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Publication numberUS3097514 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1963
Filing dateNov 2, 1961
Publication numberUS 3097514 A, US 3097514A, US-A-3097514, US3097514 A, US3097514A
InventorsArthur H. Stone
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Artificial candle
US 3097514 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,097,514 ARTIFECIAL CANDLE Arthur H. Stone, 212 Broadway, Massapequa Park, N.Y. Filed Nov. 2, 1961, Ser. No. 149,649 4 Claims. (Cl. 67-55) This invention relates to illuminating devices and more particularly to a liquid fueled artificial candle simulative of known varieties of wax candles and possessed of features and advantages additional to the illuminating and decorative qualities of such conventionally familiar candles.

Objects and advantages of the invention will be set forth in part hereinafter and in part will be obvious herefrom, or may be learned by practice of the invention, the same being realised and attained by means of the novel parts, constructions, arrangements, combinations and improvements herein shown and described.

The accompanying drawings referred to herein and constituting a part hereof, illustrate one embodiment of the invention, and together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention.

FIG. 1 is a vertical crosssection view of the present device wherein the wick-holder is received in operative position;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along line 33 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 4 is an isolated perspective view of the wickholder according to the invention.

The invention is generally directed to providing improvements in candle substitutes, and more specifically to the end of furnishing a portable lighting means of attractive appearance, comprised of few and simple parts, inexpensive with respect to production, and economical in performing its function of light production by the combustion of a liquid fuel.

One object of the invention is to provide an artificial candle comprising a casing simulating the appearance of a wax candle, a wick-tube being removably received with in the head of the casing, and frictionally retained therein to facilitate ready removal thereof for the purpose of fuel replenishment and wick adjustment.

Another object of the instant invention is the provision of a candle substitute adapted to burn liquid fuel and having a wick-holder, which by virtue of its fluted surface configuration, is adapted to provide communication between the fuel chamber and the atmosphere without the candle structure.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a simulated candle having a frictionally secured wickholder within the head thereof, said Wick-holder having a surface configuration of desirable heat radiating characteristics to thereby effectuate minimization of heat transfer between the wick-holder and the candle casing.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an artificial candle having a readily accessible and graspable wick-tube enabling quick removal thereof and subsequent exposure of a large fuel receiving opening in communication with the fuel chamber.

Still another object of the instant invention is the provision of a liquid fuel burning candle having a wickholder receivable within the head of the candle and readily adjustable for permitting or curtailing venting communication between the fuel chamber and the atmosphere without the candle structure.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an artificial candle which permanently retains its shape, length, and light producing properties and which is substantially resistant to distortion or deterioration.

3,091,514 Patented July 16, 1963 It will be understood that the foregoing general objectives and the following detailed description as well are exemplary and explanatory but are not restrictive of the invention.

Referring now in detail to the present preferred embodiment of the invention illustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawings, FIGURE 1 shows the artificial candle designated generally by numeral 1, the said candle being comprised of substantially cylindrical casing formed of head portion 2, body portion 4 and base portion 6.

Wick-holder 8 illustrated perspectively in FIGURE 4 of the drawings is, in said FIGURE 1 thereof, shown received within vertical bore 10 contained within the upper region of said head portion 2, said bore being defined by upper end 12 in communication with the atmosphere and lower end 14 in communication with passage 16 which leads directly to fuel chamber 18.

Referring to FIGURE 4, it is observed that said wickholder 8 is formed of top piece 20 terminating at upper end 22 and annular collar 24 at the lower end respectively, and reduced tubular sleeve 26 depending centrally of said collar. A reduced bore 28 extends axially through said tubular sleeve to the upper end of the said top piece for receiving a wick 39 which projects at the end of the wick-holder, the other portion of the wick depending into said fuel chamber 18. The Wick 30 is preferably of sufficient length that it will extend, as shown, through the upper end of the wick-holder and to the bottom of the chamber, thereby assuring consumption of the entire liquid contents without replenishment thereof.

In the artificial candle art, heretofore, several formidable difliculties have been encountered, a most salient problem being the preclusion of heat transfer between wick and candle casing, the pronouncement of this problern being occasioned primarily where plastic casings are employed. To the end of obviating this among other problems to be described herein, the wicker-holder according to this invention is provided with a vertically fluted surface at 32, with respect to said top piece, and at 34, with respect to said reduced sleeve, seen in FIGURES 2 and 3 respectively.

Annular shoulder 36 illustrated in FIGURE 1 and disposed at the lower end of said vertical bore 10, provides a seat for a toroidal shaped O-ring 3Si, said O-ring being adapted for frictionally securing said wick-holder within said vertical bore. Inasmuch as the top piece 20 is vertically oriented within the said bore, space 40 is provided peripherally of said top piece and said head portion 2, there being no heat conduction therebetween. By dint of the fiulted surface configuration aforedescribed, heat absorbed by metallic wick-holder 8 is readily dissipated within said space, negligible heat being convected to said plastic head portion of said casing.

Inasmuch as the wick substantially seals the reduced bore 28, transfer of air from without the candle to within the said fuel chamber is not readily permitted. Accordingly, and especially with utilization of non-volatile liquid fuels, a vacuum created within the fuel chamber upon depletion of the fuel hinders normal capillary flow of fuel to the end of the wick thereby causing flickering and ultimate extinguishment of the flame. It will therefore be appreciated that orifices 42 provided by virtue of the cooperation between fluted surface 34 and the inside surface of the said O-ring enables atmospheric communication through said O-ring, said reduced sleeve 26, and the said fuel chamber thereby providing for essential venting.

It will be further observed that wick-holder 8 being slidably and friotionally related to the said O-ring 38, may be raised or lowered to either sealingly engage top piece-collar 24 and O-ring or to provide an annular passage therebetween to permit continual venting. That is, substantially positive shut-off of fuel flow from fuel chamber 18 to without the candle is accomplished by pressing the said wick holder downwardly in said vertical bore to a position of contiguity with said O-ring, such position being desirable during periods of candle storage or nonuse.

With reference to FIGURES 1 and 4, knurled region 46 peripherally located adjacent the upper end 22 of said top piece is provided to both materially enhance rapid heat dissipation from said wick-holder and to facilitate grasping of the said wick-holder for removal thereof from said vertical bore for purposes of refueling through said passage 16 and for adjustment or replacement of said wick 30.

Base portion 6 shown received within the well of a candelabra or other supporting base 48 is preferably of hollow construction thus encouraging snugness between its convergingly tapered contour and the correspondingly complementary base configuration.

Although the construction of the aforedescribed artificial candle [is preferably one piece or integral with respect to the casing members, it will be understood that severable member construction is within the contemplation of the invention. Similarly, plastic construction, e.g., polystyrenes, polyoarb'onates, etc, while preferred do not preclude choice and utilization of other suitable materials. It will be further understood that within the purview of this invention various changes may be made in the form, details, proportion and arrangement of parts, the combination thereof and mode of operation, which generally stated consist in a device capable of carrying out the objects set forth, as disclosed and defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An artificial candle comprised of a casing having head, body and base portions, a bore within said head portion, a wick holder, a fuel chamber within said body pontion, and a wick extending through said wick holder into said fuel chamber, said wick holder including a ventically fluted top piece having upper and lower ends, a vertically fluted tubular sleeve depending integrally and centrally of said lower end, said tubular sleeve being smaller of diameter than said top piece so as to form an annular collar at the junction of said lower end and said tubular sleeve, an O-ring frictionally secured annularly of said tubular sleeve and contiguously with said annular collar, said bore having an upper passage and a substantially smaller lower passage, a shoulder disposed annularly at the juncture of said passages, said passages being disposed in vertical coaxial relation and in communioation with said fuel chamber, said tubular sleeve being slidably received within said lower passage, said O-ring being slidably and sealingly secured within said upper passage and adapted for seating engagement with said shoulder.

2. An artificial candle comprised of a casing having head, body, and base portions, a bore within said head portion, a wick holder, a fuel chamber within said body portion, and a wick extending through said wick holder into said fuel chamber, said wick holder including a top piece having upper and lower ends, a vertically fluted sleeve depending integrally and centrally of said lower end, said sleeve being smaller of diameter than said top piece so as to form an annular collar at the junction of said lower end and said sleeve, an O-ring frictionally secured annularly of said sleeve and contiguously with said annular collar, said bore having an upper passage and a substantially smaller lower passage, a shoulder disposed annularly at the juncture of said passages, said passages being disposed in vertical coaxial relation and in communication with said fuel chamber, said sleeve being slidably received within said lower passage, said O-ring being slidably and sealingly secured within said upper passage, and adapted for seating engagement with said shoulder.

3. An artificial candle comprised of a casing having head, body, and base portions, a bore within said head portion, a wick holder, a fuel chamber within said body portion, and a wick extending through said wick holder into said fuel chamber, said wick holder including a top piece having upper and lower ends, a vertically fluted sleeve depending integrally and centrally of said lower end, said sleeve extending into said fuel chamber, said sleeve being smaller of diameter than said top piece so as to form an annular collar at the junction of said lower end and said sleeve, an O-ring frictionally secured annularly of said sleeve and contiguously with said annular collar, said bore having an upper passage and a substantially smaller lower passage, a shoulder disposed annularly at the juncture of said passages, said passages being disposed in vertical coaxial relation and in comrnunication with said fuel chamber, said sleeve being slidably received within said lower passage, said O-ring being slidably and sealingly secured within said upper passage, and adapted for seating engagement with said shoulder.

4. An artificial candle comprised of a casing having head, body, and base portions, a bore within said head portion, a wick holder, a fuel chamber within said body portion, and a wick extending through said wick holder into said "fuel chamber, said wick holder including a top piece having upper and lower ends, said top piece being knurled adjacent its upper end and vertically fluted adjacent its lower end, a vertically fluted sleeve depending integrally and centrally of said lower end, said sleeve extending into said fuel chamber, said sleeve being smaller of diameter than said top piece so as to form an annular collar at the junction of said lower end and said sleeve, an *O-ring frictionally secured annularly of said sleeve and contiguously with said annular collar, said bore having an upper passage and a substantially smaller lower passage, a shoulder disposed annularly at the juncture of said passages, said passages being disposed in vertical coaxial relation and in communication with said fuel chamber, said sleeve being slidably received within said lower passage, said O-ring being slidably and sealingly secured within said upper passage, and adapted for seating engagement with said shoulder.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 176,320 Kowalski Apr. 18, 1876 211,850 Jackson Feb. 4, 1879 1,980,251 Becker Nov. 13, 1934 2,503,496 Kwasniewski Apr. 11, 1950 2,984,093 Goddard et al. May 16, 1961 FOREIGN PATENTS 849,234 Germany Mar. 19, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US176320 *Feb 28, 1876Apr 18, 1876 Improvement in artificial candles
US211850 *Oct 21, 1878Feb 4, 1879 Improvement in lamps
US1980251 *Nov 10, 1932Nov 13, 1934Frederick J BeckerArtificial taper
US2503496 *Mar 18, 1947Apr 11, 1950Kwasniewski Thadious RMetal candle
US2984093 *May 19, 1958May 16, 1961Ronson CorpGas fueled candle
DE849234C *Oct 15, 1950Mar 19, 1953Heinrich FleissnerKerzenartige Dochtlampe
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4025290 *Dec 12, 1975May 24, 1977Clayton GiangiulioLamp
US4608011 *Apr 27, 1984Aug 26, 1986Comstock Todd MCandle apparatus
US4693681 *Jul 21, 1986Sep 15, 1987Grand Royalties, Ltd.Candle apparatus
US5938430 *May 19, 1998Aug 17, 1999S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Liquid fuel lamp
US6159002 *May 5, 2000Dec 12, 2000Lamplight Farms, Inc.Oil candle having an oil seal
US7670136 *Nov 30, 2007Mar 2, 2010Bishop James DArtificial acetylene gas candle
US20090142718 *Nov 30, 2007Jun 4, 2009Bishop James DArtificial acetylene gas candle
DE3607603A1 *Mar 7, 1986Sep 4, 1986Manfred JaschekPermanent candle
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/125, 222/187, 431/324
International ClassificationF23D3/16, F23D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF23D3/16
European ClassificationF23D3/16