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Publication numberUS3102533 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1963
Filing dateFeb 2, 1961
Priority dateFeb 2, 1961
Publication numberUS 3102533 A, US 3102533A, US-A-3102533, US3102533 A, US3102533A
InventorsThomas R Field, Louis J Jenn
Original AssigneeJenn Air Products Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Counter-top range exhaust apparatus
US 3102533 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 3, 1963 L. J. JENN ETAL 3,102,533

COUNTER-TOP RANGE EXHAUST APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 2, 1961 d m. MW MA 6. U m

BY THOMAS R. FIELD W%MIMJMWM flf-f'orneys Sept. 3, 1963 L. J. JENN ETAL 3, 02,533

COUNTER-TOP RANGE EXHAUST APPARATUS Filed Feb. 2. 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTORS. a LOUIS J.JEN- and y THOMAS R. FIELD Flgo 7o {Mil/0M S'mzfl M/Al United States Patent 3,102,533 COUNTER-TQFRANGE EXHAUST APPARATUS Louis J. Jenn and Thomas R. Field, Indianapolis, Ind,

assignors to Jenn-Air Products Company, line, Indianapolis, Ind, a corporation of Indiana Filed Feb. 2, 1961, Ser. No. 86,746 3 Claims. (till. 126303) This invention relates generally to exhaust systems for counter-top ranges and in particular to a structure functioning as a portion of an exhaust system and as a cover or cap for a domestic, counter-top range.

Modern interior kitchen fittings have established a trend toward the use of counter-top ranges, either gas or electric. As is the case with all stoves and ranges, there has existed a need for the removal of cooking fumes, grease, steam and the like from the area adjacent the range. In the past this need has been met by providing exhaust systems terminating in relatively large hoods usually disposed in a wall cabinet or masking structure over the range. These solutions to the problem have involved cutouts in the counter top and the presence of the hood often has the undesirable characteristic of marring or distorting any decorative effect which might be achieved on the wall panel or splash surface just behind the range.

The structure of the present invention meets this difficulty by providing a suitably flanged box structure designed to drop into a cutout area in a conventional kitchen counter top. Flanges support the structure so that the cooking surface is substantially flush with the counter top. Electrical heating elements or gas heating elements of conventional type are mounted on the cooking surface. The structure is provided with a cover or cap, hinged at the back, and incorporating the inlet mouth of the air-exhausting means. When the cover is raised, its rear margin overlies an aperture in the cooking surface providing a substantially air-tight passage from the cover to a conduit which is located beneath the counter top and which communicates with the aperture in the cooking surface. A suitable exhaust fan and cooperating duct removes hot air and cooking odors and discharges them to the atmosphere.

The primary object of the present invention is to provide a structure of the type referred to which functions as a compact exhaust system for fume and odor removal and eliminates the necessity for large, outwardly projecting canopies.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a structure of the type referred to utilizing a cover or cap which forms the inlet mouth of the exhaust system and which further functions as a splash guard effectively protecting the wall or area behind the range from moisture and grease damage.

The full nature of the invention will be understood from the accompanying drawings and the following description and the claims.

FIG. 1 is a perspective View of a counter-top range structure embodying the present invention with the cover in closed position.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1 but showing the cover in open position.

FIG. 3 is a side sectional view taken generally along the line 3-3 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a side sectional view taken generally along the line 4-4 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the structure shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrating the arrangement of the exhaust duct and fan.

FIG. 6 is a side-sectional view of a modified form of the structure shown in FIGS. 1-5.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary front view of a portion of a "ice modified form of the front panel identified at 24 in FIG. 2..

FIG. 8 is a side-sectional view taken generally along the line 8-8 of FIG. 7.

Referring initially to FIGS. 1-5, as may best be seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, the structure of the present invention includes a generally rectangular housing or box assembly 4 having side members 5 and an integral base plate 6. The box assembly fits within a cutout area in a conventional counter top It} and is retained in proper relation to the counter top by the flanged margins 5a of the assembly. A resilient grommet 11 encloses the flanged margins. The base plate 6 of the assembly 4 carries an inclined, upwardly extending plate 12, which, in turn, supports the upwardly inclined marginal area 13 of a cooking surface plate 14 which overlies the major portion of the assembly 4. The plate 14 is provided with apertures 16 which are bounded by downwardly flanged portions 17 of the plate to provide heating element or burner receiving wells. Annular, downwardly flanged members 16 provide support means for the heating means such as conventional electric heating units indicated at 17 in FIG. 2 and also indicated schematically in FIG. 4.

As may best be seen in FIG. 4, the front marginal area of the plate 14 is off-set upwardly as indicated at 18 so as to be located at a level somewhat above the level of the heating means 17. The front margin of the plate 14 is formed as indicated in FIG. 4 with a downturned lip which rests against and over-lies the grommet 11. A serrated, decorative plate 19 over-lies the portion 18 of the plate as may best be seen in FIG. 2, the plate 14, providing a cooking surface, has its side marginal areas flanged upwardly and outwardly to over-lie the counter top 19 and the flanged marginal edges of assembly 4. The controls 21 for the heating units extend through the portion 18 of the plate 14 and through the decorative plate 19 so as to be accessible for manual operation at the front of the cooking surface.

As may best be seen in FIG. 3, :a bracket 22 supports a facing strip 23 which is preferably formed of an aluminum extrusion. The strip 23 over-lies the grommet 11 and the counter-top 10.

A cap or cover structure, indicated generally at 24, is pivotally movable with relation to the cooking surface between its closed position of FIG. 1 and its opened position of FIG. 2. As may best be seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, the cover 24 is of generally hollow, rectangular configuration and includes border members 26, preferably formed by an aluminum extrusion. The portions of the extrusion forming the sides and frontal area of'the cover support by means of screws 27 a top plate 28. As indicated in FIG. 3 the rear margin of the top plate 28 is flanged downwardly and received within a channel-shaped member 29 which also grasps the rear margin frame member 31 which is shortened in depth and differs in cross section from the side and frontal area portions of the frame. Extending from the inner surfaces of the side frame members are headed pins 32 which accommodate the slotted ends of brackets 33, the slotted brackets being capable of insertion and removal as indicated by broken lines in FIG. 3. The side margins of the brackets 33 support an inner plate 34 which does not extend to the frontal framing member 26, the foreshortening of the plate 34 providing an elongated aperture or high velocity slot 36 along the frontal or upper margin of the cover. Removal of the brackets permits removal of the front panel or plate 34 for cleaning the interior of the assembly.

Secured to the underface of the plate 14 are brackets 37 (only one of which is shown in FIG. 3) carrying ears 38. The ears 33 carry outwardly extending pins 3-9 which journal substantially L-shaped brackets 41. One

44 of each of the brackets 41 engages a recess 46 formed in resilient members 47 depending from the under face of the brackets 37. A bracket 48, depending from the bracket 22 is flanged inwardly to support a resilient,

beaded member 49 which, when the cover is in its solid line position of FIG. 3, is engaged by the channel-shaped member 29 to form an air-tight seal at their junction.

As may be seen in FIG. 4 the front ends of each of the brackets 37 are turned downwardly as indicated at 1 and accommodate threaded spring retainers 52. The spring retainers support the front ends of counter balance springs 53, shown fragmentarily in FIG. 3. The rear terminus of the springs 53 is hooked into suitably placed apertures in the leg portion 44. A wing-nut 54 (FIG. 4) serves to provide an adjustment for the force exerted by the springs 53.

As will be evident from FIGS. 3 and 4 the cover assembly 24 may be pivotally moved about the pins 39 from its open, solid line position of FIG. 3 to its broken line, closed position of FIG. 3 with the engagement of the tip of the leg 44 with the recess 46 in the resilient member 47 providing a detent latching the cover in open position. The finger ledge member 56 provides a convenient means for lifting the cover and the counter balancing springs 53 also facilitate in raising the cover to open position.

Referring again to FIG. 4, reference numeral 61 indicates generally a latch mechanism which includes a supporting bracket 62 pivotally carrying, in turn, a latch member 63 and a latch-release member 64. A. tension spring 66 urges the members apart to the extent permitted by the travel of the pin 67, carried by the member 64, in the groove 68 formed in the bracket 62. The pin 67 extends through a triangularly shaped aperture 69 in the latch member 63 so thatwhen the push-button 69 is depressed the latch member 63 will release the cover for movement to its open position.

From the foregoing it will be understood that the intake aperture or high velocity slot 36 formed at the front or upper end of the cover assembly communicates with the interior of the hollow, generally rectangular cover, and, through the elongated aperture, identified at in FIG. 3, provided by the open rear margin of the cover communicates with the interior of the rear portion of the housing assembly 4 through the elongated aperture, identified at in FIG. 3, provided along the inner upturned margin of cooking surface plate 14. Thus, if air is drawn from the rear pontion of the interior of the housing assembly 4-, air will be drawn through the intake aperture 36, travel through the interior of the cover assembly 2-4 and will enter the housing assembly as indicated by arrows'in FIG. 3. While the intake slot or aperture 36 is shown and described as continuous, it will be understood that it might be discontinuous with the component apertures taking any desired configuration.

As may be seen in FIG. 3 the base 6 of the housing assembly 4 is provided with an aperture 71 which extends along substantially the entire width of the housing. As may best be seen in FIG. 5, a duct 72 is attached by any suitable means to the base 6 of the housing 4. Com: municating with the duct 72 is a housing 73 enclosing a conventional, centrifugal air moving wheel 74 driven by an electric motor 76. A discharge duct 77 may he conneoted to the outlet of the fan housing and may terminate at an outlet to atmosphere (not shown).

In operation, with the cover in its raised position, that is, the position shown in FIG. 2, the interior of the cover communicates through registering elongated apertures 48 (and 45 with the rear portion of the interior of the housing 4. With the fan 74 in operation, smoke, cooking odors and the like rising from the area of the heating units 17 will be drawn through the high velocity slot 36, through the interior of the cover and thence through the aperture 71 and discharged through the duct 77. Since the heating elements 17 are aligned relatively closely adjacent the junction of the cover and the cooking surface plate 14, the intake slot 36 is disposed in substantially overlying or overhanging relation to the heating elements. It will he further noted that the heating, element wells, and'consequently the heating elements, are aligned in a single row or series parallel to the edge of the cooking surface plate 14 and that the longitudinal axis of the slot 36 is parallel to a line joining the centers of the heating element wells. The high velocity intake slot 36 and the registering apertures 46 and 45 all extend a distance spanning the space between the outer margins of the first and last heating element wells in the series. Because of this and because the cover structure or air intake assembly is substantially hollow or unobstructed, cooking fumes are drawn at high velocity uniformly into slot 36 throughout its length and move through substantially the entire width of the cover or intake assembly. The necessity for a hood suspended or mounted over the cooking surface plate to trap the cooking fumes is eliminated and the area above the cooking surface plate may be utilized for cabinets or to carry out a decorating scheme. The area of intake slot 36 and the air moving capacity of the air moving means 7476 are so proportioned that the intake at the slot'36 proceeds at relatively high velocity.

It will be noted that the cover when in raised or open position not only provides an inlet mouth for the system but also provides an attractive and durable splash guard which effectively protects thewall behind the range from moisture and grease damage. Since the cover can be closed or lowered immediately after use, if the cooking surface has been soiled during the cooking operation, these surfaces will be hidden on lowering of the cover until they can be conveniently scoured or cleaned. It will be understood that the plate 14 forming the cooking surface is here shown and described as recessed below the level of the counter-top, the plate 14 might also be formed so as to place the upper face of the plate 14, that is, the cooking surface flush with the counter-top 10.

While the cover is here shown and described as hinged so as to overlie the heating elements 17, it Will be understood that it could be permanently fixed in open or raised position to form a stationary splash guard and exhaust inlet. It will be further understood that, as shown in FIG. 6, the mounting of the cover structure with relation to the plate :14 might be modified so that the cover could be slidably retractable into the counter. when not in use.

'FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate a modified form of front panel which can take the place of a front plate 34. This modified front plate is utilized in application where it is desirable to adjust, within limits, the intake of the exhaust system. As may be seen in FIGS. 7 and 8, the panel 151 which replaces the plate 34, is provided with a series of elongated apertures 152 across its width, the apertures being spaced from each other and aligned horizontally. Centrally, adjacent its upper margin the plate is provided with a generally rectangular shaped, depressed area 153 and an elongated slot 154. Extendingthrough the slot is a tapered knob 156 which, at its base, is secured to a vertically extending, T-shaped bracket 157. As may best be seen in FIG. 8, the bracket is offset rearwardly some what and its lower end is rigidly-secured to an elongated channel 158, the rearwardly 'olfset configuration of the bracket 157 permitting the channel to accommodate the rearwardly flanged margins 159 of the apertures 152. 'The channels are provided with a series of spaced apertures 161 which are substantially the same size and configuration as the apertures 152. As shown in FIG. 7, the apertures 161'are out of register With the apertures 152 and the exhaust system is thereby closed off. It will be understood that by shifting the knob 156 leftwardly a selected amount, a selected portion of the apertures 152 will be opened to the exhaust system by the leftward shifting of the channel 158. The intake capacity of the system may thus he varied as desired to fit various types of applications.

The structure of the present invention might be utilized at a location on a countertop which is adapted for accommodating such units as deep fat friers, Walile irons, electric skillets and the like, that is, the convenient exhaust arrangement provided by the cover member might be utilized with structures other than range burners. While reference has been made herein to electric heating elements, it will be understood that gas burners or other heating means could be incorporated into the structure without departing from the scope of the present invention.

While the invention has been disclosed and described in some detail in the drawings and foregoing description, they are to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive in character, as other modifications may readily suggest themselves to persons skilled in this art and within the broad scope of the invention, reference being had to the appended claims.

What is claimed is: j

l. A unitary range structure including a generally flat rectangular cooking surface plate with a cover assembly therefor and a depending housing adapted to be mounted in a counter top, said plate having a single series of substantially aligned heating unit accommodating Wells, said plate provided with an elongated aperture intermediate said wells and the rear margin of the plate and communicating with said housing, the aperture in said plate extending beyond the outer margins of the first and last wells in said series and substantially to the side margins of said plate, said cover assembly pivotal-1y mounted on said plate to cover said heating unit wells when in its lowered position and to extend upwardly from said plate at an acute angle in its raised position with a portion thereof extending into said aperture whereby the distance is decreased between the vertically upwardly projected center lines of said heating unit wells and the free margin of said cover assembly, said cover assembly having a generally hollow rectangular configuration to permit uniform movement of air through substantially the entire width thereof, a high-velocity intake slot formed in the face of said cover assembly nearest said heating unit wells, said slot eirtending parallel to and adjacent the free margin of said cover assembly and parallel to said series of wells, said cover assembly having an elongated aperture therein registering with said elongated aperture in said plate when said cover assembly is in its raised position and air moving means associated with said housing for drawing cooking fumes uniformly through said high velocity slot and said housing.

2. A unitary range structure including a generally fiat rectangular cooking surface plate with a cover assembly therefor and a depending housing adapted to be mounted in a counter top, said plate having a single series of substantially aligned heating unit accommodating wells, said plate provided with an elongated aperture intermediate said wells and the rear margin of the plate and communieating with said housing, said cover assembly pivotally mounted on said plate to cover said heating unit wells when in its lowered position and to extend upwardly from said plate at an acute angle in its raised position with a portion thereof extending into said aperture whereby the distance is decreased between the vertically upwardly projected center lines of said heating unit wells and the free margin of said cover assembly, said cover assembly having a generally hollow rectangular configuration to permit uniform movement of air through substantially the entire width thereof, a high-velocity intake slot formed in the face of said cover assembly nearest said heating unit wells, said slot extending panallel to and adjacent the free margin of said cover assembly and parallel to said series of wells, said slot spanning the distance between the outer margins of the first and last wells in said series, the interior of said cover assembly when in its raised position communicating with said aperture in said plate and air moving means associated with said housing for drawing cooking fumes uniformly through said high velocity slot and said housing.

3. A unitary range structure as set forth in claim 2 wherein the portion of said cover assembly disposed nearest said cooking surface plate is removably supported in said assembly to permit access to the interior thereof for cleaning.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,828,666 Kaufiman Oct. 20, 1931 1,895,371 Briegel Jan. 24, 1933 1,969,565 Klemme Aug. 7, 1934 2,252,753 Brodbeck Aug. 19, 1941 2,482,952 Warren Sept. 27, 1949 2,595,480 Nelson et al, May 6, 1952 2,634,718 Williams Apr. 14, 1953 2,823,657 Brodbeck Feb. 18, 1958 2,974,663 Humbert Mar. 14, 1961

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1828666 *Apr 3, 1930Oct 20, 1931American Stove CoOven flue outlet
US1895371 *Jan 21, 1932Jan 24, 1933Briegel Anthony JVentilating unit for stoves
US1969565 *Feb 3, 1932Aug 7, 1934Eagle Foundry CompanyCooking stove
US2252753 *Oct 23, 1939Aug 19, 1941American Stove CoCover for range tops
US2482952 *Apr 10, 1945Sep 27, 1949Southern California Gas CoCooking range with ventilating hood
US2595480 *May 8, 1947May 6, 1952Cribben And Sexton CompanyVentilated range
US2634718 *Sep 17, 1945Apr 14, 1953Chambers CorpGas oven ventilation
US2823657 *Jan 16, 1956Feb 18, 1958Magic Chef Food Giant MarketsCooking range
US2974663 *Jan 31, 1958Mar 14, 1961Reuben J HumbertVentilating hood structures
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3274988 *Aug 27, 1964Sep 27, 1966Sunray Stove CompanyGas range
US3409005 *Dec 19, 1966Nov 5, 1968Jenn Air CorpCooking range with retractable ventilating flue
US4501260 *Jul 17, 1979Feb 26, 1985Norris Industries Inc.Cooktop ventilation system
US4934337 *Oct 2, 1989Jun 19, 1990General Electric CompanyRetractable vent and cover arrangement for down draft cooking appliance
US4945891 *Mar 30, 1989Aug 7, 1990General Electric CompanyDrive mechanism for retractable down draft vent
US5020511 *Aug 15, 1990Jun 4, 1991Liu Wan TienVertical type smokeless exhauster
US5190026 *Nov 19, 1991Mar 2, 1993Maytag CorporationModular countertop cooking system
US5311930 *Nov 17, 1992May 17, 1994Bruenn Paul RHeat reclamation device
DE102010042436A1Oct 14, 2010Apr 19, 2012BSH Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbHHob e.g. built-in gas hob, kitchenette, has integrated exhaust hood vertically movable from hob, and upper-sided hob plate provided with recess for feedthrough of hood, where plate and hood are arranged in retracted condition of hood
EP0305248A1 *Jul 29, 1988Mar 1, 1989Societe D'investissement Industriel Et Immobilier S.I.I.I.Ventilation device for cooking systems such as stoves, cooking hobs or cooking ranges
EP2072909A2 *Nov 26, 2008Jun 24, 2009Miele & Cie. KGFume hood device
EP2469188A1 *Dec 15, 2011Jun 27, 2012BSH Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbHExtractor hood
EP2607795A1 *Dec 7, 2012Jun 26, 2013Indesit Company S.p.A.Cooking appliance
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/303, 126/37.00A
International ClassificationF24C15/20
Cooperative ClassificationF24C15/2042, F24C15/2092, F24C15/12
European ClassificationF24C15/20N2, F24C15/12, F24C15/20F