n is a number equaling 4 to 40.

wherein R is an alkyl or amido group containing 8 to 24 carbon atoms; R is hydrogen, alkyl or an aralkyl group R is hydrogen or an alkyl group containing 1 to 8 carbon atoms, R is hydrogen, alkyl or aralkyl group and X is an anionic radical, e.g. chloride, sulfate or sulfate derivative.

Specific examples of emulsifying agents are lauryl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride, Turkey red oil, sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate, sodium tetraethoxylated diisobutyl phenol sulfate, etc.

The amount of disperse or cationic (basic) dye used will to a great extent depend on the shade required and upon other factors well understood in the dyeing art.

The procedure for dyeing the synthetic fibers preferably comprises first adding the desired quantity of emulsifying or dispersing agent to the carrier and then dispersing the total mixture in a portion of water, viz., to produce 1 to 10 volumes of water per volume of compositions of carrier and emulsifying agent. Prior to the addition of the diluted dispersion of carrier and emulsifying agent to the dyebath, the synthetic fiber and dyestuif is placed therein. The dispersion of carrier and emulsifying agent is then added to the dyebath and the pH of the dyebath is adjusted for optimum conditions of dyeing. Finally the resultant dye liquor is slowly raised to a temperature of about to C. At the desired elevated temperature, the fiber is held in the solution for a period of about /2 to 6 hours. At the end of this time, the fiber is scoured in a fresh bath according to well known procedures.

In order to facilitate a better understanding of this invention, reference should now be had to the following examples.

EXAMPLE 1 An emulsifying agent was made up consisting of 60% of a sodium neutralized sulfarted buty-l oleate, 16% of pine oil, 12% 'oleic acid, and 12% of triethanolarrnne. One part of the above emulsifying agent was mixed with 3 parts of the following carriers: (a) naphthalene, (b) l-methylnaphthal'ene, (c) 2-methylnaphthalene, (d) dimethylnaphthalene. Each of the above mixtures of emulsifying agent and carrier was readily dispersible in water and as such could be used as an aid in dyeing polyester fiber.

Each of the above four mixtures of carrier plus emulsifying agent was tested in an automatic beaker dyeing machine where it is possible to maintain the identical mechanical condition for all four dyeings, simultaneously. Specifically, 13 gr. of 100% polyester fiber (spun Dacron type 54) was placed in each of the four beakers of the automatic dyeing machine. To each beaker was added 325 mls. of water. The agitation was started and the water was warmed to F. At this temperature, 2.34 gr. of the mixture of emulsifier and carrier as described above was added to each of the four beakers. (This represents 18% of mixture based on the weight of the Dacron goods.) After 5 minutes of agitation at 120 F., 1.04 of Latyl Blue 4R was added to each of the beakers. The pH of the dyebaths was adjusted to 6.0. This is important since it is the optimum pH for a disperse dye, such as Latyl Blue 4R.

The temperature of the :dyebath was slowly raised from 120 F. to 205208 F., over a period of 30 minutes.

. The temperature was maintained at 205-208 F., for

a solution of 2% sodium hydroxide, 2% sodium hydrosulfite, and 2% of a nonionic deter-genta]l percentages based on the weight of the goodsin a. water to goods ratio of 25:1.

Even though the amount of carrier and the amount of dyestuif was identical in each of the dyeings described above, a visual examination of the dyed goods (with or without the extra hydrosulfite scour) indicated that the dyeing made with naphthalene as the carrier was considerably weaker than that dyeing made with either lor Z-methylnaphthalene. In addition, the dyeing made with dimethylnaphthalen'e was heavier than either of the dyeings made with the monomethylnaphthalene.

Rather than depend on a visual examination of the dyed goods, the .actual percentage of dye on the goods was determined spectrophotometrically. The general procedure is as follows: The maximum absorbency for a given dye at a certain wave length is established. At this wave length, a curve is drawn plotting percentage transmission (ordinate) vs. wave length (abscissa). In the case of Latyl Blue 4R, the point of minimum transmission (or maximum absorbency) is determined at a wave length of 580 millimicrons.

Using the above determined wave length, another curve is drawn for Latyl Blue 4R in which percentage of transmission is plotted against concentration. With this second curve, it is possible to determine an amount of dyestuff on a piece of weighed fabric merely by dissolving the fabric in a solvent. (In this case, a solvent consisting of 90 parts of phenol and 10 parts of water.) A sample of undyed goods dissolved in the same solvent becomes the reference point for 100% transmission. It is then possible to determine the exact amount of dyestuff on a piece of goods.

The following table indicates the results of such determinations spectrophotometn'cally. (This data was collected on those goods which were given the extra scour with sodium hydrosulfite as described above.)

Table I Percent of Assuming Dyestufi Naphtha- Dyeing Carrier on 100% lene is Polyester Standard A Nanhth'flene 4. 33 100 B 1-Methylnaphthalene 4. 88 113 C 2 lvfethylnaphthnlene 5. 49 126 D Dimethylnaphthalene 7. 162

The emulsifying agent of Example 1 was mixed with each of the following carriers: (a) xylene, (b) toluene, (c) naphthalene, (d) a petroleum distillate, consisting of essentially 63% of mono, di and trimethylnaphthalene, (e) tetralin. The percentage of mixture of carrier and emulsifying agent, the amount of goods, the amount of dyestuff, as well as the whole procedure as described in Example 1 was used in exactly the same manner in Example 1. Visual examination of the goods indicated that the dyeing made with the carrier consisting of the petroleum distillate (63% mono, di, and trimethylnaphthalene) gave the heaviest shade.

In order to confirm the results spectrophotometrically, the same procedure as outlined in Example 1 was used.

The results of the spectrophotometric determinations are set forth in .Table II below:

The above results were collected on those goods which were given the extra scour with sodium hydrosulfite as described in Example 1. As can be observed from the above table, there is 35% more dyestuif on the goods on using the petroleum distillate containing 63% mono, di and trimethylnaphthalene as opposed to naphthalene alone. Furthermore, 35% less dyestufi was on the goods when Tetralin' was used, 48% less dyestuff when toluene was used and 50% less dyestuff when xylene was used.

In the previous two examples, the intent was to minimize or even eliminate the possible effect of the emulsifier on the carrier action of the chemicals involved. This was accomplished by using the identical amount and type of emulsifier in each of the carrier mixtures. The following examples illustrate the nrany various emulsifiers which may be employed with the carriers of the subject invention.

EXAMPLE 3 added and the temperature of the water was raised to 120 F. At this temperature, 1.56 of the above composition of carrier and emulsifying agent was added. Im-

mediately afterwards, 0.52 gr. of Latyl Cerise B was added. The temperature of the dyebath was slowly raised to 205208 F., (over a period of 30 minutes) and the temperature maintained at 205-208" F., for 2 /2 hours. After dyeing, the goods were washed by the usual pro cedure, and on observation, the goods were found to be dyed very evenly in a deep red shade.

EXAMPLE 4 In this experiment the same combination of carrier and emulsifying agents as described in Example 3 were used. However, 1.04 gr. of Latyl Blue 4R were used instead of the red disperse dyestuff. The goods were dyed evenly in a heavy dark blue shade.

EXAMPLE 5 To parts of a petroleum distillate, consisting of 63% mono, di, and trirnethylnaphthalene was added 5.5

' parts of trietlhanolamine, 4.5 parts of dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid, and 10 parts of sulfated tetraethoxylated nonyl phenol. This particular combination of carrier and emulsifying agents was used -for the same weight of goods, the same volume of water, and the same amount of dyestufi as described in Example 3. The goods were .dyed evenly to a deep red shade.

EXAMPLE 6 The composition of carrier and emulsifying agent as described in Example 5 was used and the same dyestuff, the amount of spun polyester, the amount of water, and the usual dyeing procedure as described in Example 3. Again, the goods were dyed evenly to a dark blue shade.

EXAMPLE 7 To 80 parts of a petroleum distillate, consisting of 63% mono, di, and trimethylnaphthalene was added, 2 parts of triethanolamine, 4 parts of dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid, and 14 parts of dodecyl ethoxylated dodecyl phenol.- This particular carrier was used with the same amount of goods, the same quality of goods, the same amount of water, and the same dyestutf, as well as the usual dyeing procedure as described in Example 3. The goods were dyed evenly to a dark red shade.

EXAMPLE 8 The same composition of carrier. and emulsifying agents, as described in Example 7 was used. Again, the same quality of goods, the same amount of goods, the same amount of water, the same amount of dyestuif, and generally the same procedure as described in Example 3 was used with this particular carrier combination. Again, the goods were dyed to a dark blue shade.

EXAMPLE 9 To 85 parts of a petroleum distillate consisting of 63% mono, di, and trimethylnaphthalene was added 7.5 parts of a condensate made from coconut oil fatty acids and diethanolamine, 7.5 parts of a nonyl phenol reacted with 20 mols. of ethylene oxide and finally, 3 parts of water to clarify the above mixture. The resulting mixture was readily dispersible in water. To one of the beakers of the beaker dyeing machine was added 360 mls. of water, 6 gr. of filament polyester fiber (Dacron type 62) and 6 gr. of a mixture of spun and filament fiber (-Dacron type 54 and 56). Dacron type 62 is a modified polyester fiber which can be dyed with the so-called cationic dyestuffs.) The temperature of the water was raised to 120 F. At this temperature, 1.26 gr. of the above composition of carrier and emulsifying agent was added. Immediately afterwards, 0.09 gr. of Maxilan Red BL (cationic dyestuif) was added. The pH was adjusted to 6.5. The temperature of the dyebath was slowly raised to 205208 F. (over a period of 30 minutes) and the temperature maintained at 205208 F., for 2 hours. After dyeing, the goods were washed by the usual procedure, and on observation, the Dacron type 62 was dyed a bright red, while the Dacron type 54 and type 56 were left white.

EXAMPLE 10 To 1 part of the emulsifying agent described in Example 1 was added 3 parts of a mixed amyl naphthalene consisting essentially of mono amyl naphthalene. Again, to 1 part of the emulsifying agent described in Example 1 was added 3 parts of crude mixed amyl naphthalenes consisting essentially of di amyl naphthalenes. Finally, to 1 part of the emulsifying agent described in Example 1 was added 3 parts of an alkylated naphthalene consisting of 7 methylene groups. In the latter case, the commercially available chemical does not describe specifically the nature of the methylene groups, that is, whether the methylene groups are in one straight chain or whether 7 methyl groups are attached to the naphthalene as individual methyl groups.

The 3 mixtures of carriers and emulsifying agents prepared above were used in the automatic dyeing machine exactly as described in Example 1. Specifically, the amount of carrier and emulsifying agent, the nature and amount of dyestuff, the amount of 100% spun Dacron goods, the ratio of water to goods, and generally, the dyeing conditions were carried out exactly as described in Example 1. The scouring after dyeing was done exactly as described in Example 1.

Visual examination of the goods indicated that the 3 carriers described above were vastly inferior to even the carrier action of naphthalene and obviously, very much inferior to the carrier action of the methylnaphthalene described in the previous examples.

The carrier compositions of the subject invention provide for readily dispersible formulations which permit for highly efiicient and economical carrier compositions which may be employed with either disperse-type or cationic-type dyestuffs. In addition, the goods dyed with the compositions of the subject invention show considerably less staining than when dyed with prior art carriers and this consequently is important from the standpoint of better resistance of materials such as wool-polyester blends to crocking (rubbing). Finally, the goods dyed with the carrier compositions of the subject invention show excellent resistance to light fading, particularly if the goods are subjected to slight heat to remove all traces of the aromatic chemical, and in general are superior to those of the prior art carriers.

Having thus provided a written description of the present invention and provided specific examples thereof, it should be understood that no undue restrictions or limitations are to be imposed by reason thereof, but that the present invention is defined by the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A composition comprising about 70 to 98% of a carrier consisting essentially of methylnaphthalenes having less than 7 methyl groups on the naphthalene nucleus and about 2 to 30% of an emulsifier selected from the group consisting of anionic, nonionic and cationic emulsifiers based on the weight of the carrier employed.

2. A composition comprising about 70 to 98% of a carrier consisting essentially of a mixture of mono, di, tri and tetramethylnaphthalenes having less than 7 methyl groups on the naphthalene nucleus and about 2 to 30% of an emulsifier for said carrier based on the weight of the carrier employed.

3. A composition comprising 70 to 98% of a carrier comprising a mixture consisting essentially of about 63% by weight of mono, di, and tri methylnaphthalenes having less than 7 methyl groups on the naphthalene nucleus and about 2 to 30% of an emulsifier selected from the group consisting of anionic, nonionic and cationic emulsifiers based on the weight of the carrier employed.

4. A composition comprising about 95 to by weight of a carrier consisting essentially of methylnaphthalenes having less than 7 methyl groups on the naphthalene nucleus and about 5 to 20% by weight of an emulsifier based on the weight of the carrier employed.

5. A composition comprising about to 80% of a carrier consisting essentially of about 63% by weight of the mono, di, and tri methylnaphthalenes having less than 7 methyl groups on the naphthalene nucleus and about 5 to 20% by weight of an emulsifier based on the weight of the carrier employed selected from the group consisting of anionic, nonionic and cationic emulsifiers.

6. The process of dyeing synthetic fibers which comprises adding a carrier composition comprising about 2 to 30% of an emulsifying agent based on the weight of the carrier to be used and about 70 to 98% of a carrier consisting essentially of methylnaphthalenes having less than 7 methyl groups on the naphthalene nucleus to a dyebath and forming a mixture of said carrier composition, dyebath, dyestuffs and goods to be dyed, maintain ing the goods to be dyed in contact with said carrier composition and dyestutf at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to insure dyeing of said goods and removing the dyed goods from the dyebath.

7. The process of dyeing synthetic fibers which comprises adding a carrier composition comprising about 2 to 30% of an emulsifying agent based on the weight of the carrier to be used and about 70 to 98% of a carrier consisting essentially of a mixture of mono, di, tri and tetramethylnaphthalenes having less than 7 methyl groups on the naphthalene nucleus to a dyebath and forming a mixture of said carrier composition, dyebath, dyestuffs and goods to be dyed, maintaining the goods to be dyed in contact with said carrier composition and dyestuif at a temperature and for a period of time sufiicient to insure dyeing of said goods and removing the dyed fabrics from the dyebath.

8. The process for dyeing synthetic fibers which comprises forming a water dispersible mixture of about 2 to 30% of an emulsifying agent based on the weight of the carrier to be used and about 70 to 98% of a carrier consisting essentially of methylnaphthalenes having less than 7 methyl groups on the naphthalene nucleus, dispersing said water dispersible mixture in a volume of water and adding said water mixture of emulsifier and carrier to a dyebath forming a mixture of said carrier composition, dyebath, goods to be dyed and dyestutf, maintaining the goods to be dyed in contact with said carrier and dyestufit at a temperature and for a period of time suflicient to insure dyeing of said goods and removing the dyed fibers from the dyebath.

9. The process for dyeing synthetic fibers which comprises forming a water dispersible mixture of about 2 to 30% of an emulsifying agent based on the weight of the carrier to be used and about 70 to 98% of a carrier consisting essentially of a mixture of mono, di, tri and tetramethylnaphthalenes having less than 7 methyl groups on the naphthalene nucleus, dispersing said water dis persible mixture in a volume of water and adding said water mixture of emulsifier and carrier to a dyebath, forming a mixture of said carrier composition, dyebath, goods to be dyed and dyestufi, maintaining the goods to be dyed in said dyebath in contact with said carrier and said dyestufi' at a temperature not in excess of 210 F. and for a period of time not in excess of 2 /2 hours thereby insuring dyeing of said goods, and removing the dyed goods from the dyebath.

10. The process according to claim 9 wherein the carrier is employed in an amount of about /2 to 25% by weight based on the weight of the synthetic fiber to be dyed.

11. The process of dyeing synthetic fibers which comprises forming a Water dispersible mixture of about 5 to 20% of an emulsifying agent based on the weight of the carrier to be used selected from the group consisting of anionic, nonionic and cationic emulsifying agents, about to of a carrier consisting essentially of methylnaphthalenes having less than 7 methyl groups on the naphthalene nucleus, dispersing said water dispersible mixture in a volume of water and adding said water mixture of emulsifier and carrier to a dyebath, agitating the mixture of said carrier composition, dyebath, dyestuff and goods to be dyed, maintaining the goods to be dyed in said dyebath in contact with said carrier and dyestuif at a temperature of about 205208 F. for about 2 /2 hours to insure dyeing of said goods and removing the dyed goods from the dyebath.

12. The process according to claim 11 wherein the carrier is employed in an amount of about 4 to 18% by Weight based on the weight of the synthetic fiber to be dyed.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,803,008 Ellis et al. Apr. 28, 1931 2,069,215 Chambers Feb. 2, 1937 2,250,098 Hardt et al. July 22, 1941 2,303,551 Houghton Dec. 1, 1942 OTHER REFERENCES Mellan, Industrial Solvents, Reinhold Pub. Corp., New York, second printing, 1944, pages 131-132. Copy in Div. 43.

Rose, The Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 5th edition, Reinhold Publishing Corp. New York, 1956, page 819. Copy in Div. 43.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1803008 *Dec 3, 1928Apr 28, 1931 Dyeing
US2069215 *Aug 18, 1934Feb 2, 1937Du PontPrinting process and composition therefor
US2250098 *Aug 3, 1938Jul 22, 1941Gen Aniline & Film CorpProcess of preparing water-containing dyestuff preparations of high concentration
US2303551 *Sep 18, 1940Dec 1, 1942Allied Chem & Dye CorpSolvent composition
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3363969 *Feb 12, 1964Jan 16, 1968Du PontDyeing and light stabilizing nylon yarns with sulfonated dyes; sterically hindered phenols, and alkylnaphthalene sulfonates with or without other ultraviolet light absorbers
US3391985 *Nov 2, 1964Jul 9, 1968Geigy Ag J RProcess for pad-dyeing and printing wool and synthetic textile fibers in carrier compositions
US3503698 *Feb 8, 1966Mar 31, 1970Geigy Ag J RPad-dyeing and printing textile fibers
US3533727 *Dec 8, 1967Oct 13, 1970Macdermid IncPolypropylene dyeing with a turpentine emulsion and solvent soluble dye
US3617213 *Dec 2, 1968Nov 2, 1971Robert Curtis BrittCoal tar methyl naphthalene fraction and diphenyl carrier and dyeing therewith
US3630663 *Feb 12, 1969Dec 28, 1971Bayer AgProcess for dyeing anionic modified synthetic fibers in dye baths containing an organic nitrogen compound
US3643270 *Feb 12, 1969Feb 22, 1972Bayer AgProcess for dyeing anionic groups containing synthetic fiber materials
US3660015 *Jan 24, 1969May 2, 1972Hodogaya Chemical Co LtdProcess for the dyeing of modified polyester fibers with basic dyes in the presence of aromatic carboxylic acids
US3897207 *Jul 19, 1973Jul 29, 1975Cassella Farbwerke Mainkur AgCarrier composition and process for dyeing and printing
US4080166 *Feb 11, 1976Mar 21, 1978Hoechst AktiengesellschaftEmulsifiers for dyeing accelerators based on alkylnaphthalenes
US4270917 *Oct 2, 1979Jun 2, 1981Imperial Chemical Industries LimitedStabilized aqueous dyestuff dispersions
US4350493 *Mar 27, 1981Sep 21, 1982Sandoz Ltd.Carrier composition for disperse dyes
US5009669 *May 30, 1989Apr 23, 1991Ciba-Geigy CorporationAqueous dispensions of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzotriazoles
Classifications
U.S. Classification8/617, 516/63, 8/908, 516/69, 8/907, 516/58, 516/DIG.200, 8/900, 252/364
International ClassificationD06P1/651, D06P3/54
Cooperative ClassificationY10S8/908, D06P1/65162, Y10S8/90, Y10S8/907, Y10S516/02, D06P3/54
European ClassificationD06P1/651H4, D06P3/54