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Publication numberUS3102590 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1963
Filing dateJun 12, 1961
Priority dateJun 12, 1961
Publication numberUS 3102590 A, US 3102590A, US-A-3102590, US3102590 A, US3102590A
InventorsGrounds Robert W
Original AssigneeDrilprodco Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
By-pass treaters
US 3102590 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent ()fiice art-2,59 Patented Sept. 3, 1963 3,102,590 BY-PAS TREATERS Robert W. Grounds, Hobbs, N. Mex., assiguor to Drilprodco, Inc, Hobbs, N. Mex a corporation Filed June 12, 1961, Ser. No. 116,329 1 Claim. (6!. 16668) This invention relates to bypass treaters adapted to be used in a pipe string.

As is well known, rod pumps and other down-hole pumps are customarily used in well tubing or pipe string for pumping oil or other liquids to the surface. During such pumping, it often becomes necessary or desirable to circulate or flow liquids down the tubing or pipe string. Heretofore, in order to effect such downward flow or circulation, it has been necessary to remove or lift the pump upwardly in the tubing or pipe string. Since downhole pumps are usually used with well head pumping apparatus at the surface of the well, the derrick used during drilling is generally removed. Therefore, the removal or lifting of the pump requires the setting up-of a portable derrick or some similar structure at the surface of the well. Such procedure is not only costly but is time consuming.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved apparatus for flowing or circulating fluid downwardly in a tubing or pipe string while a downhole pump is in such tubing or pipe string and without requiring a removal or lifting of the pump.

An important object of this invention is to provide a new and improved apparatus adapted to be mounted in a tubing string or pipe for by-passing fluid around a pump which is seated in the string or pipe.

Another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved apparatus for use in a well pipe, wherein the apparatus has a pump seat for seating a down-hole pump and a bypass means for permitting downward fluid flow in the well pipe but preventing upward fluid flow except through the pump.

A further object of this invention is to provide a new and improved apparatus for use in a well pipe for discharging fluid from the well pipe at one or more selected elevations.

A particular object of this invention is to provide a new and improved tubular adapter having a channel therein with a valve means adapted to open at a selected pressure for discharging fluid from the channel.

The preferred embodiment of this invention will be described hereinafter, together with other features thereof, and additional objects will become evident from such description.

The invention will be more readily understood from a reading of the following specification and by reference to the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof, wherein an example of the invention is shown, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal view, partly in elevation and partly in section, illustrating one form of the apparatus of this invention; and

FIG. 2 is a view, partly in elevation and partly in section, illustrating another form of the invention.

In the drawings, the letter A designates generally the by-pass treater or apparatus of this invention. The bypass treater or apparatus A of this invention is adapted to be connected in a well pipe or tubing string, partial sections of which are designated with the numerals 10 and 11 in FIG. 1. As will be explained more in detail, the treater or apparatus A of this invention includes a body 12 which has a by-pass channel or passage 14 therein which is adapted to flow or by-pass fluid downwardly Aal around a down-hole pump P without requiring a removal or lifting of the pump P upwardly in the drill string.

Considering the invention more in detail, the body 12 is formed with external threads 12a at its upper end for providing a threaded connection with the section 10 of the tubing string or Well pipe which extends above the body 12. The lower end of the body 12 is provided with internal threads 12b for connecting with the section 11 of the well pipe or tubing string which extends below the body 12. The body 12 also has a fluid flow passage or bore 12c extending longitudinally therethrough.

The by-pass passage or channel 14 also extends longitudinally and is laterally offset with respect to the main fluid flow passage 120. As shown in FIG. 1, the by-pass channel 14 is formed by an enlarged offset section 12d of the body 12 and a substantially semicylindrical channel member 15 which is welded or otherwise secured within the body 12 to form the passage 14. The channel member 15 may of course be formed integrally with the body 12. The upper end 15a of the channel member 15 is disposed below the inclined portion 122 of the offset 12d so as to provide an inlet opening 12 to the open upper end of the channel or passage 14 so that there is fluid communication between the main fluid flow passage 12c and the upper opening 14a of the passage 14.

The lower end of the by-pass channel or passage 14 is provided with an internally threaded opening 141) which is adapted to receive external threads 20a of a valve housing 20. The valve housing 20 has an upper inlet port 2% and a lower outlet port 20c. A longitudinally movable valve member 22 is positioned within the housing 20 and is urged upwardly to a position closing the port 2% by a spring 23 or other suitable resilient means. The valve member 22 has a valve stem 22a therewith which extends through a fluid seal 24 such as an O-ring made of rubber or similar material. The seal 24 is mounted in a packing gland or nut 25 forming the lower portion of the housing 20. By moving the packing nut 25 upwardly and downwardly within the housing 20, the extent of the compression of the spring 23 may be adjusted to change the amount of fluid force required to move the valve member 22 downwardly to open the port 20b. Therefore, the valve member 22 is adapted to be moved downwardly to an open position when a predetermined fluid pressure is exerted downwardly from the channel 14 on the valve member 22. When the fluid pressure in the channel 14 falls below such predetermined amount, the spring 23 acts to move the valve member 22 upwardly to close the port 20b.

In the form of the invention shown in FIG. 1, the body 12 is provided with an inwardly extending shoulder 12g which is at the same elevation asan inwardly extending shoulder 15!) formed on the channel member 15. The shoulders 12g and 15b are preferably tapered or sloped downwardly and inwardly as shown in FIG. 1 to form a pump seat for seating the rod pump or other down-hole pump P.

The pump P illustrated in FIG. 1 is only partially shown since it is of conventional construction and may take numerous forms. As illustrated, the pump P has a lower tubular section 30 with annular resilient: seal rings 31 formed on the exterior thereof for engaging the bore or fluid passage 12c in sealing contact below the pump seat provided by the shoulders 12g and 15b. The pump P also has a pump seating surface 35 which is adapted to engage and seat upon the pump seat provided by the surfaces 12g and 15b. The portion 36 of the pump P above the seating surface 35 is of conventional construction and is of course connected to the usual pump rods known as sucker rods for operation in the normal manner.

In the operation of the form of the invention shown in FIG. 1, the pump P is seated in the position shown and the usual pumping operations are performed. The fluid is of course pumped from the well pipe or tubing string below the pump P to the surface at the ground level. The fluid is therefore pumped upwardly from the tubing section 11 and the fluid flow passage 1\2c below the seals 31 through the pump. During the pumping action with the pump'P, the valve member 22 is in the closed position shown in FIG. 1 so that it prevents fluid flow upwardly through the by -pass passage or opening 14. However, should it be desirable to pump a fluid downwardly below the pump P, such downward flow or circulation is obtained by forcing the fluid under a pressure which is sufflcient to overcome the spring force of the spring 23. Such fluid under pressure therefore flows around or bypasses the pump seat and enters the opening 12 and the channel 14 and is then discharged through the valve port 20c'into the area of the flow fluid passage 12c below the pump seat. Such fluid flow continues so long as the pressure of the fluid being forced down in the drill string is suff cient to maintain the valve member 22 in the open position. Various conditions may make it desirable to by-pass fluid around the pump P. 'For example, the drill string 11 may have paraflin in it below the pump P which is interfering with the flow of the well fluid through the pump. By introducing hot oil downwardly through the tubing string above the pump seat and by-passing it around the pump P to thearea below the pump P, such paraflin may be melted and then pumped out with the pump P. It will be appreciated that during the flow of the hot oil or other fluid downwardly through the by-pass channel 114, it will also circulate back up through the pump P unless it is lost or discharged at a lower point in the tubing string.

If salt accumulates in the drilling string below the pump P, water orother fluid which is capable of dissolving the salt may be introduced through the by-pass channel 14 in the same manner as previously described in connection with the hot oil or other fluid. The salt will of course be dissolved by the water or similar fluid and will then be conveyed upwardly through the pump P to the surface. During the flow of the fluid downwardly through the passage or channel 14, the pump P remains seated as shown in FIG. 1 and it is therefore not necessary to disturb the pump P during the aforesaid treatments.

In FIG. 2, another form of the treater or apparatus of this invention is shown and it is generally indicated by the designation A. The treater or apparatus A is connected in a tubing string, generally above a down-hole rod pump which is located further down in the drill string. The sections 110 and 1 11 of the tubing string are connected to the threads 112a and 112b,.respectively of the body 1112. The body 1 12 has a main fluid flow passage 112s which has a full bore diameter equal to the diameter of the tubing sections above and below the body 112.

Y Thetreater A has a by-pass passage or channel 114 4 and it operates in the same manner except that the outlet port 120c is provided in the body 4112 so that fluid flowing from the channel 114 through the inlet port 12012 flows outwardly to the area exteriorly of the body 112.

The valve member r122 is normally urged upwardly to its closed position by a spring 123 and such spring 123 has a predetermined strength which must be overcome by the fluid force acting downwardly in the channel 114 before the valve member 122 can be moved downwardly to open the flow passage 12%. A seal 124 is also provided around the valve stem 2122a. An adjustable packing nut 125 is provided for adjusting the amount of pressure exerted by the spring 123 on the valve member 122. it will also be understood that both the spring 123 and the spring 23 may be of various strengths and may be changed as desired for providing different opening pressures for the valve members 122 and 22 respectively. p

The operation of the modified apparatus A is basically the same as described in connection with the apparatus A. However, since the apparatus A is not used adjacent to a pump seat, and since it discharges the fluid to the area externally of the body 112, it normally is used in the tubing string at a point above the pump or other well tool located in the drill string. Thus, if it is desirable to remove paraflin in the tubing string, hot oil may be pumped downwardly and at a sufficient pressure to overcome the spring pressure #123 to thereby open the valve member 122 l and discharge the hot oil with the dissolved paraflin to a point exteriorly of the tubing string. Several of the I treaters A may be located in a single drill string at different elevations for discharging the paraffin or other undesirable material from the tubing string. In fact, the modifled treater A may be located in the same string with the treater A. In such case the treater A would be located at an elevation in the tubing string above the treater A.

The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention is illustrative and explantory thereof and various which corresponds with the passage or channel 14 of FIG.

1. Such passage or channel 1:14 is formed in an offset 1 1 2d of the body 112 by means of a substantially semicyl-indrical channel member 115, the outer surface \1150 of'which is substantially in line with the inner wall of the tubing string thereabove and therebelow as can be clearly seen in FIG. 2. The upper end 115a of the channel member115 terminates below an inclined surface 1 12e of the body 112 to provide for a fluid passage 112 into which fluid may flow for communication with the passage or channel 114. The channel .115 is preferably formed integrally with the body v112, although it may be separately formed and welded thereto if desired.

The treater or apparatus A has a valve member 122 which corresponds with the valve member 22 of FIG. 1

changes in the size, shape and materials, as well in the details of the illustrated construction, may be made the scope of the appended claim without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

A treater apparatus for use with a bottomhole pump, comprising a tubular body adapted to be connected in a pipe string, said body having a main fluid flow passage therethrough having a smooth bore throughout its length, a pump seat formed in said body and surrounding said main fluid flow passage for receiving a bottomhole pump, a bottomhole pump seated on said pump seat for pumping fluid upwardly through said main fluid flow passage, said pump having a lower tubular section which is slidably received in said main fluid flow passage, seal means between said lower tubular section and main fluid flow passage to seal therebetween, said body having a longitudinally ex-, tending by-pass passage with an upper opening in fluid communication with the area of said fluid flow passage above said pump seat and seal means, said by-pass passage also having a lower opening in communication with the area of said fluid flow passage below said pump seat and below said seal means, and valve means for permitting downward fluid flow through said by-pass passage to bypass said pump seat and said pump seated thereon when the fluid pressure above said valve seat is at a predetermined amount sufficient to open said valve means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,203,577 ONeill et al. June 4, 1940 2,300,348 Dana Oct. 27, .1942 3,014,531 Weaver Dec. 26, 1961

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2203577 *Jan 3, 1938Jun 4, 1940Mordica O JohnstonMeans for measuring and controlling fluid pressures
US2300348 *Apr 21, 1941Oct 27, 1942Dana Frank EMethod for cleaning oil wells
US3014531 *Nov 5, 1958Dec 26, 1961Paraffin Melting Company IncMethod of cleaning oil wells
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3361205 *Jul 28, 1965Jan 2, 1968Hydrasearch Co IncMethod and system for dissolving paraffin
US4011906 *Oct 31, 1975Mar 15, 1977Alexander Harvey CDownhole valve for paraffin control
US4049057 *Sep 30, 1976Sep 20, 1977William Stan HewesParaffin cleaner
US4224993 *Sep 13, 1979Sep 30, 1980Leonard HuckabyDewaxing valve for use in oil wells
US4267888 *Nov 15, 1979May 19, 1981Mortimer SingerMethod and apparatus for positioning a treating liquid at the bottom of a well
US4333527 *May 12, 1980Jun 8, 1982Otis Engineering CorporationSide pocket mandrel and method of construction
USRE32441 *Nov 25, 1985Jun 23, 1987Otis Engineering CorporationSide pocket mandrel and method of construction
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/68, 166/325
International ClassificationF04B47/02, F04B47/00
Cooperative ClassificationF04B47/02
European ClassificationF04B47/02