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Publication numberUS3102544 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1963
Filing dateJan 18, 1961
Priority dateJan 18, 1961
Publication numberUS 3102544 A, US 3102544A, US-A-3102544, US3102544 A, US3102544A
InventorsKeegan Thomas E, Sherer Neil E
Original AssigneeKeegan Thomas E, Sherer Neil E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Grooming device
US 3102544 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 3, 1963 T. E. KEEGAN ETAL GROOMING DEVICE Filed Jan. 1B. 1961 IN VEN TORS.

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United States Patent O 3,102,544 GRGMING DEVICE Thomas E. Keegan, @als Parli, and Neil E. Sherer, Maywood, lill. Filed Jan. i8, i961, Ser. No. 83,425 2 Claims. (Cl. 132-147) The present invention relates to the grooming of hair and is concerned particularly with the combing of hair by a person who iinds it desirable to use a hair dressing.

The advantages gained from using a hair dressing are maximized by applying the hair dressing in small amounts at relatively frequent intervals, thus avoiding an excessive application of hair dressing material at any time While achieving an optimum conditioning of the hair at all times through the frequent application of the hair dressing used. yFor this reason, the well groomed person who uses a hair dressing may iind it desirable to apply a small amount of hair dressing as a touch-up to the previously applied dressing when the hair is being combed. This may be particularly desirable on occasions when the person is grooming for an appointment or the like.

However, the matter oi applying hair dressing at frequent intervals, particularly on occasions when it may be most needed during the day for important occasions, is often dicult or inconvenient to do. In the first place, a person may not have his hair dressing available when it is most needed. Moreover, application of the hair dressing `tends to be a somewhat inconvenient procedure in which the hands may be soiled. Where a washroom is not available a person may not undertake the application of a hair dressing, even though it is much needed.

One object of the present invention is to provide a novel hair grooming device which arlords many worthwhile advantages to the user in maintaining proper grooming of the hair.

Another object is to provide a new and improved hair grooming device which can be carried and handled with the same ease and convenience as a conventional comb and `which serves not only as a comb but also as a means for eliciently applying a `hair dressing in any desired quantity without soiling the hands of the user.

Another object is -to provide an improved hair grooming device, as recited, which can be handled and used as a single integral unit to apply a hair dressing in the form of an aerosol and to comb the hair as necessary to maintain optimum grooming.

Another object is to provide an improved hair grooming device cf the character recited which is used as a one-piece uni-t to comb the hair and to apply hair dressing in an aerosol from a removable aerosol cartridge firmly supported in the integral unit in a manner which provides for easy removal and replacement of the cartridge.

A further object is to provide a hair grooming device of the character recited having an improved construction which maximizes the aerosol hair dressing storage capacity of an extremely compact hair grooming unit.

Another object is to provide a hair grooming device which achieves the above recited objects by means of an improved construction which is strikingly simple and inherently economical to manufacture on a mass production basis.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description of the exemplary embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawings, in which:

FIGURE l is a perspective view of a hair grooming device forming the exemplary embodiment of the invention illustrated;

FIG. 2 is a perspective View illustrating the use of the grooming device to apply a hair dressing;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view of ice the hair grooming device taken with reference to the -line 3 3 of FIG. l;

FIG. 4 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line lt-l of FIG. l;

lFIGS its anenlarged fragmentary sectional View of the grooming device as it appears in FIG. 3; and

FIG. 6 `is a fragmentary sectional view generally similar to FIG. 5 but illustrating dislodgment of the aerosol cartridge by one finger of the user.

Referring to the drawings `in greater detail, the hair grooming device l@ forming the exemplary embodiment of the invention illustrated has an over-all size and shape conforming generally to that of a conventional comb. The grooming device itl is well suited to be carried in a purse or pocket in the same manner as a conventional comb and is held in one hand for use in the manner of a comb.

Structurally, the grooming device lt) comprises an elongated body or support member 12; extending ythe full length of the unit and defining an internal socket or chamber lll of cylindrical shape extending substantially the full length of the body, as shown in FIG. 3.

The longitudinal chamber .la houses a thin cylindrical aerosol cartridge i6 containing a suitable hair dressing material l in liquid form, FIG. 5. It will be understood that the liquid within the cartridge 16 is maintained under pressure by a suitable propellant loaded into the cartridge in accordance with conventional practice in the production of aerosol containers. The cartridge 16 is socketed in the longitudinal chamber 1d where it is securely retained until the supply of aerosol liquid wit-hin the cartridge is depleted and the cartridge is replaced by a new cartridge.

The cartridge 16 is initially assembled into the support member 12 by moving the cartridge longitudinally through an open end Ztl of the longitudinal socket or chamber d4. 'Ille cartridge is firmly held lin its fully assembled position Within the support member -112 by eX- tremely simple retaining structure which effects a irm retention ofthe cartridge in its assembled position, while at the same time providing yfor convenient removal and replacement of the cartridge after it has been depleted.

Preferably, the chambered longitudinal support or barrel i2 is ifonmed of a suitable plastic material. As shown, the cartridge chamber 1,4 and the cartridge lo extend nearly through the full length of the support body or barrel 12 from the open end 20 of the chamber. The etiective bottom of the chamber 14.` is defined by an annular ange or `ledge 22 formed integrally with the end of the body -12 opposite tfrom the chamber opening 20 and being turned radially inward, as shown in FIGS. 3, 5 and 6-. The inner periphery of the ledge 22 deiines an opening 24 into the adjacent end of the chamber 14 which is suiiiciently large to permit entry of one [linger 26, FIG. 6, of the user to dislodge the cartridge 116 for replacement, as will presently appear.

The cartridge 16 has a thin cylindrical shape and has a construction which, in itself, conforms to conventional practice in the fabrication of aerosol containers. Hence, the aerosol cartridge 16 is inherently economical to manufacture.

As illustrated best in FIGS. '5 and 6, the end of the cartridge 16 fwhich is first inserted through the socket opening 2o lfor movement `down into the socket or chamber .14 is closed by a cover 28 secured to the cylindrical Wall of the cartridge -in a yconventional marmer which forms at the adjacent end of the cartridge an annular bead 3d protruding radially outward beyond the cylindrical wall of the cartridge.

Bottoming or socketing of the cartridge 16 in the chamber 14 forces the annular bead 3d on the bottom end :E of the cartridge into a receiver 32 deiined in the bottom r left-hand end of the chamber `14, with reference to FIGS. 3, and 6. This receiver 32 is located immediately adjacent the inwardly turned ledge 32.y previously inentioned and is defined by the ledge 22 and an anf nular protuberance 3d yformed on the inner wall of the chamber 14 and projecting a very short distance radially inward in axially spaced relation to the ledge 22, as shown in FIG. 5. The axial spacing of the protuberance or constricting element 34 from the ledge or iianfge 22 is just suiiicient to accommodate the axial length of the cartridge bead 3d. The degree to which the annular protuberance 34 projects inwardly is somewhat exaggerated in FIG. 5 for clearness in illustration.

The structural material of the barrel l2 is somewhat elastic. Hence, moderate longitudinal force on the cartridge will move the cartridge bead 30 past the constricting protuberance 34 to enter the receiver :i2` where it Iis rmly held throughout all normal use of .the grooming device.

A valve controlled atomizing head 38 of conventional construction is mounted in the end of the cartridge i6 opposite from the receiver 32 and projects somewhat beyond the adjacent endof the support barrel l2, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. The atomizing head 318 is movable and is designed to respond to axially applied ingerpressure to discharge an atomized spray liti, FIG. 2, of hair dressing material through an atomizing nozzle 39, PIG. 2, forming'a part of the head. Normally, the head 3S is Kcovered by a squared plastic cap 42 pressed over the adjacent end of the barrel 12, as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 3. An inwardly projecting annular protuberanlce 44 on the barrel end of the cap 42 tits into an annular depression d6 in the external sur-face of the barrel, FGS. 2 and 3, to releasably retain the cap in place. v

A linear series of comb teeth Sil is integrally 'formed on the support barrel i12 to project from the barrel in a straight line, as illustrated in FIGS. l to 3. Preferably, the series of comb teeth Sti extends along substantially the full length of the barrel l2.

By virtue of its small `diameter and itsrelatively great length, which extends substantially the full length of the grooming ldevice l0, the cartridge 16 provides a generous supply of a hair dressing aerosol liquid 1S within a grooming unit which is generally comparable in size with a conventional comb having a similar number and size of teeth.

Moreover, the entire hair grooming assembly by virtue 0f its highly simpliiied construction is well suited for economical manufacture on a mass production basis. As

previously intimated, the hair grooming device iti is carried and used in the Same manner as a conventional comb to comb the hair. if application of hair dressing is desired, the user has merely to remove the cap d2, hold the device in one hand, as illustrated in FIG. 2, and apply rfinger pressure to the atomizing head 38. The user directs the atomized mist of hair dressing toward his hair to apply any amount of hair dressing desired. This. rnay be only a minute quantity of hair dressing material for touch-up purposes. Ther users hands do not come in contact with the hair dressing and are not soiled in this simple procedure which can be easily and unobstrusively carried out under any circumstances in which combing of the hair would be acceptable. The cap 4Z is replaced after use. l

To replace a spent lcartridge i6, the user inserts one nger 26 through the barrel opening 2d to apply axial force to the cartridge xdislodging it from the receiver 32 for removal and replacement with a new cartridge.

The invention is claimed as follows: f 1. A personal grooming device comprising, in combination, an elongated generally straight comb body, a linear series of comb teeth formed on said body and projecting therefrom in a straight line, said series of combr teeth having a common central plane and extending along substantially the full length of said body, said comb body being shaped so that the transverse dimension of the body perpendicular to said central plane of the comb teeth is very narrow in relation to the length of the body, said body deiining therein a generally cylindrical chamber extending longitudinally through the body and opening outwardly through opposite ends thereof, a thin elongated aerosol cartridge of generally cylindrical shape containing liquid under pressure provided by a propellant fluid in the cartridge, said aerosol -cartridge being removably iitted into said chamber and being nearly coextensive in length with said body so that the cartridge is fully received within said chamber and extends through nearly the full length of the chamber, said body deiining on one end thereof an annular ledge extending radially inward with respect to said chamber to constrict the adiacent end of the chamber while at the same time deining a dinger opening into the adjacent end of said chamber lfor access to the adjacent end oi said cartridge, said body defining thereon a cartridge retaining protuberance extending into said chamber to a dimensional degree limited to a fraction of the diameter of the chamber, sa-id protuberance being located along theaxis of said chamber somewhat inwardly ci said ledge to deiine therebetween a receiver, said cartridge having a radially projecting bead thereon extending into said receiver where it is restrained by said ledge and said protuberance against displacement axially along said chamber; said protuberance being shaped and limited in size to limit its resistance to forced displacement of said cartridge bead past the protuberance and .to effect, in response to forced movement of said cartridge bead past the protuberance, camming of the protuberance without damage out of interfering relation to movement of the bead longitudinally within said chamber; a movable `atoniizing head mounted on one end of said. cartridge and projecting beyond the adjacent end oi said comb body Ifor manual control movement to release duid yunder pressure from said cartridge through fthe head, and said head including an atomizing nozzle disposed beyond said comb body to project an atomized spray of fluid outwardly from said body in response to iluid releasing movement of the head.

2. A personal grooming device comprising, in combination, an elongated generally straight comb body formed of a somewhat elastic material, a linear series of comb .teeth formed on said body and projecting therefrom -in a straight line, said series of comb teeth having a common central plane and extending along substantially the `full length of said body, said comb body being shaped so that the transverse dimension of the body perpendicular to said central plane of the comb teeth is very narrow-in relation to the length of the body, said body deiining therein a 'generally cylindrical chamber extending longitudinally through the body and opening outwardly through opposite ends thereof, a thin elongated aerosol cartridge of 'generally cylindrical shape containing liquid under pressure provided by a propellant uid in the cartridge, said aerosol cartridge being removably iitted into said chamber and being nearly `coextensive in length lwith said body so that the cartridge is fully received ywithin said chamber and extends through nearly the full length of the chamber, said body defining thereon a iirst cartridge retaining protuberance extending radially inward with respect to said chamber to a dimensional degree limited to a fraction of the diameter of the chamber, said body defining thereon a second cartridge retaining protuberance spaced axially along said chamber from said iirst protuberance and extending radially inward with respect to said chamber toa dimensional degree limited to a fraction of the diameter of the chamber, said 4iirst and second protuberances extending intro radially overlapping relation4 to two axially spaced portions of said cartridge to restrain the cartridge against 5 longitudinal 'displacement relative to said comb body; one of said protuberances being shaped and limited in size to limit its resistance to longitudinal displacement of said cartridge and to effect, in response to forced longitudinal movement of said cartridge past said one protuberance, icamiming of said one protuberance without damage out of radially overlapping relation to the cartridge; a movable atomining head mounted on one end of said cartridge and projecting beyond the adjacent end of said comb body for manual control movement to release uid under pressure from said cartridge through the head, and

Cil

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,714,556 Grosser May 28, 1929 2,737,190 Magnusson et al Mar.. 6, 1956 2,964,935 Stearns et al Oct.. 4, 1960 2,998,622 Birch et a1 Sept. 5, 1961

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1714556 *Jun 2, 1927May 28, 1929Steffi GrosserComb, containing sprayer
US2737190 *Sep 22, 1951Mar 6, 1956Magnusson David DLiquid container and comb used therewith
US2954935 *Jun 3, 1957Oct 4, 1960American Cyanamid CoMeans for pressurizing a container
US2998822 *Jun 12, 1959Sep 5, 1961Herbert M BirchSelf-contained push button applicator
Referenced by
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US3406694 *Jun 23, 1965Oct 22, 1968Leon A. OdenceCombination hairbrush-applicator
US3491777 *Jul 6, 1967Jan 27, 1970Gen Patent Dev CorpMultipurpose hair treating implement
US3516424 *Aug 6, 1968Jun 23, 1970Martin A EagleHair-care device
US3881628 *Mar 21, 1973May 6, 1975Andrew W BrainerdAerosol can holder
US6325070 *Nov 24, 2000Dec 4, 2001Dan TyrolerBrush for holding at least one of a fluid dispensing device and other items therein
US6698626 *May 10, 2002Mar 2, 2004Mckay William D.Lint remover and spray dispenser apparatus
US6763977 *Nov 22, 2002Jul 20, 2004Mckay William DLint remover and spray dispenser apparatus
US6981291Jan 12, 2004Jan 3, 2006The Hartz Mountain CorporationMotorized cleaning apparatus
US7020926Apr 28, 2005Apr 4, 2006The Hartz Mountain CorporationLint roller/brush assembly
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US7107643Nov 13, 2002Sep 19, 2006The Hartz Mountain CorporationLint brush with peel-off strips
US7225950Mar 31, 2004Jun 5, 2007The Hartz Mountain CorporationLint roll/dispensable fluid container apparatus
US7234188Sep 26, 2003Jun 26, 2007The Hartz Mountain CorporationLint removal apparatus with edge orientation
US7281288Sep 26, 2003Oct 16, 2007The Hartz Mountain CorporationCleaning apparatus with flexible connection between head and handle
US7309182Aug 31, 2004Dec 18, 2007The Hartz Mountain CorporationLiquid dispensing brush
US7364380May 21, 2004Apr 29, 2008The Hartz Mountain CorporationGrooming/cleaning apparatus
US7377001May 31, 2006May 27, 2008The Hartz Mountain CorporationGrooming/cleaning apparatus
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US7715961Apr 28, 2005May 11, 2010Agnik, LlcOnboard driver, vehicle and fleet data mining
US20040052570 *Jul 7, 2003Mar 18, 2004Mckay William D.Lint roller/brush assembly
US20040182886 *Mar 31, 2004Sep 23, 2004Mckay William D.Lint roll/dispensable fluid container apparatus
US20040245037 *Mar 30, 2004Dec 9, 2004Youichi AoyamaSupport system for a forklift power train
US20050063764 *Aug 31, 2004Mar 24, 2005Mckay William D.Liquid dispensing brush
US20050066457 *Nov 20, 2003Mar 31, 2005Mckay William D.Grooming/cleaning apparatus
US20050066464 *May 21, 2004Mar 31, 2005Mckay William D.Grooming/cleaning apparatus
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US20050184099 *Apr 28, 2005Aug 25, 2005The Hartz Mountain Corp.Lint roller/brush assembly
US20050188485 *Apr 28, 2005Sep 1, 2005The Hartz Mountain Corp.Lint roller/brush assembly
US20060121232 *Jan 23, 2006Jun 8, 2006The Hartz Mountain CorporationLint tape roll with peeling feature
US20060225233 *Jun 10, 2006Oct 12, 2006The Hartz Mountain CorporationLint roller/brush assembly
US20060265822 *May 31, 2006Nov 30, 2006The Hartz Mountain CorporationGrooming/cleaning apparatus
US20070151052 *Jan 10, 2007Jul 5, 2007The Hartz Mountain CorporationGrooming/cleaning apparatus
US20070163062 *Feb 1, 2007Jul 19, 2007The Hartz Mountain CorporationCleaning apparatus with flexible connection between head and handle
US20070220691 *May 23, 2007Sep 27, 2007The Hartz Mountain CorporationLint removal apparatus with edge orientation
US20150157108 *Dec 5, 2014Jun 11, 2015Robert Wayne RobertsProduct Dispensing Comb
Classifications
U.S. Classification132/147, 222/183
International ClassificationA45D24/00, A45D24/22
Cooperative ClassificationA45D24/22
European ClassificationA45D24/22