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Publication numberUS3100587 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 13, 1963
Filing dateMay 19, 1960
Priority dateMay 19, 1960
Publication numberUS 3100587 A, US 3100587A, US-A-3100587, US3100587 A, US3100587A
InventorsCox Jr Herbert F
Original AssigneeInland Container Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pouring type fluid container
US 3100587 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1963 H. F. cox, JR 3,100,587

POURING TYPE FLUID CONTAINER Filed May 19, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 27 I7 28 I8 f' k v \IJL 26-" 2.

INV EN TOR.

A T'TORNE YS HERBERT E Cox, JR.

Aug. 13, 1963 H.-F. cox, JR 3,100,537

POURING TYPE FLUID CONTAINER Filed May 19. 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. HERBERT F C0x,JR. E E W zflmwwxzfiw ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,100,587 POUG TYPE FLUID CONTAINER Herbert F. Cox, J12, SyracuSe,.N.Y., assignor to Inland Container (Iorporation, Indianapolis, had, a corporation Filed May 19, 1960, Ser. No. 30,341

9 Claims. (Cl. 222l) This invention relates generally to containers for use in storage sand'tnansport of fluids such as milk, ice cream mix and the like, and in particular to such a package or container having a novel 'anrangement for accommodating a liner bag and its dispensing tube within a relatively rigid outer shell.

In my copending application Serial No. 599,958, filed July 25, 1956, now Patent No. 3,007,608, and titled, Liquid Dispensing Containers, there are disclosed and claimed several types of containers all utilizing a thin plastic inner bag. The structure of the present invention makes use of a thin plastic inner :bag and a relatively.

rigid outer shell and is provided with a novel arrangement for retaining the pour tube or spout 0f the bag accessible afiter portions of the bag contents have been withdrawn therefrom.

As mentioned in my copend-ing application, the transport and storing of contain fluids, such as milk, in containers comprising flexible inner bags protected by semirigid outer shells has several advantages. Among these me improved sanitation, preservation of flavor and delayed onset of deterioration of the fluid, these advantages resulting from the substantial elimination of contaminating air-contact with the fluid during filling of the container, storage and pouring ordispens-ing therefrom.

It is the primary object of the present invention to provide a container of the type referred to having means normed at one end flap of the shell for retaining the bag spout readily accessible even though the bag has been partially emptied of its con-tents.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a container of the type referred to in which an apertured, ioreshontened portion of an end flap of the outer shell accommodates an extending portion of the member binding the pour spout to the bag whereby the spout is readily accessible upon opening the container.

A further object ot the present invention is to provide a container of the type referred to in which a toreshortened flap at the top of the containers shell retains the pour spout in a position facilitating pouring trorn the container when the flap is positioned outwardly from the container and the pour spout is extended.

The full nature of the invention will be understood trom the accompanying drawings and the [following description and claims: I

FIG. 1 is a side sectional view of la filled and sealed container embodying the present invention and ready for storage or transport. V

FIG. 2 is a liragmentary, plan view of the blank trom which the outer shell of the container is formed.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the upper portion of the container of FIG. 1. i

FIG. 4 is a View similar to FIG. 3, but showing an intermediate step in obtaining access to the container contents.

FIG. 5 is a View similar to FIG. 4, but showing the pouring tube extended and the container tilted for pour- FIG. 6 is a fragmentary, side sectional view similar to FIG. 1, but showing the inner bag partially emptied.

Referring to the drawings, the structure of the present invention comprises an outer shell 10 which may be formed of corrugated fibreboard or the like. The shell has a tubular configunation and is" rectangular in cross dgldhdid'i Patented Aug. 13, 1963 section, having end panels 11 and side panels 12. At each of their ends the side panels are provided with longitudinal side flaps 13 which are adapted to overlie the lower end flaps 14 and the upper end flaps to and 17 intog-cal with the end panels ill.

The end flap :17 is slotted and has a portion cut away to provide a toreshortened flap portion 18. The liap portion 18 is provided with an aperture 19' therethrough for receiving an element of the inner bag assembly, as will subsequently be described. The (aperture 19 may be shaped so as to provide sidewardly extending slots to faciiitate passage of the inner bag assembly element. The lower end of the shell, as viewed in FIG. 1, may be conventionally sealed by means of tape 21 which overlies the abutting edges of the lower side flaps l3.

Accommodated within the shell is a plastic bag or liner 22 which may be formed of any suitable flexible material, such as polyethylene. Extending from the upper left corner of the bag is a pouring tube 23. The tube may be formed of any suitable, relatively rigid material and provided with a removable sealing plug or cap 24!- at its free end. The interior or" the tube 23 communicates with the interior of the bag 22 and is sealed thereto by gathering and binding a portion of the bag to the tube as described in detail in my copending application mentioned above. The binding element for the tube-bag junction comprises a length of wire or similar semi-flexible means indicated at 26. The two ends of the wire are conventionally provided with loops to facilitate twisting of the wire and the extending twisted wire ends 27 accommodated within the aperture 19, the portions of the wire extending above the flap 18 being bent to prevent their being pulled back through the aperture. The sidewardly extending slots forming a part of aperture 19 facilitate insertion of the looped ends of the wire.

As will be evident from FIGS. 1 and 3, with the bag 22 filled, the tube is positioned against the under face of the adjacent side flap 13, with a length of tape 28 serving to seal the abutting edges of the upper side flaps. When a portion of the contents of the bag are to be poured from the container, the tape 28 may be cut along its length as indicated in FIG. 4, with transverse cuts being made at the upper margin of the end panels 11 so as to free the side flap 13 which normally overlies the tube 23. The appropriate side flaps 13 may then be bent back as shown in FIG. 4 and the pour spout 23 exposed; The flap portion 13 may then be extendedoutwardly from the container as shown in FIG. 5, thereby placing the pour tube in a suitable position for pouring the contents from the bag. The pouring tube cap. 24 may then be removed from the tube and the container tilted as shown in FIG. 5. It should be noted thatin pouring. the contents of the bag, only the side flap 13 adjacent the flap portion 18 is folded outwardly, the other side flap 13 being held in place by the remainder of tape 28 with the end flaps 16 and 17 .turned to closed position. As will be evident from FIG. 6,

although the bag is partially empty, the tube-bag junction and the pour tube itself are retained at the upper end of the container so as to be readily accessible when an additional quantity of fluid is to be poured from the container.

The structure of the present invention provides a simplified, economical arrangement for retaining the pouring tube readily accessible at'the top of the container even though a portion of the bag contents have been removed therefrom. The flap portion 18 further provides a means for supporting and positioning the tube-bag junction and the pouring tube in a position which facilitatespouring of the bag contents therefrom when the container is tilted while retaining the bag firmly within the outer shell. Although the foreshortened flap portion 18 has been illustrated as having attached thereto the wire binding for the tube-bag junction, it will be understood that where other types of tube-bag junctions are used, other means may be providedfor attaching the tube-bag junction, to the flap portion, the structural requirement being that the fitting forming the tube-bag junction be attached by some convenient means to the underside of the flap portion 18.

While mention has been made of the advantages of the structure of the present invention in the transporting and pouring of milk and milk products, it will be evident that the features of the present invention are equally present in the transport and pouring of any other fluids such as corrosive commercial fluids.

While the invention has been disclosed and described in some detail in the drawings and foregoing description, they are to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive in character, as modifications may readily suggest themselves to persons skilled in this art and within the broad scope of the invention, reference being'had to the appended claims.

The invention claimed is:

1. A container for storage or transport of fluid and adapted to have fluid poured therefrom, said container comprising a relatively rigid, tubular outer shell, said shell being generally rectangular in cross-section and having end flaps and longitudinal side flaps at its upper end forclosing thereof, a fluid-tight plastic bag accommodated Within said shell and sized so as to be supported by the walls of said shell when filled with fluid, a semi-rigid pouring tube extending from said bag at one corner thereof, a Wire binding the tube-bag junction and having a portion extending 'outwardlytherefrorn, the shell end flap adjacent said tube being slit to provide two parallel flap sections, one flap section being foreshortened and apertured to receive the extending portion of said binding wire to retain the tube-bag junction at said flap section although a portion of the bag contents has been emptied V therefrom, said apertured flap section when moved to extend exteriorly of the container serving to position said bag-tube junction and tube so as to facilitate pouring of the'bag contents.

2. A container for storage or transport of fluid and adapted to have fluid poured therefrom, said container comprising a relatively rigid, tubular outer shell, said shell being generally rectangular in cross-section and having end flaps and longitudinal side flaps at its upper end for closing thereof, a fluid-tight plastic bag accommodated within said shell and sized so as to be supported by the walls of said shell when filled with fluid, a semi-rigid pouring tube extending from said bag at one corner thereof, the shell end flap adjacent said tube being slit to provide two parallel flap sections, one flap section being foreshortened and apertured to receive an attaching member extending from the base portion of said tube to retain the tube-bag junction at said flap section although a portion of the bag contents has been emptied therefrom, said apertured flap section when moved to extend exteriorly of the container serving to position said tube-bag junction and tube so as to facilitate pouring of the bag contents.

3. A container for storage or transport of fluid and adapted to have fluid poured therefrom, said container comprising a relatively rigid, tubular outer shell, said shell being generally rectangular in cross-section and having end flaps and longitudinal side flaps at its upper end 'for closing thereof, -a fluidatight plastic bag accommodat'ed .within said shell and sized so as to be supported by the Walls of said shell when filled with fluid,

a semi-rigid pouring tube extending from said bag at one corner thereof, the shell end flap adjacent said tube being slit to provide two parallel flap sections, one flap section being foreshortened, means for attaching said 7 tube to the under face of said foreshortened flap section to retain the tube-bag, junction at said flap section although a portion of the bag contents has been emptied therefrom, said flap section when moved to extend exteriorly of the container serving to position said tube-bag junction and tube so as tofacilitate pouring of the bag contents.

4. A container for storage or transport of fluid and adapted to have fluid'poured therefrom, said container comprising a relatively rigid, tubular outer shell, said shell having an end flap at its upper end for closing thereof, a fluid-tight plastic bag accommodated within said shell and sized so as to be supported by the walls of said shell when filled with fluid, a semi-rigid pouring tuberextending from said bag at one corner. thereof, a wire binding the tube-bag junction and having a portion extending outwardly therefrom, said shell end flap being slit to provide two parallel flap sections, one flap section being foreshortened and apertured to receive the extending portion of said binding wire to retain the tube-bag junction at said flap section although a portion of the bag contents has been emptied therefrom, said apertured flap section when moved to extend exteriorly of the container serving to position said tube-bag junction and tube so as to facilitate pouring of the bag contents.

5. A container for storage or transport of fluid and adapted to havefluid poured therefrom, said container comprising a relatively rigid, tubular outer shell, said shell having an end flap at its upper end for closing thereof, a fluid-tight plastic bag accommodated within said shell and sized so as to be supported by the walls of said shell when filled with fluid, a semi-rigid pouring tube extending from said bag at one corner thereof, a wire binding the tube-bag junction and having a portion extending outwardly therefrom, said shell end flap being slit to provide two parallel flap sections, one flap section being foreshortened, means for attaching said tube to the underface of said foreshortened flap section toretain the tube-bag junction at said flap section although a portion of the bag contents has been emptied therefrom, said flap section when moved to extend exteriorly of the container serving to position said tube-bag junction and tube so as to facilitate pouring of the bag contents.

6. A container for storage or transport of fluid and adapted to have fluid poured therefrom, said container comprising a relatively rigid, tubular outer shell, said shell having a flap at its upper end for closing thereof, a fluid-tight plastic bag accommodated within said shell and sized so as to be supported by the walls of said shell when filled with fluid, a semi-rigid pouring tube extending from said bag, said flap being longitudinally slit to provide a flap section, means for attaching said tube to the underface of said flap section to retain the tube-bag junction at said flap section although a portion of the bag contents has been emptied therefrom, said flap section when moved to extend exteriorly of the container. serving 7 rectangular in crossrsection, said shell having end flaps and side flaps at its upper end for closing thereof, said side flaps being folded over said end flaps with a length of tape sealing the abutting free margins of said side flaps and extending over a portion of the shell side walls, a fluid tight plastic bag accommodated within said shell and sized so as to be supported by the walls of said "shell when filled with fluid, a semi-rigid pouring tube extending from said bag, one end flap of said shell being longitudinally slit to provide a flap seotion, means for attaching said tube to the underface of said flap section to retain the tube-bag junction at said flap sec tion although a portion of the bag contents has been emptied therefrom, initial access to said bag contents being obtained by cutting said tape along the free margins of said side flaps to free the side flap adjacent said flap section, moving said last mentioned side flap out of overlying relation with said flap section and moving said flap section so as to extend exteriorly of said container, whereby said tube-bag junction and tube are positioned so as to facilitate pouring of the bag contents and the bag is retained Within said shell during pouning by said end flaps and the side flap remote from said flap section.

8. A container for storage or transport of fluid and adapted to have 'fluid. poured therefrom, said container comprising a relatively rigid, tubular outer shell which is rectangular in cross-section, said shell having end flaps and side flaps at its upper end for closing thereof, said side flaps being folded over said end flaps, means sealing the abutting free margins of said side flaps and extending over a portion of the shell side walls, a fiuid tight plastic bag accommodated within said shell and sized so as to be supported by the walls of said shell 'when filled with fluid, a semi-rigid pouring tube extending from said bag, one end flap of said shell being longitudinally slit to provide a flap section, means for attaching said tube to the underface of said flap sec-tion to retain the tube-bag junction at said flap section although a portion of the bag contents has been emptied therefrom, initial access to said brag contents being obtained by freeing from said sealing means the side flap adjacent said flap section, moving said last mentioned side flap out of overlying relation with said flap section and moving said flap section so as to extend exteriorly of said container, whereby said tube-bag junction and tube are positioned so as to facilitate pouring of the bag contents and the bag is retained within said shell during pouring by said end flaps and the side flap remote from said flap section.

9. A container for storage or transport of fluid and adapted to have fluid poured therefrom, said container comprising a relatively rigid, tubular outer shell which is rectangular in cross-section, said shell having an end flap and a side flap at its upper end for closing thereof, said side flap being folded over said end flap and sealed thereover, a fluid tight plastic bag accommodated within said shell and sized so as to be supported by the walls of said shell when filled with fluid, a semi-rigid pouring tube extending from said bag, said end flap of said shell Ibeing longitudinally slit to provide a flap section, means for attaching said tube to the underface of said flap section to retain the tube-bag junction at said flap section although a portion of the bag contents has been emptied therefrom, said flap section when moved to extend exteriorly of said container serving to position said tube-bag junction and tube so as to fiacilitate pouring of the 'bag contents, said side flap and end flap retaining said bag within said shell during the pouring operation.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,057,910 Aaberg Apr. 11, 1913 1,309,819 Shepard July 15, 1919 2,293,182 Vogt Aug. 18, 1942 2,831,610 Dennie Apr. 22, 1958 2,861,718 Winzen Nov. 25, 1958 2,954,901 Winstead Oct. 4, 1960 2,973,119 Parker Feb. 28, 1961 2,998,162 Vernell Aug. 29, 1961 3,007,608 Cox Nov. 7, 1961

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3139227 *Apr 17, 1961Jun 30, 1964Dorfman Jerome JContainer
US3184117 *Sep 26, 1962May 18, 1965Container CorpBag-in-box arrangement for packaging and dispensing of liquids
US3206094 *Nov 19, 1963Sep 14, 1965Reed Paper Group LtdLined container
US3253764 *Sep 28, 1964May 31, 1966Weyerhaeuser CoContainer
US3454197 *Aug 10, 1967Jul 8, 1969Thomas R ThompsonContainer having a tearaway pull tab and a flexible bladder in the container attached to the pull tab
US4193518 *May 4, 1977Mar 18, 1980Holmes William APortable water carrier and dispenser
US4515294 *Mar 31, 1982May 7, 1985Southern Chemical Products CompanyLiquid dispenser, valve therefor and process of producing the valve
US5193712 *Feb 19, 1992Mar 16, 1993Kueppersbusch GerdStackable packing for bulk material
US5265753 *Oct 30, 1992Nov 30, 1993Georgia-Pacific CorporationContainer for flexible bag
US5788121 *Nov 15, 1995Aug 4, 1998Kabushiki Kaisha Hosokawa YokoBag for bag-in-box and bag-in-box
US6637623Mar 26, 2002Oct 28, 2003Weyerhaeuser CompanyBag-in-a-box shipping container
US7681783Jun 17, 2004Mar 23, 2010John StephensonBag in box (BIB)
US8899444 *Mar 8, 2013Dec 2, 2014Pepsico, Inc.Aseptic tubing connection for a container
WO2008089905A1 *Jan 16, 2008Jul 31, 2008Mars IncPackage for bulk material
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/105, 222/530, 229/125.37, 229/117.35, D24/118
International ClassificationB65D75/52, B65D77/06, B65D75/58
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/5872, B65D77/065
European ClassificationB65D77/06B2, B65D75/58G3