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Publication numberUS3101505 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 27, 1963
Filing dateJul 18, 1961
Priority dateJul 18, 1961
Also published asDE1428383A1
Publication numberUS 3101505 A, US 3101505A, US-A-3101505, US3101505 A, US3101505A
InventorsBelicka Michael E, Kenny Robert J, Longin Rodney
Original AssigneeElectrolux Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surface treating machine
US 3101505 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7, 1963 M. E. BELICKA ETAL 3,101,505

SURFACE TREATING MACHINE Filed July 18, 1961 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 THEIR ATTORNEY Aug. 27, 1963 M. E. BELICKA ETAL 3,101,505

SURFACE TREATING MACHINE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 18, 1961 INV EN TORS 01/01/051 6'. BEL/8K9 EOBEET J KENNY Luvs/N Poo/v5) THEIR ATTORNEY Aug. 27, 1963 M. E. BELICKA ETAL 3,101,505

SURFACE TREATING MACHINE FiledJuly l8, l961 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 IN VEN TORS Maw-mu. E. BEL/elm 48 lz EoafET J Kin/1W [on/GIN Bo DA/EY THEIR ATTORNEY United States Patent Filed July 18, 1961, Ser. No. 124,993 16 Claims. (Cl. 15-320) Our invention relates to a surface treating machine and more particularly to a relatively small machine of this type suitable for use in a home by the housewife.

One of the objects of our invention is to provide a machine having one or more rotary scrubbing elements for contacting a floor, together with means under the control of the operator for feeding a detergent liquid to the floor in the neighborhood of the scrubbing means in combination with a wet pick-up arrangement whereby the detergent and dissolved dirt may be removed from the floor, leaving the latter practically dry.

A further object of our invention is to provide means also under the control of the operator for supplying rinse water or the like to the floor in the neighborhood of the scrubbing means in order that any remaining traces of detergent may be diluted thereby, the water pick-up means then serving to remove the rinse water from the floor.

- A further object of our invention is to provide ,removable reservoirs for holding the liquid detergent and the rinse water and a removable container for accumulating the liquid which is picked up, the latter preferably having a capacity equal to at least that of the combined capacities of the two reservoirs. It is desirable that the container and reservoirs be easily removable from the rest of the apparatus in order that they may be independently carried to a sink or the like for convenience in filling and emptying.

An additional object of our invention is to provide a liquid wax reservoir, also easily removable from the rest of the apparatus for the same reasons as above men tioned, together with means under the control of the operator for applying liquid wax to the surface in order that the device may also serve as a floor polisher.

A still further object of our invention is to provide arutomatioally connectable and disconnectable means between valves located in the respective removable reservoirs and control handles permanently mounted on the handle of the device so that the reservoirs may be readily removed and replaced without the operator having to independently connect and disconnect the valves and the control handles.

A still further object of our invention is to provide retractable wheeled means for supporting the device on a rug or other soft surface covering in order that it may be used for scrubbing the rug.

Further objects and advantages of our invention will be apparent from the following description considered in connection with the accompanying drawings which form part of the specification and of which;

FIG. 1 is a perspectiveview of a preferred embodiment of our invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the device shown in FIG. 1 and is taken on the line 2--2 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 3 is a view partially in cross-section and with a hood member removed, the cross-sectional portion being taken on the line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a bottom view, partially broken away, of the device shown in the preceding figures;

FIG. 5 is a view partially in cross-section taken on the line 55 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 66 of FIG. 3;

.1515 of FIGS. 2 and 14;

3,101,505 Patented Aug. 27, 1963 Kit? FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 7-7 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 8-8 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 99 of 'FIG. 3;

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 9, but with'certain parts in dilierent positions;

FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIGS. 9 and 10, but with certain parts in still different positions;

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view on an enlarged scale taken on the line 12 '12 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 13 is a view similar to FIG. l2, but with certain parts in different positions; FIG. 14 is a view on an enlarged scale of a portion of the deviceas seen in FIG. 2; g

FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional view taken on the lines FIG. l6 is a view of the upper end of the control handle with the cover removed; and 7 FIG. 17 is a diagrammatical 'view of the gear and belt I drive best shown otherwise in FIG. '2.

Referring to the drawings reference character 20 designates a base, member, preferably a die casting, which supports a plurality of posts 22 on the upper ends of which is mounted a motor-fanunit 24 comprising an electric motor 26 having a shaft 28 carrying a centrifugal fan .30 within a fan housing 32, the latter having a convolute discharge 33. The lower end of shaft'28 extends below the fan housing and carries a toothed pulley 34 which drives a larger toothed wheel 36 by means of a toothed timing belt 38. Pulley 36 is mounted on a shaft 4010m-v naled in the base '20. Shaft 40 also carries a toothed pulley 42 and a pinion gear 44, the latter meshing with a pinion 46 mounted on a shaft 47 which is also journaled in the base 20 and which carries a toothed pulley 48. As

beneath the base where each is provided with a plate 56' having slots or apertures 5-8 therein. A brush disc 60 carrying bristles 62 extending downwardly therefrom and a plurality of pins 64 extending upwardly, may be mounted on the lower end of each shaft 54 and 55, the pins being received 'within the recesses 58. The lower end of each shaft is provided with a pivoted snap ring 66, shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 which may be pivoted to a position extending at right angles to the shaft to retain the brush thereon, or may be pivoted to a position parallel to the shaft to permit removal of the brush.

It will be noted that the brush shown in FIG. 2 is somewhat different from that shown in FIG. 5. In FIG. 2, brush 62 is provided with aback 60 of sufficient thickness so that when the snap ring 66 extends at right angles to the shaft, theupper surface of the back is in contact with the plate 56. In other words, there is no vertical movement of the brush with respect to the shaft 54 and the bristles of the brush 62 are sufliciently stiif to support the Weight of the entire machine. In FIG. 5, on the other hand, there is a brush 68 having bristles somewhat longer and, more flexible thanthose of brush 6'2 and having a' back 70 which is' somewhat thinner than the back 60 so that there may be vertical movement between the brush and the shaft 55. The back 70 is provided with pins 64 which engage the recesses 58 in plate 56 in all vertical positions of the so that the brush will turn with the shaft.

As is shown in FIGS. 2, 4 and 5, a wheel supporting member 72 is pivotally mounted on a rear skirt 73 of base casting 21 on a pin 74* which carries a spring 76 urging the member 72 against the skirt. The latter is provided with a pair of pins 78 which engage recesses for-med in the member 72 for preventing pivoting of the latter about the pin 74 when the member 72 is in the position shown in the figures. However, the member 72 may be moved axially outwardly along the pin 74 by compressing the spring 76 until the member has been withdrawn from en- 'gagement with the pins 78, whereupon the member 72 may be pivoted through 180 about the pin '74. Wheels 80 are mounted at the opposite ends oft-he member 72 and, as will be seen from 1 168.2 and 5, the bore in member 72 which receives the pin 74 is off-center vertically, with the result that the vertical location of the wheels 89 with respect to the base member 25 is altered by rotating the member 72 about the pin 74-. Thus, in FIG. 2 the wheels are shown in solid lines in their upper position where they are spaced above the floor when the device is supported on the bristles 62. In FIG. 5, on the other hand, the wheels 80 are shown in their lower position where they contact the floor so as to support a portion of the weight of the device, thus permitting the brush 68 to float on the shaft 55.

Two other supporting wheels 82 are rotatably mounted on arms 84 which are pivotally secured at 85 to the base member 20, as is best shown in FIG. 4. In the position shown in FIG. 2 as well as that shown in full lines in FIG. 4, the wheels 82 are received in @a recess 86 formed in the base member and-thus are spaced well above the floor. However, the arms 84 may be pivoted to the position shown in FIG. 5, and in broken lines in FIG. 4, to bring the wheels 82 into vertical alignment with the rear wheels 80, the wheels 80 and 82 together serving to sup port the entire weight of the device, thus leaving the brushes 68 free to float on their driving shafts as previously mentioned, so that the bristles thereof contact the supporting surface but lightly.

A conduit 90 is mounted on the upper surface of base member 20 and the lower end of the conduit communicates with an opening 92 formed in the rear portion of the base member, as shown in FIG. 8. Disposed underneath this portion of the base member is a nozzle 94 formed with a short outlet conduit 95 which is arranged to communicate with the opening 92, a flexible tube or bellows 98 being secured to the base member and bearing against the top of the nozzle to prevent leakage. A pair of leaf springs 100 urges the nozzle 94 downwardly, while a pair of resilient members 102 located near opposite ends of the nozzle restrain such downward movement. As is shown particularly in FIGS. 9 through 11, each mem her 102 is U-shaped with one leg secured to the base member 2i) by means of a rivet or the like 104- which extends through -a slot 105 in the leg so that the member 162 may be moved vertically with respect to the base member, the other leg of each member 1112 being formed with an offset portion 106 adapted to engage underneath a projection 108 on the nozzle 94.

A shaft 110 is rotatably mounted so as to extend at right angles through the lower end of conduit 91 and is provided with a butterfly valve 112 so located as to control the flow through opening 92. Shaft 111} also carries a pair of arms 114- which engage slots 115 formed in the right-hand leg of each U-shaped member 102. One end of shaft 110 extends to the exterior of the device where it is provided with an actuating arm 116 by means of which the shaft may be rotated through an angle of slightly more than With the parts in the position shown in FIG. 9, the nozzle 54- is in its lowermost position, to

' which position it is urged by the springs 100. In this position the butterfly valve 112 lies in a plane parallel to the axis of opening 92, which is the open position of the valve. If the handle 116 and shaft 111) are rotated through approximately 90 in a clockwise direction to the position shown in FIG. 10, the arms #114 lift the U- shaped members 102 which in turn lift the nozzle 94' to an inoperative position above the floor, while at the same time the butterfly valve 112 is turned to a plane normal to the axis of opening 92, thus closing the opening. Each arm 114 is provided with a projection 118 which, if the shaft 11!) is turned further in a clockwise direction to the position shown in FIG. 11, bears against a solid portion of the corresponding U-shaped member 102 below the slot therein so as to deflect the right-hand legs of members 102 sufliciently to disengage offset portions 106 from projection 1198 on the nozzle 94, thus permitting ejection of the nozzle 94 from the device due to the urging of the springs 100. Shaft 11% will not remain in this extreme position, but as soon as the operator releases handle 116, the resiliency of members 102 will rotate the shaft 111) counterclockwise to the position shown in FIG. 10, and hence the valve 112 will be closed and the offset portions 106 in proper position to engage the projection 108 on the nozzle when it is desired to again connect the latter.

Nozzle 94 is guided and constrained to only vertical movement with respect to the base 20 by a pair of ribs 120 extending inwardly from the rear skirt 73 of the base member, and by a pair of ribs 122 extending rearwardly from a partition 124 which extends downwardly from the top portion of the base member. Swingably mounted within the nozzle 94 is a squeegee 126 which is resiliently held in position within the nozzle by means of a pair of leaf springs 128. The nozzle is also preferably provided with pairs of small rollers 13!) adjacent either-end thereof which are adapted to roll on the floor and which may cause the nozzle to move upwards slightly against the force of spring 1001, especially if the floor is. uneven, thus preventing the nozzle from scratching high points of the floor.

A handle member designated generally by reference character 132 is pivotally secured to the fan housing 32 at points 134. The lower portion of the handle comprises a fork having a pair of legs 1136 joined by a horizontal portion 138. A rigid tubular member of oval crosssection is connected at its lower end to a tray or manifold 144 and at its upper end carries handle grips 142.

The'manifold 144 is secured above horizontal member 138 of the handle fork by means of rivets or the like 145. The interior of the manifold is connected by means of a flexible tube 146 to an opening 148 through the case member 20 at a point between the brushes 62. A liquid wax container 150 is removably secured below the portion 138 of the fork by any suitable means, such as the channel members 152 shown in FIGS. 2 and 5 which engage grooves formed in portion 138 so that the reservoir 150 may be removed from the handle by sliding it upwardly,

as viewed in FIG. 2. The reservoir 150 is connected by means of a flexible tube 154 with an openin 156 in the base member 20, which opening is shown in FIG. 4 as being located just ahead of the nozzle 94.

Flow from the reservoir 159 into the tube 154- is effected by means of a piston 158 mounted on a stem 160 which is urged downwardly in a cylinder 161 by means of a spring 162. Stern 161) extends through a filler cap 163 of reservoir 150, the outer end of the stem being provided with a head which may be engaged by the forked lower end of an actuating rod 164 which is urged'downwardly by means of a spring 156. When the reservoir 15% is removed by sliding it upwardly, as viewed in FIG. 2, the stem 160 is moved therewith out of the forked portion 165 of rod 164, and when the reservoir is replaced the stem 160 slides into the forked portion without any conscious quent release of the lever permits spring 162 to force the. piston 158 downwardly, thus pumping wax through tube 154. Liquid wax may be introduced into the reservoir 150 when the latter is removed from the handle through the opening normally closed bycap 163.

Removably mounted on the handle 132 is a pair of containers 172 and 174. As is shown particularly in FIGS. 2, 3 and 5, the lower ends of these containers are received snugly within manifold 144 and, as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7 these containers closely embrace the tubular member 140. At the upper ends the containers are provided with extending walls 176 and 178, respectively, which may be engaged by a locking ring 180 which is slidably mounted on tubular member 146. Thus. with the parts in the position shown in FIGS. 2 and 14 the containers 172 and 174 are securely mounted on the handle by virtue of the fact that their lower ends are received Within the manifold 144 while the wall extensions 176 and 178 are held by the clamping ring 180. In order to remove the containers, the ring may be slid upwardly on the tubular member 140 so as to disengage the extensions 176 and 178.

Container 172 is for receiving waste water which is picked up from the floor by the nozzle 94. As previously described, this nozzle is connected to the conduit 90 on the upper side of the base member 26. As is shown particularly in FIG. 3, a flexible conduit 182 extends from conduit 90 to a socket 184 which extends through the bottom of manifold 144. Container 172 is provided with conduits 186 and 188 each of which extends a short distance below the bottom of the container and upwardly through the interior of the container to near the upper end thereof. A flexible conduit 1% is connected at one end to the inlet to the fan housing 32 and at the other end to a socket 192 extending through the bottom of manifold 144. The sockets 184 and 192 are so positioned with respect to the projecting ends of conduits 186 and 188 that the latter are received within the former in substantially fluid tight manner when the container 172 is secured to the handle. Thus, operation of the fan 30 draws air from the container 172 through the pipe 188 and flexible conduit 1%, thus causing air to be drawn into the container through the nozzle 94, pipe 90, flexible conduit 182 and conduit 186 and if the device is being moved over a Wet floor, Water accumulated by the squeegee 126 is carried along with this :air into the container 172. A partition 194 is positioned with-in the container 172 between the upper open ends of conduits 186 and 188 in order to prevent liquid discharge from the upper end of conduit 186 being carried directly .into conduit 188. As is shown in FIG. 2, partition 194 extends downwardly only a short distance. Container 172 is in effect a liquid separator for separating water from the air entering through conduit 186 so that only air passes out through conduit 188. The inner wall of container 172 is provided with an opening 196 normally closely by a cap 198 which may be removed to empty the contents of the container when the latter has been removed from the handle.

Container 174 is divided throughout its entire length by a partition 200 to provide separate reservoirs 202 and 204. One of these may be used for storing a liquid detergent solution and the other for storing clear rinse water. Near their respective upper ends the reservoirs 202 and 284 are provided with filler openings which are normally closed by caps 263 and 205, respectively. The combined capacities of reservoirs 202 and 204 should not exceed that of waste water container 172.

Each reservoir is provided with a discharge opening 206 in the lower wall thereof which communicates with the manifold 144. Each opening 286 is normally closed by a valve member 208 mounted on a valve rod 216 which extends through a bushing 212 mounted in the top wallof each reservoir, as is shown more in detail in FIGS. 12 and 13. A spring 214 urges each valve 208 towards closed position.

The outer end of each bushing 212 is formed as an arcuate surface which is engaged by a similar surface on 6 a valve lifting lever 216 through which the valve rod 210 extends, the rod being provided with a head 218 which bears against the upper surface of lever 216.

The arms 220 of the levers 216 extend over the projecting ends 222 of two levers 224, the opposite ends of which are pivoted about a pin 226 within tubular member 148, as is shown more in detail in FIGS. 14 and 15. Each lever 224 extends outwardly through a slot formed in the tubular member, as well as through a slot 228 formed in locking ring 180. A spring230 encircles pin 226 and has its opposite ends engaging the levers 224 so as to urge the outer ends of each in a downward direction. An actuating chain or cord 232 is secured to an intermediate point of each lever 224 and extends upwardly within tubular member 140. The .upper ends of chains 232 are connected to actuating levers 234 pivotally mounted at the upper end of the handle, the arrangement being such that depression of the outer end of a lever 234 will pivot the corresponding lever 222 in an upward direction, as shown in FIG. 13, so as to raise the corresponding valve rod 210 to thereby permit flow through the opening 286 into the manifold 144, :from whence it flows through the conduit 146 to the floor. Manipulation of one of the levers 234 thus results in supplying detergent solution to the floor, while manipulation of the other lever supplies clear rinse water.

Due to the fact that there is no actual connection between the anms 220 or the valve lifting levers 216 which are mounted on the container 174, and the ends 222 of levers 224 which are mounted on the handle, these mem here do not interfere with removal of the container from the handle. Moreover, when the container is replaced on the handle the arms 220 are properly positioned over the ends 222 without any conscious effort on the part of the operator.

Inasmuch as it is never desirable to supply liquid wax at the same time that detergent solution or rinse water is supplied to the floor, an interlocking bar 236 is provided, as shown in FIG. 16. This bar is slidably mounted on the upper end of the handle by means of bolts 238 passing through the slots 240. The bar is provided with a central notch 242 and two outer notches 244. In the position shown in FIG. 16 the notch 242 is in line with the lever 170 which, as previously described, operates the piston 158 in the wax reservoir 150 and hence the lever is free to be pivoted so as to lift the piston. However, the levers 234 are both out of alignment with the notches 244 and hence both of these levers are locked against actuation. if the bar 236 is slid upwardly, as viewed in FIG. 16, notch 242 will be moved out of alignment with lever 170 while notches 244 will be moved into alignment with levers 234. Consequently, the :former is locked against actuation so that the wax piston 158 cannot be actuated, but either of the valves 208 can be opened so as to dispense either deter-gent solution or rinse water. While normally both valves 288 would not be open at the same time, no serious results would be incurred if they were and hence it is not considered necessary to absolutely prevent their simultaneous operation.

A hood :or cover 245 is secured to the upper end of the handle so as to conceal the mechanism carried'thereby, the ends of the control levers and the'locking bar extending through suitable slots therein.

As is shown in FIG. 5, mechanism is provided for retaining the handle in different positions with respect to the base member 26 and the parts mounted thereon. As there shown a treadle 246 having a flanged end 247 is pivotally mounted on one of the forks 136, while a plate 248 is fixed to the fan housing 32. Plate 248 has an upper edge formed with a deep slot 250, and a substantially straight surface 252 terminating in a substantially radial face 254extending between the straight surface 252 and an 'arcuate surface 256. V I

With the parts in the positions shown in .full lines in FIG. 5, the handle may be pivoted through an angle of the vertical, the end 247 of the treadle will drop into the notch 250 and the handle will'be locked in this substantially vertical position. In order to release it, the treadle 246 is pivoted in a clockwise direction, conveniently by the operators foot, sufiiciently to move the end 247 out of the slot 250. Likewise, if it is desired to lower the handle below the 45 angle, this may be done by pivoting the treadle 246 sufiicient-ly to lift the end 247 above the outer end of the radial surface 254, where it will ride on the arcuate surface 256. With the treadle in this position the handle may be lowered until a skirt 258 on the manifold 144 strikes the rear Wheels 86.

A protective and decorative hood 260 is mounted on the base member 24 so as to enclose the motor 26 and other parts carried on the upper surface of the base member. This hood is formed with openings 262 (FIG. 2) through which cooling air may be drawn by the fan 31 which air passes through the motor and through openings 264 in the motor housing directly to the inlet of the fan. Air discharged from the oonvolute 33 of the fan passes through an opening 265 in the hood member 260. Electric current for operating the motor is supplied by the cable 266 which extends upwardly through the tubular member 141) of the handle and out through a suitable opening in the cover 245.

If desired, a removable splash guard 270 may be provided for protecting the lower surface of base member 20 from becoming soiled by the detergent solution or liquid wax spun off from the rotating brushes. This guard is provided with apertures for the shafts '54 and 55 as well as apertures in line with the liquid discharge openings 148 and 156. The guard is preferably made of light weight sheet metal or plastic and is removably secured to the base 21 by means of snap fasteners 272. In order to remove the splash guard for cleaning, it is necessary to first remove the brushes 62 or 68 from the shafts 54 and 55. Also, the guard must be removed when the forward wheels 82 are to be raised or lowered.

The above-identified described device operates as follows:

Assuming it is desired to use the machine for washing a floor, containers 172 and 174 are removed from the handle 132. This is conveniently accomplished by placing the handle in the 45 position, where the projecting end 247 of the treadle 246 engages the radial surface 254. The locking ring 180 is then slid upwardly along the tubular member 140 by one hand, the other hand holding the lower container 172, until the ring is disengaged from the extensions 176 and 178 of the containers. This releases the lower container 172 so that it may be removed immediately, and if there is any waste water in it from a previous operation, this should be emptied by removing the cap 198 and pouring the water into a sink or other suitable place for disposal. In the meantime, the upper container 174 will remain on the tube 140, but may be readily removed therefrom by lifting it upwardly. The caps 203 and 205 are then removed and a suitable liquid detergent solution placed in one of the reservoirs and clear rinse water in the other. The caps 198, 203 and 205 having been replaced, the container 174 is then placed on the tube 140 with its lower end received within the manifold 144, and thereafter the lower container 172 is placed underneath the handle with its lower end received within the manifold, whereupon downward movement of the locking ring 180 secures both of the containers in place.

The supporting wheels 80 are placed in their upper position and the wheels 82 are placed in their retracted position so that the weight of the device is borne by the circular brushes 62 which are provided with bristles of sufficient stiffness to support this weight. The electric motor 26 is then started and it drives the fan 31 directly and the brushes 62 through the belts and gearing illustrated in FIG. 17.

If the floor is quite dirty, the lever 116 is placed in the position shown in FIG. 10, thereby lifting the nozzle 94 from the floor and closing the valve 112 in the suction line. The proper lever 234 is manipulated so as to open the corresponding valve 288 in the tank which contains liquid detergent, thus permitting the detergent to flow into the manifold 144 from where it is conveyed through the flexible tube 146 to the opening 148 in the base plate between the brushes 62. As the detergent flows onto the floor it is distributed by the brushes which scrub the floor as the device is moved back and forth thereover. After suificient scrubbing in this manner has taken place to loosen and dissolve the dirt, the lever 116' is shifted to the position shown in FIG. 9, where the nozzle 94 is in contact with the floor and the valve 112 is open. If the device is now moved back and forth over the area which has been previously scrubbed, the squeegee 126 accumulates the dirt-bearing detergent solution at the nozzle mouth where it is picked up by the air stream and carried through the conduits 99, 182 and 186 to the upper part of container 172. As previously described, the liquid is separated from the air stream in this container, the air continuing through the conduits 188 and 190- to the inlet to the fan from where it is discharged to the atmosphere through convolute 33 of the fan housing and opening 265 in the hood 260.

'In order to remove all traces of the dirty detergent solution the above operation may be repeated by manipulating the other handle 234 so as to open the valve 208 in the reservoir containing rinse water. This permits rinse water to run into the manifold 144 where it is conveyed through the conduit 146 and the opening 148 to the floor. It there dilutes any remaining detergent s0lution as the brushes 62 rotate in contact with the floor and may thereafter be picked up by the nozzle 94, in the manner previously described.

If the floor is but lightly soiled it may be possible to clean it satisfactorily by having the nozzle 94 on the floor at the same time that detergent solution is applied, the device being moved continuously forwardly across the floor, rather than being moved back and forth. In this mode of operation, inasmuch as the detergent is applied near the front of the brush, the latter scrub the floor with it as the device is moved forwardly and the detergent is picked up by the nozzle 94 located behind the brushes.

The device may also be used as a polisher to apply a coating of wax to a floor, either immediately after the floor has been washed or at any other time. To be used in this manner the wax reservoir 150 is removed from the handle by sliding it upwardly, as previously described. The filler cap 163 may then be removed and liquid wax poured into the reservoir whereupon the cap is replaced and the reservoir again secured to the handle. The lever 116 is placed in the position shown in FIG. 10 so as to raise the nozzle 94 from the floor. The wheels 80 and 82 are in their raised positions as previously described.

The motor 26 is then started and liquid wax may be applied to the floor by manipulating the handle which lifts the piston 162 to permit wax to flow into the cylinder 161 from where it is forced by the piston under the action of opening 162 into the flexible tube 164 to the opening 156 in the base 20. This wax is distributed by the brushes 162 as the device is moved back and forth over the floor and is applied in a thin layer to the surface of the floor in well known manner.

If it is desired to use the device for scrubbing carpets, one or both of the reservoirs in container 172 is filled with a suitable liquid rug shampoo. The lever 116 is placed in the position shown in FIG. 10 so as to raise the nozzle 94 above the surface of the carpet and the wheels 80 and 82 are placed in their lower positions, as shown in FIG.

9 5. Also, the brushes 62 are removed from the shafts 54 and 55 and are replaced by brushes 6% which, as previously mentioned have relatively long flexible bristles and the construction of the backs 70 of these brushes is such that they may float vertically on the shafts 54 and 55.

The motor 26 is now started so as to rotate the brushes 68 and liquid shampoo is applied to the rug by manipulating the proper handle 234. As the machine is moved back and forth on wheels 80 and 82 over the rug, the bristles of brushes 68 lightly contact the rug and distribute the shampoo solution and scrub the surface of the rug with it, thus loosening and dissolving dirt. After a suitable area of the rug has been scrubbed in this manner no more shampoo is applied, but the machine is moved back and forth over this area in order that the rotating brushes may pick up the dirt which has been previously loosened. After each use, the brushes should be removed and rinsed, for instance under a water tap, to remove the accumulated dirt therefrom.

It will thus be seen that themachine in accordance with our invention is suitable for scrubbing, rinsing and drying hard surfaces and also for waxing such surfaces. In addition the same machine may be used for scrubbing rugs and carpets without removing the latter from the floor.

While we have shown one more or less specific embodiment of our invention this has been done for purpose of illustration only and is not to be considered as limiting the scope of our invention, which is to be determined from the appended claims.

What we claim is:

1. In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said-frame, a cleaning liquid tank removably mounted on said handle, means for conveying liquid from said tank to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle depending from said frame, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means and removably mounted on said handle, and means in the last-mentioned tank for separatingliquid from the air passing therethrough.

2. In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, amanipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a cleaning liquid tank removably mounted on said handle, a rinse 'water tank removably mounted on said handle, means for selectively conveying liquid from the respective tanks to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, a liquid pickup suction nozzle depending from said frame, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for'connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means and removably mounted on said handle, and means in the last-mentioned tank for separating liquid from the air passing therethrough.

3. In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a cleaning liquid tank removably mounted on said handle, means for conveying liquid from said tank to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle depending from said frame, a squeegee associated with said nozzle and positioned tocontact said floor, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means and removably mounted on said handle, and means in the last-mentioned tank for separating liquid from the air passing therethrough.

4. In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a cleaning liquid tank removably mounted on said handle, means for conveying liquid from said tank to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, a liquid pick up suction nozzle depending from and vertically movable with respect to said frame to vary the spacing of the nozzle above the floor, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means and removably mounted on said handle, and means in the lastmentioned tank for separating liquid from the air passing therethrough.

5. 'In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, a rotary surface treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handlepivotally connected to said frame, a cleaning liquid tank removably mounted on said handle, means for conveying liquid from said tank to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle depending from and vertically movable with respect to said frame to vary the spacing of the nozzle above the floor,

roller means carried by said nozzle for contacting the floor to maintain a minimum spacing between the nozzle and the floor, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means and removably mounted on said handle, and means in the last-mentioned tank for separating liquid from the air passing therethrough.

6. In a floor care machine, a frame,'an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a cleaning liquid tank removably mounted on said handle, means for conveying liquid from said tank to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle depending from and vertically movable with respect to said frame to vary the spacing of the nozzle above the floor, a squeegee associated With said nozzle to move vertically therewith and positioned to contact said floor when the nozzle is in its lowermost position, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a Waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means and removably mounted on said handle, and means in the last-mentioned tank for separating liquid from the air passing therethrough.

7. :In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric-motor supported on said frame, rotary sun-face treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a cleaning liquid tank removably mounted on said handle, means for conveying liquid from said tank to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle depending from and vertically movable with respect to said frame to vary the spacing of the nozzle above the floor, roller means carried by said nozzle for contacting the floor to maintain a minimum spacing between the nozzle and the floor, a squeegee associated with said nozzle to move vertically therewith and positioned to contact said floor when said roller means are on the floor, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means and removably mounted on said handle, and means in the last-mentioned tank for separating liquid from the air passing therethrou-gh.

8. In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a cleaning liquid tank removably mounted on said handle, means for conveying liquid from said tank to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle de-v pending from and vertically movable with respect to said frame to vary the spacing of said nozzle above the floor, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting 11 l the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means and removably mounted on said handle, means in the last-mentioned tank for separating liquid from the air passing therethrough, a valve in said conduit means, and single control means for lifting said nozzle and closing said valve.

9. In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means removably supported below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a cleaning liquid tank removably mounted on said handle, means for conveying liquid from said tank to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle depending from and vertically movable with respect to said frame, manually operable means for moving said nozzle vertically between a position, closely adjacent to the floor and a position raised thereabove, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means and removably mounted on said handle, means in the last-mentioned tank for separating liquid from the air passing therethrough, a liquid wax reservoir removably mounted On said handle, and means for conveying wax from said reservoir to the floor adjacent to said rotary means.

10. In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means removably mounted below said frame for supporting the latter on a floor, means for driving said rotary means by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a cleaning liquid tank removably mounted on said handle, means for conveying liquid from said tank to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle depending from and vertically movable with respect to said frame, manually operable means for moving said nozzle vertically between a position closely adjacent to the floor and a position raised thereabove, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a Waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means and removably mounted on said handle, means in the last-mentioned tank for separating liquid from the air passing therethrough, and

wheeled means mounted on said frame and movable with respect thereto between a retracted position in which said frame is supported on said rotary means and lowered position in which said frame is supported by said Wheeled means.

11. In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a manifold secured to said handle adjacent to the lower pivoted end of the latter, a cleaning liquid tank having a lower end receivable in said manifold for positioning the lower end of the tank with respect to said handle, means for removably securing the upper end of said tank to said handle, a conduit for conveying liquid from said manifold to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, valve means for controlling flow from said tank into said manifold, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle depending from said frame, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a Waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means, means in the last-mentioned tank for separating liquid from the air'passing theret-hrough, the lower end of said last-mentioned tank being receivable in said manifold for positioning the lastmentioned lower end with respect to said handle, and means for removably securing the upper end of said lastmentioned tank to said handle.

12. In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a manifold secured to said handle adjacent to the lower pivoted end of the latter, a tank having a lower end receivable in said manifold for positioning the lower end of the tank with respect to said handle, partition means in said tank dividing it into a cleaning liquid reservoir and a rinse water reservoir, means for removably securing the upper end of said tank to said handle, a conduit for conveying liquid from said manifold to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, valve means in the lower end of each reservoir for controlling flow from the respective reservoir into said manifold, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle depending from said frame, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means, means in the last-mentioned tank for separating liquid from the air passing therethrough, the lower end of said last-mentioned tank being receivable in said manifold for positioning the last-mentioned lower end with respect to said handle, and means for removably securing the upper end of said last-mentioned tank to said handle.

13. In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a cleaning liquid tank mounted on said handle, conduit means for conveying liquid from said tank to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, a manually operablevalve for controlling flow from said tank, a liquid wax reservoir mounted on said handle, conduit means for conveying Wax from said reservoir to the floor adjacent to said rotary eans, a manually operable valve for controlling flow from said reservoir, and interlocking means for preventing simultaneous opening of said valves.

14. In a floor care machine, a. frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipu lating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a manifold secured to said handle adjacent to the lower pivoted end of the latter, a cleaning liquid tank having a lower end receivable in said manifold for positioning the lower end of the tank with respect to said handle, means for removably securing the upper end of vsaid tank to said handle, a conduit for conveying liquid from said manifold to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, valve means in said tank for controlling flow from the latter into said manifold, valve actuating means movably mounted on said handle, mechanism for transmitting motion fnorn said actuating means to said valve means, said mechanism including separable coupling means automatically coupled when said tank is secured to said handie, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle depending from said frame, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a Waste liquid tank interposed insaid conduit means, means in the last-nrentioned tank for separating liquid from the air passing therethrough, the lower end of said last-mentioned tank being receivable in said manifold for positioning the last-mentioned end with respect to said han dle, and means for removably securing the upper end of said lastmentioned tank to said handle.

15. In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary surface treating means below said frame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a manifold secured to said handle adjacent to the lower pivoted end of the latter, a cleaning liquid tank having a lower end receivable in said manifold for positioning the lower end of the ank with respect to said handle, a conduit for conveying liquid from said manifold to the floor adjacent to said rotary means, valve means for controlling flow from said tank into said manifold, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle depending from said frame, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means, means in the last-mentioned tank for separating liquid from the air passing therethrough, the lower end of said last-mentioned tank being receivable in said manifold for positioning the last-mentioned end with respect to said handle, and a single means mov- 13 able with respect to said handle for securing the upper ends of said tanks to said handle.

16. In a floor care machine, a frame, an electric motor supported on said frame, rotary sun-face nreating means below said firame and driven by said motor, a manipulating handle pivotally connected to said frame, a cleaning liquid tank irernovably mounted on said handle, means for conveying liquid linom said tank to the floor adjacent to said [rotary means, a liquid pick-up suction nozzle depending from said frame, a fan driven by said motor, conduit means for connecting the inlet of said fan to said nozzle, a waste liquid tank interposed in said conduit means and removably mounted on said handle, means in the last-mentioned tank for separating liquid firom the air passing therethmough, and manually selectively operable means for locking said pivoted handle in a substantially vertical position with respect to said frame, for limiting pivotal movement of said handle to approxi- 14 mately a 45 are from the vertical, or for releasing said handle rfior pivotal movement to a substantially horizontal position.

References Cited in the file ofthis patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,240,799 Gray Sept. 18, 1917 1,687,283 'Deutscher Oct. 9, 1928 2,149,453 Longshore et a1. Mar. 7, 1939 2,622,254 Mendelson Dec. 23, 1952 2,953,807 Nilsson Sept. 27, 1960 2,986,764 Krammes June 6, 1961 3,013,288 Lappin Dec. 19, 1961 3,028,615 Helm Apr. 10, 1962 3,040,362 Krammes June 26, 1962 3,060,484 Karammcs Oct. 30, 1962

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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/320, 15/410, 15/50.1, 15/359, 15/385
International ClassificationA47L11/30, A47L11/29
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4083, A47L11/30, A47L11/4038, A47L11/4075, A47L11/4088, A47L11/4016, A47L11/4044, A47L11/4069, A47L11/305, A47L11/4027
European ClassificationA47L11/40F6, A47L11/40J4, A47L11/40D2, A47L11/40F2, A47L11/40N2, A47L11/40E, A47L11/40L, A47L11/40N6, A47L11/30B2, A47L11/30