Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3098703 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1963
Filing dateAug 4, 1959
Priority dateAug 4, 1959
Publication numberUS 3098703 A, US 3098703A, US-A-3098703, US3098703 A, US3098703A
InventorsReuter Gilbert G, Snyder William R
Original AssigneeGilbert G Reuter Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus and method for insect control
US 3098703 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 23, 1963 w. R. SNYDER ETAL 3,098,703

APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR INSECT CONTROL Filed Aug. 4, 1959 INVENTOR.

WILLIAM z. NYDEK BYGILBEET G. EEUTEIZ wwsom, LEWIS i M QAE:

APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR a INSEQT CONTROL William R. Snyder, Detroit, and Gilbert G. Renter, Dearborn, Mich, assignors, by direct and mesne assignments, to Gilbert G. Renter Company, a corporation of Michigan Filed Aug. 4, 1959, Ser. No. 831,611

8 Claims. (Cl. 21-106) This invention relates to sanitizing means for refuse containers, and more particularly to apparatus for dispensing sanitizing agents into refuse containers to effectively destroy insects, germs and fungi and which will also deodorize such containers.

The maintenance of sanitary conditions in garbage cans has been a long standing problem. As is well known, refuse containers provide a breeding ground and food source for many insect pests, particularly the common house fly, and also harmful germs frequently breed in such containers. Additionally, the decomposed organic matter usually emits an obnoxious odor.

This problem can, of course, be solved by frequent application of insecticide or germicide into the garbage can. However, the average householder usually does not follow such sanitary practices to the point where his refuse containers are completely sanitary at all times.

According to the present invention, means are provided for maintaining complete sanitation in refuse containers without the necessity of frequent applications of insecticide, germicide or deodorizing agents. It is believed that the use of the invention, inasmuch as it requires very little effort on the part of the householder, will achieve wide acceptance and will materially assist in maintenance of sanitary conditions in the community, Which is particularly important in crowded metropolitan areas.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide means for sanitizing refuse containers.

Another object of the invention is to provide sanitizing means which will act as an insecticide, germicide, fungicide and deodorizing agent.

A further object of the invention is to provide a device for securement to the underside to the garbage can lid which will automatically dispense sanitizing agents at a predetermined rate for an extended period of time, approximately four to five weeks, without the necessity for refill.

An additional object of the invention is to provide sanitizing agents in the form of tablets which will decompose upon exposure to the ambient atmosphere of a garbage can.

A still further object of the invention is to provide sanitizing tablets in two forms, one form which will begin decomposition immediately upon being placed in a garbage can and continue to decompose for a period of days, and a second form of tablets which will start to decompose approximately at the point where the first tablets are substantially decomposed, whereby the sanitizing means will provide effective protection from the point of initial installation.

Other objects of this invention will appear in the following description and appended claims, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts in the several views.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view in section of a garbage can illustrating the installation of the present invention therein; and

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of one embodiment of the apparatus of the present invention.

Before explaining the present invention in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its Patented July 23, 1963 application to the details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, since the invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology or terminology employed herein is for the purpose of description and not of limitation.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, the device 10 of the present invention comprises a perforated container 12, in the shape of an elongated hollowed cylinder, which is releasably secured within a closed refuse container 14 by means of a pair of clamps 16, 18.

A plurality of tablets 20 are carried in the perforated container 12. As will be more fully explained hereinafter, the tablets 20 are of two types. One type begins to decompose as soon as exposed to the ambient atmosphere while the second type has a delayed action and does not begin to decompose in substantial amounts until after extended exposure to the atmosphere.

As may be seen in FIG. 2, the bracket means comprises a pair of clamps 16', 18 fabricated from a spring material. Each clamp is provided with a pair of curved legs 22 which terminate in outwardly extending feet 24. The legs are provided with upwardly extending portions 26 on the upper ends thereof, which portions 26 are interconnected by web member 28. The web member 28 is provided with an opening 30 to engage a screw 32 which projects through the garbage can lid 34. The device 10 may be mounted simply by punching holes in the lid 34 and extending the screws therethrough to threading engagement with the clamps 16, 18.

The container 12 is fabricated from a screen material which may be soldered along the edges to form a unitary structure. The screen may be of any desired mesh, such for example as from 18 to 60 mesh. The selection of the proper mesh is based on the requirement that the openings must be large enough to permit small powderlike particles to pass through but small enough to contain larger undecomposed particles of the sanitizing tablets. The shape of the container 12 is conformed, in general, to the shape of the tablets 202 The container is open at one end to permit insertion of tablets and is provided with a cap 36 to secure the tablets therein.

As previously mentioned, the sanitizing tablets are pro vided in two forms. One type of tablet is for immediate effect. The second type is for delayed effect, to come into operation after the first tablets have been substantially decomposed and to last for a longer period than the first tablets. Each type of tablet is formulated according to the same general plan. Each contains a major portion of an agent which will evaporate in the ambient atmosphere of a garbage can to cause decomposition of the tablet. Additionally, each tablet contains a minor portion of an agent which does not evaporate but provides a very strong powdered sanitizing agent.

The quick acting tablets consist of a major portion of a relatively rapidly evaporating insecticide substance such as para-dichlorobenzene, camphor, thymol or naphthalene. The preferred ingredient is para-dichlorobenzene. These ingredients form a heavy vapor which will tend to settle in air. They will begin to evaporate as soon as exposed to the atmosphere and flow down into the garbage can to immediately begin to kill flies or other insects which are contacted.

The second ingredient 'of the quick acting tablets is the gamma isomer of 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane. This agent, which is also known as lindane, will not dissolve to an appreciable extent in water and does not evaporate. When the evaporating agent vaporizes, the lindane will powder off onto the contents of the refuse can. Linda-ne is a powerful insect killer and will destroy larvae and flies. As it does not dissolve or evaporate, it will be effective for a long time. When the garbage can is emptied, a portion of the lindane will remain in the can in adherence with the side walls of the container. The container will therefore be sanitized to some extent after the utilization of all of the tablets.

An example of the composition of a useful quick acting tablet is as follows:

Percent Grains Para-dichlorobeuzene 95 66. 5 Gamma isomer of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, G-hexachlorocyelohexane- 5 8. 5

The para-dichlorobenzene in the above example may be varied from 61% to 97% by Weight and the gamma isomer of 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexaohlorocyclohexane may be varied from 3% to 39% by weight.

The delayed action tablets comprise an evaporating agent which may be paraformaldehyde or trioxane. Paraformaldehyde is preferred. The paraformaldehyde will evaporate and dissolve in water or the moisture of the refuse and forms a solution which has high oxidation properties to kill larvae, germs and fungi and will also diminish the odors of the garbage can. In addition to evaporating, the formaldehyde will also form a powder which sifts into the garbage container.

The second agent of the delayed action tablets comprises ortho-benzyl-para chlorophenol, or other chlorinated phenolic disinfectants such as trichlorophenol or tetrachlorophenol. In addition, straight phenol crystal may be used. The phenolics are very strong disinfectants and Will effectively kill all germs which are contacted. The phenolics do not evaporate but will form a powder as the tablet decomposes and will sift down into the container.

An example of the composition of a delayed action tablet is as follows:

Percent Grains Paraformaldehyde 99 69. 3 Ortho-benzyl-para-chloroph enol 1 0. 7

The paraformaldehyde in the above example may be from 69% to 99.3% by weight while the ortho-benzylpara-chlorophenol may be varied from 31% to 0.7% by weight.

The delayed action tablets may be formed into case hardened tablets with soft centers to provide an additional time delay. Both types of tablets are formed in the usual way, for example, by adding a binder to the ingredients to form a granular product then placing the product in a hopper which feeds a mold to form the tablets by com pression. Lubricants may be added to the composition to assist in the mechanical processing.

The shape of the tablets is not critical. They may be formed as square, oblong, hexagon, octagon, round, or oval. In addition, the surface of the tablets may be flat, convex, concave or any desired combination thereof.

In operation, the brackets 18, 20 are secured to the underside of a garbage can lid 34. It is best to place the container 12 above the highest possible level of garbage so that the sanitizing agents will not be buried in the garbrage and will always be effectively dispensed within the garbage can. Additionally, it is desirable to have the device located on the lid because when the garbage can is emptied by the garbage collector, it is frequently handled roughly and there would be a danger of damaging the container 12. The container 12, loaded with tablets 20, is positioned in the brackets 16, 18 and the lid closed whereupon the quick acting tablets will immediately begin to sanitize the garbage can. When the tablets have pa tially decomposed the non-evaporating materials form a powder. Each time the lid is raised and more garbage is placed in the container, at certain amount of the powdered material will be sifted through the screen and into the container. Consequently, each layer of garbage will be covered with sanitizing agent to effectively destroy any germs which may be introduced with a particular deposit of garbage.

After all of the tablets have decomposed, the perforated container 12 may be reloaded to continue sanitizing the garbage can. The quick acting tablets are substantially decomposed after from five to seven days. The delayed action tablets are substantially decomposed after from three to five Weeks. Therefore as can be readily appreciated, it is only necessary to use one or two loads per year in the average temperate climate, because germs and insects do not normally breed in the colder Weather.

It is to be understood that when the term sanitizing agent or like terms are used in this specification, the meaning intended is an agent having the general properties of an insecticide, germicide, deodorizing agent, fungicide and the like. This term is always taken to include provision of an insecticide, as one of the principal objects of the present invention is to destroy flies and their larvae.

Having thus described our invention, We claim:

1. In a device for sanitizing refuse containers including means forming a perforated container with a closed refuse container, the improvement comprising sanitizing material carried in the perforated container; said material being decomposed by evaporation upon exposure to the ambient atmosphere to release sanitizing agents including an insecticide into the refuse container; a portion of said sanitizing material beginning to decompose substantially as soon as exposed to the ambient atmosphere and at a rate to release effective amounts of sanitizing agents; the remaining portion of said sanitizing material beginning to decompose to release effective amounts of sanitizing agents at a time subsequent to exposure to the ambient atmosphere.

2. In means for sanitizing refuse containers including a perforated container structure within a closed refuse container, the improvement comprising the provision of a plurality of tablets carried in the perforated container; said tablets being decomposed by evaporation upon exposure to the ambient atmosphere to release sanitizing agents into the refuse container; said sanitizing agents including an insecticide, a disinfectant, a fungicide and a deodorizer; a portion of said tablets beginning to decompose substantially as soon as exposed to the ambient atmosphere and at a rate to release effective amounts of sanitizing agents; the remaining portion of said tablets beginning to decompose to release efiective amounts of sanitizing agents at a time subsequent to exposure to the ambient atmosphere.

3. In a device for sanitizing refuse containers including a perforated container structure within a closed refuse container, the improvement comprising the provision of a plurality of tablets carried in the perforated container; said tablets being decomposed by evaporation upon exposure to the ambient atmosphere to release sanitizing agents into the refuse container; said sanitizing agents including an insecticide; a first portion of said tablets beginning to decompose substantially as soon as exposed to the ambient atmosphere and at a rate to release effective amounts of sanitizing agents; said first portion of tablets being substantially decomposed within a period of seven days; a second portion of said tablets beginning to decompose to release effective amounts of sanitizing agents at a time subsequent to exposure to the ambient temperature; said second portion of tablets being substantially decomposed after a period of five weeks.

4. In a device for sanitizing refuse containers including a perforated container structure having wall portions fabricated from a screen material, said perforated container structure being disposed within a closed refuse container, the improvement comprising the provision of a plurality of tablets carried in the perforated container; said tablets being decomposed by evaporation upon exposure to the ambient atmosphere to release sanitizing agents including an insesticide into the refuse container; a portion of said tablets beginning to decompose substantially as soon as exposed to the ambient atmosphere of the container and at a rate to release effective amounts of sanitizing agents; the remaining portion of said tablets beginning to decompose to release effective amounts of sanitizing agents at a time subsequent to exposure to the ambient atmosphere.

5. In an apparatus for sanitizing refuse containers including a perforated container structure within a closed refuse container, the improvement comprising the provision of a pluralityof tablets carried in the perforated container; said tablets being decomposed by evaporation upon exposure to the ambient atmosphere to release sanitizing agents into the refuse container; a first portion of said tablets beginning to decompose substantially as soon as exposed to the ambient atmosphere and at a rate to release effective amounts of sanitizing agents; a second portion of said tablets beginning to decompose to release effective amounts of sanitizing agents at a time subsequent to exposure to the ambient atmosphere; each of the tablets of said first portion comprising from 61 to 97% by weight of para-dichlorobenzene and from 3 to 39% by weight of the gamma isomer of 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane; each of the tablets of said second portion comprising from 69 to 99% by Weight of paraformalde hyde and from 0.7 to 31% by weight of ortho-benzylpara-chlorophenol.

6. Sanitizing means substantially as described in claim 5 and further characterized in that each of said tablets of said first portion comprises 95% by weight of chloro dichlorobenzene and 5% of weight of the gamma isomer 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane and each of the tablets of said second portion comprises 99% by weight of paraformaldehyde and 1% by weight of ortho-benzyl-parachlorophenol.

7. Sanitizing means as described in claim 5 and further characterized in that each of the tablets of said first portion comprises from 61 to 97% by weight of an agent selected from the group consisting of para-dichlorobenzene, camphor, naphthalene and thymol and from 3 to 39% by weight of the gamma isomer of 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane and each of the tablets of said second portion comprises from 69 to 99% by weight of para formaldehyde and from 0.7 to 31% by weight of an agent selected from the group consisting of phenol crystals and chlorinated phenolic disinfectants.

8. In a device for sanitizing refuse containers including means forming a perforated container within a closed refuse container, the improvement comprising a plurality of tablets carried in the perforated container; each of said tablets including a first sanitizing agent which will evaporate in the ambient atmosphere and a second sanitizing agent which will not evaporate in the ambient atmosphere; said tablets being decomposed by vaporization of the first sanitizing agent upon exposure to the ambient atmosphere to release sanitizing agents in both vapor and powder form into the refuse container; a portion of said tablets beginning to decompose substantially as soon as exposed to the ambient atmosphere of the container and at a rate to release effective amounts of sanitizing agents; the remaining portion of said tablets beginning to decompose to release eifective amounts of sanitizing agents at a time subsequent to exposure to the ambient atmosphere.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 175,843 Thompson Apr. 11,1876

569,520 Russell Oct. 13, 1896 1,097,406 Erlenbach May 19, 1914 1,719,186 Lowy July 2, 1929 1,996,353 Seydel Apr. 2, 1935 2,425,678 Hinegardner et a1. Aug. 12, 1947 2,658,017 Marhofer Nov. 3, 1953 2,734,483 Peo Feb. 14, 1956 2,793,973 Cheronis May 28, 1957 2,802,590 Tupper Aug. 13, 1957 2,809,917 Hermelin Oct. 15, 1957 OTHER REFERENCES The Merck Index, 6th ed. (1952), pub. Merck and Co., Inc., Rahway, N.J., pp. 719, 329 and 491.

Reddish: Antiseptics, Disinfectants, Fungicides and Sterilization, pub. by Lea and Febiger, Phila., Penna. 6th ed., 1954, p. 491.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US175843 *Sep 21, 1875Apr 11, 1876 Improvement in disinfecting covers for pails
US569520 *Jan 4, 1894Oct 13, 1896 Combination waste-barrel and truck
US1097406 *Oct 23, 1912May 19, 1914Agfa AgProcess of destroying insects.
US1719186 *Sep 22, 1926Jul 2, 1929 Garbage can and process oe preventing development of maggots therein
US1996353 *Oct 22, 1932Apr 2, 1935Herman SeydelApplication of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the treatment of sewage, garbage, drains, itches, etc.
US2425678 *May 5, 1945Aug 12, 1947Du PontFungicidal compositions
US2658017 *Nov 26, 1948Nov 3, 1953Phillips Petroleum CoInsecticidal compositions containing 1, 2-dichloro-4(alpha,b-dichloroethyl)-cyclohexane and method of using the same
US2734483 *Mar 11, 1953Feb 14, 1956 Flea repelling animal collar
US2793973 *Sep 10, 1949May 28, 1957 Treatment of garbage and other wastes
US2802590 *Nov 29, 1954Aug 13, 1957Earl S TupperWaste can compound cover and parts
US2809917 *Oct 17, 1955Oct 15, 1957Hermelin Victor MSustained release pharmaceutical tablets
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3528718 *Dec 1, 1967Sep 15, 1970Harold J JohnsonGarbage can and support
US4094639 *Apr 15, 1977Jun 13, 1978The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc.Deodorizer
US4511552 *Sep 23, 1974Apr 16, 1985Cox James PDeodorant-dispensing products and dispensing process
US4817868 *Jun 5, 1987Apr 4, 1989Dow Corning Corp.Carrier for scented material
US6786424Aug 16, 2002Sep 7, 2004Matthew WardInsect repellant assembly
US8490324 *Aug 16, 2006Jul 23, 2013R C Solutions IncBait dispensing system
US8657139Oct 25, 2012Feb 25, 2014Julia Ann BodineSystem for delivering deodorizer and repellent for a container
US9309048Jul 23, 2012Apr 12, 2016Tramontina Usa, Inc.Trash can with customizable features
US20060101707 *Nov 18, 2004May 18, 2006James Timothy ATrash-can and dumpsters pest eliminator
US20080163541 *Feb 20, 2006Jul 10, 2008Bin Trap LimitedFlying Insect Trap
US20080302000 *Dec 19, 2005Dec 11, 2008Syngenta Crop Protection, Inc.Leak-Resistant Bait Station
US20090199458 *Aug 16, 2006Aug 13, 2009R C Solutions IncBait dispensing system
US20110226767 *Sep 22, 2011Ekchian Jack ARefuse container
US20130276356 *Jun 24, 2013Oct 24, 2013R C Solutions IncBait Dispensing System
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/305, 514/692, 424/76.3, 514/747, 43/132.1, 239/60, 220/87.1, 514/723, 43/120
International ClassificationA01M1/20
Cooperative ClassificationA01M1/2055
European ClassificationA01M1/20C2S