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Publication numberUS3102611 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1963
Filing dateJun 14, 1960
Priority dateJun 14, 1960
Publication numberUS 3102611 A, US 3102611A, US-A-3102611, US3102611 A, US3102611A
InventorsMote Roy F
Original AssigneeRobertson Co H H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cellular floor construction
US 3102611 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 3, 1963 V R. F. MOTE 3,102,611

CELLULAR FLOOR CONSTRUCTION Filed June 14, 1960 INVENTOR. ROY F. MOTE Unite The present invention relates to an improved cellular fioor construction and, more particularly, to novel means for supporting structures depending from cellular floors.

Cellular floors have gained wide acceptance in the building ants because of the convenience and construction simplicity resulting from their use. They are employed as a support for poured concrete floorings, fireproofing coatings and as permanent conduits for electrical wiring and ventilating streams. [In addition, subjacent ceilings and ductwork can be suspended from the cellular floors. It is in this last mentioned application that the present invention has its principal utility.

By present practices the suspension of subjacent ceilings, ductwork and the like must be completed before concrete is poured for a flooring above the cellular floor. 'Ilhe suspension is accomplished by punching or drilling a hole through the cellular floor surface to the lower surface and fastening a hanging member, such as a length of heavy wire, through the hole. Frequently difficulty is encountered in positioning the punched holes at precisely the location necessary to provide the desired supporting function. When holes are incorrectly positioned, new holes must be provided in the desired location. The inefficiency of this hit-or-miss technique is apparent. The technique, moreover, cannot be employed after concrete has been poured over the cellular floor.

Some safety hazards exist in the present hole-punching practice. Occasionally a workmans punch has been driven entirely through the cellular frame and has freely fallen to the next lower level endangering working personnel. Occasionally rods or lengths of wire have dropped entirely through punched or drilled holes endangering working personnel. Welding sparks also have been noted as a hazard when holes are provided. Concrete of fine aggregate provided as a floor covering will run through holes. Violent hammering of punching tools has in some instances severely distended the positioned cellular floors.

According to the present invention, a plurality of punched-out strips are provided in the bottom element of a cellular floor. These strips individually and collectively comprise only a minor area of the bottom element of the cellular floor. The strips depend below the surface of the bottom element and provide a clear opening therebetween which serves as a supporting bracket. In addition, the depending strips provide anchoring points for latticing the lower surface of a cellular floor with supporting elements for securing coating materials such as fireproofing which frequently is sprayed onto the lower surfaces of cellular floors.

Thus the principal object of this invention is to provide convenient suspending means in cellular floors.

A further object is to provide suspending means which do not interfere with the stacking properties of cellular floors, i.e., which permits storage and shipping of such floor frames in a minimum volume.

An additional object is to provide suspending means in cellular floors which can be selected for use regardless of whether concrete flooring has been poured over the upper surface of the cellular floor.

rates Patet Another object is to provide convenient anchoring means for retaining sprayed coating materials on the lower surface of cellular floors.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary side elevation view of a typical building frame employing cellular flooring;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary perspective illustration of a unit section of cellular flooring;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary perspective illustration of a portion of a cellular floor showing the present invention;

FIGURES 4 and 5 are cross-section views of alternative embodiments of this invention;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary cross-section view showing the present invention utilized to support depending structure;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary perspective illustration of a portion of a cellular floor illustrating an alternative embodiment of this invention;

FIGURES 8 and 9 are fragmentary plan views of an alternative embodiment of this invention;

FIGURE 10 is a fragmentary cross-section view of a cellular floor illustrating the use of the present invention for supporting sprayed coatings.

Referring to FIGURE 1, the cut-away section of a typical steel frame building is illustrated showing one manner in which cellular floors may be utilized. As shown in FIGURE 1, a typical building includes vertical girders 10 and horizontal girders 11. Cellular flooring 12 is laid above the horizontal girders 11 and secured thereto, for example, by welding. Concrete may be poured over the upper surface of the cellular floor 12 to provide a flooring surface. Ceiling supporting structure may be suspended beneath the cellular floor 12 to provide a ceiling for the subjacent story. Ductwork and conduits for heating and ventilating, for example, may be suspended from the cellular floor 12 in the space above the ceiling of the subjacent story. Mechanical piping, electrical conduits and electrical fixtures also can be suspended.

A clear illustration of :a typical cellular floor construction is presented in FIGURE 2. Each cellular floor section includes two elements, identified herein for con venience as an upper element 15 and a correlative lower element 16. The upper element 15 is provided with lengthwise, parallel channels 17. A lapped edge 18 is provided along one side of the upper element 15 and an upwardly bent flange 19 is provided along the other side. By interlocking the flange 19 with a lapped edge (corresponding to the lapped edge 13) of a similar cellular fioor'seotion, an entire floor structure may be securely assembled readily with accuracy and conformity.

The lower element 16 is provided with lengthwise, parallel channels 20 which are correlated with the channels 17 of the upper element 15. The channels 17 and 20 provide the cells from which the term cellular floor" is derived. These cells are located permanently in the assembled building and provide a readily accessible means for installing electrical wiring throughout the life of the resulting building.

The cells also may be used as air passageways. The cells should be imperforate to provide a vapor barrier, especially in roofing applications. Any obstructions or openings in the cells should be avoided.

Between the channels 17 and 20 are flat, horizontal webs 21 (in the upper element 15) and 22 (in the lower element 16). The webs 21 and 22 are contiguous and are fastened together, preferably by means of spot welds applied at spaced points along the contiguous surfaces of the webs. The fastening, of course, may be achieved by means of rivets, bolts or other means.

As shown in FIGURE 2, both the upper element 15 and the lower element 16 are provided with lengthwise, parallel channels 17 and 20, respectively. In some build ing installations, the channels 17 may be identical in cross-section with the channels 2%. In other installations, only one of the elements 15 or 16 is provided with parallel channels; the other element may be merely a flat sheet of metal of corresponding dimensions. Cellular fioor sections normally are provided in standard widths up to about three feet and in lengths from about four feet to about twenty-five feet.

By present practices, when it is desired to suspend various structures beneath cellular floors, it is necessary that all supporting elements be positioned before concrete is poured onto the top of the installed cellular floor. This requirement frequently interferes with the rapid and efiicient construction of the particular building by requiring that all subjacent structure be assembled or aligned before flooring is installed.

The preferred embodiment of the present invention is illustrated in FIGURE 3 which is a perspective view of a fragment of a lower element 16 of a cellular floor section. Parallel channels 20 and webs 22 are illustrated. Two

generally parallel openings or cuts 23 are provided in the I web 22 defining a strip 24 of metal therebetween. The strip 24 of metal is contiguous with the web 22 at each of its ends. The strip 24 is depressed downwardly below the lower surface of the web 22 to provide apertures 25 on each side. Suitable suspending means may be inserted through the apertures 25.

The strip 24 may be depressed in a symmetrical manner as illustrated in FIGURE 4 or may be depressed in an asymmetrical manner as illustrated in FIGURE Wherein the maximum depression occurs between the central portion and the end of the strip 24. v The utility of the present invention is illustrated in FIG- URE 6 which shows a depending supporting rod having a hook at one end extending through the apertures 25 and resting on the depressed metal strip 24. An I-beam 27 may be secured to the lower end of the rod 26 for supporting expanded metal plaster lath for a subjacent plastered ceiling, as an example.

An alternative embodiment of the present invention is illustrated in FIGURE 7 wherein one or more apertures 28 are provided in the depressed metal strip 24 to present additional access for anchoring depending elements such as the rod 26 (illustrated in FIGURE 6) or suitable heavy wire.

A further alternative embodiment of this invention is illustrated in FIGURES 8 and 9 wherein the openings 23' and 23" converge toward each other in their central portions. As shown in FIGURE 8, a sharp convergence may be employed. As shown in FIGURE 9, a tapering convergence may be employed. The convergence provides'a resulting metal strip 24' and 24 which is relatively thin at its maximum point of depression to facilitate the introduction of the desired deepnding supporting structure.

The embodiments illustrated in FIGURES 8 and 9 are of particular value where acute sloping sidewalls are employed in the channels 20 of the lower element 16.

As previously mentioned, frequently the undersurface of cellular floors is sprayed with a coating material after installation. The apparatus of the present invention provides a convenient anchoring surface for such sprayed coatings. It is possible to improve the anchoring features of this invention by stringing wires or rods between adjacent depressed metal strips 24 as illustrated in FIGURE 10. A heavy wire 29 extends across the lower channels 20 to interconnect two or more of the depressed metal strips 24, thereby providing a latticing to secure any d sprayed coating which may be applied to the face of a cellular fioor.

By providing the depressed metal strips 24 of this invention substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cells, they may be fabricated quite conveniently in a simple roll press during the forming of the lower elements 16. A suitable toothed roll may simultaneously cut the openings 23, depress the resulting metal strip 24, and, if desired, punch out apertures 23.

The metal strips 24 are provided only in the surface 22 and lower element 16 which is contiguous with a flat surface 21 of the corresponding upper element 15. Thus there are no openings extending entirely through the cellular floor frame which would allow wires, tools, welding sparks, poured concrete or similar materials to fall through the floor frame. Furthermore the individual cells in the cellular floor frame are imperforate. This permits their use for air conditioning, ventilating or as approved electrical raceways.

It is further possible to increase the strength of the resulting depressed metal strips by providing enlarged,

under surrounded openings at each end of the openings 23. This I is illustrated in FIGURE 8 wherein enlarged, rounded openings 30 are provided at each end of the openings 23.

According to the provisions of the patent statutes, I have explained the principle, preferred embodiment and mode of operation of my invention and have illustrated and described what I now consider to represent its best embodiment. However, I desire to have it understood that, Within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically illustrated and described.

I claim:

1. In a sectional cellular floor comprising an upper element and a correlative lower element secured thereto, at least one of said elements having lengthwise, parallel channels forming enclosed cells with the other element, the improvement in said lower element comprising a plurality of depending supporting strips formed therefrom between a pair of elongated openings therein, each of said supporting strips being contiguous with said lower element at each end thereof between said elongated openings and being depressed beneath the lower surface of said lower element to provide an unobstructed passageway be- (tween said elongated openings above .said strip and beneath the said lower surface.

2. The improvement of claim 1 wherein said elongated openings are substantially parallel to the longitudinal axes of said enclosed cells.

3. The improvement of claim 1 wherein said elongated openings of said pair coverage toward each other in their central portions.

4. The improvement of claim 1 wherein said depending supporting strips are depressed beneath the lower surface of said lower element for a maximum distance between the central portion and the end portion thereof.

5. The improvement of claim 1 wherein enlarged rounded end portions are provided at each end of the said elongated openings.

6. The improvement of claim 1 wherein at least one aperture is provided in the said depending strip.

7. In a sectional cellular floor comprising 'an upper element and correlative lower element secured thereto, at least one of said elements having lengthwise, parallel channels forming enclosed cells with the other element, the improvement in said lower element comprising a plurality of depending supporting strips formed therefrom between a pair of elongated openings therein, each of said supporting strips being contiguous with said lower element at each end thereof between said elongated openings, and being depressed beneath the lower surface of said lower element to provide an unobstructed passageway between said elongated openings above said strip and beneath the said lower surface, and wire extending across said channels between selected ones of said strips References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Murphy Jan. 5, 1904 6 Graham Feb. 7, 1922 Berlt July 3, 1956 Rice Aug. 25, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS Canada Jan. 22, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US748634 *May 1, 1902Jan 5, 1904 Metallic formed sheet
US1405579 *May 8, 1920Feb 7, 1922Malcolm J GrahamMonolithic wall
US2753143 *Jul 16, 1953Jul 3, 1956Berlt Heinz RGarment hanger linkage
US2901062 *Aug 29, 1955Aug 25, 1959Inland Steel Products CompanyMetaldecking
CA480452A *Jan 22, 1952Day Brite LightingSuspended ceiling with recessed lighting fixture
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3163389 *Aug 23, 1963Dec 29, 1964Thornburgh Argyle KBracket for paint containers and the like
US3184074 *Apr 5, 1963May 18, 1965Baermann Walter PBackground panel structure
US3245186 *Nov 24, 1961Apr 12, 1966Robertson Co H HComposite floor and apparatus therefor
US3300912 *Dec 29, 1964Jan 31, 1967Robertson Co H HHanger means for sheet metal sectional roofing and flooring
US3353313 *May 18, 1965Nov 21, 1967R C Mahon CompanyCellular floor construction
US3859770 *Jan 18, 1973Jan 14, 1975Trw IncSuspension system
US3959943 *Jan 23, 1975Jun 1, 1976Inryco, Inc.Riveted cellular panel assembly
US4350367 *Apr 14, 1980Sep 21, 1982Ing. H.C.F. Porsche AktiengesellschaftRoll bar for vehicles, especially motor vehicles
US4763863 *Nov 23, 1987Aug 16, 1988Agenor CoteSpacer brackets for electrical supply container
US6321504Apr 30, 1998Nov 27, 2001Peehr Mathias Ornfeldt SvenssonPre-manufactured roof plate element and girder thereto
US8474220 *Apr 15, 2008Jul 2, 2013Peehr Mathias Ørnfeldt SvenssonPremanufactured roof plate element
US8572900Jan 22, 2010Nov 5, 2013Epic Metals CorporationDecking having a removable rib
WO1998050647A1 *Apr 30, 1998Nov 12, 1998Peehr Mathias Ornfeld SvenssonPre-manufactured roof plate element and girder thereto
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/783.15, 52/454, 248/301, 52/483.1, 52/508, 52/332
International ClassificationE04B5/10
Cooperative ClassificationE04B5/10
European ClassificationE04B5/10