Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3103361 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1963
Filing dateJan 18, 1961
Priority dateJan 18, 1961
Publication numberUS 3103361 A, US 3103361A, US-A-3103361, US3103361 A, US3103361A
InventorsRichard G Board
Original AssigneeRichard G Board
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Football game with play-selecting cards
US 3103361 A
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

` Sept. 10, 19,63 R. G. BOARD 3,103,351

FooTAL'r.J GAME WITH PLAY-SELECTING CARDS Filed aan. 18. 1961 5 sheets-sheet 1 V V V V W v if kD. V V V 'V Q Pla/mep f Beweb Y ma )64 J/M ATroRNPfv 0. QN 0N 0- Q \l nu 0 6 NO ,w \n. innzan on." ,020 m20 zond Ua .L n.. on.- 2R52 154. F25 iban NCZ 15mm Ur ...l n35.. n nU I um. k. vs

Sept. 10, 1963 REG. BOARD FOOTBALL GAME WITH PLAY-SELECTING CARDS Filed Jan. 18, 1.961

5 Sheets-Sheet 2 `N N N mmx N Sm N N LONG PASS

WMJM

ATTORNEY Sept. 10, 1963 R. G. BOARD 3,103,351

FOOTBALL GAME WITH PLAY-SELECTING cARns Filed Jan. 1e. 1961 5 sheets-sheet s pl/Nf aNausH m al Nun.: 9597 sav/zuur.: SIN/Id Ramen 6.' Bowen pn/nas l Sept. 10, 1963 R. G. BOARD 3,103,361

FOOTBALL GAME WITH PLAY-SELECTING cARDs Filed Jan. 18, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 D .n u

OF' Fl ELD CENTER RIGHT SIDE LEFT OF CENTER PLAY INVENTOR Home@ 6.' Bowlen www/.M744

ATTORNEY Sept. I0, 1963# R. G. BoARD FOOTBALL GAME WITH PLAY-SELECTING CARDS F-iled'Jal'l. 18, i961 I 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. 7.

OFFENSE s o-ao 29-20 :sa-lo 83 DEFENSE Long Pass nd Run q Short Pass 7'/ Draw Play 8-3 8-3 DEFENSE 9-0 Long Pass Lona Pass End Run Shorf Pass Draw Play IH? v End Run Short Pass Draw Play :ru-T

INVENTOR RIGHA RD G. BOARD www/.JM

ATTORNEY United States Patent O 3,103,361 FOOTBALL GAME WITH PLAY-SELECTING This invention relates to game apparatus and more particularly to apparatus by which the game of football may be played on a game board in accordance with actual football strategy and tactics.

The game of football evokes great interest on the part of sports fans and the public in general, and accordingly many attempts have been made to produce a successful simulation of this game by way of game boards and associated apparatus. For the most part, such games only vaguely resemble the actual game of football, in that they employ a simulated football field and follow rudimentary football rules. While such games may be interesting to those having little knowledge of the actual football game,

their failure to provide :the opportunity to use the strategy and tactics employed in actual football leaves most true football fans unsatisfied. A primary defect of such prior art games is that the element of chance plays too great a part in the determination of the Winner.

The lfootball vgame of the present invention satisfies the needs of both lle neophyte football fan and the connoisseur of actual football. By virtue of its construction, real football strategy and -tactics are easily applied. The six determinative factors of football, namely-defensive formation, offensive play, yard line position of the ball, lateral position of the ball, side of center of the play, and eiiciency of execution of the play, are taken into consideration, and the element of chance determines only the last factor. iEach player is rewarded in accordance with his ability to choose the most suitable offensive plays and defensive formations at diiferent times as the game progresses.

Accordingly, it is a principal object of the invention to provide a unique football game.

A further object of the invention is to provide a football game which allows the application of actual football strategy and tactics and in which the element of chance is held in its proper perspective.

Another object of the invention is to provide a football garne which allows the players to select different defenses and offensive plays as lthe game proceeds and which rewards each player in accordance with -his skill in selecting the proper move.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a football game which allows the matching of different teams having characteristic attributes.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a football game which incorporates statistical information based on actual football play.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a football game in which a simulated playing ield is structurally related to indicia containing cards.

A still furtherobject of the invention is to provide a football game in which la simulated playing iield is structurally related -to cards displaying statistical information correlating various offensive plays and defenses based upon actual football experience, such information taking into consideration the offensive play chosen, the defensive formation chosen, the yard line position of `the ball on the field, the efliciency of execution of the play, and if desired, the lateral position of the ball and the side of center to which the play is executed.

An additional object of the invention is -to provide a football game in which a simulated playing eld is struc- ICC turally related to a card containing kick-off return and iield goal information.

Another object of the invention is to provide a football game of the aforesaid type which may incorporate a mechanical kicking device when desired.

Briefly, the game apparatus of the present invention includes a simulated football field game board having yard line markers corresponding to those employed in actual football. The board may be provided with miniature goal posts, a simulated football playing piece, down and score indicating devices, a period indicator, a number of plays indicator, and ten yard measuring devices. In a preferred form a set of defensive cards is employed, each card representing a particular defense and having longitudinal columns containing statistics for particular offensive plays. The longitudinal columns are divided into transverse columns structurally related to yardage Zones of the football field. ln one preferred embodiment, each transverse column has Width equal to the width of the ten yard zones as delineated on the playing eld. When a defensive card is placed beside the simulated playing field, the ten yard markers of the vboa-rd are aligned with the corresponding transverse column delineations on the card. In a simplified preferred embodiment the cards are divided into ya lesser number of transverse columns corresponding to zones on the board. Each transverse column on the defensive cards is divided by intersection with the longitudinal columns into blocks corresponding to the various offensive plays, and each block contains statistical information associated with index characters which may be selected by a chance device. In another preferred embodiment a separate deck of defensive cards is employed for each yardage zone on the board, each card of each deck displaying statistical information associated with index characters for a single defense and a plurality of offenses. IOther cards are provided to supply kick-off return, field goal, punt return, kick-off, and eXtra point information. A card 4for the selection of offensive plays and a mechanical kicking device may also be included.

For a more complete understanding of the invention and an elucidation of the foregoing and other objects of the invention, reference is made to the following detailed description of the invention together with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE l illustrates a simulated football eld game board together with a typical defensive card of one embodment aligned with the game lboard, and an offensive play selection card, the board and the cards being illustrated in positions that they would occupy during the actual playing of the game;

FIGURE l2 illustrates enlarged sections of such typical defensive cards as related to fragmentary sections of the game board;

FIGURE 3 illustrates a card displaying kick-olf return and field goal information arranged in zones structurally related to zones of the game board and also displaying kick-off and extra point information together with the rules of the game;

FIGURE 4 illustrates a punt return card constructed in accordance with the teachings of the invention;

FIGURE 5 illustrates in perspective a typical mechanical kicking device and simulated ball which may be employed in playing the game; f

EIGU RE 6 illustrates a typical block taken from a defensive formation card and including statistics categorized in accordance with the lateral position of the ball and the side to which the play is executed;

FIGURE 7 illustrates a modified form of defensive card; and

FlGURE 8 illustrates still another form of defensive card.

amasar Referring to `FIGURE l, reference numeral l@ designates a simulated football field game board, which may be constructed from fiberboard, for example, and which may have a decorative colored facing imprinted in accordance Iwith the actual characteristics of a football field. Thus, the face of the board may be green and may be delineated in white. The board has end zones l2, ten yard markers A14, one yard hash marks ld (preferably at both the center and sides of the tield), and simulated goal posts 1'8. The goal posts may be separable from the board, and may be formed from plastic rods which can be inserted into suitable holes in the board. Ten yard measuring devices 20, which may be formed from plastic strips or a length of chain between two posts, are also provided. These devices may be intentted with the board so as to slide along the edges thereof, or may be entirely separate therefrom.

In the form of the game board illustrated, each end of the board is provided with a chance controlled device 22 and a series of indicator wheels 24, 26, y23. chance controlled devices may be simple arrow spinners which overlie dials having index characters along their peripheries, The characters may be numbers ranging, for example, from l to 5, l to l0, or l to depending upon the number of variations desired, and the numbers on the dials need not be consecutive. As will appear more fully hereinafter, certain of the numbers may differ in color. The chance controlled devices illustrated are merely typical, and as the description of the invention proceeds, it will be appreciated that other chance devices such as dice may be employed.

The indicator wheels illustrated may be employed for different purposes. For example, wheels 24 may indicate the down and wheels 26 and Z8 may indicate the score. Additional wheels may be provided to indicate the quarter and the number of plays completed. The construction of the indica-tor wheels forms no part of the present invention, and in fact the indicating apparatus may be entirely separate from the board, or may be constituted by pencil and paper, if desired. lIn a preferred embodiment of the board, the indicator wheels are physically mounted beneath end portions thereof, the wheels extending beyond the ends of the board so that they may be gripped, and Ibeing viewed through appropriately placed slots in the board.

A playing piece 3l) is utilized to indicate the position of the ball on the playing field. This piece may simulate an actual football but preferably is provided with pointed projections 3.1 so that the position of the ball vvith respect to the yardline markers can be accurately determined. Yard line indicia is preferably placed at both lateral extremities of the board. The miniature football 3i) may be entirely separate from the board, but if desired, may be constituted by a marker physically attached toand movable along the board.

`In the playing of the game, the players are located on opposite sides of the board as indicated by positions A and B. The player representing the team on offense is provided with an offensive play card designated by reference numeral 3.2. This card has a plurality of blocks 37 designating the lvarious offensive plays, such as, off tackle, long pass, end run, short pass, and draw play. As many additional offensive plays may be provided as desired, and the blocks representative of the various plays need not be arranged in a single row as illustrated, but may form several rows, for example. A play marker 31E., which also may be in the form of a miniature football, is preferably utilized by the offensive team to designate the play chosen foria particular down. Sub-blocks 33 and 3'5 may be provided in each block 37 to designate the side of center to |which the play is to be executed. iln place of card G2 and marker 34, the offensive player may be provided with a separate card for `each offensive play. Each card may display a diagram of the corresponding play and a description of its execution. With this ar-y The vided with a deck of defensive cards, one of which in accordance with one embodiment is designated in FlG- URE l by reference numeral 36. This card represents an 8-3 defense, but similar cards are provided for the other possible defenses. In a preferred form of the invention the defensive cards are exactly as long as the playing field board. Each card is divided into a series of longitudinal columns 33 corresponding, respectively, to the various offensive plays designated on card 32. These plays are preferably imprinted on one end of each defensive card as illustrated. lEach defensive card is also divided into a plurality of transverse columns 40. Each transverse column corresponds to a particular yardage zone on the game board, and in the embodiment illustrated, the transverse columns of the cards correspond to l() yard zones on the board. The Width of the transverse columns lis made equal to the width of the 10 yard zones so that the lines which constitute the l0 yard markers on the board are aligned with the transverse column dividing lines on the cards when the cards and the board are placed side-by-side and aligned as indicated.

The intersection of the longitudinal land transverse columns of each defensive card produces a plurality of blocks 42. ln accordance with the teachings of the invention, each `block contains statistical information which correlates the defensive formation represented by the card, the 4associated offensive play designated at one end of the card, yardage position on the playing field, and the element of chance. FIGURE 2 illustrates blocks from two different defensive cards and for two ldifferent yardage Zones on the playing board. The blocks of each card are for the same offensive play, namely, a long pass. Card 44 is for an 8-3 defense, while card d6 'is for a long pass defense. Bloclcs i8 and 50 are associated with the 40 to 50 yard zone, while blocks 52 4and S4 are associated with the l0 yard to goal line Zone as indicated by the fragments of the game board li illustrated.

Each block contains a series of shaded index numerals, l through 20, each of which is associated with an unshaded symbol which designates the conclusion of the play. The numerals l through 20 correspond to numerals on a chance controlled device, .such as the devices 22 of the lgame board illustrated in FIGURE l. The index numerals are shaded in the drawing to distinguish them from the adjacent symbols. In practice, the distinction may be ensured by utilizing colors, circles, triangles, etc. ln the Iexample shown, the letter I designates lan incomplete pass, and the unshaded numbers designate yardage gained or lost (minus sign) in a play. The symbol int together with a number designates an intercepted pass at the indicated number of yards from the scrimmage line.

The statistical information in the respective blocks preferably represents actual football experience. For -a chosen offensive play, such as the long pass illustrated, certain defensive formations will be more effective than others. This fact will be reflected in the statistical information, so that as the Idefense becomes weaker for a particular offensive play, the prob-ability of success on the part of the offensive player is increased. As the ball progresses down the field, the defense becomes tighter yby virtue of the smaller area requiring defensive protection, and the probability of succeeding in particular offensive plays becomes less. The statistics will vary in accordance with the factors of defensive formation chosen, offensive play chosen, yard line position of the ball, and the manner in which the play is executed. The last factor is the only one determined by a chance controlled device, according to the present invention.

rThe number of variations in defensive cards, offensive plays, and chance controlled index numbers is determined by the need for simplicity or complexity in the playing of the game. Players unfamiliar with football may be provided with or may utilize a limited number of such variations, While those skilled in football strategy and tactics may employ ya gre-ater number of variations. A single deck of defensive cards may suffice, but a plurality =of decks may be utilized where it is desired to simulate the matching of different teams having characteristic attributes. The statistical information on the different decks of cards will be varied accordingly. Since the weighting of yardage gained numbers depends partially on the yard line position of the ball, -any given defensive formation card defends only one goal, for example, the goal to the right of the defensive player, where closest conformity to actual football statistics is desired. Consequently, unless two or more sets of cards are used, players must always defend the goal to one side, in this case the right. While the ten yard width of the blocks on the defensive cards is believed to be desirable, other widths corresponding to yardage zones on the board may be employed.

FIGURE 3 illustrates another card employed in the game. Card 56 displays kick-off, extra point, kick-off return, and field goal information. This information does not fully occupy a card the same size Ias the defensive cards, and since it is desirable to use cards of the same size, there Iis room' for the rules of the game, which may be conveniently imprinted lat one end of the card. lt will become apparent that the afore-ment-ioned four categories of information need not be placed on a single card but may occupy sever-al cards, if desired. Moreover, if a mechanical kicking device (to be described below) is employed, the kick-off, extra point and field goal information may be omitted.

The kick-off information is in the form of a table 58, which .includes the index numerals of the spinner devices 22 and :associated numbers representing the length of kick. The extra point information is in the form' of a table 6d. Here each of the index numerals of the spinners is associated with a symbol indicating whether the extra point kick is good or bad. F or simplicity, the symbols l for incomplete Iand C for complete have been employed. The extra point and the kick-olf tables are entirely chance controlled. Such is not the case for the kick-off return and field goal information, however.

The kick-off return statistics, occupying a portion of card 56 designated by numeral 62, and the field goal statistics, occupying a portion of card 56 designated by numeral 64, are `arranged in blocks 66 similar to the blocks 48, 50, 52 and 54 of the defensive cards shown in FIGURE 2. Each block has a width the same as that of the ten yard zones on the game board, and each contains the 20 index numerals of the spinner devices associated with symbols indicating the yardage of kick-off return and the completion or incompletion of the field goal, respectively.

The statistics for kick-off return are correlated with the length of kick so as to reflect different kick-off returns for kicks which are received in the various zones indicated. The transverse columns of the kick-off return card, instead of being delineated by particular yard line markers as in FIG. 3, may correspond to yard-age rang-es designated by the length of kick, as described below with respect to the punt return card. The statistics for field goals are correlated with the distance from the ngoal posts so as to reect greater probability of completion as the distance is decreased. As will appear more fully hereinafter, card 56 is used by placing it beside the game board in the position of a defensive card, so that the yard line markers `of the board are "aligned with the block divider lines of the card.

FIGURE 4 illustrates a punt return card 68. This card is preferably the sla-me size as the cards heretofore discussed and has a series of transverse columns 70 intersected 4by a .series of longitudinal columns 72 to form a plurality of blocks 74 corresponding -to blocks 42 of the 6 defensive cards as shown in FIGURE 1. Each longitudinal column corresponds to one of the defenses, such as the defenses indicated at the left end of card 68. Each transverse column corresponds to a range of the length of punt from the scrimmage line. Selection of the proper transverse column 70 may be accomplished through the use of the mechanical kicking device to 'be described, o-r through the use of a chance controlled device in combination with the table 76 at the end :of the card. The table is similar to the kick-off table 58 and contains symbols for the length of punt associated with the index numerals of the spinners.

Each block 74 contains the spinner index number-s associated with punt run back yardages. The information may be in the same 'form as kick-off table 58. These statistics may be Weighted for the various blocks 74, so as to reflect the dierent lengths of run back expected for different punt lengths and defensive formations. As indicated on 'card y68, punts traveling less than 10 yards beyond the scrimmage line may be considered blocked; hence, no run-back. A player may call for a fair catch, at his option, in which case there ris no run-back.

FIGURE 5 illustrates a mechanical kicking device which may be employed in the game. This device may include a small bock 78, to one end of which a strip of spring metal or plastic 'Sti may be attached at an angle to the block as shown. A small flat football `82, formed of -felt or similar material, may be placed on the strip |801, and when the latter is drawn back toward block 78 manually and released suddenly, the ball 82 is propelled through the air, thus simulating an actual kick. The length of the kick can be determined by the position of the ball `82 along the strip 80, on which ridges 84 may be formed to serve as guides, and by the amount of iiexing of the strip. The ydire'ction of the kick can be determined by orienting the block 78 with respect to the board. The kicking device may be utilized for kiek-offs, punts, field goals and extra points.

FIGURE 6 illustrates an alternative form which each of the blocks 42 of the defensive cards may assume. As an example, this block 43 may represent an off tackle play in the 30 to 40 yard zone. The block is divided into six smaller blocks, so as to account for different lateral positions of the ball on the field and different sides of play execution. Where the blocks of the defensive lcards are so divided, it may be preferable to decrease the number of `chance selected index numbers for the purpose of simplification, and accordingly, in FIGURE 6 only ten such numbers have been employed. The numbers opposite each of the shaded index numerals indicate yardage lgained or lost as described previously. Subblook `86 contains the necessary statistics for the situation in which the ball lies on the left side of 4the field and the play is to the leftofcenterg sub-block `88 for the left side of the field, right-of-center play; sub-block 90 for the center field, left-of-center play; sub-block 92 for the center of field, right-of-center play; sub-block l94 for the right side of field, left-of-center play; and subblock 96 for the right side of field, right-of-center play. The side of play and the lateral position of the ball are determined as set forth in the following description of the manner in which the game is played.

In general, the usual rules governing actual football play are observed. Time may be kept through the use of a stop watch, or quarters may be measured by an arbitrary number of plays, incomplete passes counting half a play to simulate the stopping of the clock. One player kicks off by using the kicking device of FIGURE 5, which may be placed on a 40 yard line, or by spinning a spinner 22 to selelct a kick-off index number in table 518 of card 56. This determines the length of kick. The miniature football playing piece 30 is then moved along the playing field to the yard line indicated. If the kicking device is employed, the playing piece may merely be substituted for the small kicking football 82, wherever the latter lands. The receiving player then spins the spinner 22 to obtain an index number for kie -off return. Card 56 of FIGURE 3 is placed alongside the playing field board and assumes the position of card 36 illustrated in FIGURE 1 so that the blocks `65 are aligned with the corresponding l yard zones on the playing field. 'Ihe kick-off return is then determined by finding the symbol adjacent the selected index number in the block '66 corresponding to the l0 yard zone in which the miniature football 30 has been positioned previously. If the ball lies exactly on a l0 yard zone dividing line, the block G6 closest to the receivers end of the field may be used.

Assuming that the vkick-off is chosen through the use of the spinner 22, and that the spinner stops on or nearest to index number 3, the length of kick as deter-mined from table 58 will be 42 yards. Thus, the playing piece 30 will be located on the 18 yard line of the receiving player. The kick-off return will be chosen in accordance with the index number selected by the receiving player within the l0 to 20 yard block of card 56. The scrimmage line will be `determined accordingly.

To illustrate the execution of a play from the line of scrimmage, it may be assumed that the ball is on the offensive teams 42 yard line, 3rd down, and 2 yards to gain to make a first down. The offensive player is located at A and the defensive player at B. The defensive player holds his set of defensive cards, illustrated by card 36 in FIGURE l, in lfront of him in such a manner that the offensive player cannot see the faces of the cards. 'Ihe defensive player then selects out of the de- Vfensive formations represented by the various cards, the defense which he Wants to use against the next play and places this card on the top of his deck, still concealing his cards. The offensive player then lselects -from the list of offensive plays indicated on card 32 in FIG- URE l the offensive play he desires to use. He indicates his selection by placing marker 34 in the proper block 317 of the card 32. The defensive player then places his cards next to his side of the playing field so that the top defensive formation card is aligned with the football field as illustrated in FIGURE l, each yard zone on the playing Ifield being exactly matched with a transverse column 40 on the top defensive card. The offensive player then spins the spinner and thereby selects an index number. The defensive player then locates the block 42, of his chosen defensive card which lies at the intersection of the longitudinal column 38 corresponding to the offensive play chosen and the transverse column -40 corresponding to the Vl0 yard zone in which fthe ball is located (or the nearest block to the right of the `defensive player if the ball lies on a ten yard marker). He reads the symbol in that blodk opposite the index number just selected, and this gives the conclusion of the play in terms of yards gained or lost, passes completed or incompleted, fumbles, penalties, pass interceptions, etc. For example, referring to FIGURE 2, 'where the `8-3 defensive card 44 is selected, the ball lies on the 42 yard line as assumed above, the spinner stops on tindex number '8, and the offensive play chosen is a long pass, the play concludes in an interception l0 yards from the line of scrimmage, that is, on the defensive teams 48 yard line.

Where defensive cards incorporating statistics for the lateral position of the ball and the side of play are employed, the offensive player will select the side of play by placing his marker 34 in one of the squares 33 or 35 for the play chosen, and the position of the ball relative to the sidelines after each play may be determined by dividing the index numbers of the spinner into 3 groups either numerically or by colors. The lateral position of the ball and the side of center chosen will then narrow down the selection of information on the defensive cards to a particular sub-block, a illustrated in FIGURE 6. To ensure a central position of the ball to facilitate a iield goal, where the physical kicking device is employed, the offensive player may state his desire to obtain a central position on the down previous to the eld goal attempt, and any yardage gained on that play may be divided by two, fractions so obtained rounded out to the smaller whole number, the ball then ending up in the center no matter which group of spinner index numbers comes up on that spin. Alternatively, players may be given the option of moving the ball to the center when a iield goal attempt is desired.

Punting may be accomplished on any down, as in actual football, the kicking device necessarily resting between 10 and 15 yards behind the line of scrimmage. Punting out of bounds may also be permitted. After the punted ball has landed, the punt return card 68 is consulted. The length of the punt from scrimmage is computed, and the appropriate transverse column on :the punt return card is then selected. The horizontal column is ascertained on the basis of the defensive formation being used during that play, that is the top card on the defensive formation deck. rfhe punt receiver now spins the spinner to select an index number among the set included within the block '74 at the intersection of these columns. The yardage of punt return is found adjacent the proper index number. llf it is not desired to employ the physical kicking device in punting the offense player may spin the spinner and select a length of punt from table 7'6 for the particular index number chosen.

If it is desired to attempt a field goal without the use of the kicking device, portion 64 of card 56 of FIGURE 3 may be utilized. The card is placed beside the field and the proper block 66 is selected in accordance with the position of the ball on the field. The conclusion of the play is determined by the symbol within that block opposite the index number selected on the spinner device by the offensive player.

Scoring is as in actual football, and points after touchdown are accomplished either with the kicking device or table 60 in lFIGURE 3, which is utilized in conjunction with the spinner.

The strategy of football can be almost exactly duplicated for both Odense and defense. Each player can have a set of defensive formation cards and appropriate offensive plays, or one set can simply be exchanged when the ball changes hands. With l0 offensive plays, 1-0 defensive formations, 20 spinner numbers, and lO yard zone defensive card columns, for example, 20,000 index number permutations are represented on the cards, 120,000 if lateral position of ball and the side of center of play are represented. This does not mean that this many different yardage gains or play conclusions are represented but indicates the range of values available to reflect accurately the combinations of the six variable factors involved in actual football. The defensive player may consider what types of plays the offense is most likely to use and the probability of their successful conclusion depending upon the type of defensive formation he himself has been using and the pattern of offensive play selection typical of his opponent. Suppose that the defensive player has been employing largely a 6-2-2-1 defense, a conservative defense fairly eicient against all types of offensive plays but just fairly so. 'Ille degree of efiiciency is reflected in the statistical weighting of the yardage gained numbers of the 6-2-2-1 card with regard to the type of offensive plays and the yard line position of the ball. IFor example, around mid-field for long passes the 6-2-2-1 yardage statistics will reflect a fair number of pass completions, a fair number of interceptions and incompletions, few very long gains. Near the defense goal line, the 6-2-2-1 defense against passes improves, as reiiected in fewer completions and more interceptions. A long pass defense formation will display high interception ratios and few long completions throughout the length of the iield, but will show relative weakness to line plays, for example.

Suppose that in the situation assumed previously, with the ball on the 42 yard line, the defensive player decides on an 8-3 defense, to stop an expected line play. Such a defense in the portion of the field at which the ball lies `will be relatively elincient against running plays but Weaker on short passes and Weakest on long passes. If the offensive player chooses an off tackle smash, the probability of stopping him short of the 2 yards needed for a first down is fairly high, as reflected in the weighting of the yardage gained numbers in the appropriate block on the 8-3 defensive formation card. If on the other hand, the offensive quarterback gambles on surprise with a long pass, the probability of completing such a pass against the 8-3 defense is relatively high in this portion of the field, though not nearly so high near the defense goal line.

In a simplified version of the game, cards of the forms illustrated in FIGURE 7 or FIGURE 8 may be employed. In these embodiments the indicia are divided into fewer yardage groups than in that previously described. While the use of fewer groups decreases the conformity of the play concluding symbols to actual football statistics for particular yard line positions, the decrease in accuracy is offset by increased simplicity in the playing of the game. Moreover, it has been found that variation of statistics `within the yardage ranges indicated in FIG. 7 is less than what might be expected` `In addition, it has been found that the statistics for corresponding zones at opposite ends of the field to not vary greatly, and accordingly, the cards may be employed to defend either goal.

In FIG. 7, a :deck of 'cards 98 -is shown, each card corresponding to a particular defense and having longitudinal columns for the lvarious offensive plays, as before. 'Ilhere are only four transverse columns 100, however, each transverse column corresponding to a yandage zone on the board. It shouldl be noted, that the range of yardage is not the same for all of the columns, and in fact the yardage ranges are chosen so as to minimize deviation from actual football statistics within the zones. While the delineations between the transverse columns may be alignable with corresponding yard line markers, as in FiG. l, where only a few transverse columns are utilized, fthe cards may be made substantially smaller than the board, and yet the proper column may be easily selected at any instant of play. This is particularly tr-ue if colored markers are printed in association with the corresponding zones on the board and cards.

The embodiment of FIG. 8 4differs [from that of FIG. 7 in that a separate deck 102, 104 is employed `for each zone. Two of the four decks (where four zones. are utilized) are illustrated, and each has a transverse column lit-6 corresponding to a particular column 100 of cards 98.

With the embodiments of FIGURE 7 and 8 the game is played as previously described, except that the cards need not be aligned with the board. The kick-E return, field goal, and punt return cards may also be simplified by decreasing the number of transverse columns, but with these cards as well as the defensive cards it is necessary to maintain a sufficient number of properly delineated transverse columns if actual football play is to be simulated. It has also been found that in some instances certain longitudinal columns corresponding to certain de- -fensive formations may be combined on the -punt return card without seriously impairing the accuracy of the results.

lIn place of the defensive cards described and illustrated offensive cards could be employed. Each card would represent a particular olensive play and would have sets of statistics `for each defensive formation. The correlation of yOffensive plays, defensive formations and yardage zones would still be present. It is to -be noted that the cards of the present invention do not themselves constitute chance controlled devices and are not dealt and played as in prior art games. The cards constitute sele'ctable translation devices, i.e., they are strategically selectable by the `defensive (or offensive) player and translate the reading of a separate chance controlled device into play concluding symbols, taking into account the a'bove factors. By virtue of such cards, the game of the present invention provides for the application of actual football strategy and yet is simple enough for enjoyable play even by novices.

The use of the apparatus of the invention for training as well as entertainment Will be apparent from the foregoing. yWhile preferred embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the ant that such embodiments may be modified without departing from the `spirit and principles of the invention. Accordingly, these embodiments are intended to -be exemplary, not restrictive, and those modifications which fall Within the range of equivalency of the appended claims are intended to. be included within their scope.

What I claim as my invention is:

l. Football game apparatus comprising a game board having a model football field thereon divided transversely into pre-determined yardage zones; a set 'of defensive cards, each card corresponding to a defensive football formation and having a first set of columns having applied thereto indicia descriptive of various offensive football plays and a second set of columns having thereon yardage indicia `corresponding to the similar yardage indicia on said game board, said sets of columns intersecting to form blocks, each of said blocks having an indicia table therein with a plurality `of index numbers and associated play concluding symbols; and a chance controlled index number selecting device.

2. Football game apparatus comprising a game board having a model football field thereon divided transversely into pre-determined yardage zones; a set of defensive cards, each corresponding to a defensive formation, each card having a set of longitudinal columns having applied thereto indicia descriptive of various offensive :football plays, respectively, and a set of transverse columns having thereon yardage indicia corresponding to the similar yardage indicia on said field, said sets of columns intersecting to form blocks, each block containing statistical information -weighted in accordance with relative efiiciency of the defensive formation represented by that card against the associated offensive play for the associated yardage zone, said statistical information being tabulated with associated index characters; and a chance controlled device for selecting said index characters.

3. The apparatus of claim l, further comprising a playing piece movable along said game board into said yardage zones, and means for displaying an offensive play chosen from a plurality of selectable plays.

4. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a kickoff return card having a plurality of blocks each containing kick-ott return yardage numerals tabulated against said index characters, said 'blocks having yardage indicia `corresponding to the similar yardage indicia on said game board.

5. The apparatus of claim l, further comprising a field goal card having a plurality of blocks each containing symbols indicating completion and incompletion of eld goals tabuiated against said index characters, said blocks having yardage indicia corresponding to the similar yardage indicia on said game board.

6. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a pair of tables having kick-off yardage numbers and extra point determining symbols tabulated, respectively, against said index characters.

7. The apparatus of claim l further comprising a punt return card having a first set of columns having applied thereto indicia descriptive of said defensive formations, respectively, and a second set of columns having thereon yardage indicia corresponding to the similar yardage indicia on said game board, respectively, said sets of columns intersecting to form blocks, each block containing said index characters tabulated against punt return yardage, and means for determining the length of punt.

8. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising means for propelling a simulated football along said field.

9. The apparatus of claim 1, each of said blocks being subdivided, the subdivided blocks -having indicia designating plays to the left and right of center and left, right, and reenter lateral positions fof lche ball.

10. Football game apparatus comprising a miniature football iie'ld; saidfield being divided into a plurality of predetermined yardage Zones, a set of cards for each of said zones, each set having yardage indicia corresponding to the similar yardage indicia on said field, each set diS- playing chance selected index characters in association with play concluding symbols for diierent oifensive plays and defensive formation; a 4chance controlled device for selecting said index characters; and a playing piece movable along said iield into said zones.

11. Football game apparatus comprising a miniature football tield divided transversely into predetermined yardage Zones; 'a set of cards, each card having a plurality of columns having thereon yardage indicia corresponding to the similar yardage indicia on said field, each column being divided into a plurality of blocks, each of Isaid blocks having a table of index symbols and associated play concluding symbols, each of said cards having identifying indicia designating the card as a play tactic of one team, and each of said blocks having identifying indicia designating l2 the block as a play tactic of an opposing team; and a chance controlled device having index symbols correspending to the index symbols of said tables.

12. Football game `apparatus comprising a miniature football iield divided transversely into predetermined yardage zones; ia set of cards for each of `said zones, each set having thereon yardage indicia corresponding to the similar yardage indicia on said eld, each card being divided into a plurality of blocks, each block having a table 0f .index symbols 'and associated play concluding symbols, each oi said cards having identifying indicia designating the card as ya play tactic of one team and each of said blocks having identifying indicia designating the block las a play tactic of an opposing team; and a chance controlled device having index symbols corresponding to the index symbols and said tables.

References Cited in the lile of this patent UNlTED STATES PATENTS 1,145,955 Wittstein July 13, 1915 1,693,277 Hustwick Nov. 27, 1928 1,923,607 Barringer Aug. 22, 1933 2,061,221 Craig Nov. 1,7, 1936 2,276,599 Tassano Mar. 17, 1942 2,722,211 Eisele Nov. 1, 1955 2,743,105 Westbrook Apr. 24, 1956 3,043,594 Seitz July 10, 1962

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4183529 *Jun 30, 1978Jan 15, 1980Hynson Charles DFootball game
US4660836 *Jun 14, 1985Apr 28, 1987Jerry RhomeQuarterback game
US5405141 *Nov 15, 1993Apr 11, 1995Wilkes; John M.Football board game apparatus and method of play
US5769419 *Aug 19, 1997Jun 23, 1998Hill; TomasFootball board game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/247, 124/7
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00041
European ClassificationA63F3/00A4D